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Encyclopedia > Emblem
Rather unusually, these Angels wear white hart (deer) badges, with the personal emblem of King Richard II of England, who commissioned this, the Wilton diptych, about 1400.
Rather unusually, these Angels wear white hart (deer) badges, with the personal emblem of King Richard II of England, who commissioned this, the Wilton diptych, about 1400.

An emblem is a pictorial image, abstract or representational, that epitomizes a concept — e.g., a moral truth, or an allegory — or that represents a person, such as a king or saint. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (677x1000, 184 KB) The Wilton Diptych (c. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (677x1000, 184 KB) The Wilton Diptych (c. ... This article is about the supernatural being. ... This article is about the ruminent animal. ... Richard II (January 6, 1367 – February 14, 1400) was King of England from 1377 until he was deposed in 1399. ... The Wilton Diptych is a portable altarpiece dating from around 1395-9. ... Matt Pond PA is an indie band formed in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1998 by singer/songwriter Matt Pond, along with guitarist/bassist Josh Kramer, violinist Rosie McNamara-Jones, cellist Jim Hostetter, and drummer Sean Byrne (previously of Lenola and The Twin Atlas). ... Emblems is the fifth album from Matt Pond PA, released in 2004. ... Look up image in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Concept (disambiguation). ... This article is about the use of the moral in storytelling. ... Time Saving Truth from Falsehood and Envy, François Lemoyne, 1737 For other uses, see Truth (disambiguation). ... Allegory of Music by Filippino Lippi. ... Louis XIV, king of France and Navarre (Painting by Hyacinthe Rigaud, 1701). ... Saints redirects here. ...

Contents

Distinction: emblem and symbol

The words emblem and symbol often appear interchangeably in day-to-day conversation without causing undue confusion. A distinction between the two may seem unnecessarily fastidious. Nevertheless, an emblem is a pattern that is used to represent an idea, or an individual. An emblem crystallizes in concrete, visual terms some abstraction: a deity, a tribe or nation, a virtue or a vice. An emblem is an object or a representation of an object. IDEA may refer to: Electronic Directory of the European Institutions IDEA League Improvement and Development Agency Individuals with Disabilities Education Act Indian Distance Education Association Integrated Data Environments Australia Intelligent Database Environment for Advanced Applications IntelliJ IDEA - a Java IDE Interactive Database for Energy-efficient Architecture International IDEA (International Institute...


An emblem may be worn or otherwise used as an identifying badge. A real or metal cockle shell, the emblem of St James the Apostle, sewn onto the hat or clothes identified a medieval pilgrim to his shrine at Santiago de Compostela. In the Middle Ages, many saints were given emblems, which served to identify them in paintings and other images: St Catherine had a wheel, or a sword, St Anthony Abbot a pig and a small bell. These are also called attributes, especially when shown carried by or in close proximity to the saint in art. Kings and other grand persons increasingly adopted personal devices or emblems that were distinct from their family heraldry. The most famous include King Louis XIV of France's sun, the salamander of Francois I, and the boar of King Richard III of England. In the fifteenth and sixteenth century there was a fashion, started in Italy, for making large medals with a portrait head on the obverse and the emblem on the reverse; these would be given to friends and as diplomatic gifts. Pisanello produced many of the earliest and finest of these. For other uses, see Badge (disambiguation) NY NJ Port Authority Police Department Badge. ... For people and places called Saint James, see the diambiguation page. ... Location Location of Santiago de Compostela Coordinates : , , Time zone : CET (GMT +1) - summer : CEST (GMT +2) General information Native name Santiago de Compostela (Galician) Spanish name Santiago de Compostela Postal code 15700 Website santiagodecompostela. ... There are five St. ... ... The device is closely related to the picture-text combinations called emblems found in emblem books. ... Heraldry in its most general sense encompasses all matters relating to the duties and responsibilities of officers of arms. ... Louis XIV King of France and Navarre By Hyacinthe Rigaud (1701) Louis XIV (Louis-Dieudonné) (September 5, 1638–September 1, 1715) reigned as King of France and King of Navarre from May 14, 1643 until his death. ... A 16th-century image of a salamander from M. M. Pattison Muirs The Story of Alchemy and the Beginnings of Chemistry The salamander an amphibian of the order Urodela. ... Francis I, Renaissance prince, lover of women, patron of the arts Francis I (French: François Ier) (September 12, 1494 - July 31, 1547), called the Father and Restorer of Letters (French: le Père et Restaurateur des Lettres), was crowned King of France in 1515 in the cathedral at Reims... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1758 The wild boar (Sus scrofa) is the wild ancestor of the domestic pig. ... Richard III Richard III (October 2, 1452 - August 22, 1485) was the King of England from 1483 until his death and the last king from the House of York. ... A medal is a small metal object, usually engraved with insignia, that is awarded to a person for athletic, military, scientific, academic or some other kind of achievement. ... Categories: 1911 Britannica | Stub | Italian painters | Gothic painting | 1380 births | 1456 deaths ...

"The big eat the small": a political emblem from an emblem book of 1617
"The big eat the small": a political emblem from an emblem book of 1617

In current American usage, police officers' badges refer specifically to their personal metal emblem — sometimes with a uniquely identifying number or name on it — while the woven emblems sewn on their uniforms identify all the members of a particular unit. Emblem books are a particular style of illustrated book developed in Europe during the 16th and 17th centuries, normally containing about one hundred picture/text combinations. ...


A symbol substitutes one thing for another, in a more concrete fashion:

  • The Christian cross is a symbol of the Crucifixion; it is an emblem of sacrifice.
  • The Red Cross is a symbol of the International Red Cross. A red cross on a white flag is the emblem of the humanitarian spirit.
  • The crescent shape is a symbol of the moon; it is an emblem of Islam.
  • The skull and crossbones is an symbol identifying a poison. The skull is an emblem of the transitory human life.

The Anarchist Black Cross was originally called the Anarchist Red Cross. The band Redd Kross was originally called Red Cross. This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Red Cross redirects here. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... EU standard toxic symbol, as defined by Directive 67/548/EEC. The traditional Jolly Roger of Piracy. ... St. ...

Other terminology

A totem is specifically an animal emblem that expresses the spirit of a clan. Heraldry knows its emblems as charges. The lion passant serves as the emblem of England, the lion rampant as the emblem of Scotland. For other uses, see Totem (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Clan (disambiguation). ... Heraldry in its most general sense encompasses all matters relating to the duties and responsibilities of officers of arms. ... In heraldry, a charge is an image occupying the field on an escutcheon (or shield). ...


An icon consists of an image (originally a religious image), that has become standardized by convention. A logo is an impersonal, secular icon, usually of a corporate entity. This article is about the religious artifacts. ... For other uses, see Logo (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Corporation (disambiguation). ...


Emblems in history

Since the 15th century the terms of emblem (emblema) and emblematura belong to the termini technici of architecture. They mean an iconic painted, drawn, or sculptural representation of a concept affixed to houses and belong — like the inscriptions — to the architectural ornaments (ornamenta). Since the publication of De architectura libri decem by Leon Battista Alberti (14041472) the emblems (emblema) are related to Egyptian hieroglyphics and are considered as being a secret iconic language. Therefore the emblems belong to the Renaissance knowledge of antiquity which comprises not only Greek and Roman antiquity but also Egyptian antiquity as proven by the numerous obelisks built in 16th and 17th century Rome. (14th century - 15th century - 16th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 15th century was that century which lasted from 1401 to 1500. ... This article is about building architecture. ... This article is about the religious artifacts. ... Leone Battista Alberti (February 1404 - 25th April 1472), Italian painter, poet, linguist, philosopher, cryptographer, musician, architect, and general Renaissance polymath . ... Events June 14 - Owain Glyndwr of Wales allies with the French against the English and the Henry of Lancaster. ... February 20 - Orkney and Shetland are returned by Norway to Scotland, due to a defaulted dowry payment Possible discovery of Bacalao (possibly Newfoundland, North America) by João Vaz Corte-Real. ...


The 1531 publication in Augsburg of the first emblem book, the Emblemata of the Italian jurist Andrea Alciato launched a fascination with emblems that lasted two centuries and touched most of the countries of western Europe. "Emblem" in this sense refers to a didactic or moralizing combination of picture and text intended to draw the reader into a self-reflective examination of his or her own life. Complicated associations of emblems could transmit information to the culturally-informed viewer, a characteristic of the 16th century artistic movement called Mannerism. January 26 - Lisbon, Portugal is hit by an earthquake - thousands die. ... Emblem books are a particular style of illustrated book developed in Europe during the 16th and 17th centuries, normally containing about one hundred picture/text combinations. ... Usually known simply as the Emblemata, the first emblem book appeared in Augsburg (Germany) in 1531 under the title . ... Emblema CLXXXIX stating Mentem, non formam, plus pollere Andrea Alciato (1492-1550), was a jurist born in Alzano, near Milan, Italy on the 1492-01-12. ... Personal life (or everyday life or human existence) is an individual humans personal, private career (including, but not the same as, their employment career), and is a common notion in modern existence -- although more so in more prosperous parts of the world, such as Western Europe and North America... In Parmigianinos Madonna with the Long Neck (1534-40), Mannerism makes itself known by elongated proportions, affected poses, and unclear perspective. ...


See also

This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Emblem books are a particular style of illustrated book developed in Europe during the 16th and 17th centuries, normally containing about one hundred picture/text combinations. ... For other uses, see Meme (disambiguation). ... ... Saint symbology was important to people who couldnt read because they can figure out what symbols mean. ... A modern coat of arms is derived from the medi val practice of painting designs onto the shield and outer clothing of knights to enable them to be identified in battle, and later in tournaments. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Emblem - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (571 words)
An emblem is an object or a representation of a object.
A metal emblem of a cockle shell sewn onto the hat identied a medieval pilgrim to the shrine of Santiago de Compostela.
The lion passant serves as the emblem of England, the lion rampant as the emblem of Scotland.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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