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Encyclopedia > Emperor Kotoku

Emperor Kōtoku (孝徳天皇 Kōtoku Tennō) (596? - November 24, 654)[1] was the 36th emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession. He ruled from July 12, 645[2] until his death in 654. His name in birth was Prince Karu. He enacted the Taika Reform Edicts. Events King Ethelbert of Kent asks for missionaries to visit his kingdom Births Deaths Categories: 596 ... November 24 is the 328th day (329th on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Events King Reccaswinth issues Visigothic law code. ... July 12 is the 193rd day (194th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 172 days remaining. ... Events End of the reign of Empress Kogyoku of Japan Emperor Kotoku ascends to the throne of Japan Byzantines recapture Alexandria from the Arabs Births Empress Jito of Japan Categories: 645 ... Events King Reccaswinth issues Visigothic law code. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Taika Reforms. ...


He was a descendant of Emperor Bidatsu. He was a son of Chinu no ōkimi (Prince Chinu) by Kibihime no ōkimi (Princess Kibihime). Empress Kōgyoku was his elder sister from same parents. Chinu was a son of Prince Oshisaka hikohito no ōe whose father was the Emperor Bidatsu. He had at least three consorts including his Empress, Hashihito no Himemiko (Princess Hashihito), the daughter of Emperor Jomei and his sister Empress Kōgyoku. Emperor Bidatsu (敏達天皇 Bidatsu Tennō) (538- September 14, 585) was the 30th emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession. ... Empress Kōgyoku (皇極天皇 Kōgyoku Tennō), also Empress Saimei (斉明天皇 Saimei Tennō) (594–661) was the 35th imperial ruler of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession. ... Emperor Jomei (舒明天皇 Jomei Tennō) (593- November 17, 641[1]) was the 34th emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession. ...


In 645 he ascended to the throne two days after Prince Naka no Ōe assassinated Soga no Iruka in the court of Kōgyoku. Kōgyoku abdicated in favor of his son and crown prince, Naka no Ōe, but Naka no Ōe insisted Kōtoku should ascend to the throne instead. ... Soga no Iruka (蘇我入鹿 ? - July 10, 645) was a statesman in the Yamato Period of Japan. ...


According to Nihonshoki he was of gentle personality and was favor in Buddhism. In 645 he created a new city in the area called Naniwa, and moved the capital from Yamato province to this new city (see Nara). The new capital had a sea port and was good for foreign trade and diplomatic activities. In 653 Kotoku sent an embassy to Tang Dynasty, but not all ships could reach China because of wrecking. Nihonshoki (Japanese: 日本書紀), sometimes translated as Chronicles of Japan, is the second oldest book of classical Japanese history. ... A replica of an ancient statue of Gautama Buddha, found in Sarnath, near Varanasi. ... Events End of the reign of Empress Kogyoku of Japan Emperor Kotoku ascends to the throne of Japan Byzantines recapture Alexandria from the Arabs Births Empress Jito of Japan Categories: 645 ... Osaka ) is the capital of Osaka Prefecture and the third-largest city in Japan, with a population of 2. ... Yamato (大和) was a province of Japan. ... , Nara ) is the capital city of Nara Prefecture in the Kansai region of Japan, near Kyoto. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


Naka no Ōe held the rank of crown prince and was the de facto leader of the government. In 653 Naka no Ōe proposed to move the capital again to Yamato province. Kotoku denied. Naka no Ōe ignored the emperor's policy and moved to the former province. Many courtiers and loyals in the court including Empress Hashihito followed him. Kotoku was left in the palace. In the next year he died because of illness. After his death, Naka no Ōe wouldn't ascend to the throne soon but his mother and the sister of Kotoku, the former Empress Kogyoku ascended to the throne under another name, Saimei. Events Pope Martin I arrested Sigeberht II the Good succeeds Sigeberht I the Little as king of Essex Aripert, nephew of Theodelinda, succeeds Rodoald as king of the Lombards Births Deaths Chindaswinth, king of the Visigoths Rodoald, king of the Lombards Abbas, uncle of Muhammad and his chief financial supporter. ...


Notes

  1. ^ November 24, 654 corresponds to the Tenth Day of the Tenth Month of 654 (kōin) of the traditional lunisolar calendar used in Japan until 1873.
  2. ^ July 12, 645 corresponds to the Fourteenth Day of the Sixth Month of 645 (isshi).
Preceded by:
Empress Kōgyoku
Emperor of Japan
645-654
Succeeded by:
Empress Saimei

  Results from FactBites:
 
Kotoku Shusui at AllExperts (832 words)
Kotoku Shusui (幸徳 秋水 Kōtoku ShÅ«sui, November 4 or September 23, 1871–January 24, 1911) was a socialist and anarchist who played a leading role in introducing anarchism to Japan in the early 20th century, particularly by translating the works of contemporary European and Russian anarchists, such as Peter Kropotkin, into Japanese.
In 1901, when Kotoku had attempted to found the Japanese Social Democratic Party with Sakai, he was not an anarchist, but a social democrat — indeed, Sakai and Kotoku were the first to translate The Communist Manifesto into Japanese, which appeared in an issue of the Common People's Newspaper and which got them heavily fined.
In November 1905 Kotoku travelled to the United States in order to freely criticise the Emperor of Japan, whom he now saw as the linchpin of capitalism in Japan.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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