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Encyclopedia > Emirates Stadium
Emirates Stadium
Ashburton Grove, The Emirates, Arsenal Stadium (by UEFA)
Location Ashburton Grove, London
Opened July 22, 2006
Owner Arsenal FC
Operator Arsenal FC
Surface Grass, 105 × 68 metres (~114 x 74 yards)[1]
Construction cost £430 million
Architect HOK Sport
Structural engineer Buro Happold
Services engineer Buro Happold
Former names
Ashburton Grove
Tenants
Arsenal Football Club
Capacity
60,355[2]

The Emirates Stadium is a football stadium located on Ashburton Grove in Holloway, north London, and the home of Arsenal Football Club since it opened in July 2006. The stadium has an all-seated capacity of 60,355,[2] making it the second largest stadium in the Premier League after Old Trafford, and the third-largest stadium of any kind in London, after Wembley and Twickenham. During the planning and construction stages, it was known as Ashburton Grove before a naming rights deal with the airline Emirates was struck in October 2004. The stadium project cost £430 million, but not all was for the actual construction of the stadium itself.[3] Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2208x1608, 1252 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Emirates Stadium ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... is the 203rd day of the year (204th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Arsenal Football Club (also known as Arsenal, The Arsenal or The Gunners) are an English professional football club based in Holloway, north London. ... HOK Sport + Venue + Event, a division of Hellmuth, Obata and Kassabaum, is an architectural practice specializing in the design of public assembly spaces and planning of major special events. ... // View of the Great Court Buro Happold is a professional services firm providing engineering consultancy, design, planning, project management and consulting services for all aspects of buildings, infrastructure and the environment. ... // View of the Great Court Buro Happold is a professional services firm providing engineering consultancy, design, planning, project management and consulting services for all aspects of buildings, infrastructure and the environment. ... Arsenal Football Club (also known as Arsenal, The Arsenal or The Gunners) are an English professional football club based in Holloway, north London. ... Soccer redirects here. ... Holloway is an inner-city district in the London Borough of Islington and follows for the most part, the line of the Holloway Road (A1 road). ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Arsenal Football Club (also known as Arsenal, The Arsenal or The Gunners) are an English professional football club based in Holloway, north London. ... For the Scottish equivalent see Scottish Premier League The FA Premier League (often referred to as the Barclays Premiership in England and the Barclays English Premier League or just simply The EPL internationally) is a league competition for football clubs located at the top of the English football league system... Old Trafford (given the nickname The Theatre of Dreams by Sir. ... For the old stadium, see Wembley Stadium (1923). ... Twickenham Stadium (usually known as just Twickenham or Twickers[1]) is a stadium located in Twickenham, in the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames. ... Emirates Airline (shortened form: Emirates) (Arabic: طيران الإماراتTayarān al-Imārāt) is a subsidiary of The Emirates Group. ...

Contents

Stadium

The stadium is a four-tiered bowl with roofing over the stands but not over the pitch. The design team was made up of architects HOK Sport, construction consultants AYH, and engineering firm Buro Happold. The stadium was constructed by Sir Robert McAlpine[4] on the site of the former Ashburton Grove industrial estate, several hundred metres from Arsenal's former stadium Highbury. HOK Sport is a division of the international architectural firm HOK which specializes in sports facilities. ... AYH are a Quantity Surveying firm, whose head office is based in London. ... // View of the Great Court Buro Happold is a professional services firm providing engineering consultancy, design, planning, project management and consulting services for all aspects of buildings, infrastructure and the environment. ... Sir Robert McAlpine Ltd. ... An industrial park is an area of land set aside for industrial development. ... Arsenal Stadium was a football stadium in North London, the home ground of Arsenal Football Club between 6 September 1913 and 7 May 2006. ...

Inside the Emirates Stadium
Inside the Emirates Stadium

The upper (26,646) and lower (24,425) tiers of the stadium are standard seating. For the 2006-07 season, ticket prices for an adult range between £32 and £66 for most matches, but as cheap as £13 for juniors. (designated "Category B"), with the price rising for "Category A" matches against certain top sides to between £46 and £94.[5] Season ticket prices for 2006-07 ranged between £885 and £1,825.[6] Image File history File links Insideemirates1. ... Image File history File links Insideemirates1. ... The new Wembley Stadium was completed in time for the 2006-07 seasons FA Cup Final. ...


The main middle tier, known as the "Club Level", is premium priced and also includes the director's box. There are 7,139 seats at this level, which are sold on licences lasting from one to four years. The cost of club tier seats for 2006–07 ranges from £2,500 to £4,750 per season and covers admission to all home league games and any home games Arsenal play in the UEFA Champions League, FA Cup and Carling Cup.[7] These were sold out by May 2006. European Cup redirects here. ... This article is about the English FA Cup. ... The Football League Cup, commonly known as the League Cup, is an English football competition. ...


Immediately above the club tier there is a small tier consisting of 150 boxes of 10, 12 and 15 seats. The total number of spectators at this level is 2,222. Box prices start at £65,000 per annum plus VAT, and covers admission to all home league games and any home games Arsenal play in the UEFA Champions League, FA Cup and Carling Cup.[8] The most exclusive area in the stadium is known as the "Diamond Club" which is invite only and costs £25,000 up front plus £25,000 a year. Tickets here include use of a private lounge, a complimentary restaurant and bar, valet parking and concierge service. Members will also have the option of travelling to European away games on the players' aeroplane. This article refers to the tool of travel. ...


Due to the high demand for tickets and the relative wealth of their London fanbase, Arsenal expect the revenue from their premium seating and corporate boxes to be nearly as much as the revenue from the entire stadium at Highbury.[9]


The pitch is 105 × 68 metres in size, making it the joint-largest pitch in the Premiership,[1] while the total grassed area is 113 × 76 metres.[10] It runs north-south like at Highbury, with the players' tunnel and the dugouts on the west side of the pitch underneath the main TV camera. The away fans are found in the south-east corner of the lower tier. The away supporter configuration can be expanded from 1,500 seats to 4,500 seats behind the south goal in the lower tier, and a further 4,500 seats can be made available also in the upper tier, bringing the total to 9,000 supporters (the regulation 15% required for domestic cup competitions such as the FA Cup and Carling Cup). This article is about the English FA Cup. ... The Football League Cup, commonly known as the League Cup, is an English football competition. ...


The upper tier is contoured to leave open space in the corners of the ground, and the roof is significantly canted inwards. Both of these features are meant to provide as much airflow and sunlight to the pitch as possible. Arsenal have a reputation for having one of the best playing surfaces in the world, and the design of the new stadium took this into account. This does have the effect that supporters in the upper tier on one side of the ground are unable to see supporters in the upper tier opposite. In the north-west and south-east corners of the stadium are two giant screens suspended from the roof. The club are currently in the process of examining whether to add a third giant screen in the north-east corner of the stadium.


The new stadium pays tribute to Arsenal's former home, Highbury. The club's offices are officially called Highbury House, located north-east of Emirates Stadium, and house the bust of Herbert Chapman that used to reside at Highbury. Three other busts that used to reside at Highbury of Claude Ferrier (architect of Highbury's East stand), Denis Hill-Wood (Former Arsenal chairman and father of current chairman Peter Hill-Wood) and Arsene Wenger (current Arsenal manager) have also been moved to Emirates Stadium but they are currently in storage. Herbert Chapman (January 19, 1878 – January 6, 1934) was an English football player and manager. ... Claude Waterlow Ferrier FRIBA (1879 - 6 July 1935) was a Scottish architect, who specialised in the Art Deco style. ... Denis John Charles Hill-Wood (June 25, 1906 – May 4, 1982) was an English cricketer and football club chairman. ... Peter Hill-Wood is Arsenal F.C.s current Chairman. ... Ars ne Wenger (b. ...


Additionally, the two bridges over the railway line to the east of the stadium, connecting the stadium to Drayton Park, are called the Clock End and North Bank bridges, after the stands at Highbury; the clock that gave its name to the old Clock End has been resited on the exterior of Emirates Stadium facing the bridge of the same name. The Arsenal FC club museum, which was formerly held in the North Bank Stand, opened in October 2006 and is located to the north of the stadium, within the Northern Triangle building. For other uses, see Clock (disambiguation). ...


Name

The Emirates Stadium sign is lit up at night
The Emirates Stadium sign is lit up at night

It was announced on 5 October 2004 that the Emirates Stadium will be known as such for at least the first 15 years after the club agreed a £100m sponsorship deal with Emirates Airline. This sum also includes payments for an eight-year shirt sponsorship by Emirates, starting in the 2006–07 season.[11] Image File history File links Outsideemirates. ... Image File history File links Outsideemirates. ... For other uses, see 5th October (Serbia). ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Emirates Airline (shortened form: Emirates) (Arabic: طيران الإماراتTayarān al-Imārāt) is a subsidiary of The Emirates Group. ... The new Wembley Stadium was completed in time for the 2006-07 seasons FA Cup Final. ...


The stadium name is often colloquially shortened to "The Emirates", although some supporters continue to use the former name "Ashburton Grove" for the new stadium, especially those who object to the concept of corporate sponsorship of stadium names.[12] This discrepancy between official and unofficial names is similar to the manner in which Arsenal's former ground, Arsenal Stadium, is almost universally referred to as "Highbury" by supporters, the media and the club itself.[13] For other uses, see Corporation (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Arsenal Stadium was a football stadium in North London, the home ground of Arsenal Football Club between 6 September 1913 and 7 May 2006. ...


Due to UEFA regulations on stadium sponsors, during UEFA Champions League matches the stadium is not officially referred to as Emirates Stadium, as Emirates are not an official sponsor of the Champions League competition; other stadia, such as the Allianz Arena in Munich, have fallen foul of this rule before.[14] UEFA refer to the stadium as Arsenal Stadium,[15] which was the official name of the stadium at Highbury. The Union Européenne de Football Association or Union of European Football Associations in English, almost always referred to by the acronym UEFA (pronounced (you-AY-fuh) or (oo-Ay-fuh) or ), is the administrative and controlling body for European football. ... European Cup redirects here. ... Allianz Arena The Allianz Arena is a football stadium located in the north-Munich district of Fröttmaning. ... For other uses, see Munich (disambiguation). ...


History

Detail of the roof and supports nearing completion in March 2006
Detail of the roof and supports nearing completion in March 2006

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (707x1024, 139 KB) Detail of the roof of the new Emirates Stadium for Arsenal F.C. Photograph © Andrew Dunn, 25 March 2006. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (707x1024, 139 KB) Detail of the roof of the new Emirates Stadium for Arsenal F.C. Photograph © Andrew Dunn, 25 March 2006. ...

The need for a new stadium

Arsenal started looking to develop a larger stadium during the later part of the 1990s, as their existing ground at Highbury had a capacity of 38,419[16] when it became all-seater in 1993, which was lower than the stadium capacities of almost every other European football club of comparable stature. There was little room for expansion as the East Stand backed directly onto the pavement of a public road and the other three backed onto housing; in addition the East Stand is a Grade II listed building. Arsenal had a season ticket waiting list which had been closed for some time with over 20,000 members, and were missing out on a great deal of potential revenue. However, finding a site for a new stadium in London was extremely difficult. Arsenal Stadium was a football stadium in North London, the home ground of Arsenal Football Club between 6 September 1913 and 7 May 2006. ... The Forth Bridge, designed by Sir Benjamin Baker and Sir John Fowler, opened in 1890, and now owned by Network Rail, is designated as a Category A listed building by Historic Scotland. ...


The club were willing to consider a location close to the M25 motorway if necessary, but had a strong preference for a location in the London Borough of Islington close to Highbury. At one stage they had considered moving to Wembley Stadium (Arsenal had played Champions League games at the old Wembley Stadium during the 1998–99 and 1999–2000 seasons) but in the end pulled out of the plans.[17] When the Wembley revamp was given the go-ahead in 2002, there was speculation that Arsenal and Tottenham would move into the new stadium when it was finished, even though the club was pressing ahead with the Ashburton Grove project by this stage.[18] The M25 motorway looking south between junctions 14 and 15, near Heathrow Airport. ... Arms of Islington London Borough Council Islington Town Hall Islington is a borough of London to the north of the City of London, west of Hackney, east of Camden, and south of Haringey. ... For the old stadium, see Wembley Stadium (1923). ... European Cup redirects here. ... For the new stadium, see Wembley Stadium. ... The 1998-1999 season was the 119th season of competitive football in England. ... The 1999-2000 season was the 120th season of competitive football in England. ... Tottenham Hotspur Football Club is an English professional football club which plays in the Premier League. ...


Ashburton Grove chosen

A map of Ashburton Grove

Eventually the club selected a site, an industrial estate at Ashburton Grove, which was just five hundred metres from Highbury as the crow flies. The plan was announced in November 1999, with a scheduled opening date of August 2003; this later slipped back to summer 2006 due to planning and financial difficulties. The Ashburton Grove site had many occupants, the most significant being Islington Council's recycling plant and the Royal Mail Holloway Delivery Office. In order to develop the site, it was necessary to buy out the existing occupants, and pay for their relocation (Arsenal purchased 10 acres (40,000 m²) of former railway land on Lough Road, off Caledonian Road, to house a new recycling plant, while the Royal Mail moved to Hamilton Park); this proved to be very expensive. Islington is a borough of London to the north of the City of London, west of Hackney, east of Camden, and south of Haringey. ... Royal Mail is the national postal service of the United Kingdom. ... Holloway is an inner-city district in the London Borough of Islington and follows for the most part, the line of the Holloway Road (A1 road). ...


Local opposition

The Emirates Stadium under construction.
The Emirates Stadium under construction.

Despite Arsenal's presence in Islington for over 80 years, several local resident and business groups opposed the new stadium. Some who were made to move took legal action in July 2002, which was ultimately unsuccessful.[19] The stadium became a major issue in the local elections in May 2006. The Liberal Democrats lost seats in several wards affected by the stadium and now depend on the deciding vote of the Mayor for power.[20] The Metropolitan Police also demanded that supporters' coaches be parked in the nearby Sobel Sports Centre rather than in the stadium's underground car park, and access restrictions affecting 14 streets are imposed on match days. These conditions were imposed for the Health and Safety Certificate, without which the stadium could not open. The road closures were passed at a council meeting but kept under review.[21][22] Download high resolution version (1647x1011, 383 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Arsenal F.C. Emirates Stadium User:Edward/contribs Categories: Public domain images ... Download high resolution version (1647x1011, 383 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Arsenal F.C. Emirates Stadium User:Edward/contribs Categories: Public domain images ... Arms of Islington London Borough Council Islington Town Hall Islington is a borough of London to the north of the City of London, west of Hackney, east of Camden, and south of Haringey. ... The Liberal Democrats, often shortened to Lib Dems, is a liberal political party in the United Kingdom formed in 1988 by the merger of the Liberal Party and the Social Democratic Party; the two parties had already been in an alliance for seven years prior to this, since not long... Metropolitan Police redirects here. ... Parking lot is the American English term that refers to a cleared area that is more or less level and is intended for parking vehicles. ... Occupational safety and health is the discipline concerned with preserving and protecting human and facility resources in the workplace. ...


Construction

Interior of the stadium, near the end of construction.
Interior of the stadium, near the end of construction.

Actual construction of the stadium began in February 2004. As well as the stadium itself, two bridges over the Northern City railway line connecting the stadium with Drayton Park were also built; these were completed in summer 2004. The stadium topped out in August 2005, and was completed ahead of schedule and on budget. The club has announced that all of the hospitality boxes have been taken,[4] and by February 2006 90% of the club tier seats had been sold, by June 2006 the rest had been sold too. The first seat in the new stadium was ceremonially installed on 13 March 2006 by Arsenal midfielder Abou Diaby.[23] The stadium's floodlights were successfully tested for the first time on 25 June, and a day later the goalposts were erected. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1632x1224, 401 KB) Summary Edit history from English Wikipedia: (del) (cur) 13:18, June 24, 2006 . ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1632x1224, 401 KB) Summary Edit history from English Wikipedia: (del) (cur) 13:18, June 24, 2006 . ... This article is about the edifice (including an index to articles on specific bridge types). ... The Northern City Line is a former name for the railway line from Moorgate to Finsbury Park in London, once part of the Great Northern Electrics line. ... This is the top-level page of WikiProject trains Rail tracks Rail transport refers to the land transport of passengers and goods along railways or railroads. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 72nd day of the year (73rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Vassiriki Abou Diaby (born May 11, 1986 in Paris) is a French football midfielder of Ivorian descent currently playing for Arsenal. ... ... is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Look up goal in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

Official opening

The Emirates Stadium was officially opened by Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh on Thursday October 26, 2006; it had been intended that Queen Elizabeth II would officially open the stadium as well, but she suffered a back injury and was unable to attend on the day.[24] The royal visit echoed the attendance of the Queen's uncle, the Prince of Wales (later King Edward VIII) at the official opening of Highbury's West Stand in 1932.[25] Prince Philip redirects here. ... is the 299th day of the year (300th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of sixteen sovereign states, holding each crown and title equally. ... Edward VIII (Edward Albert Christian George Andrew Patrick David; later The Prince Edward, Duke of Windsor; 23 June 1894 – 28 May 1972) was King of Great Britain, Ireland, the British Dominions beyond the Seas, and Emperor of India from the death of his father, George V (1910–36), on 20...


Milestones

Interior of the stadium.
Interior of the stadium.

In order to obtain the licences the stadium needed to open, it first hosted three non-full capacity events. The first non full-capacity event was a shareholder open day on July 18, the second an open training session for 20,000 selected club members held on July 20. The third event on July 22 was the first match, as detailed below. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2576x1932, 988 KB) Im the author, i release this under fre licence and what not I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2576x1932, 988 KB) Im the author, i release this under fre licence and what not I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... is the 199th day of the year (200th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 201st day of the year (202nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 203rd day of the year (204th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

A testimonial match, often referred to simply as a testimonial, is a practice in some sports, notably football (soccer) and especially in England, where a club puts on a match in honor of a player for service to the club. ... Dennis Nicolaas Maria Bergkamp (born May 10, 1969 in Amsterdam) is a retired Dutch professional footballer. ... Amsterdamsche Football Club Ajax (Euronext: AJAX) also referred to as Ajax Amsterdam, AFC Ajax, or simply Ajax (pronounced /ˈʌɪjaks/), is a professional football club from Amsterdam, Netherlands. ... Klaas-Jan Huntelaar (born August 12, 1983) is a Dutch footballer who plays as a striker for Ajax and the Netherlands. ... Thierry Daniel Henry, born 17 August 1977 in Paris, France, is a French football player. ... For the Scottish equivalent see Scottish Premier League The FA Premier League (often referred to as the Barclays Premiership in England and the Barclays English Premier League or just simply The EPL internationally) is a league competition for football clubs located at the top of the English football league system... Aston Villa redirects here. ... is the 231st day of the year (232nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 266th day of the year (267th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Sheffield United Football Club is a professional English football club based in the City of Sheffield, South Yorkshire. ... European Cup redirects here. ... {| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 235th day of the year (236th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Dinamo is one of the most famous and successful Croatian football clubs. ... is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Elano Blumer (born June 14, 1981 in Iracemápolis, São Paulo) is a Brazilian football player. ... This article is about the Brazilian footballer. ... West Ham United Football Club is an English football club based in West Ham, London Borough of Newham, East London, and have played their home matches at the 35,146 capacity Boleyn Ground stadium since 1904. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 46th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Springsteen redirects here. ... The E Street Band is a backing band that has toured and recorded with rock musician Bruce Springsteen on and off since 1972. ... is the 150th day of the year (151st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ...

Attendances

The stadium's capacity is currently 60,355,[2] having been reduced slightly from 60,432 at its opening in 2006.[30] The highest attendance for a match at Emirates Stadium to date is 60,161, for a 2-2 draw with Manchester United on November 3, 2007.[31] The average attendance for competitive first-team fixtures in the stadium's first season, 2006-07, was 59,837, with a Premier League average attendance of 60,045.[32] Manchester United Football Club are a world-famous English football club, based at the Old Trafford stadium in Trafford, Greater Manchester, and are one of the most popular sports clubs in the world, with over 50 million supporters worldwide. ... is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... The new Wembley Stadium was completed in time for the 2006-07 seasons FA Cup Final. ... For other sports leagues which may be referred to by this name, see List of professional sports leagues. ...


Finance

The £430 million cost of the project, augmented by the extra costs the club had to meet besides building the stadium itself, was a formidable obstacle, especially as Arsenal were not granted any public subsidy. Arsenal had difficulty obtaining finance for the project, and work ceased just after it had begun, before restarting when a £260m loan package was obtained from a consortium of banks, led by the Royal Bank of Scotland.[33] In economics, a subsidy is generally a monetary grant given by a government to lower the price faced by producers or consumers of a good, generally because it is considered to be in the public interest. ... For other uses, see Loan (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Bank (disambiguation). ... The Royal Bank of Scotland Plc (Scottish Gaelic: [1]) is one of the retail banking subsidiaries of Royal Bank of Scotland Group plc, which together with NatWest, provides branch banking facilities in the United Kingdom. ...


In August 2005 Arsenal announced plans to replace most of the bank debt with bonds. The proposed bond issue went ahead on 13 July 2006. The club issued £210 million worth of 13.5 year bonds with a spread of 52 basis points over UK government bonds and £50 million of 7.1 year bonds with a spread of 22 basis points over LIBOR. It was the first publicly marketed, asset-backed bond issue by a European football club.[34] On 31 May 2006 the club's net debt was £262.1 million, an increase of over £100m from the previous year.[35] For alternative meanings, see bond (a disambiguation page). ... is the 194th day of the year (195th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A basis point (often denoted as bp, bps or ; rarely, permyriad) is a unit that is equal to 1/100th of 1%. It is commonly used to denote the change in a financial instrument, or the difference (spread) between two interest rates; although it may be used in any case... Gilts are bonds issued by the governments of the United Kingdom, South Africa, or Ireland. ... LIBOR stands for the London Interbank Offered Rate and is a daily reference rate based on the interest rates at which banks offer to lend unsecured funds to other banks in the London wholesale (or interbank) money market. ... is the 151st day of the year (152nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


However at the same time there are multiple sources of income for the club; the remainder of the Lough Road site is being used for new housing, as are the surplus areas around the stadium at Ashburton Grove. Highbury is currently being converted into apartments, most of which have been sold. In total, more than 2,000 homes will be built at the three sites, and the club is counting on the profit from these developments to make a major contribution towards the costs of the new stadium. Other sources of revenue include the £100m from Emirates for the naming rights, to be paid over the course of the deal[11] and a £15m contribution towards the capital costs of the stadium's catering facilities from catering firm Delaware North, which has a 20-year exclusive contract to run the stadium's catering operation,[36]


Finally, there is the increased revenue from the stadium itself. In 2005, Arsenal's chief executive Keith Edelman commented that the new stadium is expected to increase Arsenal's turnover from typically £115 million to around £170 million.[37] Final accounts for the year ending May 2007, Arsenal's first season at the Emirates, released in September 2007, show that Arsenal's turnover has increased to £200.8m a 46% increase on the previous year and that group operating profits increased to £51.2m a 274% increase on 2006.[38] Keith Edelman is Managing Director of Arsenal Football Club Keith Edelman graduated in 1971 from UMIST in 1971 with a BSc (Hons) in Management Sciences. ...


Access

View of the South Bridge with the ARSENAL statue lettering in the foreground and the Emirates Stadium in the background.
View of the South Bridge with the ARSENAL statue lettering in the foreground and the Emirates Stadium in the background.

The Emirates Stadium is served by a number of London Underground stations and bus routes. Arsenal tube station is the closest for the northern portion of the stadium. Holloway Road tube station is the closest to the southern portion, but will be exit-only on matchdays; it is currently estimated that £60 million is required to give the station the appropriate capacity to deal with the crowds, but only £7.5 million had been set aside in the planning permission for upgrading the station. Drayton Park station will continue to be shut on matchdays as the rail services to this station do not work at weekends nor after 9 pm. This has proven controversial as congestion still remains an issue, with roads being clogged over an hour after the end of games.[citation needed] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (900x600, 133 KB)[edit] Summary I took this photo on the South Bridge of the Emirates stadium, Tues 17th October 2006. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (900x600, 133 KB)[edit] Summary I took this photo on the South Bridge of the Emirates stadium, Tues 17th October 2006. ... The London Underground is a rapid transit system that serves a large part of Greater London and some neighbouring areas of Essex, Hertfordshire and Buckinghamshire. ... Arsenal Tube Station at night Platform of Arsenal tube station - Gillespie Road is still clearly displayed on the wall Arsenal tube station, in Highbury, north London, is a London Underground station located near Arsenal Stadium, the home of Arsenal football club. ... Southbound Piccadilly Line Platform Holloway Road is a station on the London Underground. ... Drayton Park station is on Network Rails Northern City Line which carries WAGN services between Moorgate and Welwyn Garden City or Hertford via Finsbury Park. ...


The next nearest stations are Finsbury Park and Highbury and Islington, which are served by both Underground and First Capital Connect services. Both are approximately a 10 minute walk away. In addition there are numerous bus routes serving the area.[39] Driving to the Emirates Stadium is not recommended; strict matchday parking restrictions will be in operation around the stadium. In addition, for one hour before kick off to one hour after the final whistle there will be a complete ban on vehicle movement on a number of the surrounding roads, with no exceptions. Finsbury Park Station is a busy transport interchange in North London. ... Highbury & Islington station is a mainline and London Underground zone 2 station, to the north of London. ... First Capital Connect is a train operating company in England that began its passenger operations on the National Rail network at 02:00 BST 1 April 2006. ...


Generally, the stadium opens to ticket holders two hours before kick off. For easy stadium access, the stadium is divided in to four colour-coded quadrants - Orange and Blue at the North end of the stadium, and Yellow and Green to the South. The club shop, named "The Armoury", and ticket offices are located near the Yellow Quadrant. The term box office can refer to either: A place where tickets are sold to the public for admission to a venue The amount of business a particular production, such as a movie or theatre show, does. ...


The stadium operates an electronic ticketing system where members of "The Arsenal" (the club's fan membership scheme) use their membership cards to enter the stadium, thus removing the need for turnstile operators. Non-members are issued with one-off paper tickets embedded with an RFID tag allowing them to enter the stadium. An EPC RFID tag used for Wal-Mart Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) is an automatic identification method, relying on storing and remotely retrieving data using devices called RFID tags or transponders. ...


References

  1. ^ a b Questions & Answers. Arsenal.com (2006-08-22). Retrieved on 8 December, 2006.
  2. ^ a b c Statement of Accounts and Annual Report 2006/2007. Arsenal Holdings plc (May 2007). Retrieved on 2007-12-19.
  3. ^ arsenal.com, Results for the year ended 31 May 2007, page 7.
  4. ^ a b First ball kicked at Emirates Stadium. Arsenal.com.
  5. ^ Ticket Information. Arsenal.com. Retrieved on 8 December, 2006.
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  7. ^ Arsenal launch Club Level. Arsenal.com (2004-11-01). Retrieved on 8 December, 2006.
  8. ^ Platinum Membership. Arsenal.com.
  9. ^ Based on a quote by chief executive Keith Edelman in Management Today, quoted in: Reasons to be cheerful. ANR (2004-08-06). Retrieved on 8 December, 2006.
  10. ^ Emirates Stadium - Key Facts. Arsenal.com. Retrieved on 2007-09-25.
  11. ^ a b Arsenal name new ground. BBC Sport (2004-10-05). Retrieved on 8 December, 2006.
  12. ^ Brian Dawes (2006-05-26). The 'E' Word. Arsenal World. Retrieved on 8 December, 2006.
  13. ^ Farewell to Highbury. Arsenal.com. Retrieved on 8 December, 2006.
  14. ^ UEFA likely to fine Bayern for breaching advertising laws. World Soccer News (2005-10-06). Retrieved on 8 December, 2006.
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  16. ^ Highbury. Arsenal.com. Retrieved on 28 July, 2006.
  17. ^ Arsenal Stadium. Islington Council.
  18. ^ Arsenal rule out Wembley move. BBC Sport.
  19. ^ Arsenal clear final hurdle. BBC Sport.
  20. ^ LD LOSE TO NOC, bbc.co.uk Local Election 2006.
  21. ^ Local Opposition to Stadium Defeated. Islington Gazette.
  22. ^ Stadium Update. anr.
  23. ^ Diaby grabs a Seat for Success. Arsenal.com.
  24. ^ Duke of Edinburgh opens Emirates Stadium. Arsenal.com. Retrieved on 26 October, 2006.
  25. ^ Queen to officially open Emirates Stadium. Arsenal.com.
  26. ^ Gunners Set Dennis Date. Sky Sports Online.
  27. ^ Bergkamp given rousing farewell. BBC Sport (2006-07-22). Retrieved on 23 August, 2007.
  28. ^ Brazil 3-0 Argentina. BBC Sport.
  29. ^ "Emirates Stadium to host first concert", Arsenal.com, 2007-12-03. Retrieved on 2007-12-03. 
  30. ^ The real capacity of Emirates Stadium. Arsenal.com (2006-08-16). Retrieved on 2007-12-24.
  31. ^ "Man Utd game attracts record attendance", Arsenal.com, 2007-11-05. Retrieved on 2007-12-24. 
  32. ^ Nearly two million through the Emirates gates. Arsenal.com. Retrieved on 24 May, 2007.
  33. ^ Arsenal secure stadium cash. BBC Sport website (February 23, 2004). Retrieved on 8 December, 2006.
  34. ^ Arsenal sell £260m bond to help finance stadium. Soccernet (July 13, 2006). Retrieved on 8 December, 2006.
  35. ^ Results for the Year ended 31 May 2006. Arsenal Football Club (2006). Retrieved on 8 December, 2006.
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  37. ^ Dominic O'Connell and Dan Box (August 28, 2005). Arsenal's goal with new bond. The Sunday Times. Retrieved on 8 December, 2006.
  38. ^ Arsenal Holdings financial results announced. Arsenal.com. Retrieved on 25 September, 2007.
  39. ^ How to get to the Emirates Stadium. Arsenal.com.

Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 234th day of the year (235th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Keith Edelman is Managing Director of Arsenal Football Club Keith Edelman graduated in 1971 from UMIST in 1971 with a BSc (Hons) in Management Sciences. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 218th day of the year (219th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 5th October (Serbia). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 146th day of the year (147th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 279th day of the year (280th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 269th day of the year (270th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 203rd day of the year (204th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 337th day of the year (338th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 337th day of the year (338th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 228th day of the year (229th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 358th day of the year (359th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 358th day of the year (359th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 194th day of the year (195th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 240th day of the year (241st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...

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Coordinates: 51°33′18.08″N, 0°6′30.50″W Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Flickr is a photo sharing website and web services suite, and an online community platform, which is generally considered an early example of a Web 2. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...

Arsenal Football Club (also known as Arsenal, The Arsenal or The Gunners) are an English professional football club based in Holloway, north London. ... For a list of all Arsenal players, major or minor, with a Wikipedia article, see Category:Arsenal F.C. players. ... This is a list of seasons played by Arsenal Football Club in English and European football, from 1893 (when Woolwich Arsenal joined the Football League) to the present day. ... This page details Arsenal Football Club records. ... The History of Arsenal Football Club between 1886 and 1966 covers their time from the clubs foundation, through the first two major periods of success (the 1930s, and the late 1940s and early 1950s, respectively) and the clubs subsequent decline to mid-table status in the 1960s. ... This article details the History of Arsenal Football Club from 1966 to the present day. ... Arsenal Reserves are the reserve team of Arsenal Football Club. ... Arsenal Ladies Football Club are an English womens football club affiliated with Arsenal FC. Founded in 1987, they are the most successful club in English womens football; the team have won the FA Womens Premier League nine times, the FA Womens Cup eight times, and the... The Manor Ground in Plumstead, south east London was a football stadium that was the home of Woolwich Arsenal (later renamed Arsenal) between 1888 & 1890, and 1893 & 1913. ... The Invicta Ground was a football stadium in Plumstead, south east London, that was the home of Royal Arsenal (today known simply as Arsenal) between 1890 and 1893. ... Arsenal Stadium was a football stadium in North London, the home ground of Arsenal Football Club between 6 September 1913 and 7 May 2006. ... Arsenal TV is a planned sports television channel devoted to coverage of the English football club Arsenal. ... Gilberto Silva (far left) and Ledley King (far right), the matchday captains of Arsenal and Tottenham Hotspur respectively, before the North London derby at White Hart Lane, on April 21, 2007. ... For other sports leagues which may be referred to by this name, see List of professional sports leagues. ... The Premier League 2007–08 season (known as the Barclays Premier League for sponsorship reasons) is the sixteenth since its establishment. ... This article is about the football stadium. ... For the football team see Upton Park FC The Boleyn Ground is the official name of Upton Park, the football stadium of West Ham United. ... The City of Manchester Stadium (also known as COMS or Eastlands) is a sports venue in Manchester, England. ... Craven Cottage is the name of a sports stadium in the Hammersmith and Fulham area that has been the 6. ... Ewood Park is a football stadium in Blackburn, Lancashire and the home of Blackburn Rovers football club. ... Fratton Park is the home stadium of Portsmouth F.C., and is situated in the English city-port of Portsmouth. ... Goodison Park is the home ground of Everton F.C. in Liverpool. ... The JJB Stadium is a sports stadium located within the Robin Park Complex in Newtown, Wigan, Greater Manchester. ... The Madejski Stadium is a football stadium in Reading, England. ... Old Trafford is an area of Trafford, Greater Manchester, England. ... // Pride Park Stadium is a football (soccer) stadium in the Pride Park business park on the outskirts of Derby city centre in the UK. It is owned by and is the home of Derby County F.C. The stadium holds 33,597 spectators. ... The Reebok Stadium is the home stadium of English Premier League football club Bolton Wanderers, and is located on the Middlebrook retail park in Horwich, near Bolton. ... The Riverside Stadium is a football stadium in Middlesbrough, England, which has been the home of Middlesbrough F.C. since it opened in 1995. ... St. ... St James Park is an all-seater stadium in Newcastle upon Tyne, England, and is the home of Newcastle United Football Club. ... This article is about the home stadium of Sunderland A.F.C.. For the home stadium of SL Benfica, see Estádio da Luz. ... Stamford Bridge is a football stadium on the border of Fulham and Chelsea, in the London Borough of Hammersmith and Fulham that is home to Chelsea Football Club. ... For other uses, see Villa Park (disambiguation). ... For the railway station of the same name, see White Hart Lane railway station. ...

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www.arsedup.com (566 words)
Tags: arsenal • arsenal news • Emirates Stadium • gooners • highbury • Thierry Henry
Flickr tags: arsenal • arsenal news • Emirates Stadium • gooners • highbury • Thierry Henry
Tags: arsenal • arsenal news • Emirates Stadium • gooners • gunners • highbury
Emirates Stadium - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2590 words)
Emirates Stadium was designed by HOK Sport (who also designed the Telstra Stadium, the new Wembley Stadium, and the Estádio da Luz) and constructed by Sir Robert McAlpine Ltd.
Due to UEFA regulations on stadium sponsors, during UEFA Champions League matches the stadium is not officially referred to as Emirates Stadium, as Emirates are not an official sponsor of the Champions League competition; other stadia, such as the Allianz Arena in Munich, have fallen foul of this rule before.
Arsenal tube station is the closest for the northern portion of the stadium.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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