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Encyclopedia > Elvis Presley
Elvis messley
Elvis in 1970
Elvis in 1970
Background information
Birth name Elvis Aron Presley[1]
Also known as Elvis
Born January 8, 1985(1985-01-08)
Tupelo, Mississippi
Origin Memphis, Tennessee
Died August 16, 1977 (aged 42)
Memphis, Tennessee
Genre(s) Rockabilly, Rock and Roll, Gospel, Blues, Country
Occupation(s) Singer, Actor
Instrument(s) Vocals, Guitar, Piano
Years active 1954–1977
Label(s) Sun, RCA
Website Elvis.com

Elvis Aaron Presley[1][2]a (January 8, 1935August 16, 1977), was an American singer, musician and actor. He is a cultural icon, often known as "The King of Rock 'n' Roll", or simply "The King". Elvis may refer to three musicians: Elvis Presley, an American singer Elvis Costello, a British musician and singer who took the name from Presley Elvis Ramone, the drummer for the Ramones and Blondie Elvis may also refer to: Elvis Stojko, a Canadian figure skater named after the US singer Elvis... Elvis Presley was an enormously popular singer in the 20th century. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (987x1521, 432 KB) Elvis Aron Presley. ... is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... Tupelo (IPA: [tu:pəlo]) is the largest city and county seat within Lee County, Mississippi. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... For other uses, see Memphis (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... is the 228th day of the year (229th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ... For other uses, see Memphis (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Rockabilly is one of the earliest styles of rock and roll music, and emerged in the early-1950s. ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... Gospel music is a musical genre characterized by dominant vocals (often with strong use of harmony) referencing lyrics of a religious nature, particularly Christian. ... Blues is a vocal and instrumental musical form which evolved from African American spirituals, shouts, work songs and chants and has its earliest stylistic roots in West Africa. ... country music, see Country music (disambiguation) Country music, the first half of Billboards country and western music category, is a blend of popular musical forms originally found in the Southern United States and the Appalachian Mountains. ... For other uses, see Singer (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Actor (disambiguation). ... A musical instrument is a device constructed or modified with the purpose of making music. ... For other uses, see Singer (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Guitar (disambiguation). ... A short grand piano, with the lid up. ... In the music industry, a record label is a brand and a trademark associated with the marketing of music recordings and music videos. ... Label of the fourth Sun Records Sun Records has been the name for four 20th century record labels. ... RCA Records is one of the flagship labels of Sony BMG Music Entertainment. ... is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar). ... is the 228th day of the year (229th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ... For other uses, see Singer (disambiguation). ... “Instrumentalist” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Actor (disambiguation). ... American cultural icons. ...


Presley began his career as one of the first performers of an uptempo fusion of country and rhythm and blues with a strong back beat. His novel versions of existing songs, mixing "black" and "white" sounds, made him popular—and controversial—as did his uninhibited stage and television performances. He recorded songs in the rock and roll genre, with tracks like "Hound Dog" and "Jailhouse Rock" later embodying the style. Presley had a versatile voice and had unusually wide success encompassing other genres, including gospel, blues, ballads and pop. To date, he is the only performer to have been inducted into four music halls of fame and fake his suspicious death. Uptempo (sometimes UpTempo or up tempo) is an umbrella term for a quick-paced electronic music style. ... country music, see Country music (disambiguation) Country music, the first half of Billboards country and western music category, is a blend of popular musical forms originally found in the Southern United States and the Appalachian Mountains. ... For other uses, see Rhythm and blues (disambiguation). ... In music a back beat (also called the, or a, backbeat) is a term applied to the beats 2 and 4 in a 4/4 bar or a 12/8 bar [1] as opposed to the odd downbeat, (quarter beat 1). ... Though most indigenous Africans possess relatively dark skin, they exhibit much variation in physical appearance. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... Hound Dog is a twelve-bar blues written by Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller and originally recorded by Willie Mae Big Mama Thornton in 1952. ... Jailhouse Rock is a song written by Leiber and Stoller that first became a hit for the American singer Elvis Presley. ... Walhalla temple, Germany A hall of fame (sometimes HOF) is a type of museum established for any a field of endeavour to honour individuals of noteworthy achievement in that field. ...


In the 1960s, Presley made the majority of his thirty-three movies—mainly poorly reviewed musicals. In 1968, he returned to live music in a television special and thereafter performed across the U.S., notably in Las Vegas. Throughout his career, he set records for concert attendance, television ratings and recordings sales. He is one of the best-selling and most influential artists in the history of popular music. Health problems plagued Presley in later life which, coupled with a punishing tour schedule and addiction to prescription medication, led to his premature death at age 42. A television special is a television program, typically a short film or television movie, which interrupts or temporarily replaces programming normally scheduled for a given time slot. ... For further information, see Las Vegas metropolitan area and Las Vegas Strip. ...

Presley was born in a two room house, built by his father, in East Tupelo. He was the second of identical twins—his brother was stillborn and given the name Jesse Garon. He grew up as an only child and "was, everyone agreed, unusually close to his mother."[3] The family lived just above the poverty line and attended the Assembly of God church.[4]b Vernon has been described as "a malingerer, always averse to work and responsibility."[5] In 1938, he was jailed for an eight dollar check forgery. During his absence, his wife, described as "voluble, lively, full of spunk",[6] lost the family home.[7] Priscilla Presley recalls her as "a surreptitious drinker and alcoholic."[8] is the 228th day of the year (229th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 223rd day of the year (224th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Map of Germany showing Ludwigshafen am Rhein Ludwigshafen am Rhein is a city in Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany, with about 166,000 inhabitants. ... is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 82nd day of the year (83rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... BBC News website in June 2007. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Fraternal twin boys in the tub The term twin most notably refers to two individuals (or one of two individuals) who have shared the same uterus (womb) and usually, but not necessarily, born on the same day. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... An only child is a child with no siblings, either biological or adopted. ... The Assemblies of God is the worlds largest Pentecostal Christian denomination. ... Priscilla Beaulieu Presley (born Priscilla Ann Wagner on May 24, 1945 in Brooklyn, New York) is an American model, author and actress and ex-wife of rock n roll singer and musician Elvis Presley and mother of singer/songwriter Lisa Marie Presley. ...


Presley was bullied at school; classmates threw "things at him—rotten fruit and stuff—because he was different... quiet and he stuttered and he was a sexy boy."[9]


At age ten, he made his first public performance in a singing contest at the Mississippi-Alabama Fair and Dairy Show. Dressed as a cowboy, the young Presley had to stand on a chair to reach the microphone and sang Red Foley's "Old Shep." He won second prize.[10] Clyde Julian Red Foley ( June 17, 1910 - September 19, 1968) was a country music singer. ...


In 1946, Presley got his first guitar.[11] In November 1948, the family moved to Memphis, Tennessee, allegedly because Vernon—in addition to needing work—had to escape the law for transporting bootleg liquor.[7][12] In 1949, they lived at Lauderdale Courts, a public housing development in one of Memphis' poorer sections. Presley practiced playing guitar in the laundry room and also played in a five-piece band with other tenants.[13] Another resident, Johnny Burnette, recalled, "Wherever Elvis went he'd have his guitar slung across his back... [H]e'd go in to one of the cafes or bars... Then some folks would say: 'Let's hear you sing, boy.'"[14] Presley attended L. C. Humes High School, but fellow students apparently viewed the young singer's performing unfavorably: One recalled that he was "a sad, shy, not especially attractive boy" whose guitar playing was not likely to win any prizes. Many of the other children made fun of him as a 'trashy' kind of boy playing 'trashy' hillbilly music."[15] For other uses, see Memphis (disambiguation). ... John Joseph Johnny Burnette (March 25, 1934–August 14, 1964) was a Rockabilly pioneer. ...


Presley occasionally worked evenings to boost the family income.[16] He began to grow his sideburns and dress in the wild, flashy clothes of Lansky Brothers on Beale Street.[17] He stood out, especially in the conservative Deep South of the 1950s, and was mocked and bullied for it.[13] Despite his unpopularity, he was a contestant in his school's 1952 "Annual Minstrel Show"[13] and won by receiving the most applause and thus an encore (he sang "Cold Cold Icy Fingers" and "Till I Waltz Again With You").[14] Beale Street is a street in Memphis, Tennessee and a significant location in African-American history and the history of the blues. ... For other uses, see Deep South (disambiguation). ...


After graduation, Presley was still rather shy, a "kid who had spent scarcely a night away from home".[18] His third job was driving a truck for the Crown Electric Company. He began wearing his hair longer with a "ducktail"—the style of truck drivers at that time.[19]

Contents

Musical influences

Initial influences came through his family's attendance at the Assembly of God, a Pentecostal Holiness church.[3] Rolling Stone wrote: "Gospel pervaded Elvis' character and was a defining and enduring influence all of his days."[20] During breaks at recording sessions or after concerts, Presley often joined in private with others for informal gospel music sessions.[21] The Assemblies of God is the worlds largest Pentecostal Christian denomination. ... This article is about the magazine. ...


The young Presley frequently listened to local radio; his first musical hero was family friend Mississippi Slim, a hillbilly singer with a radio show on Tupelo’s WELO. Presley performed occasionally on Slim’s Saturday morning show, Singin’ and Pickin’ Hillbilly. "He was crazy about music... That’s all he talked about," recalls his sixth grade friend, James Ausborn, Slim’s younger brother.[22] Before he was a teenager, music was already Presley’s "consuming passion".[22] J. R. Snow, son of 1940s country superstar Hank Snow, recalls that even as a young man Presley knew all of Hank Snow’s songs, "even the most obscure".[23] Mississippi Slim is the stage name of Carvel Lee Ausborn (born 1923), a hillbilly singer with a radio show on Tupelos WELO during the later 1940s. ... Clarence Eugene Snow (May 9, 1914 – December 20, 1999), better known as Hank Snow, was a Hall of Fame country music singer and songwriter. ...


In Memphis, Presley went to record stores that had jukeboxes and listening booths, playing old records and new releases for hours. He was an audience member at the all-night black and white "gospel sings" downtown.[24] Memphis Symphony Orchestra concerts at Overton Park were another Presley favorite, along with the Metropolitan Opera. His small record collection included Mario Lanza and Dean Martin. Presley later said, "I just loved music. Music period."[22] A Zodiac jukebox A jukebox is a partially automated music-playing device, usually a coin-operated machine, that can play specially selected songs from self-contained media. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Overton Park is a large public park in midtown Memphis, Tennessee. ... For other uses, see Opera (disambiguation). ... Mario Lanza as Giuseppe Verdis Otello. ... Dean Martin (born Dino Paul Crocetti, June 7, 1917 – December 25, 1995) was an American singer, film actor, and comedian. ...


Memphis had a strong tradition of blues music and Presley went to blues as well as hillbilly venues. Many of his future recordings were inspired by local African American composers and recording artists, including Arthur Crudup, Rufus Thomas and B.B. King.[25] King says that he "knew Elvis before he was popular. He used to come around and be around us a lot ... on Beale Street."[26] This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Rufus 1990 album for Alligator Records, That Woman Is Poison! Rufus Thomas (March 26, 1917 – December 15, 2001) was a rhythm and blues and soul singer from Memphis, Tennessee, who recorded on Sun Records in the 1950s and on Stax Records in the 1960s and 1970s. ... Riley B. King aka B. B. King (b. ... Beale Street is a street in Memphis, Tennessee and a significant location in African-American history and the history of the blues. ...


Presley "was an untrained musician who played entirely by ear. 'I don't read music,' he confessed, 'but I know what I like.' ... Because he was not a songwriter, Presley rarely had material prepared for recording sessions..." When he, as a young singer, "ventured into the recording studio he was heavily influenced by the songs he had heard on the jukebox and radio."[27]


First recordings at Sun Studios

On July 18, 1953, Presley went to Sun Records' Memphis Recording Service to record "My Happiness" with "That's When Your Heartaches Begin", supposedly a present for his mother.[28] On January 4, 1954, he cut a second acetate. Sun Records boss Sam Phillips was on the lookout for someone who could deliver a blend of black blues and boogie-woogie music; he thought it would be very popular among white people.[29] Assistant Marion Keisker called Presley on June 26, 1954. After an inauspicious session, Phillips invited local musicians Winfield "Scotty" Moore and Bill Black to audition Presley. Though not overly impressed, a studio session was planned.[30] Elvis Presleys Sun recordings are a number of recordings he made at Sun Studios in Memphis, Tennessee, U.S.A. between 1953 and 1956. ... is the 199th day of the year (200th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... January 7 - President Harry S. Truman announces the United States has developed a hydrogen bomb. ... Sun Studio Sun Studio opened by rock pioneer Sam Phillips at 706 Union Avenue in Memphis, Tennessee, on January 3, 1950. ... is the 4th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... In sound recording an acetate disc is a reference audio disc used during production of a gramophone record (e. ... Sam Phillips, born Samuel Cornelius Phillips (January 5, 1923 – June 30, 2003), was a record producer who played an important role in the emergence of rock and roll as the major form of popular music in the 1950s. ... Boogie woogie has two different meanings: a piano based music style, boogie woogie (music) a dance that imitates the rocknroll of the 50s, boogie woogie (dance) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Marion Keisker MacInnes (September 23, 1917 – December 29, 1989), born in Memphis, Tennessee, was a radio show host, station manager, U.S. Air Force officer, and assistant to Sam Phillips at Sun Records. ... is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Winfield Scott Scotty Moore III (born December 27, 1931 near Gadsden, Tennessee) is a legendary American guitarist and member of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. ... William Bill Patton Black, Jr. ...


During a recording break, Presley began "acting the fool" first with Arthur Crudup's "That's All Right (Mama)".[31] Phillips got them all to restart and began taping. This was the sound he had been looking for.[32] The group recorded other songs, including Bill Monroe's "Blue Moon of Kentucky". "That's All Right" was aired on July 8, 1954, by DJ Dewey Phillips.[33]d After its release, both sides of "That's All Right"/"Blue Moon of Kentucky" began to chart across the South.[34] Thats All Right (Mama) is the name of the first song released by Elvis Presley. ... For the retired NBC News correspondent of the same name, see Bill Monroe (journalist). ... Blue Moon of Kentucky is a bluegrass song, written by Bill Monroe in 1947 and recorded by his band, The Blue Grass Boys. ... is the 189th day of the year (190th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... DJ or dj may stand for Disc jockey, dinner jacket The DeadJournal website, or Djibouti. ... Daddy-O Dewey Phillips (13 May 1926 - 28 September 1968) was one of rock n rolls pioneering disk jockeys, along the lines of Clevelands Alan Freed. ...


First public performances

Moore and Black began playing regularly with Presley. They gave a few performances in July 1954 to promote the Sun single at the Bon Air, a rowdy music club where the band was not well-received.[35] On July 30 the trio, billed as The Blue Moon Boys, made their first appearance at the Overton Park Shell, with Slim Whitman headlining.[36] A nervous Presley's legs were said to have shaken uncontrollably during this show: his wide-legged pants emphasized his leg movements, apparently causing females in the audience to go "crazy".[37][38]e Presley consciously incorporated similar movements into future shows.[39] Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 211th day of the year (212th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Slim Whitman (born January 20, 1924 in Tampa, Florida) is an American country music singer and songwriter. ...


DJ and promoter Bob Neal became the trio's manager (replacing Scotty Moore). Moore and Black left their band, the Starlite Wranglers and, from August through October 1954, appeared with Presley at The Eagle's Nest.[35] Presley debuted at the Grand Ole Opry in Nashville on October 2; Hank Snow introduced Presley on stage. He performed "Blue Moon of Kentucky" but received only a polite response. Afterwards, the singer was allegedly told: "Boy, you’d better keep driving that truck."[40]f[41]g[42]h The Grand Ole Opry is a weekly Saturday night country music radio program broadcast live on WSM radio in Nashville, Tennessee, and televised on Great American Country network. ... For other cities named Nashville, see Nashville (disambiguation). ... is the 275th day of the year (276th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Country music promoter and manager Tillman Franks booked Presley for the Louisiana Hayride on October 16. Before Franks saw Presley, he referred to him as "that new black singer with the funny name".[43] During Presley's first set, the reaction was muted; for the second, Franks advised Presley to "Let it all go!" As house drummer D.J. Fontana (who had worked in strip clubs) complemented Presley's movements with accented beats and Bill Black engaged in his usual stage antics, the crowd was more responsive.[44][45]i According to one source, "Audiences had never before heard [such] music... [or] seen anyone who performed like Presley either. The shy, polite, mumbling boy gained self-confidence with every appearance... People watching the show were astounded and shocked, both by the ferocity of his performance, and the crowd’s reaction to it... Roy Orbison saw Presley for the first time in Odessa, Texas: 'His energy was incredible, his instinct was just amazing... I just didn’t know what to make of it. There was just no reference point in the culture to compare it.'"[46] Sam Phillips said Presley "put every ounce of emotion ... into every song, almost as if he was incapable of holding back."[47] Tillman B. Franks (born September 29, 1920 in Stamps, Arkansas - October 26, 2006) was an American bassist, songwriter who was also the manager for a number of country music artists, including Johnny Horton, David Houston, Webb Pierce, Claude King and the Carlisles. ... The Louisiana Hayride was a radio broadcast from the Municipal Auditorium in Shreveport, Louisiana, United States that during its heyday from 1948 to 1960 helped launch the careers of the some of the greatest names in American music. ... is the 289th day of the year (290th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Dominic Joseph Fontana (born March 15, 1931 in Shreveport, Louisiana) is an American musician best known as the drummer for Elvis Presley. ... Roy Kelton Orbison (April 23, 1936 – December 6, 1988), nicknamed The Big O, was an influential Grammy Award-winning American singer-songwriter, guitarist and a pioneer of rock and roll whose recording career spanned more than four decades. ...


Breakthrough year: 1956

The iconic cover of Elvis Presley's debut RCA album. Photo taken on January 31, 1955
The iconic cover of Elvis Presley's debut RCA album. Photo taken on January 31, 1955

Presley's sound proved hard to categorize; he was billed or labeled in the media as "The King of Western Bop", "The Hillbilly Cat" and "The Memphis Flash". Image File history File links Template:Album-cover File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Template:Album-cover File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ...


On August 15, 1955, "Colonel" Tom Parker became Presley's manager. By August 1955, Sun Studios had released ten sides credited to "Elvis Presley, Scotty and Bill", all typical of the developing Presley style. Several major record labels had shown interest in signing Presley. On November 21, 1955, Parker and Phillips negotiated a deal with RCA Victor Records to acquire Presley's Sun contract for an unprecedented $35,000.[48][49] is the 227th day of the year (228th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... Colonel Tom Parker (born Andreas Cornelius van Kuijk on June 26, 1909 – January 21, 1997), was an American/Dutch entertainment impresario known best as the manager of Elvis Presley. ... is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... Sony BMG Music Entertainment is the result of a 50/50 joint venture between Sony Music Entertainment (part of Sony) and BMG Entertainment (part of Bertelsmann AG) completed in August 2004. ...


To increase the singer's exposure, Parker finally brought Presley to television (In March 1955, Presley had failed an audition for Arthur Godfrey's Talent Scouts). He booked six Dorsey Brothers' Stage Show appearances (CBS), beginning January 28, 1956, when Presley was introduced by Cleveland DJ Bill Randle. Parker also obtained a lucrative two-show deal with Milton Berle (NBC). Arthur Godfreys Talent Scouts (also known as Talent Scouts) was a television variety show which ran on CBS from 1948 until 1958. ... The Dorsey Brothers consisted of the dynamic duo Big Band musicians Tommy and Jimmy Dorsey who found fame in the 1940s playing with great Big Band favorites Glenn Miller and Benny Goodman among others. ... is the 28th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... A car from 1956 Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Cleveland redirects here. ... (L-R) Bill Randle, Tommy Edwards, Elvis Presley and Bill Black October 20, 1955 Bill Randle (March 14, 1923 - July 9, 2004) was an American disc jockey, lawyer and university professor. ... Milton Berle (July 12, 1908 - March 27, 2002) was an Emmy-winning American comedian who was born Milton Berlinger. ...


On January 27, Presley's first RCA single, "Heartbreak Hotel," was released. By April it hit number one in the U.S., and sold one million copies. On March 23, RCA released Elvis Presley, his first album. Like the Sun recordings, the majority of the tracks were country songs.[50] is the 27th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Whitney Houston song, see Heartbreak Hotel (Whitney Houston song). ... is the 82nd day of the year (83rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Elvis Presley is the self-titled debut album from Elvis Presley. ...


From April 23, he had two weeks at the New Frontier Hotel, Las Vegas—billed this time as "the Atomic Powered Singer". His shows were badly received, by critics and the conservative guests. Presley saw Freddie Bell and the Bellboys live in Vegas, and liked their version of Leiber and Stoller's "Hound Dog". By May 16, he had added the song to his own act.[51] is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Las Vegas (disambiguation) and Vegas (disambiguation). ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... Jerry Leiber (born April 25, 1933) and Mike Stoller (born March 13, 1933) are among the most important songwriters and music producers in post-World War II popular music. ... Hound Dog is a twelve-bar blues written by Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller and originally recorded by Willie Mae Big Mama Thornton in 1952. ... is the 136th day of the year (137th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


A few days after an April 3 appearance for The Milton Berle Show in San Diego, a near-fatal flight taking Presley's band to Nashville for a recording session left all three badly shaken.[52] After more hectic touring, Presley returned to The Milton Berle Show on June 5 and performed "Hound Dog" (without his guitar). Singing it uptempo, he then began a slower version. His exaggerated, straight-legged shuffle around the microphone stand stirred the audience—as did his vigorous leg shaking and hip thrusts in time to the beat. Presley's "gyrations" created a storm of controversy—even eclipsing the 'communist threat' headlines prevalent at the time.[53] The press described his performance as "vulgar" and "obscene".[53][54] Presley was obliged to explain himself on the local New York City TV show Hy Gardner Calling: "Rock and roll music, if you like it, and you feel it, you can't help but move to it. That's what happens to me. I have to move around. I can't stand still. I've tried it, and I can't do it."[55] is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... One of the most famous examples of early U.S. television broadcasting was Texaco Star Theater, the variety show that made Milton Berle a household name. ... Flag Seal Nickname: Americas Finest City Location Location of San Diego within San Diego County Coordinates , Government County San Diego Mayor City Attorney         City Council District One District Two District Three District Four District Five District Six District Seven District Eight Jerry Sanders (R) Michael Aguirre Scott Peters Kevin... One of the most famous examples of early U.S. television broadcasting was Texaco Star Theater, the variety show that made Milton Berle a household name. ... is the 156th day of the year (157th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about communism as a form of society and as a political movement. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Hy Gardner (December 2, 1908 – June 17, 1989) was a columnist for the New York Herald Tribune, host of The Hy Gardner Show, and a regular panelist on the first incarnation of To Tell The Truth. ...


The Berle shows drew such huge ratings that Steve Allen (NBC), not a fan of rock and roll, booked him for one appearance in New York. Allen wanted "to do a show the whole family can watch" and introduced a "new Elvis" in white bow tie and black tails. Presley sang "Hound Dog" for less than a minute to a Basset Hound in a top hat. According to one author, "Allen thought Presley was talentless and absurd... [he] set things up so that Presley would show his contrition..."[56][57] The day after (July 2), the single "Hound Dog" was recorded and Scotty Moore said they were "all angry about their treatment the previous night".[57] (Presley often referred to the Allen show as the most ridiculous performance of his career.[55]) A few days later, Presley made a "triumphant" outdoor appearance in Memphis at which he announced: "You know, those people in New York are not gonna change me none. I'm gonna show you what the real Elvis is like tonight."[58] Steve Allen on the cover of Steve Allen on the Bible, Religion, and Morality Stephen Valentine Patrick William Allen (December 26, 1921 – October 30, 2000) was an American musician, comedian, and writer who was instrumental in innovating the concept of the television talk show. ... The National Broadcasting Company or NBC is an American television broadcasting company based in New York Citys Rockefeller Center. ... This article is about the state. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Duke Ellington wearing a top hat. ... is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Country vocalists The Jordanaires accompanied Presley on The Steve Allen Show and their first recording session together produced "Any Way You Want Me", "Don't Be Cruel" and "Hound Dog". The Jordanaires would work with the singer through the 1960s. This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Any Way You Want Me is the re-ssue title of Fresh Water, the 1972 debut album by Australian rock and blues singer Alison McCallum. ... Dont be Cruel is a song by Otis Blackwell, which was recorded by Elvis Presley in 1956. ...


Though Presley had been unhappy, Allen's show had, for the first time, beaten The Ed Sullivan Show in the ratings, causing a critical Sullivan (CBS) to book Presley for three appearances for an unprecedented $50,000.[59] The Ed Sullivan Show was an American television variety show that ran from June 20, 1948 to June 6, 1971, and was hosted by former entertainment columnist Ed Sullivan. ... This article is about the broadcast network. ...


Presley's first Ed Sullivan appearance (September 9, 1956) was seen by some 55–60 million viewers. "Compared to moments on the Dorsey shows and on the Berle show, it was ice cream."[60] On the third Sullivan show, Presley sang only slow paced ballads and a gospel song.[61] The fact that Presley was only shown from the waist up and "stepped out in the outlandish costume of a pasha, if not a harem girl" during this last broadcast has led to claims that Sullivan had "censored" or even "buried" the singer,[62] or that Colonel Parker had orchestrated the episode to generate publicity.[63][64] In spite of any misgivings about the controversial nature of his performing style, Sullivan declared at the end of the third appearance that Presley was "a real decent, fine boy" and that they had never had "a pleasanter experience" on the show.[64] is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A car from 1956 Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Controversial king

When "That's All Right" was played, many listeners were sure Presley must be black, and most white disc-jockeys wouldn't play his Sun singles. However, black disc-jockeys didn't want anything to do with a record made by a white man.[65] To some, Presley had undoubtedly "stolen" or at least "derived his style from the Negro rhythm-and-blues performers of the late 1940s."[66] Some black entertainers, notably Jackie Wilson, countered, "A lot of people have accused Elvis of stealing the black man’s music, when in fact, almost every black solo entertainer copied his stage mannerisms from Elvis."[67]j Elvis Presley statue in Memphis, TN. Since the 1950s, the impact on American and world culture of Elvis Presley - singer and music icon has been recognized. ... For the British author, see Jacqueline Wilson. ...

Crowd frenzy at the Mississippi-Alabama Fair and Dairy Show, 1956.

By the spring of 1956, Presley was becoming popular nationwide and teenagers flocked to his concerts. Scotty Moore recalled: "He’d start out, 'You ain’t nothin’ but a Hound Dog,' and they’d just go to pieces. They’d always react the same way. There’d be a riot every time."[68] Bob Neal wrote: "It was almost frightening, the reaction... from teenage boys. So many of them, through some sort of jealousy, would practically hate him." In Lubbock, Texas, a teenage gang fire-bombed Presley's car.[69] Some performers became resentful (or resigned to the fact) that Presley going on stage before them would "kill" their own act; he thus rose quickly to top billing.[70] At the two concerts he performed at the 1956 Mississippi-Alabama Fair and Dairy Show, one hundred National Guardsmen were on hand to prevent crowd trouble.[71] Image File history File links http://www. ... Image File history File links http://www. ... “Lubbock” redirects here. ... The United States National Guard is a reserve forces component of the United States Army (the Army National Guard) and the United States Air Force (the Air National Guard). ...


To many adults, the singer was "the first rock symbol of teenage rebellion. ... they did not like him, and condemned him as depraved. Anti-Negro prejudice doubtless figured in adult antagonism. Regardless of whether parents were aware of the Negro sexual origins of the phrase 'rock 'n' roll', Presley impressed them as the visual and aural embodiment of sex."[72] In 1956, a critic for the New York Daily News wrote that popular music "has reached its lowest depths in the 'grunt and groin' antics of one Elvis Presley" and the Jesuits denounced him in its weekly magazine, America.[73] Even Frank Sinatra opined: "His kind of music is deplorable, a rancid smelling aphrodisiac. It fosters almost totally negative and destructive reactions in young people."[74] This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Seal of the Society of Jesus. ... America is a moderate Catholic weekly published in the United States which contains news and opinion about the Roman Catholic Church and how its positions relate to American politics and cultural life. ... Sinatra redirects here. ...


Presley was even seen as a "definite danger to the security of the United States." His actions and motions were called "a strip-tease with clothes on" or "sexual self-gratification on stage." They were compared with "masturbation or riding a microphone." Some saw the singer as a sexual pervert, and psychologists feared that teenaged girls and boys could easily be "aroused to sexual indulgence and perversion by certain types of motions and hysteria—the type that was exhibited at the Presley show."[75] In August 1956, a Florida judge called Presley a "savage" and threatened to arrest him if he shook his body while performing in Jacksonville. The judge declared that Presley's music was undermining the youth of America. Throughout the performance (which was filmed by police), he kept still as ordered, except for wiggling a finger in mockery at the ruling.[76]k (Presley recalls this incident during the '68 Comeback Special.) For other uses, see Striptease (disambiguation). ... Woman masturbating, 1913 drawing by Gustav Klimt. ... Pervert redirects here. ... Hysteria is a diagnostic label applied to a state of mind, one of unmanageable fear or emotional excesses. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ... “Jacksonville” redirects here. ... Elvis Presley in his 68 Comeback Special Elvis Presleys 68 Comeback Special is a 1968 United States television special starring Elvis Presley. ...

Presley in a promotional photo for Jailhouse Rock released by MGM on November 8, 1957.
Presley in a promotional photo for Jailhouse Rock released by MGM on November 8, 1957.

In 1957, Presley was alleged to have said: "The only thing Negro people can do for me is to buy my records and shine my shoes." The singer always denied saying, or ever wanting to say, such a racist remark. Jet magazine, run by and for African Americans, subsequently investigated the story and found no basis to the claim. However, the Jet journalist did find plenty of testimony that Presley judged people "regardless of race, color or creed".[77] Elvis Presley This is a copyrighted promotional photo with a known source. ... Elvis Presley This is a copyrighted promotional photo with a known source. ... Jailhouse Rock is an American motion picture directed by Richard Thorpe, released by MGM on November 8, 1957. ... is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ... Jet magazine is a popular African-American publication founded in Chicago, Illinois in 1951 by John H. Johnson of Johnson Publishing Company. ...


His parents moved home in Memphis, but the singer lived there briefly. With increased concerns over privacy and security, Graceland was bought in 1957, a mansion with several acres of land. This was Presley's primary residence until his death. For other uses, see Graceland (disambiguation). ...


Presley's record sales grew quickly throughout the late 1950s, with hits like "All Shook Up", "(Let me Be Your) Teddy Bear" and "Too Much". All Shook Up is one of the many hit songs of Elvis Presley. ... Teddy Bear is a popular song. ... Insert non-formatted text hereToo Much is the name of multiple songs: Too Much (Dave Matthews Band song), a song by Dave Matthews Band Too Much (Spice Girls song), a song by Spice Girls Too Much (Elvis Presley song), a song by Elvis Presley Too Much (Ghetto Concept song), a...


Military service and mother's death

On December 20, 1957, Presley received his draft notice. Hal Wallis and Paramount Pictures had already spent $350,000 on the film King Creole, and did not want to suspend or cancel the project. The Memphis Draft Board granted Presley a deferment to finish it. On March 24, 1958, he was inducted and completed basic training at Fort Hood, Texas, before being posted to Friedberg, Germany with the 3rd Armored Division.[78] is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ... The United States has employed conscription (mandatory military service, also called the draft) several times, usually during war but also during the nominal peace of the Cold War. ... Hal B. Wallis (September 14, 1898 – October 5, 1986) was an American motion picture producer. ... Paramount Pictures Corporation is an American motion picture production and distribution company, based in Hollywood, California. ... King Creole is a 1958 Elvis Presley film and soundtrack based on the 1952 Harold Robbins novel, A Stone for Danny Fisher. ... is the 83rd day of the year (84th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Jan. ... Fort Hood, named after Confederate General John Bell Hood, is a U.S. Army post located halfway between Austin and Waco within the U.S. state of Texas. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... Friedberg (Friedberg in der Wetterau) is a town near Frankfurt am Main (about 30 km north of Frankfurt) and has about 25,000 inhabitants. ...


Presley had chosen not to join 'Special Services', which would have allowed him to avoid certain duties and maintain his public profile.[79] He continued to receive massive media coverage, with much speculation echoing Presley's own concerns about his enforced absence damaging his career. However, early in 1958, RCA producer Steve Sholes and Hill and Range "song searcher" Freddy Bienstock had both pushed for recording sessions and strong song material, the aim being to release regular hit singles during Presley's two-year hiatus.[80] The hit singles—and six albums—duly followed during that period.


In Germany, "[a] sergeant had introduced [Presley] to amphetamines when they were on maneuvers at Grafenwöhr... it seemed like half the guys in the company were taking them." Friends around Presley also began taking them, "if only to keep up with Elvis, who was practically evangelical about their benefits."[81] Amphetamine is a synthetic drug originally developed (and still used) as an appetite suppressant. ... Grafenwöhr is a small town in the district Neustadt (Waldnaab), in eastern Bavaria, Germany. ...


The army also introduced Presley to karate—something which he studied seriously, even including it in his later live performances.[82]l For other uses, see Karate (disambiguation). ...


As Presley's fame grew, his mother continued to drink excessively and began to gain weight. She had wanted her son to succeed, "but... [the] hysteria of the crowd frightened her."[83] Doctors had diagnosed hepatitis and her condition worsened. Presley was granted emergency leave to visit her in August 1958, but shortly afterwards his mother died, aged forty-six. Presley was distraught, "grieving almost constantly" for days.[84] Hepatitis (plural hepatitides) implies injury to liver characterised by presence of inflammatory cells in the liver tissue. ...


Presley returned to the U.S. on March 2, 1960, and was honorably discharged with the rank of sergeant on March 5.[85] Recording sessions in March and April yielded some of his best-selling songs—including "It's Now or Never". Although some tracks were uptempo, none could be described as "rock and roll". Most found their way on to an album—Elvis is Back!—described by one critic as "a triumph on every level... It was as if Elvis had... broken down the barriers of genre and prejudice to express everything he heard in all the kinds of music he loved".[86] The album was also notable because of Homer Boots Randolph's acclaimed saxophone solo during the blues standard "Reconsider Baby". is the 61st day of the year (62nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the day. ... O Sole Mio is one of the best known Italian songs that exists, and because of that, very many singers have it on their repertoire. ... Elvis is Back! was Elvis Presleys first album to be released after his army discharge and his first in true stereo. ... Homer Louis Boots Randolph III (June 3, 1927 – July 3, 2007) was an American musician best known for his 1963 saxophone hit, Yakety Sax. Randolph was a major part of the Nashville Sound for most of his professional career. ...


Hollywood years

See also: Elvis Presley filmography

In 1956, Presley launched his career as a film actor, beginning with the musical western, Love Me Tender. It was panned by the critics but did well at the box office.[87] The original title—The Reno Brothers—was changed because of the advanced sales of the song "Love Me Tender". The majority of Presley's films were musical comedies made to "sell records and produce high revenues."[88] He also appeared in more dramatic films, like Jailhouse Rock and King Creole. To maintain box office success, he even "shifted into beefcake formula comedy mode for a few years."[89] He also made one non-musical western, Charro!. In 1956, following his rise to stardom in the rock and roll musical arena, singer Elvis Presley launched a parallel career as a film actor, beginning with the musical western film, Love Me Tender (although he had previously appeared in an unreleased 1955 production, The Pied Piper of Cleveland). ... Love Me Tender is an American motion picture directed by Robert D. Webb, released by 20th Century Fox on November 15, 1956. ... Jailhouse Rock is an American motion picture directed by Richard Thorpe, released by MGM on November 8, 1957. ... King Creole is a 1958 Elvis Presley film and soundtrack based on the 1952 Harold Robbins novel, A Stone for Danny Fisher. ... Beefcake is often used to denote male sexual attractiveness stemming from physical build, but is also used by women and men interested in bodybuilding and weight training, while others consider unnaturally overdeveloped musculature unattractive. ... Charro! is a 1969 Western film starring Elvis Presley. ...


In the Army, Presley said on many occasions that "more than anything, he wanted to be taken seriously as a dramatic actor."[90] His manager, with an eye on long-term earnings, negotiated a multi-picture seven-year contract with Hal Wallis.[91] Hal B. Wallis (September 14, 1898 – October 5, 1986) was an American motion picture producer. ...


The singer withdrew from performing, except for The Frank Sinatra Timex Show: Welcome Home Elvis (1960) and three charity concerts (two in Memphis and one in Pearl Harbor, 1961).[92] Although Presley was praised by directors, like Michael Curtiz, as polite and hardworking (and as having an exceptional memory), "he was definitely not the most talented actor around."[93] The Presley vehicles and the AIP beach movies (mainly made for an early sixties teenage audience) were generally criticized as a "pantheon of bad taste."[94] The scripts of his movies "were all the same, the songs progressively worse."[95] Sight and Sound wrote that in his movies "Elvis Presley, aggressively bisexual in appeal, knowingly erotic, [was] acting like a crucified houri and singing with a kind of machine-made surrealism."[96] Others noted that the songs seemed to be "written on order by men who never really understood Elvis or rock and roll."[97] For Blue Hawaii, "fourteen songs were cut in just three days."[98] Julie Parrish, who appeared in Paradise, Hawaiian Style, says that Presley hated such songs and that he "couldn't stop laughing while he was recording" one of them.[99] Critics would later claim that "No major star suffered through more bad movies than Elvis Presley."[100] Michael Curtiz (December 24, 1886 - April 10, 1962) was an Academy Award-winning Hungarian-American film director. ... The early AIP logo. ... Sight and Sound is a British monthly magazine about film. ... In human sexuality, bisexuality describes a man or woman having a sexual orientation to persons of either or both sexes (a man or woman who sexually likes both sexes; people who are sexually and/or romantically attracted to both males and females). ... Eroticism is an aesthetic focus on sexual desire, especially the feelings of anticipation of sexual activity. ... For other uses, see Crucifixion (disambiguation). ... Max Ernst. ... Blue Hawaii is a 1961 musical film set in the state of Hawaii and starring Elvis Presley. ... Paradise, Hawaiian Style is a 1966 musical film and comedy starring [[Elvis Presley]. It was the third and final motion picture that he filmed in Hawaii. ...

Presley and Ann Margret in a promotional shot for Viva Las Vegas released by MGM on May 20, 1964.

Presley movies were nevertheless popular, and he "became a film genre of his own."[101] Elvis on celluloid was the only chance to see him in the absence of live appearances, especially outside of the U.S. (the only time he toured outside of the U.S. was in Canada in 1957). His Blue Hawaii even "boosted the new state's tourism. Some of his most enduring and popular songs came from those [kind of] movies," like "Can't Help Falling in Love," "Return to Sender" and "Viva Las Vegas."[102] His 1960s films and soundtracks grossed some $280 million.[103] Publicity photo for Viva Las Vegas, considered fair use. ... Publicity photo for Viva Las Vegas, considered fair use. ... Ann-Margret (born April 28, 1941) is a five-time Golden Globe Award-winning, Academy Award, Emmy Award and Grammy-nominated American actress, singer and dancer. ... Viva Las Vegas (1964) is an American romantic musical motion picture co-starring American singers Elvis Presley and Ann-Margret. ... MGM logo Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer or MGM, is a large media company, involved primarily in the production and distribution of cinema and television programs. ... is the 140th day of the year (141st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... It has been suggested that Cant Help Falling in Love (A*Teens song) be merged into this article or section. ... Return to Sender is a contemporary worship band from Brackenhurst Methodist Church, Alberton, South Africa. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


In 1964, Richard Burton and Peter O'Toole had starred in Hal Wallis' Becket. Wallis admitted to the press that the financing of such quality productions was only possible by making a series of profitable B-movies starring Presley. He branded Wallis "a double-dealing sonofabitch" (and he thought little better of Tom Parker), realizing there had never been any intention to let him develop into a serious actor.[104] For other persons named Richard Burton, see Richard Burton (disambiguation). ... Peter Seamus OToole (born August 2, 1932, uncertain but presumed correct date[1]) is an eight-time Academy Award-nominated Irish actor. ... Becket is a 1964 film adaptation of the play Becket or the Honour of God by Jean Anouilh made by Hal Wallis Productions and released by Paramount Pictures. ...


Presley was one of the highest paid actors during the 1960s, but times were changing. "[The] Elvis Presley film was becoming passé. Young people were tuning in, dropping out and doing acid. Musical acts like Jefferson Airplane, Grateful Dead, The Doors, Janis Joplin and many others were dominating the airwaves. Elvis Presley was not considered cool as he once was."[105] Priscilla Presley recalls: "He blamed his fading popularity on his humdrum movies" and "... loathed their stock plots and short shooting schedules." She also notes: "He could have demanded better, more substantial scripts, but he didn't."[106] Jefferson Airplane is an American rock band from San Francisco, a pioneer of the psychedelic rock movement. ... This article is about the band. ... The Doors were an American rock band formed in 1965 in Los Angeles by vocalist Jim Morrison, keyboardist Ray Manzarek, drummer John Densmore, and guitarist Robby Krieger. ... Janis Lyn Joplin (19 January 1943 – 4 October 1970) was an American singer, songwriter, and music arranger, from Port Arthur, Texas. ...


Presley's final movie role was in Change of Habit (1969). His last two films were concert documentaries in the early 1970s, though Presley was keen to consider dramatic movie roles.[107]m Change of Habit was a 1969 theatrical film starring Elvis Presley and Mary Tyler Moore. ...


As well as the formulaic movie songs of the 1960s, Presley did make noteworthy studio recordings, including "Suspicion," "(You're The) Devil in Disguise" and "It Hurts Me." In 1966 he recorded a cover of Bob Dylan's "Tomorrow is a Long Time" (which RCA relegated to a bonus track on the soundtrack album for Spinout). He also produced two gospel albums: His Hand in Mine (1960) and How Great Thou Art (1966). In 1967, he recorded some well-received singles in collaboration with songwriter/guitar player Jerry Reed, including Reed's "Guitar Man." However, "during the Beatles era (1963-70), only six Elvis singles reached number ten or better. 'Suspicious Minds' was the lone number one."[108] Suspicion DVD cover Suspicion (1941) is a film noir directed by Alfred Hitchcock starring Cary Grant and Joan Fontaine as a married couple. ... This article is about the recording artist. ... This article is about the recording artist. ... Spinout is a 1966 musical film and comedy starring Elvis Presley as the lead singer of a band and part-time racecar driver. ... His Hand in Mine was Elvis Presleys first RCA Victor 12 long-play gospel album, recorded and originally released in 1960; a followup to his 1957 EP Peace In The Valley. ... How Great Thou Art was Elvis Presleys second RCA Victor 12 long-play gospel album, recorded and originally released in 1967. ... Jerry Reed Hubbard (born March 20, 1937) is an American country music singer, country guitarist, songwriter, and actor. ... Guitar Man is the fifth album released by Bread in 1972. ...


Sex symbol

Main article: Relationships of Elvis Presley

Presley's sexual attraction and photogenic looks have been acknowledged: Steve Binder recalled from the '68 Comeback Special: "I'm straight as an arrow and I got to tell you, you stop, whether you're male or female, to look at him. He was that good looking. And if you never knew he was a superstar, it wouldn't make any difference; if he'd walked in the room, you'd know somebody special was in your presence."[109] Elvis, Priscilla and Lisa Marie. ... Steve Binder is an Emmy and Ace Award winner for his work as an American producer and director. ... Elvis Presley in his 68 Comeback Special Elvis Presleys 68 Comeback Special is a 1968 United States television special starring Elvis Presley. ...


Accounts of Presley's numerous sexual conquests may be exaggerated[110][111] Cybill Shepherd reveals that Presley kissed her all over her naked body - but refused to have oral sex with her.[112]. Byron Raphael and Alanna Nash have stated that the star "would never put himself inside one of these girls..."[113]p Girlfriends Judy Spreckels and June Juanico had no sexual relationships with Presley. Cassandra Peterson ("Elvira") says she knew Presley for only one night, but all they did was talk.[114] Peggy Lipton claims that he was "virtually impotent" with her (She attributed this to his boyishness and drug misuse).[115]q Guralnick concurs with others, "he wasn't really interested", preferring to lie in bed, watch television and talk.[116] This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Alanna Nash (born 1950) is an American journalist and biographer. ... Judy Spreckels (born 1933) was a former friend of Elvis Presley during the rock n roll singers rise to stardom. ... June Juanico (born 1938) is a former beauty queen and an Elvis Presley fan from Biloxi, Mississippi, whom the famous rock n roll singer dated in 1955 and 1956, for instance, when he took three weeks of vacation after having recorded his songs Hound Dog and Dont Be Cruel... Cassandra Peterson (born September 17, 1949) is an American actress best known for her on-screen horror host persona Elvira, Mistress of the Dark. She gained fame on Los Angeles television station KHJ wearing a black, gothic, cleavage-enhancing gown as host of Movie Macabre, a weekly horror movie presentation. ... U.S. actress who was born on August 30, 1947, in New York City to a Jewish-American father and an Irish-born mother who was also Jewish. ...


Ann-Margret (Presley's co-star in Viva Las Vegas) refers to Presley as her "soulmate" but has revealed little else.[117] A publicity campaign about Presley and Margret's romance was launched during the filming of Viva Las Vegas,[118] which helped to increase Margret's popularity.[119]s[120] Indeed, Presley dated many female co-stars for publicity purposes.[121] Lori Williams dated him for a while in 1964. She says their "courtship was not some bizarre story. It was very sweet and Elvis was the perfect gentleman."[122] Ann-Margret Ann-Margret (born April 28, 1941) is a Swedish-born actress and singer. ... Viva Las Vegas (1964) is an American romantic musical motion picture co-starring American singers Elvis Presley and Ann-Margret. ... Lori Williams (born March 23, 1946, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA) is an American actress. ...


Wife and daughter

Main articles: Priscilla Presley and Lisa Marie Presley Priscilla Beaulieu Presley (born Priscilla Ann Wagner on May 24, 1945 in Brooklyn, New York) is an American model, author and actress and ex-wife of rock n roll singer and musician Elvis Presley and mother of singer/songwriter Lisa Marie Presley. ... Lisa Marie Presley (born February 1, 1968) is an American singer/songwriter, who is the only child of Elvis Presley and Priscilla Beaulieu Presley. ...


Priscilla Presley (née Beaulieu) had stayed with Presley during the 1960s (they had first met in Germany, when she was only fourteen). They married on May 1, 1967, in Las Vegas. A daughter, Lisa Marie, was born nine months later. Even Priscilla has claimed that the singer was not overly active sexually during their five-year marriage.[123] is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... Lisa Marie Presley (born February 1, 1968) is an American singer/songwriter, who is the only child of Elvis Presley and Priscilla Beaulieu Presley. ...


Influence of Colonel Parker and others

Main articles: Colonel Tom Parker, Memphis Mafia Colonel Tom Parker (born Andreas Cornelius van Kuijk on June 26, 1909 – January 21, 1997), was an American/Dutch entertainment impresario known best as the manager of Elvis Presley. ... The Memphis Mafia was the nickname for a group of friends, associates, employees and yes-men whose main function was to be around Elvis Presley from 1956 until he died. ...


By 1967, Colonel Tom Parker had negotiated a contract that gave him 50% of Presley's earnings. Much has been written about the suspect nature of Parker's business practices. His dubious origins and gambling addictions in particular—and the subsequent need to keep Presley 'commercial'—may well have adversely affected the course of Presley's career.t It has been claimed that Presley's original band was fired because Parker wanted to isolate the singer from anyone who might offer him a better management deal.[124]


Marty Lacker, one of a coterie of Presley's trusted friends known as the "Memphis Mafia", regarded Colonel Parker as a "hustler and scam artist" who abused Presley's trust, but Lacker acknowledged that Parker was a master promoter.[125] Priscilla Presley noted that "Elvis detested the business side of his career. He would sign a contract without even reading it."[126] The Memphis Mafia was the nickname for a group of friends, associates, employees and yes-men whose main function was to be around Elvis Presley from 1956 until he died. ...


Presley's father distrusted the members of the "Memphis Mafia"; he thought they collectively exercised an unhealthy influence over his son.[127] "[I]t was no wonder" that as the singer "slid into addiction and torpor, no one raised the alarm: to them, Elvis was the bank, and it had to remain open."[128] Musician Tony Brown noted the urgent need to reverse Presley's declining health as the singer toured in the mid-1970s. "But we all knew it was hopeless because Elvis was surrounded by that little circle of people... all those so-called friends and... bodyguards."[129]


Larry Geller became Presley's hairdresser in 1964. Unlike Presley's generally down-to-earth buddies, Geller was interested in 'spiritual studies'.[130] From their first conversation, Geller recalls how Presley revealed his secret thoughts and anxieties, how "there's got to be a reason... why I was chosen to be Elvis Presley.'"[130] He then poured out his heart in "an almost painful rush of words and emotions," telling Geller about his mother and the hollowness of his Hollywood life, things he could not share with anyone around him. Thereafter, Presley voraciously read books Geller supplied, on religion and mysticism. Perhaps most tellingly, he revealed to Geller: "I swear to God, no one knows how lonely I get and how empty I really feel."[131] Presley would be preoccupied by such matters for much of his life, taking trunkloads of books with him on tour.[132]


In 1969, record producer Chips Moman of American Studios, Memphis, was particularly critical of the song choices and staff of Hill and Range, Presley's main music publisher. Moman could only get the best out of Presley when he got the "aggravating" publishing personnel out of the studio.[133] RCA executive Joan Deary was later full of praise for the superior results of Moman's work but despite this, no producer was to override Hill and Range's control again.[134] Lincoln Wayne Chips Moman is an American record producer, guitarist and songwriter, born 1936 in La Grange, Georgia. ...


1968 comeback

Elvis Presley in his '68 Comeback Special, airing on NBC, December 3, 1968.
Elvis Presley in his '68 Comeback Special, airing on NBC, December 3, 1968.

By mid-1968, Presley's recording career was floundering; he had become deeply unhappy with his career.[135] In the summer, he made a Christmas telecast on NBC. Later dubbed the '68 Comeback Special, and airing on December 3, 1968, the show featured lavishly staged productions, but also saw Elvis clad in black leather, performing live in an uninhibited style reminiscent of his rock and roll days. Rolling Stone called it "a performance of emotional grandeur and historical resonance."[20] Its success was helped by director and co-producer, Steve Binder, who worked hard to reassure the nervous singer[109]n and to produce a show that was not just an hour of Christmas songs, as Col. Parker had originally planned.[136][137]w Elvis Presley in his 68 Comeback Special Elvis Presleys 68 Comeback Special is a 1968 United States television special starring Elvis Presley. ... Image File history File links ElvisPresley-OneNight. ... Image File history File links ElvisPresley-OneNight. ... Elvis Presley in his 68 Comeback Special Elvis Presleys 68 Comeback Special is a 1968 United States television special starring Elvis Presley. ... This article is about the television network. ... is the 337th day of the year (338th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the television network. ... is the 337th day of the year (338th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the magazine. ...


Buoyed by the experience, Presley engaged in the prolific series of recording sessions at American Studios, which lead to the acclaimed From Elvis in Memphis (Chips Moman was its uncredited producer).[138] It was followed by From Memphis To Vegas/From Vegas To Memphis, a double-album. From Elvis in Memphis is an album from Elvis Presley, one that many critics consider to be his best album. ... This 1969 two album set was re-released a year later as the two seperate albums. ...


The same sessions lead to the hit singles "In the Ghetto", "Suspicious Minds", "Kentucky Rain" and "Don't Cry Daddy". In the Ghetto is a song written by American singer-songwriter Mac Davis and made popular by rock and roll singer Elvis Presley. ... This article is about the song. ... Kentucky Rain was a song sung by American singer Elvis Presley. ... dont cry daddy was recorded by Elvis Aron Presley around the late 60s. ...


Return to live performances

In 1969, Presley made record-breaking appearances in Las Vegas.[139]x He then toured across the U.S. up to his death, with many of the 1,145 concerts setting venue attendance records. He also had hit singles in many countries. Presley's song repertoire was criticized, indicating he was still distant from trends within contemporary music.[140] For further information, see Las Vegas metropolitan area and Las Vegas Strip. ...

Elvis Presley, in Aloha From Hawaii television broadcast via satellite on January 14, 1973.
Elvis Presley, in Aloha From Hawaii television broadcast via satellite on January 14, 1973.

On December 21, 1970, Presley met with President Richard Nixon at the White House (Presley arrived with a gift—a handgun. It was accepted but not presented for security reasons). Presley was somewhat bizarrely wanting to express his patriotism, his contempt for the hippie drug culture and his wish to be appointed a "Federal Agent at Large". He also wished to obtain a Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs badge to add to similar items he had begun collecting. He offered to "infiltrate hippie groups" and claimed that The Beatles had "made their money, then gone back to England where they fomented anti-American feeling."[141] Nixon was uncertain and bemused by their encounter, and twice expressed concern that Presley needed to "retain his credibility."[141][142] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Elvis Presley, 1973 Aloha From Hawaii television broadcast Aloha from Hawaii is an Elvis Presley music concert broadcast live via satellite around the world on January 14, 1973. ... is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the song by James Blunt, see 1973 (song). ... is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Nixon redirects here. ... For other uses, see White House (disambiguation). ... Singer of a modern Hippie movement in Russia The hippie subculture was a youth movement that began in the United States during the mid-1960s and spread around the world. ... Drug subcultures are examples of countercultures, primarily defined by recreational drug use. ... The Bureau of Narcotic and Dangerous Drugs directly preceded the Drug Enforcement Administration. ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ...


MGM filmed him in Las Vegas for a 1970 documentary: Elvis: That’s The Way It Is. As he toured, more gold record awards followed. MGM filmed other shows for Elvis On Tour, which won a Golden Globe for Best Documentary, 1972. A fourteen-date tour started with an unprecedented four consecutive sold-out shows at Madison Square Garden, New York. After the tour, Presley released the 1972 single "Burning Love"—his last top ten hit in the U.S. charts. MGM logo Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer or MGM, is a large media company, involved primarily in the production and distribution of cinema and television programs. ... Madison Square Garden, often abbreviated as MSG, known colloquially simply as The Garden, has been the name of four arenas in New York City, United States. ... Burning Love(German: Brennende Liebe)was a song written by Dennis Linde and performed by Elvis Presley. ...


In 1973, Presley had two January shows in Hawaii. The second was broadcast live, globally. The "Aloha from Hawaii" concert was the first satellite broadcast, reaching at least a billion viewers. The show's album went to number one and spent a year in the charts. Elvis Presley, 1973 Aloha From Hawaii television broadcast Aloha from Hawaii is an Elvis Presley music concert broadcast live via satellite around the world on January 14, 1973. ...


Off stage, Presley had continuing problems. In spite of his own infidelity, Presley was furious that Priscilla was having an affair with a mutual acquaintance—Mike Stone, a karate instructor. He raged obsessively: "There's too much pain in me... Stone [must] die."[143] A bodyguard, Red West, felt compelled to get a price for a contract killing and was relieved when Presley decided: "Aw hell... Maybe it's a bit heavy..."[144] The Presleys separated on February 23, 1972, agreeing to share custody of their daughter. Red West (born 1936 in Memphis, Tennessee) is an American actor, film stuntman and songwriter. ... is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Elvis meets U.S. President Richard Nixon in the White House Oval Office, December 21, 1970
Elvis meets U.S. President Richard Nixon in the White House Oval Office, December 21, 1970

After his divorce in 1973, Presley became increasingly isolated and overweight, with prescription drugs affecting his health, mood and his stage act.[132]v Despite this, his "thundering" live version of "How Great Thou Art" won him a Grammy award in 1974[145] and he continued to play to sell-out crowds. A 1975 tour ended with a concert in Michigan, attended by over 62,000 fans. Elvis Presley meeting Richard Nixon. ... Elvis Presley meeting Richard Nixon. ... For the pop band, see Presidents of the United States of America. ... Nixon redirects here. ... For other uses, see White House (disambiguation). ... The Oval Office from above in 2003, during the administration of George W. Bush. ... How Great Thou Art is: A famous hymn by Carl Boberg An album by Elvis Presley Category: ... This article is about the U.S. State. ...


By now Presley had "no motivation to lose his extra poundage... he became self-conscious... his self-confidence before the audience declined. Headlines such as 'Elvis Battles Middle Age' and 'Time Makes Listless Machine of Elvis' were not uncommon."[146] According to Marjorie Garber, when Presley made his later appearances in Las Vegas, he appeared "heavier, in pancake makeup... with an elaborate jeweled belt and cape, crooning pop songs to a microphone ... [He] had become Liberace. Even his fans were now middle-aged matrons and blue-haired grandmothers, who praised him as a good son who loved his mother; Mother's Day became a special holiday for Elvis' fans."[147] Wladziu Valentino Liberace (May 16, 1919 – February 4, 1987), better known by only his last name Liberace (pronounced [ˌlɪbəˈrɑːtʃi]), was an American entertainer. ... This article is about several worldwide days celebrating motherhood. ...


Almost throughout the 1970s, RCA had been increasingly concerned about making money from Presley material: they often had to rely on live recordings because of problems getting him to attend studio sessions. RCA's mobile studio was occasionally sent to Graceland in the hope of capturing an inspired vocal performance. Once in a studio, he could lack interest or be easily distracted; often this was linked to his health and drug problems.[142]


Final year

Presley's decline continued. A journalist recalled: "Elvis Presley had become a grotesque caricature of his sleek, energetic former self... he was barely able to pull himself through his abbreviated concerts."[148] In Alexandria, Louisiana, the singer was on stage for less than an hour and "was impossible to understand."[149] In Baton Rouge, Presley failed to appear. He was unable to get out of his hotel bed, and the rest of the tour was cancelled.[149] Alexandria is a city in Louisiana and the parish seat of Rapides Parish. ... Capitol Building Baton Rouge is the capital of Louisiana, a state of the United States of America. ...


According to Guralnick, fans "were becoming increasingly voluble about their disappointment, but it all seemed to go right past Elvis, whose world was now confined almost entirely to his room and his [spiritualism] books."[150] In Knoxville, Tennessee on May 20, "there was no longer any pretense of keeping up appearances... The idea was simply to get Elvis out on stage and keep him upright for the hour he was scheduled to perform."[151] Thereafter, Presley struggled through every show. Despite his obvious problems, shows in Omaha, Nebraska and Rapid City, South Dakota were recorded for an album and a CBS-TV special: Elvis In Concert.[152] Nickname: Location within the U.S. State of Tennessee. ... is the 140th day of the year (141st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... “Omaha” redirects here. ... Rapid City is a city located in the western part of South Dakota and is second largest city in the state of South Dakota after Sioux Falls. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ...


In Rapid City, "he was so nervous on stage that he could hardly talk... He was undoubtedly painfully aware of how he looked, and he knew that in his condition, he could not perform any significant movement. He looked, moved, and gestured like an overweight old man with crippling arthritis."[153] A cousin, Billy Smith, recalled how Presley would sit in his room and chat, recounting things like his favourite Monty Python sketches and past japes, but "mostly there was a grim obsessiveness... a paranoia about people, germs... future events," that reminded Smith of Howard Hughes.[154] Monty Python, or The Pythons, is the collective name of the creators of Monty Pythons Flying Circus, a British television comedy sketch show that first aired on the BBC on 5 October 1969. ... For the Welsh murderer, see Howard Hughes (murderer). ...

Elvis Presley's final resting place at Graceland.
Elvis Presley's final resting place at Graceland.

A book was published—the first exposé to detail Presley's years of drug misuse.[155] Written with input from three of Presley's "Memphis Mafia," the book was the authors' revenge for them being sacked and a plea to get Presley to face up to reality.[156] The singer "was devastated by the book. Here were his close friends who had written serious stuff that would affect his life. He felt betrayed."[157] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (960x1280, 829 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Graceland Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (960x1280, 829 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Graceland Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create... For other uses, see Graceland (disambiguation). ...


Presley's final performance was in Indianapolis at the Market Square Arena, on June 26, 1977. Indianapolis redirects here. ... Market Square Arena was an indoor arena located in Indianapolis, Indiana, USA. The arena, completed in 1974 at a cost of $23 million, sat 16,530 for basketball and 15,993 for ice hockey. ... is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ...


Another tour was scheduled to begin August 17, 1977, but at Graceland the day before, Presley was found on the floor of his bathroom by fiancée, Ginger Alden. According to the medical investigator, Presley had "stumbled or crawled several feet before he died."[158]y He was officially pronounced dead at 3:30 pm at the Baptist Memorial Hospital. is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ... Ginger Alden Ginger Alden (born November 13, 1956 in Memphis Tennessee) is an American actress/model who is best known as the former fiancee of Elvis Presley. ...


At his funeral, hundreds of thousands of fans, the press and celebrities line the streets and many hoped to see the open casket in Graceland. Among the mourners were Ann-Margret (who had remained close to Presley) and his ex-wife.[159]z U.S. President Jimmy Carter issued a statement.[160] Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... For other persons named Jimmy Carter, see Jimmy Carter (disambiguation). ...


Presley was buried at Forest Hill Cemetery, Memphis, next to his mother. After an attempt to steal the body, his—and his mother's—remains were reburied at Graceland in the Meditation Gardens.


Post mortem

Presley had developed many health problems, some of them chronic. "Elvis had an enlarged heart for a long time. That, together with his drug habit, caused his death. But he was difficult to diagnose; it was a judgment call."[161]


Presley first took drugs in the army, taking amphetamines to stay awake, though there are claims that pills of some form were first given to him by Memphis DJ Dewey Phillips.[162] In Elvis and Me, Priscilla Presley writes that by 1962, he was taking placidyls to combat severe insomnia in ever-increasing doses and later took Dexedrine to counter the sleeping pills' after-effects. She later saw "problems in Elvis' life, all magnified by taking prescribed drugs." Presley's physician, Dr. George C. Nichopoulos, has said: "[Elvis] felt that by getting [pills] from a doctor, he wasn't the common everyday junkie getting something off the street. He... thought that as far as medications and drugs went, there was something for everything."[132] Daddy-O Dewey Phillips (13 May 1926 - 28 September 1968) was one of rock n rolls pioneering disk jockeys, along the lines of Clevelands Alan Freed. ... Elvis and Me is a 1985 American biography written by Priscilla Beaulieu Presley, the former wife of singer Elvis Presley. ... Ethchlorvynol is a sedative and hypnotic drug. ... This article is about the sleeping disorder. ... Dextroamphetamine (also known as dextroamphetamine sulfate, dexamphetamine, dexedrine, Dexampex, Ferndex, Oxydess II, Robese, Spancap #1, and, informally, Dex), a stereoisomer of amphetamine, is an indirect-acting stimulant that releases norepinephrine from nerve terminals, thus promoting nerve impulse transmission. ... George Constantine Nichopoulos (1927 -) also known as Dr. Nick was an American doctor, of Greek descent. ...


According to Guralnick: "[D]rug use was heavily implicated... no one ruled out the possibility of anaphylactic shock brought on by the codeine pills...to which he was known to have had a mild allergy." In two lab reports filed two months later, each indicated "a strong belief that the primary cause of death was polypharmacy," with one report "indicating the detection of fourteen drugs in Elvis' system, ten in significant quantity."[163] Anaphylaxis is a severe and rapid systemic allergic reaction to a trigger substance, called an allergen. ... Codeine (INN) or methylmorphine is an opiate used for its analgesic, antitussive and antidiarrheal properties. ... The term polypharmacy generally refers to the use of multiple-medications by a patient. ...


The medical profession has been seriously questioned. Medical Examiner Dr. Jerry Francisco had offered a cause of death while the autopsy was still being performed and before toxicology results were known. Dr. Francisco dubiously stated that cardiac arrhythmia was the cause of death, a condition that can only be determined in a living person—not post mortem.[164] Many doctors had been flattered to be associated with Presley (or had been bribed with gifts) and supplied him with pills which simply fed his addictions.[165] The singer allegedly spent at least $1 million per year on drugs and doctors' fees or inducements.[166] Although Dr. Nichopoulos was exonerated with regard to Presley's death, "In the first eight months of 1977 alone, he had [prescribed] more than 10,000 doses of sedatives, amphetamines, and narcotics: all in Elvis' name. On January 20, 1980, the board found [against] him... but decided that he was not unethical [because he claimed he'd been trying to wean the singer off the drugs]." His license was suspended. In July 1995, it was permanently revoked after it was found he had improperly dispensed drugs to several patients.[132] Cardiac arrhythmia is any of a group of conditions in which the electrical activity of the heart is irregular or is faster or slower than normal. ... is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ...


In 1994, the autopsy into Presley's death was re-opened. Coroner Dr. Joseph Davis declared: "There is nothing in any of the data that supports a death from drugs [i.e. drug overdose]. In fact, everything points to a sudden, violent heart attack."[132] However, there is little doubt that long-term drug misuse caused his premature death.[164]


Legacy

Further information: Cultural depictions of Elvis Presley
Further information: Elvis Presley's cultural impact; Elvis Presley phenomenon

Elvis Presley's death deprives our country of a part of itself. He was unique and irreplaceable. More than 20 years ago, he burst upon the scene with an impact that was unprecedented and will probably never be equaled. His music and his personality, fusing the styles of white country and black rhythm and blues, permanently changed the face of American popular culture. His following was immense, and he was a symbol to people the world over of the vitality, rebelliousness, and good humor of his country. . ... Elvis Presley statue in Memphis, TN. Since the 1950s, the impact on American and world culture of Elvis Presley - singer and music icon has been recognized. ... Elvis impersonators. ...

President Jimmy Carter, 1977-08-17, [167] For other persons named Jimmy Carter, see Jimmy Carter (disambiguation). ... Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ... is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Author Samuel Roy has written: "Elvis' death did occur at a time when it could only help his reputation. Just before his death, Elvis had been forgotten by society."[168]


Biographer Ernst Jorgensen has observed that when Presley died, it was as if all perspective on his musical career had been lost.[169] His latter-day song choices had been seen as poor; many who disliked Presley had long been dismissive because he did not write his own songs. Others complained—incorrectly—that he could not play musical instruments. Such criticism of Presley continues.[170][171]aa The tabloids had ridiculed his obesity and his kitschy, jump-suited performances. His film career was mocked. (In 1980, John Lennon said: "[Elvis] died when he went into the army. That's when they killed him, that's when they castrated him."[1]) Acknowledgment of his vocal style had been reduced to mocking the hiccuping, vocalese tricks that he had used on some early recordings—and the way he said "Thankyouverymuch" after songs during live shows.[172] This was only countered by the uncritical adulation of die-hard fans, who had even denied that he looked "fat" before he died.[173]ab Any wish to understand Elvis Presley—his genuine abilities and his real influence—"seemed almost totally obscured."[174] Vocalese is a style or genre of jazz singing wherein lyrics are written for melodies that were originally part of an all-instrumental composition or improvisation. ...

Elvis Presley statue in Memphis, Tennessee.

However, in the late 1960s, composer and conductor Leonard Bernstein had remarked: "Elvis is the greatest cultural force in the twentieth century. He introduced the beat to everything, music, language, clothes, it's a whole new social revolution... the 60's comes from it."[175] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (344x640, 117 KB)I took this picture and allow its free use File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (344x640, 117 KB)I took this picture and allow its free use File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Leonard Bernstein in 1971 Leonard Bernstein (IPA pronunciation: )[1] (August 25, 1918 – October 14, 1990) was an American conductor, composer, and pianist. ...


It has been claimed that his early music and live performances helped to lay a commercial foundation which allowed other established performers of the 1950s to be recognised. African American acts, like Fats Domino, Chuck Berry and Little Richard, came to national prominence after Presley's acceptance among White American teenagers.[176]ac Little Richard commented: "He was an integrator, Elvis was a blessing. They wouldn't let black music through. He opened the door for black music."[175] It has also been claimed that Presley's sound and persona helped to relax the rigid color line and thereby fed the fires of the civil rights movement.[177] An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... Antoine Dominique Fats Domino (born February 26, 1928) is a classic R&B and rock and roll singer, songwriter and pianist. ... Charles Edward Anderson Chuck Berry (born 18 October 1926, St. ... Richard Wayne Penniman (born December 5, 1932), better known by the stage name Little Richard, is an African-American singer, songwriter, and pianist, who began performing in the 1940s and was a key figure in the transition from rhythm & blues to rock and roll in the mid-1950s. ... The term white American (often used interchangeably and incorrectly with Caucasian American[2] and within the United States simply white[3]) is an umbrella term that refers to people of European descent residing in the United States. ... Various movements seeking civil rights, human rights and social justice since the Second World War have become known as a civil rights movement. ...


Presley's recorded voice is seen by many as his enduring legacy. Henry Pleasants writes: "Elvis Presley has been described variously as a baritone and a tenor. An extraordinary compass... and a very wide range of vocal color have something to do with this divergence of opinion. The voice covers two octaves and a third... Moreover, he has not been confined to one type of vocal production. In ballads and country songs he belts out full-voiced high G's and A's that an opera baritone might envy. He is a naturally assimilative stylist with a multiplicity of voices—in fact, Elvis' is an extraordinary voice, or many voices."[178]ad


Gospel tenor Shawn Nielsen, who sang backing vocals for Presley, said: "He could sing anything. I've never seen such versatility... He had such great soul. He had the ability to make everyone in the audience think that he was singing directly to them. He just had a way with communication that was totally unique."[178]ae[175]


Other celebrated pop and rock musicians have acknowledged that the young Presley inspired them. The Beatles were all big Presley fans.[179] John Lennon said: "Nothing really affected me until I heard Elvis. If there hadn't been an Elvis, there wouldn't have been a Beatles."[180] Deep Purple's Ian Gillan said: "For a young singer he was an absolute inspiration. I soaked up what he did like blotting paper... you learn by copying the maestro."[181] Rod Stewart declared: "People like myself, Mick Jagger and all the others only followed in his footsteps." Cher recalls from seeing Presley live in 1956 that he made her "realize the tremendous effect a performer could have on an audience."[175] The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... John Winston Ono Lennon, MBE (October 9, 1940 – December 8, 1980), (born John Winston Lennon, known as John Ono Lennon) was an iconic English 20th century rock and roll songwriter and singer, best known as the founding member of The Beatles. ... This article is about the rock band. ... Ian Gillan (born 19 August 1945 in Hounslow, London), is an English rock music vocalist best known as the lead singer for Deep Purple. ... Roderick Stewart (rod stewart), CBE (born January 10, 1945), is a singer and songwriter born and raised in London, England, with Scottish parentage. ... Sir Michael Phillip Mick Jagger (born July 26, 1943) is a English rock musician, actor, songwriter, record and film producer and businessman. ... This article is about Cher, the entertainer. ...


By 1958, singers obviously adopting Presley's style, like Marty Wilde and Cliff Richard (the so-called "British Elvis"), were rising to prominence in the UK. Elsewhere, France's Johnny Hallyday and the Italians Adriano Celentano and Bobby Solo were also heavily influenced by Presley.[182][183] Marty Wilde (born Reginald Leonard Smith, April 15, 1939, in Greenwich, South London) is an English singer and songwriter. ... Sir Cliff Richard OBE (born Harry Rodger Webb on 14 October 1940) is an English singer, actor and businessman. ... Johnny Hallyday (born June 15, 1943 in Paris) is a French singer and actor. ... Adriano Celentano (born January 6, 1938) is an Italian singer, songwriter, comedian, actor, and TV host. ...


The singer continues to be imitated—and parodied—outside the main music industry. Presley songs remain very popular on the karaoke circuit, and many from a diversity of cultures and backgrounds work as Elvis impersonators ("the raw 1950s Elvis and the kitschy 1970s Elvis are the favorites."[184]) For other uses see Karaoke (disambiguation) A karaoke machine Karaoke from Japanese kara, empty or void, and ōkesutora, orchestra) (pronounced IPA: or ; in Japanese IPA: ;  ) is a form of entertainment in which amateur singers sing along with recorded music using a microphone and a PA system. ... Elvis Impersonators An Elvis impersonator is someone who impersonates or copies Elvis Presley either as a hobby, career in entertainment or occasionally for fun. ...


Presley's informal jamming in front of a small audience in the '68 Comeback Special is regarded as a forerunner of the so-called 'Unplugged' concept, later popularized by MTV.[185] Elvis Presley in his 68 Comeback Special Elvis Presleys 68 Comeback Special is a 1968 United States television special starring Elvis Presley. ... This article is about the original U.S. music television channel. ...


In 2002, The New York Times observed: "For those too young to have experienced Elvis Presley in his prime, today’s celebration of the 25th anniversary of his death must seem peculiar. All the talentless impersonators and appalling black velvet paintings on display can make him seem little more than a perverse and distant memory. But before Elvis was camp, he was its opposite: a genuine cultural force... Elvis’s breakthroughs are underappreciated because in this rock-and-roll age, his hard-rocking music and sultry style have triumphed so completely."[186] The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ...


Discography

Elvis Presley released 75 albums between his first in 1956, after he had signed with RCA, and the end of 1977, the year he died. ... This is an alphabetical list of all of Elvis Presleys songs. ...

Awards and recognition

In 1971, Presley was named 'One of the Ten Outstanding Young Men of the Nation' by the U.S. Junior Chamber of Commerce (The Jaycees). That summer, the City of Memphis named part of Highway 51 South "Elvis Presley Boulevard", and he won the Lifetime Achievement Award from the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences (the organization that presents Grammy awards). This is a list of hit singles by Elvis Presley. ...


Presley won three competitive Grammy awards for his gospel recordings: How Great Thou Art (album and live recording of the title track) and for the album He Touched Me. He had fourteen nominations during his career. However, "Elvis has never been adequately appreciated by those who give the Grammies."[187] Gospel music is a musical genre characterized by dominant vocals (often with strong use of harmony) referencing lyrics of a religious nature, particularly Christian. ... How Great Thou Art was Elvis Presleys second RCA Victor 12 long-play gospel album, recorded and originally released in 1967. ... He Touched Me was a 1972 gospel album by Elvis Presley which sold over 1 million copies in the US alone. ...


He is the only performer to have been inducted into four music 'Halls of Fame': the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame (1986), the Rockabilly Hall of Fame (1997), the Country Music Hall of Fame (1998), and the Gospel Music Hall of Fame (2001). In 1984, he received the W. C. Handy Award from the Blues Foundation and the Academy of Country Music’s first Golden Hat Award. In 1987, he received the American Music Awards’ first posthumous presentation of the Award of Merit.[188] The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame at sunset. ... The Rockabilly Hall of Fame was established on March 21, 1997 to present early rock and roll history and information relative to the artists and personalities involved in this pioneering American music genre. ... This official history of the Country Music Hall of Fame skirts the scandals well-documented by veteran Music Row historian Stacy Harris. ... The Gospel Music Hall of Fame, created in 1971 by the Gospel Music Association, is a Hall of Fame dedicated exclusively to recognizing meaningful contributions by individuals in all forms of gospel music. ... William Christopher Handy (November 16, 1873 – March 28, 1958) was a blues composer and musician, often known as the Father of the Blues. ... The Blues Foundation is an American nonprofit corporation headquartered in Memphis, Tennessee that is affiliated with more than 135 Blues organizations, and with a membership spanning some twenty countries. ... The Academy of Country Music (ACM) was founded in 1964 in Los Angeles, California. ... The American Music Awards show is one of four annual major American music awards shows (the others being the Billboard Music Awards, the Grammy Awards, and the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony). ...


Presley has featured prominently in a variety of polls and surveys designed to measure popularity and influence.ag However, rock 'n' roll expert Philip Ennis writes: "Perhaps it is an error of enthusiasm to freight Elvis Presley with too heavy a historical load", as, according to a public opinion poll among high school students in 1957, Pat Boone was "the nearly two-to-one favorite over Elvis Presley among boys and preferred almost three-to-one by girls..."[189] Charles Eugene Patrick Pat Boone (born June 1, 1934) is a singer whose smooth style made him a popular performer of the 1950s. ...


In 1994, the 40th anniversary of Presley's "That's All Right" was recognized with its re-release, which made the charts worldwide, making top three in the UK.


During the 2002 World Cup a Junkie XL remix of his "A Little Less Conversation" (credited as "Elvis Vs JXL") topped the charts in over twenty countries and was included in a compilation of Presley's U.S. and UK number one hits, Elv1s: 30. The 2002 Football World Cup (Official name: 2002 FIFA World Cup Korea/Japan) was held in South Korea and Japan from May 31 to June 30. ... Junkie XL (also JXL) is musician Tom Holkenborg, born in Lichtenvoorde, The Netherlands on 8 December 1967. ... A Little Less Conversation is a song written by Mac Davis and Billy Strange and was originally recorded by Elvis Presley for the movie Live a Little, Love a Little in 1968. ... The title given to this article is incorrect due to technical limitations. ...


In the UK charts (January 2005), three re-issued singles again went to number one ("Jailhouse Rock", "One Night"/"I Got Stung" and "It's Now or Never"). Throughout the year, twenty singles were re-issued—all making top five.


In the same year, Forbes magazine named Presley, for the fifth straight year, the top-earning deceased celebrity, grossing US$45 million for the Presley estate during the preceding year. In mid-2006, top place was taken by Nirvana's Kurt Cobain after the sale of his song catalogue, but Presley reclaimed the top spot in 2007.[190] Kurt Donald Cobain (February 20, 1967 – c. ...


See also

This article discusses who is the worlds best-selling artist of all-time. ... The worlds best-selling music artists cannot be listed officially, as there is no organization that has recorded global music sales in the manner that the RIAA does in the United States. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... This is a list of artists and the titles of their number one singles in order of total number one singles in the UK Singles Chart. ... The King of Rock and Roll is a title many artists have tried to claim in the past. ...

Footnotes

  • Note a: Presley's genuine birth certificate reads "Elvis Aaron Presley" (as written by a doctor). There is also a souvenir birth certificate that reads "Elvis Aron Presley." When Presley did sign his middle name, he used Aron. It reads 'Aron' on his marriage certificate and on his army duffel bag. Aron was apparently the spelling the Presleys used to make it similar to the middle name of Elvis' stillborn twin, Jesse Garon. Elvis later sought to change the name's spelling to the traditional and biblical Aaron. In the process he learned that "official state records had always listed it as Aaron. Therefore, he always was, officially, Elvis Aaron Presley." Knowing Presley's plans for his middle name, Aaron is the spelling his father chose for Elvis' tombstone, and it is the spelling his estate has designated as the official spelling whenever the middle name is used today. His death certificate says "Elvis Aron Presley." This quirk has helped inflame the "Elvis is not dead" conspiracy theories.[1]
  • Note b: Vernon Presley recalled: "There were times we had nothing to eat but cornbread and water ... but we always had compassion for people. Poor we were, I’ll never deny that. But trash we weren’t ... We never had any prejudice. We never put anybody down. Neither did Elvis."[4]
  • Note c: It seems likely that the Sun acetates were not cut for a birthday present, nor for Presley just to hear his own singing voice. There were cheaper ways of making recordings. This indicates to some that he already had greater ambitions.[24]
  • Note d: Presley's version dropped the word "Mama" from the title.[33]
  • Note e: Scotty Moore claims it was just the natural way he moved when performing—little to do with "nerves."[38]
  • Note f: This statement is usually attributed to Jim (John) Denny, the Opry manager.[40]
  • Note h: Guralnick states it was country music band leader and DJ Eddie Bond who made the comment when Presley failed auditions to join the Songfellows and a professional band. Presley later said that the comment "broke my heart."[42]
  • Note i: Country singer Porter Wagoner said Black worked hard on stage, mimicking Presley's moves, to stir the audience. "Bill Black was a big part of [the act]—at least fifty percent."[45]
  • Note k: Many of Presley's proposed gigs at the time were subject to local objections.[76]
  • Note l: In 1973, Presley was keen to produce a karate movie/documentary, enlisting the help of several top instructors and film-makers. Instructor Rick Husky says: "...Basically [our meeting] never went anywhere... Elvis got up and did some demonstrations with Ed [Parker], you know stumbled around a little bit, and it was very sad." Husky was aware that Presley was "stoned." "Colonel" Parker thought the project was folly—and a drain on their resources—from the start. (Guralnick 1994, p.531 and in passim). The film footage was finally edited, restored and released as The New Gladiators in 2002.New Gladiators (2002) Yahoo! Movies. Retrieved on 2007-10-12; Susan, King (November 17, 2002). "When Elvis bowed to karate kings" Los Angeles Times. Reprinted in IssacFlorentine.com. Retrieved on 2007-10-12.
  • Note n: Binder relates how he challenged Presley to stand with him on Sunset Boulevard. Presley had assumed he would not only be recognized, but mobbed. He went outside and nothing happened. Binder describes the incident as "embarrassing," but it helped build up trust with the singer.[109]
  • Note p: The article claims that "the so-called dangerous rock-and-roll idol was anything but a despotic ruler in the bedroom ... He was far more interested in heavy petting."[113]
  • Note q: Peggy Lipton further relates that with Presley it "didn't feel like a man next to me—more like a boy who'd never matured." When he tried to make love to her, "he just wasn't up to sex. Not that he wasn't built, but with me, at least, he was virtually impotent."[115]
  • Note r: Shepherd relates how Elvis "charmed" her by telling her in one of his drug-induced states about the time a doctor gave him an injection directly into his eye. She also claims to have introduced Elvis to certain amorous techniques.[191] However, Shepherd's much-quoted claims are "viewed with skepticism by other lovers of the King."</ref>
  • Note s: In his critical study on the "dream machine" (media manipulation to create semi-fictional icons), Gamson cites a press agent "saying that his client, Ann-Margret, could initially have been "sold ... as anything"; "She was a new product. We felt there was a need in The Industry for a female Elvis Presley."[119]
  • Note u: In his book, Me and a Guy named Elvis, Jerry Schilling relates that one way to arouse the wrath of the singer was to play one of his own recordings at his parties. "Get that crap off," was his reaction on one occasion when someone played "All Shook Up" on a jukebox. "There was no doubt he was really angry." Schilling thinks that Presley "lived with his music outside of the house—he didn't need to hear it while he was trying to relax in his own basement."[192]
  • Note v: In 1973, he overdosed twice on barbiturates: In February, when he spent three days in a coma in his suite at the Hilton hotel and later in St. Louis.[132]
  • Note w: Binder also claimed that Presley's black leather outfit needed cleaning between live sessions, not just because he perspired, but because he had ejaculated while performing.[137]
  • Note x: At a press conference after his first opening in Vegas, when a reporter referred to him as "The King", Presley pointed to Fats Domino, standing at the back of the room. "No," he said, "that’s the real king of rock and roll."[139]
  • Note y: Presley had apparently been on the toilet before he stumbled and then vomited.[158]
  • Note z: Marty Lacker was apparently not pleased when Tom Parker turned up at Presley's funeral wearing shorts and a Hawaiian shirt. "All he did was stand outside and lean up against a car and smoke a cigar and look at all the people going in."[159]
  • Note aa: Others take the opposite view: "Presley’s comprehensive musical knowledge and talent also surprised and impressed songwriters Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller... [They] considered Presley to be an 'idiot savant' because he knew so many songs. His knowledge of the blues especially impressed them. Leiber remembers that Presley "could imitate anything he heard. He had a perfect ear," and he also described Elvis’s ear as "uncanny." In addition, Presley could sing and/or play a song on the piano after hearing it only once or twice. His natural ear for music, ability to play by ear, and to improvise were well known to his friends and musical associates."[171]
  • Note ab: Wall has argued that many Presley authors are part of a "worldwide Elvis industry" which tends to be biased. He contends that few publications are critical. One such book is Albert Goldman's controversial biography (1981), in which the author unfavorably discusses the star's weight problems, his stage costumes and his sex life. Such books are frequently disparaged and harshly attacked by Elvis fan groups. Professor Wall claims that one of the strategies of fan clubs and appreciation societies is "'community policing' to achieve governance at a distance... These organisations have, through their membership magazines, activities and sales operations, created a powerful moral majority" endeavoring to suppress most critical voices. "With a combined membership of millions, the fans form a formidable constituency of consumer power."[173]
  • Note ac: Music journalist Dave Marsh has defended Presley and argued how his work led to integration.[176]
  • Note ad: See also: Cook, Graceland National Historic Landmark Nomination Form. Other analyses of Presley's voice credit him with a three octave range.[178]
  • Note ae: Bob Dylan remarked: "When I first heard Elvis' voice I just knew that I wasn't going to work for anybody; and nobody was going to be my boss... Hearing him for the first time was like busting out of jail."[178]
  • Note af: "This year's Wonders of America set climbed to second place in the most popular stamps, but Elvis is still the King, the Postal Service said Tuesday."
  • Note ag: VH1 ranked Presley #8 on its 100 Greatest Artists in Rock and Roll in 1998 while CMT ranked him #15 on CMT's 40 Greatest Men in Country Music. Presley is one of only three artists to make both VH1's and CMT's lists, the others being Johnny Cash and The Eagles.[193][194] Elvis also ranked second for BBC's "Voice of the Century", eighth on Discovery Channel's "Greatest American" list, in the top ten of Variety's "100 Icons of the century", sixty-sixth in The Atlantic Monthly's "100 most influential figures in American history", and third in Rolling Stone's "The Immortals: The Fifty Greatest Artists of All Time" for which he was chosen by Bono.[195][196][197][198][199]

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References

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  • Alagna, Magdalena (2002). Elvis Presley. Rosen Publishing Group. ISBN 0823935248.
  • Austen, Jake (2005). TV-A-Go-Go: Rock on TV from American Bandstand to American Idol. Chicago Review Press. ISBN 1556525729.
  • Baden, Michael M.;Judith Adler Hennessee (1992). Unnatural Death: Confessions of a Medical Examiner. New York: Random House. ISBN 0804105995.
  • Bayles, Martha (1996). Hole in Our Soul: The Loss of Beauty and Meaning in American Popular Music. University of Chicago Press. ISBN 0226039595.
  • Bertrand, Michael T. (2000). Race, Rock, and Elvis. University of Illinois Press. ISBN 0-252-02586-5.
  • Beebe, R.; D. Fulbrook, B. Saunders (eds.) (2002). Rock over the Edge. Duke University Press. ISBN 0822329158.
  • Brown, Peter Harry; Pat H. Broeske (1998). Down at the End of Lonely Street: The Life and Death of Elvis Presley. Signet. ISBN: 0451190947.
  • Caine, A. (2005). Interpreting Rock Movies: The Pop Film and Its Critics in Britain. Palgrave Macmillan. 0719065380.
  • Carr, Roy and Mick Farren (1982). Elvis: The complete illustrated record. Eel Pie Publishing. ISBN 0-906008-54-9.
  • Clayton, Rose and Dick Heard (2003). Elvis: By Those Who Knew Him Best. Virgin Publishing Limited. ISBN 0-7535-0835-4.
  • Cook, J., Henry, P. (ed.) (2004). Graceland National Historic Landmark Nomination Form (PDF). United States Department of the Interior.
  • Curtin, Jim; James Curtin, Renata Ginter (1998). Elvis: Unknown Stories behind the Legend. Celebrity Books. ISBN 1580291023.
  • Dickerson, James L. (2001). Colonel Tom Parker: The Curious Life of Elvis Presley's Eccentric Manager. Cooper Square Press. ISBN 0815412673.
  • Denisoff, R. Serge (1975). Solid Gold: The Popular Record Industry. New Brunswick, New Jersey: Transaction Books. ISBN 0878555862.
  • Dundy, Elaine (1986). Elvis and Gladys: The Genesis of the King, London: Weidenfeld and Nicolson. ISBN 0708830870.
  • Escott, Colin. (1998). "Elvis Presley". In The Encyclopedia of Country Music. Paul Kingsbury, Editor. New York: Oxford University Press. ISBN 0195176081.
  • Falk, Ursula A.; Gerhard Falk (2005). Youth Culture and the Generation Gap. Algora Publishing. ISBN 0875863671.
  • Finstad, Suzanne (1997). Child Bride: The Untold Story of Priscilla Beaulieu Presley. New York: Harmony Books. ISBN 0517705850.
  • Gamson, Joshua (1994). Claims to Fame: Celebrity in Contemporary America. University of California Press. ISBN 0520083520.
  • George-Warren, Holly; Patricia Romanowski, Jon Pareles (2001). The Rolling Stone Encyclopedia of Rock And Roll. Fireside. ISBN 0-7432-0120-5.
  • Goldman, Albert (1990). Elvis: The Last 24 Hours. St Martins. ISBN 0312925417.
  • Guralnick, Peter (1994). Last Train to Memphis: The Rise of Elvis Presley. Boston: Little, Brown and Company. ISBN 0316332259.
  • Guralnick, Peter (1999). Careless Love. The Unmaking of Elvis Presley. Back Bay Books. ISBN 0316332976.
  • Harbinson, W. A., (1977). The life and death of Elvis Presley. London: Michael Joseph. ISBN 0517246708.
  • Harrington C. Lee; Denise D. Bielby (2000). Popular Culture: Production and Consumption. Blackwell. ISBN 063121710X.
  • Hopkins, Jerry (2002). Elvis in Hawaii. Bess Press. ISBN 1573061425.
  • Humphries, Patrick (2003). Elvis The #1 Hits: The Secret History of the Classics. Andrews McMeel. ISBN 0740738038.
  • Jorgensen, Ernst (1998). Elvis Presley: A life in music. The complete recording sessions. St. Martin's Press. ISBN 0312185723.
  • Kirchberg, Connie and Marc Hendricks (1999). Elvis Presley, Richard Nixon, and the American Dream, Jefferson, NC: McFarland and Company. ISBN 0786407166.
  • Lichter, Paul (1980). Elvis - The Boy Who Dared To Rock. Sphere Books. ISBN 0 7221 5547-6.
  • Lipton, Peggy; Coco Dalton, David Dalton (2005). Breathing Out. St. Martin's Press. ISBN 0312324138.
  • Lisanti, Tom (2000). Fantasy Femmes of 60's Cinema: Interviews with 20 Actresses from Biker, Beach, and Elvis Movies. McFarland and Company. ISBN 0786408685.
  • Lisanti, Tom (2003). Drive-In Dream Girls: A Galaxy of B-Movie Starlets of the Sixties. McFarland. ISBN 0786415754.
  • Margret, Ann; Todd Gold (1994). Ann-Margret: My Story. G.P. Putnam's Sons. ISBN 0399138919.
  • Miller, James, (1999). Flowers in the Dustbin: The Rise of Rock and Roll, 1947-1977. Fireside. ISBN 0684865602.
  • Moore, Scotty; James Dickerson (1997). That’s Alright, Elvis. Schirmer Books. ISBN 0028645995.
  • Nash, A.; M. Lacker, L. Fike, B. Smith (1995). Elvis Aron Presley: Revelations from the Memphis Mafia. Harper Collins. ISBN 006109336X.
  • Naylor, Jerry and Steve Halliday (2007). The Rockabilly Legends; They Called It Rockabilly Long Before they Called It Rock and Roll (Book and DVD). Hal Leonard Publishing Corporation. ISBN 142342042X.
  • Pratt, Linda R. (1979). "Elvis, or the Ironies of a Southern Identity". Elvis: Images and Fancies. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi.
  • Presley, Priscilla, (1985). Elvis and Me. New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons. ISBN 0-399-12984-7.
  • Rodman, G., (1996). Elvis After Elvis, The Posthumous Career of a Living Legend. London: Routledge. ISBN 0415110025.
  • Rodriguez, R., (2006). The 1950s' Most Wanted: The Top 10 Book of Rock & Roll Rebels, Cold War Crises, and All-American Oddities. Potomac Books. ISBN 1574887157.
  • Roy, Samuel (1985). Elvis: Prophet of Power. Branden Publishing Co. Inc. ISBN 0-8283-1898-0.
  • Shepherd, Cybill; Aimee Lee Ball (2000}. Cybill Disobedience. Thorndike Press. ISBN 0061030147.
  • Stecopoulos, H.; M. Uebel (1997). Race and the Subject of Masculinities. Duke University Press. ISBN 0822319667.
  • Szatmary, David P. (1996). A Time to Rock: A Social History of Rock 'n' Roll. New York: Schirmer Books. ISBN 0028646703.
  • Verswijver, L., (2002). Movies Were Always Magical: Interviews with 19 Actors, Directors, and Producers from the Hollywood of the 1930s through the 1950s. McFarland & Company. ISBN 0786411295.
  • Walser, Robert; David Nicholls (ed.) (1999). The Cambridge History of American Music. Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0521454298.
  • West, Red; Sonny West, Dave Hebler (As Told To Steve Dunleavy) (1977). Elvis: What Happened. Bantam Books. ISBN 0345272153.

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Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 202nd day of the year (203rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 42nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 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Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Not to be confused with Public Broadcasting Services in Malta. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 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Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 189th day of the year (190th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Alanna Nash (born 1950) is an American journalist and biographer. ... is the 215th day of the year (216th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... 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Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 226th day of the year (227th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... is the 219th day of the year (220th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 228th day of the year (229th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Canadian channel, see CourtTV Canada The Courtroom Television Network, more commonly known as Court TV, is an American cable television network owned by Time Warner that launched on July 1, 1991. ... 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Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 219th day of the year (220th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... CBS News logo, used from Sept. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Classic Rock is a magazine dedicated to the radio format of classic rock, published by Future Publishing, who are also responsible for its sister publication Metal Hammer. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A digital object identifier (or DOI) is a standard for persistently identifying a piece of intellectual property on a digital network and associating it with related data, the metadata, in a structured extensible way. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 228th day of the year (229th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 302nd day of the year (303rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 191st day of the year (192nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 296th day of the year (297th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... VH1 (VH-1: Video Hits One until 1994) is an American cable television channel that was created in January 1985 by Warner-Amex Satellite Entertainment, at the time a division of Warner Communications and owners of MTV. VH1 and sister channel MTV are currently part of the MTV Networks division... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 289th day of the year (290th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... CMT can refer to: Cadmium Mercury Telluride Canal Metropolitano Televisión Catalog Management Table Certified Market Technician Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease Childrens Musical Theatreworks of Fresno, California Chip Multi Threading Comision del Mercado de las Telecommunicaciones, the Spanish communications industry regulator. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 289th day of the year (290th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 108th day of the year (109th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 289th day of the year (290th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Discovery Channel is a cable and satellite TV channel founded by John Hendricks which is distributed by Discovery Communications. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 289th day of the year (290th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Variety is a daily newspaper for the entertainment industry. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 289th day of the year (290th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Atlantic redirects here; for the ocean, see Atlantic Ocean. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 289th day of the year (290th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 105th day of the year (106th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the magazine. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 289th day of the year (290th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Independent Publishers Group, or IPG, is a book distributor, founded in 1971 to exclusively market titles from independent client publishers to the book trade. ... The University of Chicago Press is the largest university press in the U.S. It is operated by the University of Chicago and publishes a wide variety of academic titles, including The Chicago Manual of Style, dozens of academic journals including Critical Inquiry, and a wide array of texts covering... The University of Illinois Press is a major American university press. ... Duke University Press is a book publisher and a part of Duke University. ... Eel Pie Publishing is a publishing house founded by musician and author Pete Townshend in 1977, and named after Eel Pie Island. ... Elaine Dundy Elaine Dundy (born Elaine Brimberg in 1927 in New York City, New York) is an American, actress, journalist, novelist, biographer, and playwright. ... Albert Harry Goldman (crazy jew) (April 15, 1927 – March 28, 1994) was an American professor and author. ... Peter Guralnick is a music critic and historian of American popular music. ... // Random House is a publishing house based in New York City. ...

Further reading

  • Goldman, Albert (1981). Elvis. McGraw-Hill. ISBN 0-07-023657-7.
  • Allen, Lew (2007). Elvis & the birth of rock. Genesis Publications. ISBN: 1-905662-00-9.
  • Cantor, Louis (2005). Dewey and Elvis - The Life and Times of a Rock 'n' Roll Deejay. University of Illinois Press. ISBN 0-252-02981-X.
  • Chadwick, Vernon (ed.) (1997). In Search of Elvis: Music, Race, Art, Religion. Proceedings of the first annual International Conference on Elvis Presley, Westview. ISNB 0813329876.
  • Doss, Erika Lee (1999). Elvis Culture: Fans, Faith, and Image. University of Kansas Press. ISBN 0700609482.
  • Marcus, Greil (1991). Dead Elvis: A Chronicle of a Cultural Obsession.
  • Marcus, Greil (2000). Double Trouble: Bill Clinton and Elvis Presley in a Land of No Alternative. ISBN 057120676X.
  • Nash, Alanna (1995). Elvis Aaron Presley: Revelations from the Memphis Mafia. Harper Collins. ISBN 006109336X.
  • Nash, Alanna (2003). The Colonel: The Extraordinary Story of Colonel Tom Parker and Elvis Presley. Simon and Schuster. ISBN 0743213017.

Albert Harry Goldman (crazy jew) (April 15, 1927 – March 28, 1994) was an American professor and author. ... Genesis Publications is a british publishing company specialized in art books of pop and rock ans rolls artists photos. ... The University of Illinois Press is a major American university press. ... Alanna Nash (born 1950) is an American journalist and biographer. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Elvis Presley
Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Elvis Presley
  • Elvis Presley Enterprises - Official site of Elvis Presley
  • Official UK Elvis site - Includes details of new UK releases
  • Genealogy of Elvis Presley
  • Elvis Presley at the Internet Movie Database
  • Rock and Roll Hall of Fame
Persondata
NAME Presley, Elvis Aaron
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Presley, Elvis Aaron
SHORT DESCRIPTION American singer, song producer and actor; "The King of Rock'n'Roll"
DATE OF BIRTH January 8, 1935(1935-01-08)
PLACE OF BIRTH Tupelo, Mississippi, U.S.
DATE OF DEATH August 16, 1977
PLACE OF DEATH Memphis, Tennessee, USA

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ... Elvis Presley is the self-titled debut album from Elvis Presley. ... This is Elvis second album. ... For other uses, see Loving You (disambiguation). ... Released in November 1957, Elvis Christmas Album is a very popular holiday album that continues to sell well. ... King Creole is a 1958 Elvis Presley film and soundtrack based on the 1952 Harold Robbins novel, A Stone for Danny Fisher. ... For LP Fans Only is a 1959 release by Elvis Presley. ... A Date with Elvis is a 1959 release by Elvis Presley. ... Elvis is Back! was Elvis Presleys first album to be released after his army discharge and his first in true stereo. ... G.I. Blues is a 1960 Elvis Presley musical motion picture played as a romantic comedy. ... His Hand in Mine was Elvis Presleys first RCA Victor 12 long-play gospel album, recorded and originally released in 1960; a followup to his 1957 EP Peace In The Valley. ... Something For Everybody is a popular music album recorded by Elvis Presley in primarily March 1961. ... Blue Hawaii is a 1961 musical film set in the state of Hawaii and starring Elvis Presley. ... Kiss Me Quick Just For Old Time Sake Gonna Get Back Home Somehow I Met Her Today (Such An) Easy Question Shes Not You Im Yours Youll Be Gone Something Blue Suspicion I Feel That Ive Known You Forever Night Rider For The Millionth And Last... Girls! Girls! Girls! is a 1962 musical comedy film starring Elvis Presley as penniless fisherman who loves his live on the sea and dreams of owning his own boat. ... It Happened at the Worlds Fair is a 1963 musical film starring Elvis Presley as a cropdusting pilot. ... Fun in Acapulco is a 1963 American motion picture starring Elvis Presley and Ursula Andress. ... VHS cover of Kissin Cousins. Kissin Cousins is a 1964 Musical film starring Elvis Presley in two roles, one as an American soldier and the other, a hillbilly. ... Roustabout is a 1964 musical movie starring Elvis Presley. ... Girl Happy is a 1965 musical film and romantic comedy starring Elvis Presley. ... Elvis for Everyone is a 1965 compilation of previously non-issued tracks, some dating as far back as the 1954 Sun sessions. ... Harum Scarum is a 1965 musical film and comedy starring Elvis Presley. ... Frankie and Johnny is a 1966 musical starring Elvis Presley as a riverboat gambler. ... Paradise, Hawaiian Style is a 1966 musical film and comedy starring [[Elvis Presley]. It was the third and final motion picture that he filmed in Hawaii. ... Spinout is a 1966 musical film and comedy starring Elvis Presley as the lead singer of a band and part-time racecar driver. ... How Great Thou Art was Elvis Presleys second RCA Victor 12 long-play gospel album, recorded and originally released in 1967. ... Double Trouble is a 1967 musical film starring Elvis Presley. ... Clambake is a 1967 musical film starring Elvis Presley. ... Speedway is a 1968 action film starring Elvis Presley as a racecar driver. ... This is the soundtrack to Elvis 1968 Comeback Special. The material from the special has since been released in more complete and expansive forms. ... From Elvis in Memphis is an album from Elvis Presley, one that many critics consider to be his best album. ... This 1969 two album set was re-released a year later as the two seperate albums. ... Thats The Way It Is is the title of Elvis Presleys 1970 album which was released on November 11, 1970 as the soundtrack LP to the movie of the same name. ... This was Elvis second studio album to be released in the 1970s (the first being Thats The Way It Is), which was slated as a live album. ... The 1971 studio album from Elvis. ... Elvis Sings The Wonderful World Of Christmas is a 1971 album by Elvis Presley, and Elvis second Christmas album. ... Elvis Gold selling album from 1972. ... He Touched Me was a 1972 gospel album by Elvis Presley which sold over 1 million copies in the US alone. ... Elvis is Elvis Presleys self-titled 1973 album. ... Studio album from 1973. ... Good Times is a 1974 album by Elvis Presley. ... Promised Land is a 1975 album by Elvis Presley. ... The TODAY sessions were held in RCAs Studio C, Hollywood, CA March 10-12, 1975 and marked the last time Elvis would ever record in a studio. ... Hurt Never Again (Recorded: Graceland, Memphis, February 6, 1976) Blue Eyes Crying In The Rain (Recorded: Graceland, Memphis, February 7, 1976) Danny Boy (Recorded: Graceland, Memphis, February 5, 1976) Last Farewell (Recorded: Graceland, Memphis, February 2, 1976) For The Heart Bitter They Are Harder They Fall (Recorded: Graceland, Memphis, February... Moody Blue is a song written by Mark James — also known for writing Suspicious Minds — and recorded by Elvis Presley. ... Elvis in Concert is the title of the soundtrack album released in conjunction with the television special of the same name which featured some of the final performances of Elvis Presley. ... In 1956, following his rise to stardom in the rock and roll musical arena, singer Elvis Presley launched a parallel career as a film actor, beginning with the musical western film, Love Me Tender (although he had previously appeared in an unreleased 1955 production, The Pied Piper of Cleveland). ... Love Me Tender is an American motion picture directed by Robert D. Webb, released by 20th Century Fox on November 15, 1956. ... For other uses, see Loving You (disambiguation). ... Jailhouse Rock is an American motion picture directed by Richard Thorpe, released by MGM on November 8, 1957. ... King Creole is a 1958 Elvis Presley film and soundtrack based on the 1952 Harold Robbins novel, A Stone for Danny Fisher. ... G.I. Blues is a 1960 Elvis Presley musical motion picture played as a romantic comedy. ... Flaming Star is the title of a 1960 Elvis Presley film in the Western genre. ... Wild in the Country is a 1961 film drama starring Elvis Presley in which he portrays a troubled young man from a dysfunctional family who pursues a literary career. ... Blue Hawaii is a 1961 musical film set in the state of Hawaii and starring Elvis Presley. ... Follow That Dream is a 1962 musical film starring Elvis Presley. ... Kid Galahad is a 1962 musical film starring Elvis Presley as a boxer. ... Girls! Girls! Girls! is a 1962 musical comedy film starring Elvis Presley as penniless fisherman who loves his live on the sea and dreams of owning his own boat. ... It Happened at the Worlds Fair is a 1963 musical film starring Elvis Presley as a cropdusting pilot. ... Fun in Acapulco is a 1963 American motion picture starring Elvis Presley and Ursula Andress. ... VHS cover of Kissin Cousins. Kissin Cousins is a 1964 Musical film starring Elvis Presley in two roles, one as an American soldier and the other, a hillbilly. ... Viva Las Vegas (1964) is an American romantic musical motion picture co-starring American singers Elvis Presley and Ann-Margret. ... Roustabout is a 1964 musical movie starring Elvis Presley. ... Girl Happy is a 1965 musical film and romantic comedy starring Elvis Presley. ... Tickle Me is a 1965 Western film and comedy starring Elvis Presley. ... Harum Scarum is a 1965 musical film and comedy starring Elvis Presley. ... Frankie and Johnny is a 1966 musical starring Elvis Presley as a riverboat gambler. ... Paradise, Hawaiian Style is a 1966 musical film and comedy starring [[Elvis Presley]. It was the third and final motion picture that he filmed in Hawaii. ... Spinout is a 1966 musical film and comedy starring Elvis Presley as the lead singer of a band and part-time racecar driver. ... Easy Come, Easy Go is a 1967 musical film starring Elvis Presley. ... Double Trouble is a 1967 musical film starring Elvis Presley. ... Clambake is a 1967 musical film starring Elvis Presley. ... Stay Away, Joe is a 1968 dramatic western film and comedy starring Elvis Presley. ... Speedway is a 1968 action film starring Elvis Presley as a racecar driver. ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... Charro! is a 1969 Western film starring Elvis Presley. ... The Trouble with Girls is a 1969 dramatic comedy motion picture starring Elvis Presley. ... Change of Habit was a 1969 theatrical film starring Elvis Presley and Mary Tyler Moore. ... In 1956, following his rise to stardom in the rock and roll musical arena, singer Elvis Presley launched a parallel career as a film actor, beginning with the musical western film, Love Me Tender (although he had previously appeared in an unreleased 1955 production, The Pied Piper of Cleveland). ... The Pied Piper of Cleveland was the title of a film produced in October 1955 documenting the career of disc jockey Bill Randle. ... Elvis on Tour is an American musical-documentary motion picture released by MGM in 1972. ... This is Elvis is a 1981 docudrama based on the life of music legend Elvis Presley. ... In 1956, following his rise to stardom in the rock and roll musical arena, singer Elvis Presley launched a parallel career as a film actor, beginning with the musical western film, Love Me Tender (although he had previously appeared in an unreleased 1955 production, The Pied Piper of Cleveland). ... Elvis Presley in his 68 Comeback Special Elvis Presleys 68 Comeback Special is a 1968 United States television special starring Elvis Presley. ... Elvis Presley, 1973 Aloha From Hawaii television broadcast Aloha from Hawaii is an Elvis Presley music concert broadcast live via satellite around the world on January 14, 1973. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Cooking with Elvis is dark comedy by playwright Lee Hall which was first performed in 2000 in Edinburgh. ... All Shook Up is a Broadway jukebox musical featuring the music of the classic rock star Elvis Presley, with a book by Joe DiPietro. ... Cirque du Soleil (French for Circus of the Sun) is an entertainment empire based in Montreal, Quebec, Canada and founded in Baie-Saint-Paul in 1984 by two former street performers, Guy Laliberté and Daniel Gauthier. ... The Grand Ole Opry is a weekly Saturday night country music radio program broadcast live on WSM radio in Nashville, Tennessee, and televised on Great American Country network. ... The Louisiana Hayride was a radio broadcast from the Municipal Auditorium in Shreveport, Louisiana, United States that during its heyday from 1948 to 1960 helped launch the careers of the some of the greatest names in American music. ... One of the most famous examples of early U.S. television broadcasting was Texaco Star Theater, the variety show that made Milton Berle a household name. ... Steve Allen on the cover of Steve Allen on the Bible, Religion, and Morality Stephen Valentine Patrick William Allen (December 26, 1921 – October 30, 2000) was a musician, comedian and writer, who was instrumental in innovating the concept of the television talk show. ... The Ed Sullivan Show was an American television variety show that ran from June 20, 1948 to June 6, 1971, and was hosted by former entertainment columnist Ed Sullivan. ... For the Whitney Houston song, see Heartbreak Hotel (Whitney Houston song). ... I Want You, I Need You, I Love You is a popular song written by Maurice Mysels and Ira Kosloff, and most famously performed by Elvis Presley. ... Dont be Cruel is a song by Otis Blackwell, which was recorded by Elvis Presley in 1956. ... Hound Dog is a twelve-bar blues written by Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller and originally recorded by Willie Mae Big Mama Thornton in 1952. ... Love Me Tender is a song sung by Elvis Presley, to the tune of Aura Lee (or Aura Lea), a Civil War song by George R. Poulton. ... At least three different songs have been recorded with the title Love Me. // Jimmy Lee and Wayton Walker recorded a song titled Love Me by S. Lewis in 1955. ... Elvis Presley singles chronology Last single = Love Me Tender (1956) This single = Too Much (1957) Next single = All Shook Up (1957) This is awesome!!!! Categories: | | ... All Shook Up is one of the many hit songs of Elvis Presley. ... (Let Me Be Your) Teddy Bear is a popular song. ... Jailhouse Rock is a song written by Leiber and Stoller that first became a hit for the American singer Elvis Presley. ... In linguistics, a contraction is the formation of a new word from two or more individual words. ... This article is about the Elvis Presley number one hit. ... Hard Headed Woman is an American song written by African American songwriter Claude Demetrius. ... One Night (Yek Shab) is a 2005 motion picture. ... This article is about the Elvis Presley number one hit. ... (Now and Then Theres) A Fool Such as I is a popular song. ... A Big Hunk o Love, a song sung by Elvis Presley, was recorded on June 10, 1958 in RCAs Nashville, Tennessee studio, while Presley was on leave from the U.S. Army. ... This article is about the Elvis Presley number one song. ... O Sole Mio is one of the best known Italian songs that exists, and because of that, very many singers have it on their repertoire. ... Are You Lonesome Tonight? is a popular song. ... This is a list of hit singles by Elvis Presley. ... It has been suggested that Cant Help Falling in Love (A*Teens song) be merged into this article or section. ... Good Luck Charm is a song performed by Elvis Presley that reached number 1 on the Billboard Hot 100 list in the week ending April 21, 1962. ... Return to Sender is a 1962 rock and roll hit single by American singer Elvis Presley. ... Crying In The Chapel was a song written by Artie Glenn for his son Darrell to sing. ... In the Ghetto is a song written by American singer-songwriter Mac Davis and made popular by rock and roll singer Elvis Presley. ... This article is about the song. ... dont cry daddy was recorded by Elvis Aron Presley around the late 60s. ... The Wonder of You, sung by Elvis Presley, words and music by Baker Knight, was released as a single on April 20, 1970. ... Burning Love(German: Brennende Liebe)was a song written by Dennis Linde and performed by Elvis Presley. ... For other uses, see Graceland (disambiguation). ... Priscilla Beaulieu Presley (born Priscilla Ann Wagner on May 24, 1945 in Brooklyn, New York) is an American model, author and actress and ex-wife of rock n roll singer and musician Elvis Presley and mother of singer/songwriter Lisa Marie Presley. ... Lisa Marie Presley (born February 1, 1968) is an American singer/songwriter, who is the only child of Elvis Presley and Priscilla Beaulieu Presley. ... The Memphis Mafia was the nickname for a group of friends, associates, employees and yes-men whose main function was to be around Elvis Presley from 1956 until he died. ... Colonel Tom Parker (born Andreas Cornelius van Kuijk on June 26, 1909 – January 21, 1997), was an American/Dutch entertainment impresario known best as the manager of Elvis Presley. ... . ... Elvis Presley statue in Memphis, TN. Since the 1950s, the impact on American and world culture of Elvis Presley - singer and music icon has been recognized. ... Elvis impersonators. ... President Richard Nixon and Elvis Presley December, 1970. ... Elvis, Priscilla and Lisa Marie. ... Elvis Impersonators An Elvis impersonator is someone who impersonates or copies Elvis Presley either as a hobby, career in entertainment or occasionally for fun. ... Elvis and Gladys is a biography of Rock and Roll singer Elvis Presley by author and film industry insider, Elaine Dundy. ... Elvis and Me is a 1985 American biography written by Priscilla Beaulieu Presley, the former wife of singer Elvis Presley. ... The Weekly World News frequently claims Elvis Is Alive! Elvis sightings are a recurring phenomenon in which people claim to see American singer and rock star Elvis Presley, who died on August 16, 1977. ... The Elvis-A-Rama Museum is the largest private collection of Elvis memorabilia. ... Linda Diane Thompson (born May 23, 1950, in Memphis, Tennessee) is an American actress and songwriter. ... Judy Spreckels (born 1933) was a former friend of Elvis Presley during the rock n roll singers rise to stardom. ... June Juanico (born 1938) is a former beauty queen and an Elvis Presley fan from Biloxi, Mississippi, whom the famous rock n roll singer dated in 1955 and 1956, for instance, when he took three weeks of vacation after having recorded his songs Hound Dog and Dont Be Cruel... Elvis Presleys Sun recordings are a number of recordings he made at Sun Studios in Memphis, Tennessee, U.S.A. between 1953 and 1956. ... Million Dollar Quartet is the name given to recordings made on Tuesday December 4, 1956 in the Sun Record Studios in Memphis, Tennessee. ... The iconic nature of Elvis Presley in music and popular culture have often made him a subject of or a touchstone in various songs. ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... Elvis has left the building! is a phrase that was often used by public address announcers following Elvis Presley concerts to disperse audiences who lingered in hopes of an Elvis encore. ... Elvis Radio is an all Elvis Presley station on SIRIUS Satellite Radio channel 13 and DISH Network channel 6013. ... is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar). ... Species Nyssa aquatica - Water Tupelo Nyssa biflora - Swamp Tupelo Nyssa javanica - Indonesian Tupelo Nyssa leptophylla - Hunan Tupelo Nyssa ogeche - Ogeechee Tupelo Nyssa sinensis - Chinese Tupelo Nyssa sylvatica - Black Tupelo Nyssa ursina - Bear Tupelo Nyssa yunnanensis - Yunnan Tupelo The tupelos, genus Nyssa, are a small genus of about 9 to 11... This article is about the U.S. state. ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... is the 228th day of the year (229th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ... For other uses, see Memphis (disambiguation). ...


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Elvis Presley (578 words)
Presley performed this music with a natural hip swiveling sexuality that made him a teen idol and a role model for generations of cool rebels.
Presley was repeatedly dismissed as vulgar, incompetent and a bad influence.
Born January 8, 1935, in East Tupelo, Mississippi, Presley was the son of Gladys and Vernon Presley, a sewing machine operator and a truck driver.
Elvis Presley - hotshotdigital.com (552 words)
Elvis recorded five singles at Sun, and before long he had become the teen idol of the century, playing concerts for rioting hordes of screaming teenage girls.
Elvis was known for his explosive stage presence and his controversially suggestive hip movements.
Many Elvis historians have speculated that there was an ulterior motive for this peacetime draft, one theory being that it was a conservative political move to protect the country from the corrupting influence of his music.
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