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Encyclopedia > Emperor Meiji
Emperor Meiji

Emperor Meiji, photographed by Uchida Kuichi,1873
Given name: Mutsuhito
(睦仁)
Childhood name: Sachi-no-miya
Dates of reign: 18671912
Era name: Meiji
Era dates: 18671912
Posthumous name: Emperor Meiji
(明治天皇)
Born: November 3, 1852
Father: Emperor Kōmei
Mother: Nakayama Yoshiko

Emperor Meiji (明治天皇 Meiji Tennō?) (November 3, 1852July 30, 1912) was the 122nd emperor of Japan according to the traditional order of succession, reigning from February 3, 1867 until his death. Image File history File links Meiji_Emperor. ... Portrait of the Emperor Meiji by Uchida Kuichi, 1873. ... Yamada Tarō (), a typical Japanese name (male), equivalent to John Smith in English. ... Cunt BAg Twat Fuk suck my penis ring 0778851865!!!!!!Year 1867 (MDCCCLXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday in the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Japanese era name (年号, nengō, lit. ... Cunt BAg Twat Fuk suck my penis ring 0778851865!!!!!!Year 1867 (MDCCCLXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday in the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... November 3 is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 58 days remaining. ... 1852 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Emperor Kōmei of Japan Emperor Kōmei ) (July 22, 1831 - January 30, 1867) was the 121st imperial ruler of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession. ... November 3 is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 58 days remaining. ... 1852 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... July 30 is the 211th day (212th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 154 days remaining. ... 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday in the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... For the CPR ocean liner, see Empress of Japan. ... February 3 is the 34th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Cunt BAg Twat Fuk suck my penis ring 0778851865!!!!!!Year 1867 (MDCCCLXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


His personal name was Mutsuhito (睦仁?). Like all his predecessors, he has been known by a posthumous name since his death. Upon his death a new tradition of giving the late emperor the name of the era coinciding with his reign was established. Having ruled during the Meiji era (Enlightened rule), he is now known as Emperor Meiji. Although he is sometimes referred to as Mutsuhito or Emperor Mutsuhito outside of Japan, Japanese emperors are only referred to by their posthumous names in Japan. Use of an emperor's personal name would be considered too familiar, or even derogatory. A posthumous name (Traditional Chinese: 諡號/謚號 Simplified Chinese: 谥号; Pinyin: shì hào; Romaji: shigō/tsuigō; Revised Romanization of Korean: siho) is a honorary name given to royalty in some cultures posthumously, that is, after the persons death. ... Japanese era name (年号, nengō, lit. ... The Meiji period ) denotes the 45-year reign of Emperor Meiji, running from 8 September 1868 (in the Gregorian calendar, 23 October 1868) to 30 July 1912. ...


At the time of his birth in 1852, Japan was an isolated, pre-industrial, feudal country dominated by the Tokugawa Shogunate and the daimyo, who ruled over the country's more than 250 decentralized domains. By the time of his death in 1912, Japan had undergone a political, social, and industrial revolution at home (See Meiji Restoration) and emerged as one of the great powers on the world stage. 1852 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Pre-industrial society refers to specific social attributes and forms of political and cultural organization that were prevalent before the advent of the Industrial Revolution and the rise of Capitalism. ... torin was here ... The Tokugawa shogunate or Tokugawa bakufu (徳川幕府) (also known as the Edo bakufu) was a feudal military dictatorship of Japan established in 1603 by Tokugawa Ieyasu and ruled by the shoguns of the Tokugawa family until 1868. ... Daimyo Matsudaira Katamori visits the residence of a retainer. ... The Han ) were the fiefs of feudal clans of Japan that were created by Toyotomi Hideyoshi and existed until their abolition in 1871, three years after the Meiji Restoration. ... 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday in the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The Meiji Restoration ), also known as the Meiji Ishin, Revolution, or Renewal, was a chain of events that led to enormous changes in Japans political and social structure. ... One of the hallmarks of contemporary great power status is permanent membership on the United Nations Security Council. ...

Contents

Life

Emperor Meiji was the surviving son of Emperor Kōmei by the lady-in-waiting Nakayama Yoshiko (18341907), the daughter of Lord Nakayama Tadayasu, sometime minister of the left (sadaijin) and a scion of the Fujiwara. He was born eight months before the arrival of Commodore Matthew Calbraith Perry and the United States squadron of "Black Ships" in Edo Bay and two years before the first of the unequal treaties which the Tokugawa shogunate signed with Perry. Originally titled Sachi no miya (Prince Sachi), the future emperor spent most of his childhood at the Nakayama household in Kyoto, as it was customary to entrust the upbringing of imperial children to prominent court families. Emperor Kōmei of Japan Emperor Kōmei ) (July 22, 1831 - January 30, 1867) was the 121st imperial ruler of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession. ... Lady in Waiting is an album by American southern rock band The Outlaws, released in 1976. ... Nakayama Yoshiko (January 1836–October 5, 1907, Japanese 中山慶子) was a Japanese lady-in-waiting. ... 1834 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1907 (MCMVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Fujiwara (藤原) can refer to: The Fujiwara clan and its members Kamatari Fujiwara Keiji Fujiwara Fujiwara-no-Sai, character of Hikaru no Go Takumi Tak Fujiwara, character of Initial D Zakuro Fujiwara, character of Tokyo Mew Mew (Known as Renee Roberts in the Mew Mew Power English anime) This... Matthew Calbraith Perry (1794-1858) Matthew Calbraith Perry (April 10, 1794 – March 4, 1858) was the Commodore of the U.S. Navy who compelled the opening of Japan to the West with the Convention of Kanagawa in 1854. ... A Squadron is a small unit or formation of cavalry, aircraft (including balloons), or naval vessels. ... Japanese 1854 print describing Commodore Matthew Perrys Black Ships. The Black Ships (in Japanese, 黒船, kurofune) was the name given to Western vessels arriving in Japan between the 15th and 19th centuries. ... Edo (Japanese: , literally: bay-door, estuary, pronounced //), once also spelled Yedo or Yeddo, is the former name of the Japanese capital Tokyo. ... Tokyo Bay from space Tokyo Bay ) is a bay in the southern Kantō region of Japan. ... Kyoto )   is a city in the central part of the island of HonshÅ«, Japan. ...


He was formally adopted by Asako Nyōgō (later Empress Dowager Eishō), the principal consort of Emperor Kōmei, on 11 July 1860. He also received the personal name Mutsuhito, the rank of shinnō (imperial prince, and thus a potential successor to the throne) and the title of Kōtaishi (Crown Prince) on the same day. Crown Prince Mutsuhito acceded to the throne on 3 February 1867 at the age of fourteen. Later that year, the era was changed to Meiji, or “enlightened rule”, which was later used for his posthumous name. This marked the beginning of the tradition of proclaiming one era for the entire reign of an emperor, and posthumously naming him after the era over which he ruled. July 11 is the 192nd day (193rd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 173 days remaining. ... 1860 is the leap year starting on Sunday. ... A Crown Prince or Crown Princess is the heir or heiress apparent to the throne in a royal or imperial monarchy. ... February 3 is the 34th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Cunt BAg Twat Fuk suck my penis ring 0778851865!!!!!!Year 1867 (MDCCCLXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Japanese era name (年号, nengō, lit. ...


On 2 September 1867, Emperor Meiji married Masako (later renamed Haruko) (28 May 184919 April 1914), the third daughter of Lord Ichijō Tadaka, sometime minister of the left (sadaijin). Known posthumously as Empress Shōken, she was the first imperial consort to receive the title of kōgō (literally, the emperor's wife, translated as empress consort), in several hundred years. Although she was the first Japanese empress consort to play a public role, she bore no children. However, Emperor Meiji had fifteen children by five official ladies-in-waiting. Only five of his children, a prince born to Lady Naruko (18551943), the daughter of Yanagiwara Mitsunaru, and four princesses born to Lady Sachiko (18671947), the eldest daughter of Count Sono Motosachi, lived to adulthood. They were: September 2 is the 245th day of the year (246th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Cunt BAg Twat Fuk suck my penis ring 0778851865!!!!!!Year 1867 (MDCCCLXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... May 28 is the 148th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (149th in leap years). ... 1849 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... April 19 is the 109th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (110th in leap years). ... 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Empress Shōken in Western garb, a sign of the reform taken under the Meiji era Empress Shōken ) (28 May 1849 - 19 April 1914) was empress consort of Japan as the wife of Emperor Meiji. ... King George V of the United Kingdom and his consort, Queen Mary A queen consort is the wife and consort of a reigning king. ... 1855 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1943 calendar). ... Cunt BAg Twat Fuk suck my penis ring 0778851865!!!!!!Year 1867 (MDCCCLXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1947 calendar). ... A count is a nobleman in most European countries, equivalent in rank to a British earl, whose wife is also still a countess (for lack of an Anglo-Saxon term). ...

August 31 is the 243rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (244th in leap years), with 122 days remaining. ... 1879 (MDCCCLXXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... December 25 is the 359th day of the year (360th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 6 days remaining in the year. ... Year 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar). ... Emperor Taisho (大正天皇 Taishō Tennō) (August 31, 1879 – December 25, 1926), whose given name was Yoshihito (嘉仁), was the 123rd imperial ruler of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession, from 1912 until his death in 1926. ... September 30 is the 273rd day of the year (274th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1888 (MDCCCLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... March 8 is the 67th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (68th in leap years). ... 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1940 calendar). ... April 30 is the 120th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (121st in leap years), with 245 days remaining. ... 1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... His Imperial Highness Prince Takeda Tsunehisa ) of Japan (22 September 1882 – 23 April 1919) was the founder of the Takeda-no-miya ōke branch of Japanese Imperial Family. ... September 22 is the 265th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (266th in leap years). ... Year 1882 (MDCCCLXXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... April 23 is the 113th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (114th in leap years). ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... Look up Issue in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... In biology, offspring are the product of reproduction, a new organism produced by one or more parents. ... January 28 is the 28th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1890 (MDCCCXC) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar). ... August 11 is the 223rd day of the year (224th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... April 29 is the 119th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (120th in leap years). ... 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... His Imperial Highness Prince Kitashirakawa Naruhisa , 1 April 1887 - 1 April 1923) of Japan, was the 3rd head of a collateral branch of the Japanese imperial family. ... April 1 is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 274 days remaining. ... 1887 (MDCCCLXXXVII) is a common year starting on Saturday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. ... April 2 is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 273 days remaining. ... {{year nav|1939 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... August 7 is the 219th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (220th in leap years), with 146 days remaining. ... Year 1891 (MDCCCXCI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... November 3 is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 58 days remaining. ... 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... May 6 is the 126th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (127th in leap years). ... 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... His Imperial Highness Prince Asaka (Yasuhiko) of Japan (jp: 朝香宮鳩彦王 Asaka no miya Yasuhiko ō, 2 October 1887 - 13 April 1981) of Japan, was a member of the Japanese imperial family and a career army officer. ... October 2 is the 275th day (276th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 90 days remaining. ... 1887 (MDCCCLXXXVII) is a common year starting on Saturday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. ... April 13 is the 103rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (104th in leap years). ... 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 11 is the 131st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (132nd in leap years). ... Year 1896 (MDCCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display calendar). ... March 5 is the 64th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (65th in leap years). ... 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... May 18 is the 138th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (139th in leap years). ... 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar). ... Prince Higashikuni (Naruhiko) of Japan (東久邇 稔彦 Higashikuni Naruhiko, also Higashikuni no miya Naruhiko ō (東久邇宮 稔彦王)) (3 December 1887 – 26 January 1990) was the 43rd Prime Minister of Japan from 17 August 1945 to 9 October 1945, a period of 54 days. ... December 3 is the 337th (in leap years the 338th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1887 (MDCCCLXXXVII) is a common year starting on Saturday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. ... January 20 is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... MCMXC redirects here; for the Enigma album, see MCMXC a. ...

Meiji Restoration

Main article: Meiji Restoration

Emperor Meiji was the symbolic leader of the Meiji Restoration, in which the Tokugawa shogunate was abolished by Imperial forces following the Boshin War. The Charter Oath, a five-point statement of the nature of the new government, abolished feudalism and proclaimed a modern democratic government for Japan. Although a parliament was formed, it had no real power, and neither did Emperor Meiji. Power had passed from the Tokugawa into the hands of those Daimyo and other samurai who had led the Restoration. Japan was thus controlled by the Genro, an oligarchy, which comprised the most powerful men of the military, political, and economic spheres. Emperor Meiji, if nothing else, showed greater political longevity than his recent predecessors, as he was the first Japanese monarch to remain on the throne past the age of 50 since the abdication of Emperor Ōgimachi in 1586. The Meiji Restoration ), also known as the Meiji Ishin, Revolution, or Renewal, was a chain of events that led to enormous changes in Japans political and social structure. ... The Tokugawa shogunate or Tokugawa bakufu (徳川幕府) (also known as the Edo bakufu) was a feudal military dictatorship of Japan established in 1603 by Tokugawa Ieyasu and ruled by the shoguns of the Tokugawa family until 1868. ... The Boshin War (戊辰戦争 Boshin Sensō, literally War of the Year of the Dragon) was fought in 1868-1869 between the Tokugawa Shogunate and the pro-Imperial forces in Japan. ... The Five Charter Oath (五箇条の御誓文, Gokajyo no Goseimon) was an outline of the main aims and the course of action to be followed by the new Meiji era government of Japan after the fall of the Tokugawa Shogunate in 1867 during the Meiji Restoration. ... torin was here ... The National Diet of Japan ) is Japans legislature. ... The Genro (元老) were retired elder Japanese statesmen, who served as informal advisors to the emperor, during the Meiji and Taisho periods in Japanese history. ... Forms of government Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Oligarchy (Greek , Oligarkhía) is a form of government where political power effectively rests with a small, elite segment of society (whether distinguished by wealth, family or military prowess). ... Emperor ÅŒgimachi (正親町天皇 Emperor ÅŒgimachi) (June 18, 1517 - February 6, 1593) was the 106th emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession. ... 1586 was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar. ...


The Meiji Restoration is a source of pride for the Japanese, as it and the accompanying industrialization allowed Japan to become the preeminent power in the Pacific and a major player in the world within a generation. Yet, Emperor Meiji's role in the Restoration is debatable. He certainly did not control Japan, but how much influence he wielded is unknown. It is unlikely it will ever be clear whether he supported the Sino-Japanese War (1894-1895) or the Russo-Japanese War (1904-1905). One of the few windows we have into the Emperor's own feelings is his poetry, which seems to indicate a pacifist streak, or at least a man who wished war could be avoided. For other meanings of Pacific, see Pacific (disambiguation). ... Generation (From the Greek γιγνμαι), also known as procreation, is the act of producing offspring. ... Japan and Qing China fought the First Sino-Japanese War (or the Qing-Japanese War) during 1894 and 1895, primarily over control of Korea. ... 1894 (MDCCCXCIV) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1895 (MDCCCXCV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Combatants Russian Empire Empire of Japan Commanders Emperor Nicholas II Aleksey Kuropatkin Stepan Makarov† Emperor Meiji Oyama Iwao Heihachiro Togo Strength 500,000 Soldiers 400,000 Soldiers Casualties 39,518 killed; 158,600 wounded; 74,000 POW (http://www. ... 1904 (MCMIV) was a leap year starting on a Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1905 (MCMV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar). ... Pacifism is the opposition to war or violence as a means of settling disputes. ...


Near the end of his life several anarchists, including Kotoku Shusui, were executed on charges of having conspired to murder the sovereign. This conspiracy was known as the High Treason Incident. Kōtoku Shūsui (1871-1911) Kotoku Shusui (幸徳 秋水 Kōtoku Shūsui, November 4 or September 23, 1871–January 24, 1911) was a socialist and anarchist who played a leading role in introducing anarchism to Japan in the early 20th century, particularly by translating the works of contemporary European and... The High Treason Incident ), also known as the ), was a socialist-anarchist plot to assassinate Japanese Emperor Meiji in 1910, leading to a mass arrest of leftists, and the execution of 12 alleged conspirators in 1911. ...


Trivia

The Last Samurai is an action/drama film written by John Logan and Edward Zwick & Marshall Herskovitz based on a story by Logan. ... Tom Cruise (born Thomas Cruise Mapother IV on July 3, 1962) is an Academy Award-nominated, Golden Globe Award-winning American actor and film producer. ... The Kabukiza in Ginza is one of Tokyos leading kabuki theaters. ... Nakamura Shichinosuke II, (中村七之助二代目)(b. ...

Personal information

  • Father
    • Emperor Kōmei
  • Mother
    • Nakayama Yoshiko, a concubine of Emperor Komei
  • Wife
    • Ichijo Masako, the Empress Shōken, also known as "Haruko"
  • Concubines
    • Lady Mitsuko (unknown), not much is known about Lady Mitsuko, however she gave birth the first son of the Emperor's.
    • Lady Natsuko (1856 - 1873), not much is known about Lady Natsuko, however she gave birth to the first daughter of the Emperor's and died in childbirth.
    • Yanagiwara Naruko (1855 - 1943)
    • Chigusa Kotoko (1855 - 1944)
    • Sono Sachiko (1867 - 1947)
  • Children
    • A prince, born on 18 September 1873, but died on the same day, whose mother was Lady Mitsuko
    • A princess, born on 13 November 1873, but died on the same day, whose mother was Lady Natsuko
    • Shigeko, (25 January 1875 - 8 June 1876) the Princess Ume, whose mother was Lady Naruko
    • Yukihito, (23 September 1877 - 26 July 1878) the Prince Take, whose mother was Lady Naruko
    • Yoshihito, the Emperor Taishō
    • Akiko, (3 August 1881 - 6 September 1883) the Princess Shige, whose mother was Lady Kotoko
    • Fumiko, (26 January 1883 - 8 September 1883) the Princess Masu, whose mother was Lady Kotoko
    • Shizuko, (10 February 1886 - 4 April 1887) the Princess Hisa, whose mother was Lady Sachiko
    • Michihito, (1887 - 1888) the Prince Aki, whose mother was Lady Sachiko
    • Masako, (30 September 1888 - 8 March 1940) the Princess Tsune, whose mother was Lady Sachiko
    • Fusako, (28 January 1890 – 11 August 1974) the Princess Kane, whose mother was Lady Sachiko
    • Nobuko, (7 August 1891 – 3 November 1933) the Princess Fumi, whose mother was Lady Sachiko
    • Teruhito, (1893 - 1894) the Prince Mitsu, whose mother was Lady Sachiko
    • Toshiko, (11 May 1896 – 5 March 1978) the Princess Yasu, whose mother was Lady Sachiko
    • Takiko, (1897 - 1899) the Princess Sada whose mother was Lady Sachiko

Emperor Kōmei of Japan Emperor Kōmei ) (July 22, 1831 - January 30, 1867) was the 121st imperial ruler of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession. ... Empress Shōken in Western garb, a sign of the reform taken under the Meiji era Empress Shōken ) (28 May 1849 - 19 April 1914) was empress consort of Japan as the wife of Emperor Meiji. ... Concubinage is either the state of a couple living together as lovers with no obligation created by vows, legal marriage, or religious ceremony, or the state of a woman supported by a male lover who is married to, and usually living with, someone else. ... Childbirth (also called labour, birth, partus or parturition) is the culmination of a human pregnancy with the emergence of a newborn infant/s from the mothers uterus. ... Emperor Taisho (大正天皇 Taishō Tennō) (August 31, 1879 – December 25, 1926), whose given name was Yoshihito (嘉仁), was the 123rd imperial ruler of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession, from 1912 until his death in 1926. ...

Further reading

  • Emperor of Japan: Meiji and His World, 1852-1912 by Donald Keene, Columbia University Press, 2002. ISBN 0-231-12340-X

External links

  • Meiji Shrine ((English))
  • Meiji Emperor
  • The New Student's Reference Work/Mutsuhito, Emperor of Japan
Preceded by
Emperor Kōmei
Emperor of Japan
1867-1912
Succeeded by
Emperor Taishō

 
 

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