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Encyclopedia > Emigration
A memorial statue in Hanko, Finland, commemorating the thousands of emigrants who left the country to start a new life in the United States
A memorial statue in Hanko, Finland, commemorating the thousands of emigrants who left the country to start a new life in the United States

Emigration is the act and the phenomenon of leaving one's native country or region to settle in another. It is the same as immigration but from the perspective of the country of origin. Human movement before the establishment of state boundaries or within one state, is termed migration. There are many reasons why people might choose to emigrate. Some are for political or economic reasons, or for personal reasons like finding a spouse while visiting another country and emigrating to be with them. Many older people living in rich nations with cold climates will choose to move to warmer climates when they retire. Image File history File links Emigmonument. ... Image File history File links Emigmonument. ... Hanko (IPA: ) (Hangö in Swedish, or Гангут in Russian), is a small bilingual port city on the south coast of Finland, 130 km west of Helsinki. ... Finnish Americans are Americans of Finnish descent, who currently number at about 700,000. ... A family of Russian settlers in the Caucasus region, ca. ... For other uses, see State (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Border (disambiguation). ... Net migration rates for 2006: positive (blue), negative (orange) and stable (green). ... For other uses, see Politics (disambiguation). ... Face-to-face trading interactions on the New York Stock Exchange trading floor. ... The term spouse refers to either partner in marriage, generally called a husband or wife, depending on gender. ...


Many political or economic emigrants move together with their families toward new regions or new countries where they hope to find peace or job opportunities not available to them in their original location. Throughout history a large number of emigrants return to their homelands, often after they have earned sufficient money in the other country. Sometimes these emigrants move to countries with big cultural differences and will always feel as guests in their destinations, and preserve their original culture, traditions and language, sometimes transmitting them to their children. The conflict between the native and the newer culture may easily create social contrasts, generally resulting in an uncomfortable situation for the "foreigners", who have to understand legal and social systems sometimes new and strange to them. Often, communities of emigrants grow up in the destination areas. For other uses, see Culture (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Tradition (disambiguation). ... A community is a social group of organisms sharing an environment, normally with shared interests. ...


Emigration had a profound influence on the world in the 19th and the 20th century, when hundreds of thousands of poor families left Europe for the United States, Canada, Brazil, Argentina, Colombia, Australia and New Zealand. For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ...


Even though definitions may be vague and vary somewhat, emigration/immigration should not be confused with the phenomenon of involuntary migration, such as instances of population transfer or ethnic cleansing. Forced migration refers to the coerced movement of a person or persons away from their home or home region. ... Population transfer is a term referring to a policy by which a state, or international authority, forces the movement of a large group of people out of a region, most frequently on the basis of their ethnicity or religion. ... Ethnic cleansing refers to various policies or practices aimed at the displacement of an ethnic group from a particular territory in order to create a supposedly ethnically pure society. ...


Motives to migrate can be either incentives attracting people away, known as pull factors, or circumstances encouraging a person to leave, known as push factors, for example: Push factors or pull factors are factors in which would make one individual want to move out of certain areas (called push factors) and factors that would make one person attracted to another area (called pull factors). ... Push factors or pull factors are factors in which would make one individual want to move out of certain areas (called push factors) and factors that would make one person attracted to another area (called pull factors). ...


Push factors

These factors, excepting disagreement with politics and discontent with natives, generally do not affect people in developed countries; even a natural disaster is unlikely to cause out-migration. For other uses, see War (disambiguation). ... For other uses of War, see War (disambiguation). ... <nowiki>Insert non-formatted text hereBold text</nowiki>A famine is a social and economic crisis that is commonly accompanied by widespread malnutrition, starvation, epidemic and increased mortality. ... Fields outside Benambra, Victoria, Australia suffering from drought conditions A drought is an extended period of months or years when a region notes a deficiency in its water supply. ... This article is about the medical term. ... A boy from an East Cipinang trash dump slum in Jakarta, Indonesia shows what he found. ... Fundamentalism is a movement to maintain strict adherence to founding principles. ... Mount Pinatubo eruption, 1991 A natural disaster is the consequence of a natural hazard (e. ... Harassment refers to a wide spectrum of offensive behavior. ... Bullying is the act of intentionally causing harm to others through verbal harassment, physical assault, or other more subtle methods of coercion such as manipulation. ... Abuser redirects here. ... World map indicating Human Development Index (as of 2004). ...


See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
Emigration - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (450 words)
Emigration is the act and the phenomenon of leaving one's native country to settle abroad.
Emigration had a profound influence on the world in the 19th and the 20th century, when hundreds of thousands of poor families left Europe for the United States, Canada, Brazil, Argentina, and Australia.
Even though definitions may be vague and vary somewhat, emigration/immigration should not be confused with the phenomenon of involuntary migration, such as instances of population transfer or ethnic cleansing.
Emigration: Departure,Crossing and Arrival (5767 words)
Lord Monteagle, in particular, believed that in emigration lay the solution of Ireland's population problem, and the Monteagle Papers contain a number of letters from grateful emigrants; he was also responsible for setting up the Select Committee of the House of Lords on Colonization, that is, emigration, in 1847.
Emigration began to be used as an alternative to eviction, and Sir Robert Gore Booth, a resident landlord, was accused by Mr.
Emigration also saved money; the cost of emigrating a pauper was generally about half the cost of maintaining him in the work-house for one year, and once the ship had sailed the destitute were effectually got rid of, for they could return only with immense difficulty.
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