FACTOID # 7: The top five best educated states are all in the Northeast.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Emmeline Pankhurst
Statue of Emmeline Pankhurst in Victoria Tower Gardens next to the Houses of Parliament, Westminster. (January 2006)
Statue of Emmeline Pankhurst in Victoria Tower Gardens next to the Houses of Parliament, Westminster. (January 2006)

Emmeline Pankhurst (14 July 185814 June 1928) was one of the founders of the British suffragette movement. (the WSPU women's social and political union) It is the name of "Mrs Pankhurst", more than any other, which is associated with the struggle for the enfranchisement of women immediately preceding World War I. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (600x800, 314 KB) Summary Statue of Emmeline Pankhurst, Victoria Tower Gardens, Westminster, London. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (600x800, 314 KB) Summary Statue of Emmeline Pankhurst, Victoria Tower Gardens, Westminster, London. ... Victoria Tower Gardens is a public park along the north bank of the River Thames in London. ... “Houses of Parliament” redirects here. ... Westminster is a district within the City of Westminster in London. ... is the 195th day of the year (196th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1858 (MDCCCLVIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 165th day of the year (166th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Suffragette with banner, Washington DC, 1918 The title of suffragette (also occasionally spelled suffraget) was given to members of the womens suffrage movement, originally in the United Kingdom. ... Suffrage is the civil right to vote, or the exercise of that right. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ...


217.44.79.149 (talk) 19:42, 27 November 2007 (UTC)==Early life== She was born Emmeline Goulden in Stretford, Lancashire, England to abolitionist Robert Goulden and feminist Sophia Crane, and married Richard Marsden Pankhurst, a barrister, in Salford in 1879.[1] Richard Pankhurst was already a supporter of the women's suffrage movement, and had been the author of the Married Women's Property Acts of 1870 and 1882.[2] Stretford is a town within the Metropolitan Borough of Trafford, in Greater Manchester, England. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article is about the abolition of slavery. ... Feminism is a social theory and political movement primarily informed and motivated by the experience of women. ... Richard Marsden Pankhurst Richard Marsden Pankhurst (May, 1834 - July 5, 1898) was the son of Henry Francis Pankhurst (1806-1873) and Margaret Marsden (1803-1879). ... For other uses, see Salford (disambiguation). ... Year 1879 (MDCCCLXXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The term womens suffrage refers to an economic and political reform movement aimed at extending suffrage — the right to vote — to women. ... 1870 (MDCCCLXX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1882 (MDCCCLXXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...

Contents

Foundation of suffrage organisations

In 1889, Pankhurst founded the Women's Franchise League, but her campaign was interrupted by her husband's death in 1898. [3] In 1903 she founded the better-known Women's Social and Political Union, an organization most famous for its militancy which began in 1905. [4] Its members included Annie Kenney, Emily Wilding Davison who was killed by the King's horse in the 1913 Epsom Derby as the result of a suffragette protest, and the composer Dame Ethel Mary Smyth.[5][6][7] Pankhurst was joined in the movement by her daughters, Christabel Pankhurst and Sylvia Pankhurst, both of whom would make a substantial contribution to the campaign in different ways.[8] Her other daughter, Adela Pankhurst emigrated to Australia where she was politically active in first the Communist Party of Australia and then the fascist Australia First Movement.[9] At one point, Pankhurst lived in an apartment that was located at 159 Knightsbridge, London. The address still exists, but is now operating as The Knightsbridge Green Hotel. Year 1889 (MDCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Womens Franchise League was an organisation created by the Suffragette Emmeline Pankhurst together with her husband Richard in 1889, fourteen years before the creation of the Womens Social and Political Union in 1903. ... Year 1898 (MDCCCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1900 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Friday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... The Womens Social and Political Union (WSPU) was the leading militant organisation campaigning for Womens suffrage in the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see 1905 (disambiguation). ... Annie Kenney (1879-1953) was a working-class suffragette who is credited with sparking off suffragette militancy when she heckled Winston Churchill. ... Emily Davison Emily Wilding Davison (October 11, 1872 Blackheath – June 8, 1913 Epsom) is remembered as the woman who died by throwing herself under the hoofs of Anmer, King George Vs horse on June 4, 1913 at the Epsom Derby in support of the British suffragette movement. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Ethel Smyth. ... Christabel Pankhurst Dame Christabel Harriette Pankhurst DBE (September 22, 1880 – February 13, 1958) was a suffragette born in Manchester, England. ... Sylvia Pankhurst Estelle Sylvia Pankhurst (May 5, 1882 - September 27, 1960) was a campaigner in the suffragette movement in the United Kingdom, and a prominent left communist. ... Adela Pankhurst (1885-1961) was recruited during World War I as an organiser for the Womens Peace Army in Melbourne by Vida Goldstein. ... The Communist Party of Australia was founded in 1920 and dissolved in 1991. ... Fascism (in Italian, fascismo), capitalized, was the authoritarian political movement which ruled Italy from 1922 to 1943 under the leadership of Benito Mussolini. ... Australia First Movement was a proto-fascist movement which grew out of the Rational Association and the Victorian Socialist Party. ...

Pankhurst being arrested (1914)

Pankhurst's tactics for drawing attention to the movement led to her being imprisoned several times but, because of her high profile, she did not at first endure the same privations as many of the imprisoned working-class suffragettes. However, she did experience force-feeding after going on hunger strike on various occasions. Her approach to the campaign did not endear her to everyone, and there were splits within the movement as a result. Her autobiography, My Own Story, was published in 1914. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2279x3000, 592 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Emmeline Pankhurst ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2279x3000, 592 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Emmeline Pankhurst ... A hunger strike is a method of non-violent resistance in which participants fast as an act of political protest, or to provoke feelings of guilt or to achieve a goal such as a policy change. ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


In 1914, World War I broke out, and Pankhurst felt that nothing should interfere with her country's efforts to win. All attempts to gain votes for women were put on hold, and her efforts were instead directed to urging women to take over men's jobs, so that the men could go and fight in the war. With support from David Lloyd George, she organised a parade of 30,000 women, using £2,000 funding from the government, to encourage employers to let women take over men's jobs in industry. On September 8, 1914, Christabel re-appeared at the London Opera House, after her long exile, to utter a declaration on "The German Peril". Pankhurst toured the country, making recruiting speeches. Her supporters handed white feathers to every young man they encountered wearing civilian dress, and bobbed up at Hyde Park meetings with placards: "Intern Them All". “The Great War ” redirects here. ... David Lloyd George, 1st Earl Lloyd-George of Dwyfor, OM, PC (17 January 1863 – 26 March 1945) was a British statesman who was Prime Minister throughout the latter half of World War I and the first four years of the subsequent peace. ... is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... [[Media:[[Media:[[Media:[[Media:[[Media: A white feather is sometimes given as a mark of cowardice. ...


Enlistment of the unenlisted was of the highest priority. As Sylvia Pankhurst pointed out in her chronicle, The Suffragette Movement, her mother and sister rallied their followers in an effort to reroute the militant momentum which they had so successfully orchestrated in the struggle for suffrage:

Characteristically, Mrs. Pankhurst threw all her energies and all her influence into the effort, which now, designated itself pro-war and pro-conscription. Although not all of the members of the suffrage movement backed the war, Mrs. Pankhurst’s influence swayed many to follow her lead. Giving its energies wholly to the prosecution of the War, it rushed to a furious extreme, its Chauvinism unexampled amongst all the other women’s societies.[10]

The British government started to implement voting rights for women, across the then United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, in March 1918. While the Representation of the People Act 1918 only gave voting rights to women over 30, and that with a property qualification, while all men over 21 were enfranchised, the Suffragettes nevertheless saw it as a great victory. In November 1918, women over 21 were given the right to become Members of Parliament — meaning women could be MPs and not be allowed to vote. In 1928, women finally achieved equal voting rights to men in the United Kingdom. This article is about the historical state called the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland (1801–1927). ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... The Representation of the People Act 1918 widened suffrage by abolishing practically all property qualifications for men and by enfranchising women over 30 who met minimum property qualifications. ...


Writings (selected)

  • The Powers and Duties of Poor Law Guardians in Times of Exceptional Distress, 1895.
  • The Present Position of the Women’s Suffrage Movement in: The Case for Women’s Suffrage, hg.v. B. Villiers, 1907.
  • The Importance of the Vote, 1908.
  • Suffrages Speeches from the Dock, 1912.
  • My own Story (1914), Reissued by Greenwood Publishing Group, 1985.

Secondary literature

  • Piers Brendon, Eminent Edwardians (Houghton Mifflin Company, 1980) ISBN 0-395-29195-X
  • Linda Hoy, Profiles: Emmeline Pankhurst, 1985
  • Martin Pugh, The Pankhursts, Penguin 2002
  • Sylvia Pankhurst, The Suffragette Movement: An Intimate Account of Persons and Ideals, Reissued in 1984 by Chatto & Windus
  • June Purvis Emmeline Pankhurst: a biography Routledge, 2002

Piers Brendon (1940-12-21 —) is a British writer. ...

Popular Culture

  • In the Doctor Who TV episode "Smith and Jones", the Tenth Doctor told his assistant Martha Jones that Emmeline Pankhurst had stolen his laser spanner.
  • In Disney's Mary Poppins, Mrs. Banks sings "Take heart for Mrs. Pankhurst has been clapped in irons again!" in the song Sister Sufragette
  • In Helen Fielding's novel Bridget Jones: The Edge of Reason,Tom tries to convince Bridget to vote and says, "Go on then. Remember Mrs. Pankhurst."

This article is about the television series. ... Smith and Jones is an episode of the British science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... The Tenth Doctor is the name given to the tenth and current incarnation of the fictional character known as the Doctor seen on screen in the long-running BBC television science-fiction series Doctor Who. ... Martha Jones is a fictional character played by Freema Agyeman in the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who, and will appear in its spin-off series, Torchwood. ... Helen Fielding (born February 19, 1958 in Morley, West Yorkshire) is a British author, best known as the author of the novel Bridget Joness Diary and its sequel Bridget Jones: The Edge Of Reason The Bridget Jones books had their origins in a column published in The Independent and... Bridget Jones: The Edge of Reason is a book by Helen Fielding as well as movie based on the book. ...

See also

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Emmeline Pankhurst
Wikisource has original text related to this article:
The Citizenship of Women: A Plea for Woman's Suffrage

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... The original Wikisource logo. ... The Pankhurst Centre in Manchester provides a women-only space that creates a unique environment in which women can learn together, work on projects and socialise. ... The History of Feminism is the history of Feminist movements. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

References

  1. ^ Who was Emmeline Pankhurst educationforum.co.uk
  2. ^ Emmeline Goulden Pankhurst (1858 - 1928) BBC history
  3. ^ educationforum para 4
  4. ^ BBC para 4
  5. ^ educationforum
  6. ^ Emily Wilding Davison historylearningsite.co.uk
  7. ^ Dame Ethel Smyth ibiblio.org
  8. ^ Emmeline Pankhurst about.com, Jone Johnson Lewis, para 11
  9. ^ From Fabian to fascist Phil Shannon's review of Adela Pankhurst: The Wayward Suffragette 1885-1961
  10. ^ Pankhurst, Sylvia. The Suffragette Movement, p. 593.

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:

  Results from FactBites:
 
Emmeline Pankhurst (274 words)
Emmeline Pankhurst was one of the founders of the British suffragette movement.
She was born Emmeline Goulden in Manchester, England, in 1857 and married Richard Marsden Pankhurst, a barrister, in 1879.
Mr Pankhurst was already a supporter of the women's suffrage movement, and had been the author of the Married Women's Property Acts of 1870 and 1882.
Emmeline Pankhurst - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (945 words)
Emmeline Pankhurst (July 14, 1858 – June 14, 1928) was one of the founders of the British suffragette movement.
She was born Emmeline Goulden in Manchester, England to abolitionist Robert Goulden and feminist Sophia Crane, and married Richard Marsden Pankhurst, a barrister, in Salford in 1879.
Dr Pankhurst was already a supporter of the women's suffrage movement, and had been the author of the Married Women's Property Acts of 1870 and 1882.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m