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Encyclopedia > Emerson College

Emerson College

The Shield of Emerson College
Motto Bringing Innovation to Communication and the Arts
Established 1880
Type Private
Endowment $86,138,325
President Jacqueline Liebergott
Faculty 250
Undergraduates 2,900
Postgraduates 900
Location Boston, Mass., USA
Address 120 Boylston, Boston, MA 02116-4624
Campus Urban
Colors Purple and Gold
Mascot Lions
Affiliations ProArts Consortium, New England Association of Schools and Colleges
Website http://www.emerson.edu/

Emerson College was founded in 1880 by Charles Wesley Emerson as a "school of oratory," in Boston, Massachusetts. Emerson's main campus is located near the Boston Common, at the gateway to the Theatre District; it also maintains buildings in Los Angeles and the town of Well, Netherlands. Emerson owns and operates Boston's Cutler Majestic Theatre, and in April 2005, acquired the Paramount Theatre (Boston). Image File history File links Emerson Colleges Shield File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... Year 1880 (MDCCCLXXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... Jacqueline Liebergott, along with the rest of the administrative branch of the college, is widely protested by students and faculty alike. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... “Boston” redirects here. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... The Professional Arts Consortium (ProArts) is an association of six Boston area institutions of higher education with emphsis to visual and performing arts. ... Accredition organization in New England. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Year 1880 (MDCCCLXXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Charles Wesley Emerson (1837 - 1908) was the founder and first president of Emerson College in Boston, Massachusetts. ... “Boston” redirects here. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Image:Boston common Boston Massachusetts USA.jpg Boston Common in 2005, with the State House looming in the background 1890 Map of Boston Common and the adjacent Public Garden View of the Water Celebration, on Boston Common, October 25th 1848 Boston Common Engraving For the television series, see Boston Common... Nickname: Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates: , State County Settled 1781 Incorporated April 4, 1850 Government  - Type Mayor-Council  - Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa  - City Attorney Rocky Delgadillo  - Governing body City Council Area  - City  498. ... Well is a small town of about 1500 in the province of Limburg in the southern part of the Netherlands. ... The Cutler Majestic Theatre at Emerson College, in Boston, Massachusetts, is a 1903 Beaux Arts style opera house, designed by the architect John Galen Howard. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Paramount Theatre is a Boston, Massachusetts theatre located on Washington Street, between Avery and West Streets. ...


Emerson claims to be "the only comprehensive college or university in America dedicated exclusively to communication and the arts in a liberal arts context." It offers over 37 degree programs in the Arts and Communication. The college is accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges, Inc. In the history of education, the seven liberal arts comprise two groups of studies, the trivium and the quadrivium. ... Accredition organization in New England. ...

Contents

Origins

Charles Wesley Emerson founded the Boston Conservatory of Elocution, Oratory, and Dramatic Art in 1880, a year after Boston College closed the School of Oratory. Classes were held at 13 Pemberton Square in Boston. Ten students enrolled in the conservatory's first class. The following year, the conservatory changed its name to the "Monroe Conservatory of Oratory," in honor of Charles Emerson's teacher at Boston University's School of Oratory, Professor Lewis B. Monrore. In 1890, the name changed again to "Emerson College of Oratory" and was later shortened to Emerson College in 1939. [1] Charles Wesley Emerson (1837 - 1908) was the founder and first president of Emerson College in Boston, Massachusetts. ... Year 1880 (MDCCCLXXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... For similarly-named academic institutions, see Boston (disambiguation)#Education. ... Nickname: City on the Hill, Beantown, The Hub (of the Universe)1, Athens of America, The Cradle of Revolution, Puritan City, Americas Walking City Location in Massachusetts, USA Counties Suffolk County Mayor Thomas M. Menino(D) Area    - City 232. ... Charles Wesley Emerson (1837 - 1908) was the founder and first president of Emerson College in Boston, Massachusetts. ... For similarly-named academic institutions, see Boston (disambiguation). ... Year 1890 (MDCCCXC) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar). ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Early expansion and growth

The college expanded and rented space at 36 Bromfield Street, and moved to Odd Fellows Hall on Berkeley and Tremont Streets in the South End of Boston. With the new location, the college's first library was established in 1892. Henry Southwick, a faculty member and graduate, became a financial partner for the college with Emerson. This financial partnership led to the purchase of the Boston School of Oratory from Moses T. Brown in 1894. Odd Fellows Hall can refer to: Odd Fellows Hall (Eureka, California) Odd Fellows Hall (La Grange, California) Odd Fellows Hall (Santa Ana, California) Independent Order Of Odd Fellows Hall, in Ashton, Idaho Montepelier Odd Fellows Hall, in Montepelier, Idaho Odd Fellows Hall (Salmon, Idaho) Salmon Odd Fellows Hall, Idaho, also... The South End is a neighborhood in Boston, Massachusetts. ... Nickname: City on the Hill, Beantown, The Hub (of the Universe)1, Athens of America, The Cradle of Revolution, Puritan City, Americas Walking City Location in Massachusetts, USA Counties Suffolk County Mayor Thomas M. Menino(D) Area    - City 232. ... 1892 (MDCCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1894 (MDCCCXCIV) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ...


At the turn of the century, faculty members Henry and Jessie Southwick and William H. Kenney purchased the college from Dr. Emerson. Soon after, the college rented a new location in Chickering Hall.


Dr. Emerson retired in 1903 and William J. Rolfe, a Shakespearean scholar and actor, was named the second President of Emerson College of Oratory. His service as president lasted until his retirement in 1908. 1900 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Friday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... William Shakespeare—born April 1564; baptised April 26, 1564; died April 23, 1616 (O.S.), May 3, 1616 (N.S.)—has a reputation as the greatest of all writers in English. ... A scholar is either a student or someone who has achieved a mastery of some academic discipline, perhaps receiving financial support through a scholarship. ... For other uses, see Actor (disambiguation). ... 1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ...


As the Student Government Association of the college held its first meeting in 1908, the third president, Henry Lawrence Southwick, of the college was inaugurated. He introduced the study of acting and stagecraft into the college curriculum. 1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ...


During his tenure, the college rented a new building at 30 Huntington Avenue. The college was also granted the right to award Bachelor of Literary Interpretation (B.L.I.) degrees. In addition, Emerson became the first with a collegiate level program in Children's Theatre. The school also held its first course in Journalism in 1924. Unprofessional theater of any type performed by children. ... Journalism is a discipline of gathering, writing and reporting news, and more broadly it includes the process of editing and presenting the news articles. ... Year 1924 (MCMXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The college purchased its first piece of real estate with a new women's dormitory building at 373 Commonwealth Ave. and started intramural sports in 1931 with the organization of volleyball games. The term intramural is most commonly associated with sports teams organized within a school. ... Year 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1931 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the ball used in this sport, see Volleyball (ball). ...


Administrative restructuring

In 1930, full charge and control of the College was transferred to the Board of Trustees by William H. Kenney, Henry Lawrence Southwick, and Jessie Southwick. Year 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display 1930 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


When Harry Seymour Ross was appointed the fourth president of Emerson College in 1931, the first course in radio broadcasting was taught by the program director of WEEI, a Boston AM radio station. Year 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1931 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Radio broadcasting can be done via cable FM, local wire networks, satellite and the Internet. ... The program director (spelt programme director in many countries) is the person who decides what will be aired on a television or radio station. ... WEEI is a sports radio station in Boston, Massachusetts that broadcasts on 850 kHz from a transmitter in Needham, Massachusetts. ... Nickname: City on the Hill, Beantown, The Hub (of the Universe)1, Athens of America, The Cradle of Revolution, Puritan City, Americas Walking City Location in Massachusetts, USA Counties Suffolk County Mayor Thomas M. Menino(D) Area    - City 232. ...


Purchase of the buildings at 130 Beacon Street and 128 Beacon Street a year later started the first presence of Emerson College in Boston's Back Bay. Emerson kept ownership of these buildings until the summer of 2003. Nickname: City on the Hill, Beantown, The Hub (of the Universe)1, Athens of America, The Cradle of Revolution, Puritan City, Americas Walking City Location in Massachusetts, USA Counties Suffolk County Mayor Thomas M. Menino(D) Area    - City 232. ... Aerial view of Back Bay, Boston including the Charles River, Prudential Center and John Hancock Tower Back Bay is an officially recognized neighborhood of Boston, Massachusetts. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In the following years, a professional training program in Speech Pathology (1935) and the first undergraduate program in broadcasting and broadcast journalism (1937), were offered for the first time in the United States. 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar). ... Year 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Also, construction of a theater behind 128-130 Beacon was started, and the institution is granted the right to award degrees in a Master of Arts. A Master of Arts is a postgraduate academic masters degree awarded by universities in North America and the United Kingdom (excluding the ancient universities of Scotland and Oxbridge. ...


Post-war era

Between the G.I. Bill of Rights and the Broadcasting curriculum, the student body moved from a primarily female population to an equally balanced population of men and women. With the appointment of Boylston Green, the first president with no prior association with college, Green put his background as a dean of students into extra-curricular activities, including the establishment of a student activities fee. These efforts led to the first publication of Emerson's student newspaper, The Berkeley Beacon in 1947. It is still in production today. The G. I. Bill of Rights or Servicemens Readjustment Act of 1944 provided for college or vocational education for returning World War II veterans as well as one-year of unemployment compensation. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Emerson also saw large development in its broadcasting program. A 1-year certificate of Broadcasting was offered via evening classes. The FCC awarded the college a 10 watt license in 1949. WERS, the first educational FM radio station in New England, was born. The station's power was increased to 300 watts three years later, and 18,000 watts by 1953. The FCCs official seal. ... Year 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... WERS (89. ... The abbreviations FM, Fm, and fm may refer to: Electrical engineering Frequency modulation (FM) and its most common applications: FM broadcasting, used primarily to broadcast music and speech at VHF frequencies FM synthesis, a sound-generation technique popularized by early digital synthesizers Science Femtometre (fm), an SI measure of length... A radio station is an audio (sound) broadcasting service, traditionally broadcast through the air as radio waves (a form of electromagnetic radiation) from a transmitter to an antenna and a thus to a receiving device. ... This article is about the region in the United States of America. ... Year 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


At the start of the decade, Emerson College became a member of the New England Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools, an accreditation association for schools and colleges in New England. Founded in 1885, the New England Association of Schools & Colleges, Inc. ...


President Boylston Green eventually retired, and Godfrey Dewey served as Acting President until 1951. At that time, Jonathon French was appointed as Acting President, and he became President in December of that year, despite never being inaugurated. Year 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... An inauguration is a ceremony of formal investiture whereby an individual assumes an office or position of authority or power. ...


Financial crisis of 1952

The college suffered from a severe financial crisis in 1952 and sought $50,000 in emergency funding. At the time, the Chairman of the Corporation stated that without these funds, the college had three alternatives: Go broke, sell out, or join up with another institution. Led by the National Alumni Council, a grassroots campaign was launched to improve the financial situation of the college. The efforts led to the resignation of the Council of Trustees, which was replaced mostly by alumni. The new board elected a former Emerson history professor, S. Justus McKinley, as the 5th President of Emerson College. Year 1952 (MCMLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A grassroots political movement is one driven by the constituents of a community. ...


Rising from financial trouble

Pulling out of Financial crisis, the college started to develop its programs with new facilities.


In 1953, Emerson opened The Robbins Speech and Hearing Clinic at 145 Beacon Street, furthering the Communication Sciences and Disorders program. A television studio was dedicated at 130 Beacon in 1954 with its first closed circuit TV program the following year as WERS-TV. The first annual spring musical Lady in the Dark by Moss Hart was presented. Year 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Lady in the Dark was a Broadway musical written by Kurt Weill (music), Ira Gershwin (lyrics), and Moss Hart (book and direction). ... Moss Hart (October 24, 1904 – December 20, 1961) was an American playwright and director of plays and musical theater. ...


The school was authorized to grant Bachelors and Masters of Science in Speech, honorary degrees and Bachelor of Music in conjunction with the Longy School of Music. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The Longy School of Music, Cambridge, Massachusetts. ...


Back Bay as Emerson's campus

As the 1960s started, the building at 373 Commonwealth Avenue was sold to purchase a dormitory at 100 Beacon Street to accommodate an enrollment of 609 undergraduate and 29 graduate students. A year later, a building at 150 Beacon Street was obtained for dorms, a dining hall, and administrative offices. With major gifts from Elisabeth Abbot Smith and J.F. Buzzard, the Library moved from the fourth floor of 130 Beacon Street into its own building at 303 Berkeley Street. In 1964, two buildings were purchased by the college: 96 Beacon Street, which became the student union building, and 132-134 Beacon Street, which became a dormitory. The 1960s decade refers to the years from 1960 to 1969, inclusive. ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ...


Despite almost moving to Lawrence, Massachusetts in the 1980s (see below), The campus remained primarily in Back Bay until the late 1990s.   Settled: 1655 â€“ Incorporated: 1847 Zip Code(s): 01840 â€“ Area Code(s): 351 / 978 Official website: http://www. ... The 1980s refers to the years from 1980 to 1989. ... For the band, see 1990s (band). ...


In 1967, Richard Chapin, former Dean of the Harvard Business School was inaugurated as the seventh president of Emerson College. Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... Harvard Business School, officially named the Harvard Business School: George F. Baker Foundation, and also known as HBS, is one of the graduate schools of Harvard University. ...


An Academic planning committee approved a new course of study for general education requirements. The first level of this program replaced the college-wide requirements with a two-year interdisciplinary course of study and electives. In order to accommodate this new program, the building at 67-69 Brimmer Street was purchased. The Institute of Interdisplainary Studies was born. A year later (1972), the college gained authorization to grant BS, BFA, and MFA degrees. Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Bachelor of Fine Arts, usually abbreviated BFA, is the standard undergraduate degree for students seeking a professional education in the visual or performing arts. ... In the United States, a Master of Fine Arts (MFA) is a terminal graduate degree in an area of visual, plastic, literary or performing arts typically requiring two to three years of study beyond the bachelor level. ...


Relocation of Emerson College

Though Emerson College has moved to various locations within the city of Boston, the appointment of Allen E. Koenig (the ninth president of Emerson College) almost took the college outside of Boston.


As soon as he was inaugurated, Koenig initiated talks with Pine Manor College in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts to relocate Emerson and merge the two schools. However, an agreement was never reached and the plan was dropped entirely. Pine Manor College, or PMC, is a private, womens liberal arts college located in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts. ... Boston College and the Chestnut Hill Reservoir Located 6 miles west of Boston, Chestnut Hill is a wealthy suburb notable for its stately old houses, scenic landscape and the historic campus of Boston College. ...


At the start of the 1980s, Koenig made a proposal to the Board of Trustees for a major renovation of the college's facilities. The plan allowed for: New performance spaces, classrooms, and faculty offices at Brimmer Street; Remodeling the Library and Learning Resources Center at 150 Beacon; remodeling the 303 Berkely building for the Humanities and Social Sciences Division; A new radio/audio complex at 126 Beacon; and construction for two new television studios behind 130 Beacon. The 1980s refers to the years from 1980 to 1989. ...


In 1984, 335 Commonwealth Avenue was purchased for Administration and the Communication Studies department. The college also received the authorization to grant MFA degrees in Creative Writing. This article is about the year. ... In the United States, a Master of Fine Arts (MFA) is a terminal graduate degree in an area of visual, plastic, literary or performing arts typically requiring two to three years of study beyond the bachelor level. ...


Despite the newly purchased Commonwealth Avenue buildings, Lawrence, Massachusetts was soon chosen as a new location for Emerson College, about 44.5 km (27 mi) away from Boston. The mayor of Lawrence stated that the land would be taken by eminent domain and sold to Emerson with a token payment of $100. However, the five private landowners disagreed with this arrangement and took the case to court. Three years later in 1988, Judge John Forte ruled in favor of Emerson College and the City of Lawrence. The river-front site of Lawrence was proposed as the new campus. However, as real estate values in Boston dropped and the costs of constructing a new campus increased, the plans were put on hold and eventually abandoned when Koenig resigned as president in 1989.   Settled: 1655 â€“ Incorporated: 1847 Zip Code(s): 01840 â€“ Area Code(s): 351 / 978 Official website: http://www. ... “km” redirects here. ... “Miles” redirects here. ... Nickname: City on the Hill, Beantown, The Hub (of the Universe)1, Athens of America, The Cradle of Revolution, Puritan City, Americas Walking City Location in Massachusetts, USA Counties Suffolk County Mayor Thomas M. Menino(D) Area    - City 232. ... Eminent domain (United States), compulsory purchase (United Kingdom, New Zealand, Republic of Ireland), resumption/compulsory acquisition (Australia) or expropriation (Canada, South Africa) in common law legal systems is the inherent power of the state to seize a citizens private property, expropriate property, or rights in property, without the owner... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ...


Regardless of the failed relocation attempt, the college bought a building at 0 Marlborough Street (also known as 6 Arlington Street) in 1988 for dormitories and a dining hall. Also, Kasteel Well in the Netherlands was purchased and became the home of Emerson's overseas program (now called External Programs). Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... Castle Well The castle was founded in the fourteenth century. ...


Rebirth

John Zacharis became the tenth president of Emerson College and faced a college fractured by the failed move to Lawrence, Massachusetts. Over the course of two years, he moved to restore unity to the campus by purchasing a building at 180 Tremont, now called the Ansin Building. This purchase started a transition from Back Bay to the Boston Theatre District. Sadly, Zacharis went on medical leave in 1992 and died of leukemia shortly after. Aerial view of Back Bay, Boston including the Charles River, Prudential Center and John Hancock Tower Back Bay is an officially recognized neighborhood of Boston, Massachusetts. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ...


During Zacharis' leave, Jacqueline Weis Liebergott was appointed as the Acting President. A year later, Liebergott was inaugurated and became the first female president of the college. Shortly after, she submitted a 10-year master plan to the Boston Redevelopment Authority which involved moving the college to the Theatre District (also known at that time as the Combat Zone). Jacqueline Liebergott, along with the rest of the administrative branch of the college, is widely protested by students and faculty alike. ... The Boston Redevelopment Authority is a planning and development agency in Boston. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


In 1994, a planning document of the college's future plans was drafted and public hearings were held. The college also extended health care benefits to domestic partners of gay and lesbian faculty, administration and staff. Under the plan, dental coverage and tuition waivers were also available. Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ...


1994 was also the year the college started to go online with a $100,000 gift from Mrs. Mary E. Tufte. Under the contribution, The Tufte Lab was placed on the 4th floor of the Ansin Building and dedicated in Mrs. Tufte's honor. The lab was the catalyst for a telecommunications / fiber optic network installation, which was completed in October 1995. Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... Fiber Optic strands An optical fiber in American English or fibre in British English is a transparent thin fiber for transmitting light. ... 1995 was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In addition, the college announced the purchase and restoration of The Little Building (Boston) (1994) across the street from the Ansin Building and next to Emerson's Majestic Theatre. Restoration was completed on the façades of the college's buildings at 126, 128, 130, 132-134, 168 Beacon Street, and 21 Commonwealth Avenue. Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... The Cutler Majestic Theatre at Emerson College, in Boston, Massachusetts, is a 1903 Beaux Arts style opera house, designed by the architect John Galen Howard. ...


1996 - Present

In the mid-90s Emerson purchased the Walker Building (Boston) at 120 Boylston. The building currently hosts the school's Department of Television, Radio, Film Production department, Institutional Advancement (Alumni and Development) department, Human Resources department and Government and Community Relations department. It also contains the school's library and many of its classrooms.


In 2003 the Tufte Performance Production Center (PPC) at 10 Boylston Place opened. The 11-story steel and glass building houses the Department of Performing Arts and includes two theaters (The Semel Theatre and The Greene Theatre), two television studios, make up and costume labs, faculty offices and an exhibition area. Also that year the Cutler Majestic Theatre finished renovations and re-opened as one of the mainstages of Emerson Stage productions. The Cutler Majestic Theatre at Emerson College, in Boston, Massachusetts, is a 1903 Beaux Arts style opera house, designed by the architect John Galen Howard. ...


In 2004 it was announced that the buildings at 96, 100 and 132 Beacon had been sold and would be gone by the Fall 2006 semester.


Construction of a new 14-story residence hall at 150 Boylston Street began in March 2004 and was completed in September 2006 in time for the new school year. It is the first entirely new residence hall in Emerson's history. The facility includes residential suites, athletic facilities, offices and meeting rooms for student organizations, informal gathering places for off-campus students, space for small-group rehearsals and performances and dining facilities.


In 2005 the school purchased the historic Paramount Theatre (Boston) off Washington Street with the plans to build a new complex at the site. The complex will include a 550-seat main stage theater inside the existing Paramount Theater and a 125-seat black box theater in an adjacent new building. Plans also include a 200-seat film screening room, eight rehearsal studios ranging from 700 to 1,900 square feet, six smaller rehearsal spaces, a sound stage for film students and a new scene shop. In fall 2006, the school acquired the Colonial Theatre adjacent to the Little Building, as it continues to consolidate its campus holdings on the south side of Boston Common. Paramount Theatre is a Boston, Massachusetts theatre located on Washington Street, between Avery and West Streets. ... A scene shop is a special workshop in many medium or large theaters. ...


On April 3, 2006, a three-ton scaffolding platform on the east side of the 150 Boylston construction project fell to the street below, killing two construction workers and one motorist. The scaffolding was attached to the east side of the building and was in the process of being removed. Investigators found that the construction workers did not properly secure the scaffolding to a crane while dismantling the apparatus, causing the platform to be unstable and resulting in the accident. Construction was stopped for over a week to allow investigators to determine the cause of the accident, but resumed in time to meet the project's August 2006 deadline. [2] is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In May of 2006, the Campus Center in the Piano Row building was named the Max Mutchnick Campus Center after a major gift from the 1987 graduate and co-creator of Will & Grace. In summer 2006, the school acquired the Colonial Theatre building adjacent to the Little Building. Its upper stories will be converted to dormitory space. With the addition of dorm space here and at the Paramount Theatre, the school hopes to accommodate up to 75 percent of its students in on-campus housing by the year 2010. Jason Nidorf Mutchnick (born 11 November 1965 in Chicago, Illinois) is an American television producer. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... Will & Grace is a popular Emmy Award winning and Golden Globe nominated American television sitcom that was originally broadcast from 1998 to 2006. ...


Campus

In recent years, Emerson College has moved from Boston's Back Bay neighborhood to the theatre district of Boston in the south-east corner of the Boston Common. In addition to the buildings listed below, Emerson College owns and runs the Cutler Majestic Theatre. Back Bay redirects here. ... Image:Boston common Boston Massachusetts USA.jpg Boston Common in 2005, with the State House looming in the background 1890 Map of Boston Common and the adjacent Public Garden View of the Water Celebration, on Boston Common, October 25th 1848 Boston Common Engraving For the television series, see Boston Common... The Cutler Majestic Theatre at Emerson College, in Boston, Massachusetts, is a 1903 Beaux Arts style opera house, designed by the architect John Galen Howard. ...


Non-Residence Hall Buildings

The Ansin Building (180 Tremont Street)

Once owned by the Boston Edison Company, the Ansin Building was purchased by Emerson in 1992. The building stands 14 stories high and contains all Visual & Media Arts (VMA) labs and facilities, offices for all VMA and Writing, Literature & Publishing (WLP) departments, and home of both WERS and WECB. It also contains the Tufte and 3D computer labs, Digital Production labs, and the Media Services center. NSTAR (NYSE: NST) is a private utility company that provides retail electricity and natural gas to customers in eastern and central Massachusetts. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... WERS (89. ... Formed over 60 years ago, WECB maintains the status of a free-form and non-commercial carrier current radio station at Emerson College in Boston, Massachusetts. ...


Computer Labs: 3D Lab (3DL), Tufte Lab, Writing & Publishing Lab (WPL), XML (Opened Fall 2006)
Production Labs/Facilities: Digital Production Labs 1 & 2 (DPL1, DPL2), Video Editing Lab (VEL), Steenbeck Lab Steenbeck film editing machine rollers Steenbeck is a brand name that has become synonymous with a type of flatbed film editing suite. ...


216 Tremont Street

A former bank building at 216 Tremont Street. Houses the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders and its clinic for hearing-impaired children. Also located here are the offices of the Registrar, Student Financial Services, Health Services, Career Services, the Counseling Center and the International Student Center. The Bill Bordy Theater and Auditorium on the ground floor of 216 is used for lectures, performances, performance classes and special events.


Computer Labs: Communication Sciences and Disorders Lab (CSD)


The Walker Building (120 Boylston Street)

Home to classrooms, offices to various non-academic and academic departments, and five computer labs, and the Emerson Library. The fifth and sixth floors are connected to the fourth and fifth floors of the Tufte building.


Computer Labs: Advanced Projects Lab (APL), Advanced Teaching Lab (ATL), Communication & Marketing Labs (CML) 1, 2, and Journalism Lab (JRL)
Production Facilities: Newsroom TV Studio, Newsroom Editing Labs
Academic Facilities: Library


The Tufte Performance Production Center (10 Boylston Place)

Opened in the fall of 2003, the 11-story building is home to two television studios, two performing art theaters, the Huret and Spector Gallery, set and costume studios, classrooms, and the offices of the Department of Performing Arts. The fifth and sixth floors of the building are connected to the fourth and fifth floors of the Walker Building.


Computer Labs: CAD Lab
Performance Theaters & Facilities: Semel Theatre, The Kermit and Elinore Greene Theater, The Bobbi Brown and Steven Plofker Design Technology and Makeup Studio
Television Studio & Facilities: Di Bona Television Studio & Control Room, Studio B & Control Room “CAD” redirects here. ... Bobbi Brown graduated from Emerson College in Boston with a degree in theatrical makeup. ... Vin Di Bona (1944) is a television producer for many American television shows such as Americas Funniest Home Videos and Entertainment Tonight. ...


Piano Row & Max Mutchnick Campus Center (150 Boylston Street)

The building replaces residence hall and student union buildings on Beacon and Arlington streets with most offices relocating to the new building.


With fourteen floors, 150 Boylston includes a gymnasium, twelve floors of dormitories, food court (but not a full-serve cafeteria), meeting/performance spaces, and various administrative offices including Student Life offices.


The student organization and activities spaces are named the Max Mutchnick Campus Center in recognition of a major gift from Mutchnick, a 1987 Emerson graduate and co-creator and executive producer of the Will & Grace television sitcom.


The building's inception generated a good deal of controversy within the Emerson community, largely due to its appropriation of funding. As an attempt to counteract negative press about the school's athletics program (Emerson was ranked last in sports by the Princeton Review, placing just behind Sarah Lawrence College) the administration chose to build an athletics center, including a basketball court and a weight room, in the new campus center. This angered many of Emerson's current students, who felt that the space and funds could have been better spent building performing arts spaces or buying new equipment for the film and video programs. The Princeton Review (TPR) is a for-profit U.S. company that offers private instruction and tutoring for standardized achievement tests, in particular those offered by the Educational Testing Service (ETS), such as the SAT, GRE, LSAT, GMAT, and MCAT. The company was founded in 1982 and is based in...


The Cutler Majestic Theatre

Built originally in 1903, the Majestic Theatre was one of the first in Boston to be pre-lit for electricity, shown by its use of over 4500 light bulbs throughout the building. In the 1920s it converted to vaudeville, straying from its original purpose as an opera house. The 1950s then brought motion pictures to the Majestic, and not long after that the theatre fell into incredible disrepair. Emerson purchased the theatre in 1983, and began extensive renovations on the building. The theatre is a member of the national League of Historic Theatres. The Cutler Majestic Theatre at Emerson College, in Boston, Massachusetts, is a 1903 Beaux Arts style opera house, designed by the architect John Galen Howard. ...


The theatre is home to 2-3 Emerson Stage productions each year, various speaking events, Family Weekend, Open House, and the annual EVVY Awards, Emerson's own award show and the largest student-run live television production in the country.


Residence Halls

There are two residence hall buildings which house over 1,310 students. These residences are primarily for new freshman students, but also house a few other undergraduate students. All residence halls are coed by room and feature laundry services among other amenities.


In the summer of 2006, the building at 150 Boylston Street (Piano Row) replaced the residence buildings at 6 Arlington, 100 and 132-134 Beacon Street. Though the three buildings were sold, the total housing capacity was raised by over 100 students. More residence halls are either in planning stages and will further increase housing capacity.


The Little Building (80 Boylston Street)

In addition to housing a number of administrative offices on the ground floor, the Little Building was once an office and residential space before Emerson College purchased the building in 1994 and opened for use in September 1995.


The residence hall houses over 750 students in ten floors of the twelve story building and contains the college's only cafeteria, a workout center in its basement and The Cabaret, a space in the basement used for performances with a maximum capacity of 150 people.


The housing section of the building is comprised of singles, doubles, triples, two quads, and suites of between 4 and 6 people made up of various configurations of singles and doubles.


Piano Row (150 Boylston Street)

Opened in September 2006, 150 Boylston (located on the stretch of Boylston St. referred to as "Piano Row") is a dormitory and campus center. The building houses 560 students on the top 12 floors.


Due to its location, the building itself is often referred to as "Piano Row." In the building's early days, many administrators attempted to popularize the nickname "The Max," but the moniker never caught on. Contrastingly, many students have adopted a nicknames far less popular with the administration, such as "The Gay Spaceship" (a reference to the building's bizarre interior) and "Death Row" (see below).


The residence floors consist of seven suites per floor. Each suite block consists of three two-person bedrooms and one shared bathroom and living room for the block. In addition, each floor has at least one residence assistant room with either a common room or an additional residence assistant bedroom every other floor.


Piano Row is also home to the Max Mutchnick Campus Center and the Piano Row Gymnasium. The former features several conference, meeting, and rehearsal spaces open to all students, offices for Student Life and the Student Government Association, and storage for any student organization that requires it. The Gymnasium is an NCAA regulation-size basketball court, with several sets of bleachers and a sky box equipped for events, as well as a workout and fitness center for athletes. Also housing new offices for the Athletics Department, it is Emerson College's first-ever indoor athletic facility. Jason Nidorf Mutchnick (born 11 November 1965 in Chicago, Illinois) is an American television producer. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ...


The building also features a diner, which offers several made-to-order servings as well as convenience items, with indoor seating overlooking the Boston Common. Image:Boston common Boston Massachusetts USA.jpg Boston Common in 2005, with the State House looming in the background 1890 Map of Boston Common and the adjacent Public Garden View of the Water Celebration, on Boston Common, October 25th 1848 Boston Common Engraving For the television series, see Boston Common...


During the construction of the building, a 20,000 pound scaffolding collapsed and left three people dead. The building has been nicknamed "Death Row" by some students, partly due to the fact that the collapse occurred when workers where dismantling the scaffolding around the thirteenth floor. The building was dedicated to Michael Tsan Ty, 28, who was crushed in his car, and two construction workers, Robert E. Beane, 41, and Romildo Silva, 27. Boston Globe Article Many of Emerson's more superstitious students and faculty members still believe the building to be haunted to this day. In many buildings in the U.S. and Canada, there is no thirteenth floor. ...


Future buildings

Paramount Center Arts/Residence Complex

In 2005, Emerson College, the City of Boston, the Boston arts community, and Millennium Partners announced plans to renovate the Paramount Theatre. The project will renovate the 180,000-square-foot property and add a 450 seat and 125 seat theatre, scene shop, support spaces, and a residence hall for 250 students. The renovations are expected to be completed by Fall 2008. Paramount Theatre is a Boston, Massachusetts theatre located on Washington Street, between Avery and West Streets. ...


The Colonial Building (100 Boylston)

On February 24, 2006, Emerson college announced plans to purchase the Colonial Building on 100 Boylston Street, and the purchase was completed in late summer 2006. The building's top nine floors will be converted to residence halls with possible plans to extend certain offices and facilities such as the school library. is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Academic Programs

Acting is the work of an actor or actress, which is a person in theatre, television, film, or any other storytelling medium who tells the story by portraying a character and, usually, speaking or singing the written text or play. ... The Bachelor of Fine Arts, usually abbreviated BFA, is the standard undergraduate degree for students seeking a professional education in the visual or performing arts. ... Musical theater (or theatre) is a form of theatre combining music, songs, dance, and spoken dialogue. ... The Bachelor of Fine Arts, usually abbreviated BFA, is the standard undergraduate degree for students seeking a professional education in the visual or performing arts. ... The Bachelor of Fine Arts, usually abbreviated BFA, is the standard undergraduate degree for students seeking a professional education in the visual or performing arts. ... The Bachelor of Fine Arts, usually abbreviated BFA, is the standard undergraduate degree for students seeking a professional education in the visual or performing arts. ... A B.A. issued from the University of Tennessee. ... A Master of Arts is a postgraduate academic masters degree awarded by universities in North America and the United Kingdom (excluding the ancient universities of Scotland and Oxbridge. ... A B.A. issued from the University of Tennessee. ... The bouncing ball animation (below) consists of these 6 frames. ... A B.A. issued from the University of Tennessee. ... The Bachelor of Fine Arts, usually abbreviated BFA, is the standard undergraduate degree for students seeking a professional education in the visual or performing arts. ... ‹ The template below is being considered for deletion. ... Videography refers to the process of capturing moving images on electronic media (e. ... A B.A. issued from the University of Tennessee. ... The Bachelor of Fine Arts, usually abbreviated BFA, is the standard undergraduate degree for students seeking a professional education in the visual or performing arts. ... The film director, on the right, gives last minute direction to the cast and crew, whilst filming a costume drama on location in London. ... A B.A. issued from the University of Tennessee. ... The Bachelor of Fine Arts, usually abbreviated BFA, is the standard undergraduate degree for students seeking a professional education in the visual or performing arts. ... Documentary film is a broad category of visual expression that is based on the attempt, in one fashion or another, to document reality. ... A B.A. issued from the University of Tennessee. ... The Bachelor of Fine Arts, usually abbreviated BFA, is the standard undergraduate degree for students seeking a professional education in the visual or performing arts. ... This article is about motion pictures. ... A B.A. issued from the University of Tennessee. ... The Bachelor of Fine Arts, usually abbreviated BFA, is the standard undergraduate degree for students seeking a professional education in the visual or performing arts. ... Interactive media refers to media of communication that allow for active participation by the recipient, hence interactivity. ... A B.A. issued from the University of Tennessee. ... The Bachelor of Fine Arts, usually abbreviated BFA, is the standard undergraduate degree for students seeking a professional education in the visual or performing arts. ... A B.A. issued from the University of Tennessee. ... The Bachelor of Fine Arts, usually abbreviated BFA, is the standard undergraduate degree for students seeking a professional education in the visual or performing arts. ... A film producer creates the conditions for making movies. ... A B.A. issued from the University of Tennessee. ... The Bachelor of Fine Arts, usually abbreviated BFA, is the standard undergraduate degree for students seeking a professional education in the visual or performing arts. ... A B.A. issued from the University of Tennessee. ... The Bachelor of Fine Arts, usually abbreviated BFA, is the standard undergraduate degree for students seeking a professional education in the visual or performing arts. ... Sound design is a technical/conceptually creative field. ... A B.A. issued from the University of Tennessee. ... The Bachelor of Fine Arts, usually abbreviated BFA, is the standard undergraduate degree for students seeking a professional education in the visual or performing arts. ... A B.A. issued from the University of Tennessee. ... The Bachelor of Fine Arts, usually abbreviated BFA, is the standard undergraduate degree for students seeking a professional education in the visual or performing arts. ... A B.A. issued from the University of Tennessee. ... The Bachelor of Fine Arts, usually abbreviated BFA, is the standard undergraduate degree for students seeking a professional education in the visual or performing arts. ... A Master of Arts is a postgraduate academic masters degree awarded by universities in North America and the United Kingdom (excluding the ancient universities of Scotland and Oxbridge. ... A Master of Arts is a postgraduate academic masters degree awarded by universities in North America and the United Kingdom (excluding the ancient universities of Scotland and Oxbridge. ... New media refers to forms of human and media communication that have been transformed by the creative use of technology to fulfil the basic social need to interact and transact. ... A Master of Arts is a postgraduate academic masters degree awarded by universities in North America and the United Kingdom (excluding the ancient universities of Scotland and Oxbridge. ... “Sound recorder” redirects here. ... A Master of Arts is a postgraduate academic masters degree awarded by universities in North America and the United Kingdom (excluding the ancient universities of Scotland and Oxbridge. ... A Master of Arts is a postgraduate academic masters degree awarded by universities in North America and the United Kingdom (excluding the ancient universities of Scotland and Oxbridge. ... A B.A. issued from the University of Tennessee. ... A Master of Arts is a postgraduate academic masters degree awarded by universities in North America and the United Kingdom (excluding the ancient universities of Scotland and Oxbridge. ... A B.A. issued from the University of Tennessee. ... The Bachelor of Fine Arts, usually abbreviated BFA, is the standard undergraduate degree for students seeking a professional education in the visual or performing arts. ... A Master of Arts is a postgraduate academic masters degree awarded by universities in North America and the United Kingdom (excluding the ancient universities of Scotland and Oxbridge. ... Creative writing is a term used to distinguish certain imaginative or different types of writing from technical writing. ... In the United States, a Master of Fine Arts (MFA) is a terminal graduate degree in an area of visual, plastic, literary or performing arts typically requiring two to three years of study beyond the bachelor level. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A Master of Arts is a postgraduate academic masters degree awarded by universities in North America and the United Kingdom (excluding the ancient universities of Scotland and Oxbridge. ... Doctor of Philosophy, abbreviated Ph. ... Broadcast journalism refers to television news and radio news, as well as the online news outlets of broadcast affiliates. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Journalism is a discipline of gathering, writing and reporting news, and more broadly it includes the process of editing and presenting the news articles. ... A Master of Arts is a postgraduate academic masters degree awarded by universities in North America and the United Kingdom (excluding the ancient universities of Scotland and Oxbridge. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A Master of Arts is a postgraduate academic masters degree awarded by universities in North America and the United Kingdom (excluding the ancient universities of Scotland and Oxbridge. ... A Master of Arts is a postgraduate academic masters degree awarded by universities in North America and the United Kingdom (excluding the ancient universities of Scotland and Oxbridge. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A Master of Arts is a postgraduate academic masters degree awarded by universities in North America and the United Kingdom (excluding the ancient universities of Scotland and Oxbridge. ...

Administration

Board of Trustees

Officers:
Ted Cutler, Chair
Jeffrey Greenhawt, Treasurer
Lawrence Rasky, Secretary


Members:
Dr. Justin Lee Altshuler, Kevin Scott Bright, Michael Carson, Vincent J. Di Bona, Bobbi Brown [3], Tom Freston, Steven A. Goldman, Tony Goldman, Gary Grossman, Douglas Herzog, Douglas Holloway, Judy Huret, Richard Janssen, Albert M. Jaffe, Sheryl S. Levy, Jacqueline Liebergott, Jonathan Miller, Richard Remis, Nancy Ryan, Lucille S. Salhany, Terry Semel, Linda Schwartz, Jane Shattuc, Peter Smyth, Alan L. Stanzler, Esq., Andreas Veith, Marillyn Zacharis This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... Bobbi Brown graduated from Emerson College in Boston with a degree in theatrical makeup. ... Thomas E. Freston (born 22 November 1945) is an American television executive most recently serving as President and Chief Executive Officer of the newly-split Viacom, until his resignation on September 5, 2006. ... Jacqueline Liebergott, along with the rest of the administrative branch of the college, is widely protested by students and faculty alike. ... Terry Semel (born on February 24, 1943 in Brooklyn, New York, U.S.A.) was the chairman and CEO of Yahoo! Incorporated. ...


Emeritus:
Elmer F. Baker, Leo L. Beranek, James Coppersmith, Patricia Neighbors, Irma Mann Stearns, Harvey L. Thompson, Jr., The Rev. Dr. Rhys Williams Emeritus (IPA pronunciation: or ) is an adjective that is used in the title of a retired professor, bishop or other professional. ... Rhys Williams may be: Rhys Williams (1897 - 1969) actor. ...


Board of Overseers

Eric Alexander, Edward V. Baron, C. Thomas Bauer, William H. Berman, Barney T. Bishop III, Kathryn Boutilier, Alicia Denise Brown, Susan M. Cannon, Gayle N. Carson, Bonnie Comley, Joseph J. Cronin, Rhoda D. Cutler, Maria T. D'Arcangelo-Lapides, Scott Davis, Don Demesquita, John Charles Ford, Ira Harvey Goldstone, Jan E. Jacobs Greenhawt, Gary A. Krantz, Howard M. Liberman, John P. McGovern, Terri A. McGraw, Barry O'Brien, Colette A.M Phillips, Robert Rudnick, Eduardo G. Samame, Linda Schwartz, Steven Shaw, Elizabeth Solender, David Steinberg, Marc Summers, John A. Wentworth, Richard Charles Willis, David B. Woolfson, Muriel Kagan Zager Eric Alexander (born 1968) is an American jazz saxophonist, known for his sophisticated hard bop and post-bop style. ... Barry OBrien is a TV writer and producer. ... Steven Shaw is the name of a number of people: Steve Shaw, a Republican politician who briefly ran for Mayor of New York City Steven Shaw (actor), a film actor Steven Shaw (TV actor), a television actor Steven Shaw (cinematographer), an active cinematographer Steven Shaw is the name of a... David Steinberg, born into a Jewish family August 9, 1940, in Winnipeg, Manitoba, is a Canadian comedian, actor, director, writer and author. ... Marc Summers (born Marc Berkowitz November 11, 1951 in Indianapolis, Indiana) is an American television personality, popular game show host, producer, and a two-time talk show host, perhaps best known for hosting the childrens game show Double Dare on Nickelodeon. ...


Senior administrators

President: Jacqueline Liebergott
Vice President for Information Technology: William Gilligan
Vice President for Academic Affairs: Linda Moore
Vice President for Administration & Finance: David Ellis
Vice President for Administrative Services: Michael F. Delleo
Vice President for Finance: John Donohoe
Vice President for Institutional Advancement: Sherri Mylott
Vice President and General Counsel: Christine Hughes
Vice President for Public Affairs: David Rosen
Associate Vice President of Student Financial Services and Acting Dean of Enrollment: TBD
Associate Vice President for Government and Community Relations: Margaret Ann Ings Jacqueline Liebergott, along with the rest of the administrative branch of the college, is widely protested by students and faculty alike. ... Information and communication technology spending in 2005 Information technology (IT), as defined by the Information Technology Association of America (ITAA), is the study, design, development, implementation, support or management of computer-based information systems, particularly software applications and computer hardware. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Public administration can be broadly described as the study and implementation of policy. ... The three letter abbreviation TBD may be/mean, depending on context: an  acronym for To Be Determined (...at a later point in time. ...


Academic deans and directors

School of the Arts, Dean: Grafton Nunes
School of Communication, Interim Dean: Janis Andersen
Dean of Students: Ronald Ludman
Interim Graduate Dean: Donna Schroth
Institute for Liberal Arts and Interdisciplianary Studies, Director: David Bogen
Continuing Education and Advance Studies, Executive Director: Hank W. Zappala
College Library, Executive Director: Robert Fleming


Media, Theatre, Journals, & Publications

Media

WERS (89. ... Formed over 60 years ago, WECB maintains the status of a free-form and non-commercial carrier current radio station at Emerson College in Boston, Massachusetts. ... Carrier current is a method of low-power broadcasting that uses the electrical system of a building to distribute an AM radio signal. ...

Theatre

  • Drama
    • Rareworks
    • Mercutio
    • Shakespeare Society
    • Kidding Around
    • Musical Theatre Society
  • Comedy
  • Dance & Other Performance
    • Noteworthy
    • The Emerson Dance Company
    • EC Dance
    • The Random Arts Delegation (RAD!)

Journals and publications

The Berkeley Beacon (founded in 1947), is Emerson Colleges student-run newspaper. ... The Emerson Review is Emerson Colleges oldest literary publication. ... Hyena Magazine is the longest-running humor publication at Emerson College. ... Ploughshares is an American literary journal published quarterly by Emerson College. ...

Student life

Student organizations

Emerson College offers a large number of organizations, most of which are highly active and diverse ranging from curriculum based activities to social action organizations. All organizations, (except Greek-lettered organizations and departmental student organizations) are under the control of the Student Government Association and must renew their existence yearly. The terms fraternity and sorority (from the Latin words and , meaning brother and sister respectively) may be used to describe many social and charitable organizations, for example the Lions Club, Epsilon Sigma Alpha, Rotary International, Optimist International, or the Shriners. ...


Greek Organizations

Emeron College's Greek organizations include:


Alpha Epsilon Phi
Alpha Epsilon Phi is a national sorority founded in 1909 to promote esteem and sorority fidelity. AEPhi Beta Alpha Chapter is composed of a diverse group of women brought together by their common values of honesty, philanthropy, scholarship, leadership, tradition, pride, fun, sisterhood, and growth. As a social sorority, AEPhi organizes sister and Emerson events, as well as devotes time to local and national philanthropies. The sisters of the Beta Alpha Chapter at Emerson are especially dedicated to the fight against breast cancer--raising thousands to help the cause. As a national sorority AEPhi works with other local chapters and participates in AEPhi’s annual National Convention. Alpha Epsilon Phi provides a lifetime bond of friendship and sisterhood.


Alpha Pi Theta
Alpha Pi Theta is the oldest and only local fraternity existing only here at Emerson College. The Brotherhood is comprised of an eclectic mix of personality and talent, which harbors a strong support system for individuals in the organization to grow and develop. We pride ourselves on our strong ties among both active members and alumni, who have worked together throughout our 60 years of existence in an effort to better each other as well as the Emerson community as a whole.


Kappa Gamma Chi
Kappa Gamma Chi is Emerson College's oldest and only professional sorority, dedicated to the promotion of women's advancement in society, as well as community service. The Alpha Chapter of Kappa Gamma Chi was founded at Ohio Wesleyan University in 1890. In 1902, the Gamma Chapter of Kappa was founded at Emerson, along with our brother fraternity, Phi Alpha Tau.


Phi Alpha Tau
Phi Alpha Tau is the nation's oldest and foremost communicative arts fraternity. Established in 1902 by a group of students dedicated to serving the community, fostering brotherhood, furthering the communicative arts, and promoting the aims and ideals of Emerson College, Phi Alpha Tau is compiled of some of the most active and unique gentlemen on campus. Our events include The Public Conversation, a forum that brings administrative officials together to discuss student concerns, the Joseph E. Connor award, an award presented to an outstanding gentlemen in the world today, and Honorary Brother Inductions of faculty, staff and administration, creating a network of brothers here on campus.


Sigma Alpha Epsilon
Sigma Alpha Epsilon is the largest Fraternity in the country and the only National Fraternity at Emerson College. Priding themselves on living by their creed, The True Gentlemen, Sigma Alpha Epsilon is an organization which not only strengthens the bonds of brotherhood, but also serves to improve Loyalty, Honor, and Friendship among its members. With distinguished alumni ranging from Presidents, to sports heroes to celebrities, Sigma Alpha Epsilon has a massive network across the country from the past 150 years, and serves as a networking base even after the undergraduate experience is over.


Sigma Pi Theta
Sigma Pi Theta was founded in 1979 on the Emerson Campus as a Women's Support Group, with the help of their brother fraternity, Alpha Pi Theta. The sisters of Sigma are dedicated to the principles of sisterhood, trust and love to supporting the women in both the Emerson and local Boston communities. As well as being involved in a variety of service projects, the sisters volunteer at Rosie's Place, a local women's shelter, making and serving dinner once a week.


Zeta Phi Eta
Zeta Phi Eta, established at Emerson College in 1908, is a National Professional Coed Fraternity in the Communication Arts and Sciences. Founded at Northwestern University in 1893, Zeta Phi Eta is the oldest national group of its kind. Since that time, Zeta has bonded together individuals committed to high standards in the communication arts and sciences, while providing opportunities for sharing professional interests through worthwhile activities. The sisters and brothers of Zeta Phi Eta are strongly involved with the campus community, in addition to working with many outside organizations such as the AIDS Action Committee and the American Cancer Society.


Athletics

The College is members of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (Division III), the Eastern College Athletic Conference, and Charter member of the Great Northeast Athletic Conference. The athletic department supports Lacrosse, Tennis, Baseball, Basketball, Cross-Country, Golf and Soccer for all students in addition to Volleyball for women. The School has Ice Hockey [4] though offers no support to the program The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... Division III (or DIII) is a division of the National Collegiate Athletic Association of the United States. ... The Eastern College Athletic Conference is a College Athletic Conference comprising schools that compete in 35 mens and womens sports. ... The Great Northeast Athletic Conference (or GNAC) is an intercollegiate athletic conference affiliated with the NCAA’s Division III. Member institutions are located in the northeastern United States in the States of Connecticut, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island and Vermont. ... The Dive Shot. Lacrosse is a team sport that is played with ten players (mens field), six players (mens box), or twelve players (womens field), each of whom uses a netted stick (the crosse) in order to pass and catch a hard rubber ball with the aim... For other uses, see Tennis (disambiguation). ... This article is about the sport. ... This article is about the sport. ... This article is about the sport. ... Football is a ball game played between two teams of eleven players, each attempting to win by scoring more goals than their opponent. ... For the ball used in this sport, see Volleyball (ball). ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ...


Notable Emersonians

  • Emerson College Alumni
  • Faculty (Past and Present)
  • College Presidents (Past and Present)

External links

  • Emerson College official website

 
 

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