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Encyclopedia > Elton John
Elton John

Background information
Birth name Reginald Kenneth Dwight
Also known as Sir Elton Hercules John
Born March 25, 1947 (1947-03-25) (age 60)
Origin Flag of England Pinner, Middlesex, London, England
Genre(s) Pop rock, piano rock
Occupation(s) Musician, songwriter, producer
Instrument(s) Singing, piano, keyboards
Years active 1964—present
Label(s) Uni, MCA, Geffen, MCA, Rocket/Island, Universal, Interscope, Mercury
Website EltonJohn.com

Sir Elton Hercules[1] John CBE[2] (born Reginald Kenneth Dwight on 25 March 1947) is a five-time Grammy and one-time Academy Award-winning English pop/rock singer, composer and pianist. Image File history File links Eltonjohn. ... is the 84th day of the year (85th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_England. ... Pinner is a suburb in north-west London. ... The Middlesex Guildhall at Westminster Middlesex is one of the 39 historic counties of England and was the second smallest (after Rutland). ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem - the United Kingdom anthem God Save the Queen is commonly used England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto)1 Unified  -  by Athelstan 927 AD  Area  -  Total... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... For Japanese racehorse, see Pop Rock (horse). ... Piano rock, sometimes referred to as piano pop, is a term for a style of music that is based around the piano, and sometimes around piano-related instruments, such as the Fender Rhodes, the Wurlitzer electric piano, and keyboard-based synthesizers. ... “Instrumentalist” redirects here. ... A songwriter is someone who writes the lyrics to songs, the musical composition or melody to songs, or both. ... In the music industry, a record producer (or music producer) has many roles, among them controlling the recording sessions, coaching and guiding the musicians, organizing and scheduling production budget and resources, and supervising the recording, mixing and mastering processes. ... A musical instrument is a device constructed or modified with the purpose of making music. ... Harry Belafonte singing, photograph by C. van Vechten Singing is the act of producing musical sounds with the voice, which is often contrasted with speech. ... A short grand piano, with the top up. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Uni Records was a subsidiary of MCA Records. ... MCA Records was an American-based record company owned by Music Corporation of America (MCA). ... Geffen Records is an American record label, owned by Universal Music Group, and operates as one third of UMGs Interscope-Geffen-A&M label group. ... MCA Records was an American-based record company owned by Music Corporation of America (MCA). ... The Rocket Record Company was a record label founded by Elton John, with Bernie Taupin, Gus Dudgeon and Steve Brown among others, in 1972. ... Universal Records is an American record label owned by Universal Music Group. ... Interscope Records is a record label currently owned by the Universal Music Group. ... Mercury Records was a record label founded in Chicago, Illinois in 1945 by Irving Green, Berle Adams and Arthur Talmadge. ... The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire is a British order of chivalry established on 4 June 1917 by King George V. The Order includes five classes in civil and military divisions; in decreasing order of seniority, these are Knight Grand Cross or Dame Grand Cross (GBE) Knight Commander... is the 84th day of the year (85th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Grammy Award statuette The Grammy Awards, presented by the Recording Academy (an association of Americans professionally involved in the recorded music industry) for outstanding achievements in the recording industry, is one of four major music awards shows held annually in the United States (the Billboard Music Awards, the American Music... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem - the United Kingdom anthem God Save the Queen is commonly used England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto)1 Unified  -  by Athelstan 927 AD  Area  -  Total... For popular forms of music in general, see Popular music. ... For other uses, see Rock music (disambiguation). ... A singer is a musician who uses their voice to produce music. ... A composer is a person who writes music. ... A pianist is a person who plays the piano. ...


In his four-decade career, John has been one of the dominant forces in rock and popular music, especially in the 1970s. John has sold more than 250 million albums[3] plus hundreds of millions of singles[4], making him one of the most successful artists of all time. He has more than 50 Top 40 hits including seven consecutive #1 U.S. albums, 59 Top 40 singles, 16 Top 10, 4 #2 hits, and nine #1 hits [1]. His success has had a profound impact on popular music and has contributed to the continued popularity of the piano in rock and roll. In 2004, Rolling Stone Magazine ranked Elton John #49 on their list of The Immortals: 100 Greatest Artists of All Time.[5] Top 40 is a radio format based on frequent repetition of songs from a constantly-updated list of the forty best-selling singles. ... Popular music is music belonging to any of a number of musical styles that are accessible to the general public and are disseminated by one or more of the mass media. ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... This article is about the music magazine. ...


Some of the characteristics of Elton John's music are his ability to quickly craft unique melodies for the lyrics of songwriting partner Bernie Taupin, his rich tenor voice, his classical and gospel-influenced piano, the aggressive orchestral arrangements of Paul Buckmaster among others and the flamboyant fashions and on-stage showmanship, especially evident during the 1970s. Bernie Taupin (born May 22, 1950) is an English lyricist most famous for his collaboration with Elton John. ... This article or section seems to contain too many examples (or examples of poor quality) for an encyclopedia entry. ... Gospel music is a musical genre characterized by dominant vocals (often with strong use of harmony) referencing lyrics of a religious nature, particularly Christian. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Paul Buckmaster is an artist, arranger, and composer. ... Flamboyant is the name given to a florid style of architecture in vogue in France during the 15th and 16th century. ...


Elton John was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1994. He has been heavily involved in the fight against AIDS since the late 1980s and was knighted in 1998. He entered into a civil partnership with David Furnish on 21 December 2005 and continues to be a champion for the gay rights movement. The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame at sunset. ... Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS or Aids) is a collection of symptoms and infections resulting from the specific damage to the immune system caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). ... The dignity of Knight Bachelor is a part of the British honours system. ... Metropolitan Community Church vicar Debbie Gaston (right) with partner Elaine celebrating their Civil Partnership outside Brighton Town Hall on Dec 21, 2005 Civil partnerships in the United Kingdom, granted under the Civil Partnership Act 2004, give same-sex couples rights and responsibilities identical to civil marriage. ... David Furnish (born October 26, 1962 in Toronto, Canada) is Elton Johns life partner. ... December 21 is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The gay rights movement is a collection of loosely aligned civil rights groups, human rights groups, support groups and political activists seeking acceptance, tolerance and equality for non-heterosexual, (homosexual, bisexual), and transgender people - despite the fact that it is typically referred to as the gay rights movement, members also...

Contents

Biography

Childhood

Elton John was born Reginald Kenneth Dwight on March 25, 1947 in the northwest London suburb of Pinner, Middlesex, near Watford. He was born at home in the modest council house at 55 Pinner Hill Road that was the home of his maternal grandparents, with whom his newlywed parents, Stanley and Sheila Dwight, were living at the time.[6] When the young family was better established, they purchased a nicer, semi-detached house around the corner at 111 Potter Street.[7] Reginald was educated at nearby Pinner County Grammar School until he dropped out at the age of 15 to pursue a career in the music industry.[8][9]


The two defining issues of Elton John’s early childhood were music and the lack of love he received from his father.[8][9] Both these issues would have a significant impact on shaping his career as a rock star:


Stanley Dwight was a Royal Air Force officer who was frequently absent from home and who apparently never approved of his son. Elton has stated that he could never do anything right in his father’s eyes, and that he was afraid even to eat crisps (potato chips) in his father’s presence for fear of being shouted at for chewing too loudly. His father was annoyed when he began playing rock music on the piano, telling him instead to concentrate on the classics. Later, when Elton began to seriously consider a career in music, his father tried to steer him toward a more conventional career such as banking.[8] After the couple divorced in 1962, Stanley remarried within four months and went on to have four more children, which hurt Elton because “he was supposed to hate kids. I guess I was just a mistake in the first place.”[10] Years later, when Stanley Dwight was on his deathbed and requested a final visit from his rock star son, Elton refused to meet with him.[11]


Elton has stated that his wild stage costumes and performances were his way of letting go after such a restrictive childhood. Extending this idea, it is likely that the excesses and addictions of his personal life had some basis in these childhood issues. Additionally, Elton’s ceaseless ambition to succeed, manifested even today by a nearly endless touring schedule, may well be grounded in the desire of every child to “prove” himself in the eyes of an unapproving parent.[12][13]


Both of Elton’s parents were musically inclined, his father having been a trumpet player with a semi-professional big band that played military dances. The Dwights were avid record buyers, exposing the boy to all the popular singers and musicians of the day. Elton remembers being immediately hooked on rock and roll when his mother brought home records by Elvis Presley and Bill Haley and his Comets in 1956.[8][9]


But the young Reginald Dwight was not merely interested in music—he was a piano prodigy. He started playing the piano at the age of 3, and at the age of 4, his mother was astonished to hear him picking out Winifred Atwell’s “The Skater’s Waltz” by ear.[8][9] It wasn’t long before the boy was being pressed into service as a performer at parties and family gatherings. He began taking piano lessons at the age of 7. He showed great musical aptitude at school, including the ability to compose melodies, and gained some notoriety by playing like Jerry Lee Lewis at school functions. At the age of 11, he won a junior scholarship to the Royal Academy of Music. One of his instructors reports that, when he entered the Academy, she played a four-page piece by Handel, which he promptly played back like a “gramophone record.”[9]


For the next five years, Elton took the tube into central London to attend Saturday classes at the Academy, in addition to his regular school duties at Pinner County Grammar School. Elton has since stated that he enjoyed playing Chopin and Bach and singing in the choir during Saturday classes, but that he was not otherwise a diligent classical student. "I kind of resented going to the Academy,” he says. “I was one of those children who could just about get away without practising and still pass, scrape through the grades." He even claims that he would sometimes skip classes and just ride around on the Tube. However, several instructors have testified that he was a “model student,” and during the last few years he was taking lessons from a private tutor in addition to his classes at the Academy.[9] Therefore, whatever his internal attitude might have been, it seems clear that he was dedicated to learning his craft.


Elton’s mother Sheila, though also strict with her son, was more vivacious than her husband, and somewhat of a free spirit. With Stanley Dwight uninterested in his son and often physically absent, Elton was raised primarily by his mother and maternal grandmother. When his father was home, the Dwights would have terrible arguments that greatly distressed their son. Elton was 15 when they divorced. Sheila was soon remarried to a local painter named Fred Farebrother, who turned out to be a caring and supportive stepfather. Elton affectionately referred to him as “Derf,” his first name in reverse.[9] They moved into flat #1A in an eight-unit apartment building called Frome Court not far from both previous homes. It is here that Elton would write the songs that would launch his career as a rock star. In fact, he would live here until he had four albums simultaneously in the American Top 40.[14]


Early career (1962–1969)

At the age of 15, with the help of mother Sheila and stepfather "Derf", Reginald Dwight became a weekend pianist at the nearby Northwood Hills pub, playing on Friday, Saturday and Sunday nights. The crowd was often rough – sometimes an unruly patron would dump a pint of beer into Reginald's piano – and the youngster had to work hard to please them[citation needed]. He played everything from Jim Reeves country songs ("He'll Have to Go") to Irish folk numbers ("When Irish Eyes Are Smiling"), decades-old ditties ("Beer Barrel Polka"), hits of the day ("King of the Road"), and songs he had written himself. He received a modest, steady income and substantial tips. "During that whole period, I don't think I ever missed a gig", he said later. A stint with a short-lived group called the Corvettes rounded out his time. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article includes a list of works cited but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Folk music can have a number of different meanings, including: Traditional music: The original meaning of the term folk music was synonymous with the term Traditional music, also often including World Music and Roots music; the term Traditional music was given its more specific meaning to distinguish it from the...


In 1964, Dwight and his friends formed a band called Bluesology. By day, he ran errands for a music publishing company; he divided his nights between solo gigs at a London hotel bar and working with Bluesology. By the mid-1960s, Bluesology was backing touring American soul and R&B musicians like The Isley Brothers, Major Lance, Doris Troy and Patti LaBelle and The Bluebelles. In 1966, the band became musician Long John Baldry's supporting band and began touring cabarets in England. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Isley Brothers (IPA: ) are an African-American music group from Cincinnati, Ohio, who hold the record for being the longest-running charted group in music history. ... Major Lance compilation album Major Lance (b 4 April 1941, Winterville, Mississippi - d 3 September 1994, Decatur, Georgia) was an American R&B singer. ... Doris Troy (January 6, 1937 - February 16, 2004) was an R&B singer, known to her many fans as Mama Soul. ... Labelle (with the b written in small caps, while the spelling LaBelle exclusivelly refers to the stage surname of the groups lead vocalist, Patti LaBelle) was an American R&B/soul group, who successfully melded dance music with funk and glam rock, resulting in such memorable songs as Lady... John William Baldry, popularly known as Long John Baldry (January 12, 1941 – July 21, 2005) was a pioneering blues singer from England. ...


After failing lead vocalist auditions for King Crimson[citation needed] and Gentle Giant, Dwight answered an advertisement in the New Musical Express placed by Ray Williams, then the A&R manager for Liberty Records. At their first meeting, Williams gave Dwight a stack of lyrics written by Bernie Taupin, who had answered the same ad. Dwight wrote music for the lyrics, and then mailed it to Taupin, and thus began a partnership that continues to this day. In 1967, what would become the first Elton John/Bernie Taupin song, "Scarecrow", was recorded; when the two first met, six months later, Reginald Dwight had changed his name to Elton John, by deed poll, in homage to Bluesology saxophonist Elton Dean and Long John Baldry. King Crimson are a musical group founded by guitarist Robert Fripp and drummer Michael Giles in 1969. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Not to be confused with the Canadian music magazine Music Express The New Musical Express (better known as the NME) is a Popular music magazine in the United Kingdom which has been published weekly since March 1952. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Liberty Records was a United States-based record label. ... A deed poll is a legal document binding only to a single person or several person acted jointly to express an active intention. ... Elton Dean (born October 28, 1945, Nottingham, England; died February 7, 2006) was a jazz musician who performed on alto saxophone, saxello (a variant of the soprano saxophone) and occasionally piano. ...

Empty Sky, Elton John's 1969 debut album, went largely unnoticed.
Empty Sky, Elton John's 1969 debut album, went largely unnoticed.

The team of John and Taupin joined Dick James's DJM Records as staff songwriters in 1968, and over the next two years wrote material for various artists, like Roger Cook and Lulu. Taupin would write a batch of lyrics in under an hour and give it to John, who would write music for them in half an hour, disposing of the lyrics if he couldn't come up with anything quickly. For two years, they wrote easy-listening tunes for James to peddle to singers. Cover for album Empty Sky by Elton John. ... Empty Sky (1969) is the name of an album (as well as a song on the album) by Elton John released in 1969 Empty Sky is a song by Bruce Springsteen, on the album The Rising (2003) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists pages that might... Dick James (born Reginald Leon Vapnick, in 1920, in London died 2 January 1986) was the singer of the Robin Hood and The Buccaneers themes, from British television in the 1950s and was a friend and associate of renowned record producer George Martin. ... DJM Records was the record label of Dick James. ... Roger Frederick Cook (b. ... Marie McDonald McLaughlin Lawrie, OBE, (born 3 November 1948 in Lennoxtown, Stirlingshire), best known by her stage name Lulu, is a Scottish singer, songwriter, actor, model, and television personality who has been successful in the entertainment business from the 1960s through the 2000s. ... <nowiki>Insert non-formatted text here<nowiki>Insert non-formatted text hereInsert non-formatted text here</nowiki></nowiki> This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Their early output included an entry for British song for the Eurovision Song Contest in 1969, called "Can't Go On (Living Without You)" It came sixth of six songs.[15] The modern logo was introduced for the 2004 Contest to create a consistent visual identity. ...


During this period John also played on sessions for other artists including playing piano on The Hollies' "He Ain't Heavy, He's My Brother" and singing backing vocals for The Scaffold.[16] The Hollies are an English Beat group formed in the early 1960s. ... He Aint Heavy, Hes My Brother is a song by the Hollies. ... The Scaffold were a trio from Liverpool, England consisting of Mike McGear (Michael McCartney, brother of Paul), Roger McGough and John Gorman. ...


On the advice of music publisher Steve Brown, John and Taupin started writing more complex songs for John to record for DJM. The first was the single "I've Been Loving You" (1968), produced by Caleb Quaye, former Bluesology guitarist. In 1969, with Quaye, drummer Roger Pope, and bassist Tony Murray, John recorded another single, "Lady Samantha," and an album, Empty Sky. Despite good reviews, none of the records sold well. Caleb Quaye (born 1948 in London, England), is a rock guitarist and studio musician best known for his work in the 1960s and 1970s with Elton John, Mick Jagger, Pete Townsend, Paul McCartney and Hall and Oates. ... Lady Samantha is the second solo single by British musician Elton John; it was released on January 17, 1969 in Great Britain, and some time later in the United States. ... Empty Sky is the debut album by British singer/songwriter Elton John, released in 1969 (see 1969 in music). ...


1970s

John and Taupin now enlisted Gus Dudgeon to produce a follow-up with Paul Buckmaster as arranger. Elton John was released in the spring of 1970 on DJM Records/Pye Records in the UK and Uni Records in the USA, and established the formula for subsequent albums; gospel-chorded rockers and poignant ballads. The first single from the album, "Border Song," only made the US Top 100 peaking at #92. After the second single "Your Song" made the US Top Ten, the album followed suit. John's first American concert took place at The Troubadour in Los Angeles (his introduction was provided by Neil Diamond), in August, backed by ex-Spencer Davis Group drummer Nigel Olsson and bassist Dee Murray. Kicking over his piano bench Jerry Lee Lewis-style and performing handstands on the keyboards, John left the critics raving, and drew praise from fellow artists such as Quincy Jones and Bob Dylan. Gus Dudgeon (1942 - 2002) was a British record producer, and the inventor of audio sampling as a musical device. ... Elton John is the artists eponymous second album. ... Pye Records was a British record label. ... Uni Records was a subsidiary of MCA Records. ... Border Song is a gospel ballad originally performed by British musician Elton John. ... The Billboard Hot 100 is the United States music industry standard singles popularity chart issued weekly by Billboard magazine. ... Your Song is a ballad performed by British musician Elton John. ... Exterior of the Troubadour Damien Rice at the Troubadour The Troubadour is a nightclub located in West Hollywood, California, at 9081 Santa Monica Boulevard just east of Doheny Drive and the border of Beverly Hills. ... The Spencer Davis Group was a mid 1960s British beat group from Birmingham, England, founded by Spencer Davis (born 17 July 1939, Swansea, Wales). ... Olsson (back) performing at an Elton John concert at the Royal Opera House. ... Dee Murray (April 3, 1946 - January 15, 1992; born David Murray Oates in Southgate, London) was a British bassist, best known as a member of Elton Johns original rock band. ... Quincy Delightt Jones Jr. ... Bob Dylan (born Robert Allen Zimmerman, May 24, 1941) is an American singer-songwriter, author, musician, and poet who has been a major figure in popular music for five decades. ...


In the spring of 1970, John was recruited to provide piano and backing vocals on "Back Home", the song recorded by the England football squad which was about to depart to Mexico for the World Cup finals. Back Home is an album by the British singer/songwriter Eric Clapton. ... First international  Scotland 0 - 0 England (Partick, Scotland; 30 November 1872) Biggest win  Ireland 0 - 13 England (Belfast, Ireland; 18 February 1882) Biggest defeat  Hungary 7 - 1 England (Budapest, Hungary; 23 May 1954) World Cup Appearances 12 (First in 1950) Best result Winners, 1966 European Championship Appearances 7 (First in... The 1970 Football World Cup was held in Mexico, from May 31 to June 21. ...


Elton John was followed quickly with the concept album Tumbleweed Connection in October 1970, which reached the Top Ten on the Billboard 200. A frenetic pace of releasing two albums a year was now established. Tumbleweed Connection is the third album by British singer/songwriter Elton John, released in 1970 (see 1970 in music). ... The Billboard 200 is a ranking of the 200 highest-selling music albums and EPs in the United States, published weekly by Billboard magazine. ...


The live album 17-11-70 (11-17-70 in the US) showcased Elton's talent as a rock pianist and father of piano rock. Taped at a live show aired from A&R Studios on WABC-FM in New York City, and introduced by disc jockey Dave Herman, it featured extended versions of John/Taupin's early compositions that illustrate the gospel and boogie-woogie influences on John's piano playing. It also featured much interaction between John, bassist Dee Murray, and drummer Nigel Olsson. During the magnum opus 18:20 version of "Burn Down the Mission", the band interpolates Arthur "Big Boy" Crudup's "My Baby Left Me" and a full rendition of The Beatles' "Get Back" before a rampaging conclusion. 11-17-70 (named 17-11-70 in the U.K.) is a live album by British singer/songwriter Elton John, released in 1971 (see 1971 in music). ... 11-17-70 is a live album by British singer/songwriter Elton John, released in 1971 (see 1971 in music). ... Piano rock, sometimes referred to as piano pop, is a term for a style of music that is based around the piano, and sometimes around piano-related instruments, such as the Fender Rhodes, the Wurlitzer electric piano, and keyboard-based synthesizers. ... WPLJ is a New York City radio station, broadcast on 95. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Dave Herman (born September 3, 1941 in Bryan, Ohio) was a tackle in the National Football League who played ten seasons for the New York Jets, from whom he started in Super Bowl III. Categories: | | | | | | | ... Burn Down the Mission is the tenth song on Elton Johns album Tumbleweed Connection. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... Get Back sessions, see Let It Be (album). ...


John and Taupin then wrote the soundtrack to the obscure film Friends and then the album Madman Across the Water, the latter reaching the Top Ten and producing the hit "Levon", while the soundtrack album produced the hit "Friends". Friends is a 1971 film directed by Lewis Gilbert and written by Gilbert, Vernon Harris and Jack Russell. ... Madman Across the Water is the fifth album by British singer/songwriter Elton John, released in 1971. ... Levon is a popular 1871 armenian king As usual with Taupin, the turks comitted a genocide in 1915 when levon was king of armenia they killed many many people but we got control of our land again by not giving up. ...

Elton John's sixth album, Madman Across the Water
Elton John's sixth album, Madman Across the Water

In 1972, the final piece of what would become known as the Elton John Band fell into place, with the addition of Davey Johnstone (on guitar and backing vocals). Murray, Olsson, and Johnstone came together with John and Taupin's writing, John's flamboyant performance style, and producer Gus Dudgeon to create a hit-making chemistry for the next five Elton John albums. Known for their instrumental playing, the members of the band were also strong backing vocalists who worked out and recorded many of their vocal harmonies themselves, usually in Elton's absence. Cover for album Madman Across the Water by Elton John. ... Johnstone(left) performing Funeral For a Friend at an Elton John concert. ... In the music industry, a record producer (or music producer) has many roles, among them controlling the recording sessions, coaching and guiding the musicians, organizing and scheduling production budget and resources, and supervising the recording, mixing and mastering processes. ...


The band released Honky Chateau, which became Elton's first American number 1 album, spending five weeks at the top of the charts and spawning the hit singles "Rocket Man (I Think It's Going To Be A Long, Long Time)" and "Honky Cat". Honky Château is the sixth album by British singer/songwriter Elton John, released in 1972 (see 1972 in music). ... For Johns 2007 compilation album, see Rocket Man: The Definitive Hits. ... Honky Cat was a song from the 1972 Elton John album Honky Chateau. ...


The 1973 pop album Don't Shoot Me I'm Only the Piano Player came out at the start of 1973, and produced the hits "Crocodile Rock" and "Daniel"; the former became his first U.S. number one hit. (Ironically this, like his other famous 1970s solo hits, would be popular in his native land but never top the UK Singles Chart; this achievement would have to wait two decades.) Both the album and "Crocodile Rock" were the first album and single, respectively on the consolidated MCA Records label in the USA, replacing MCA's other labels including Uni. Dont Shoot Me Im Only the Piano Player is the seventh album by British singer/songwriter Elton John, released in 1973 (see 1973 in music). ... Crocodile Rock is a song written by Elton John and Bernie Taupin. ... DANIEL SONG, IRVINE CALIFORNIA, GOES TO NORTHWOOD HIGH SCHOOL IN 9TH GRADE GOT HIS ASS KICKED BY JASON PHAM. TWICE HES A PUSSY IM DANIEL SONG!!!!!!!!!!!!==Sources== Categories: | ... The UK Singles Chart is currently compiled by The Official UK Charts Company (OCC) on behalf of the British record industry. ... MCA Records was an American-based record company owned by Music Corporation of America (MCA). ...


Goodbye Yellow Brick Road, a double album considered by many to be Elton John's best album, followed later in 1973. It gained instant critical acclaim and topped the chart on both sides of the Atlantic. It also temporarily established Elton John as a glam rock star. It contained the Number 1 hit "Bennie and the Jets", along with the popular and praised "Goodbye Yellow Brick Road", "Candle in the Wind", "Saturday Night's Alright for Fighting", "Funeral For A Friend/Love Lies Bleeding" and "Grey Seal" (originally recorded and released in 1970 as the B-side to the UK-only single, "Rock and Roll Madonna"). Goodbye Yellow Brick Road is the seventh studio album by British singer/songwriter Elton John, released in 1973. ... David Bowie as Glam superstar Ziggy Stardust on the cover of his 1973 Album Aladdin Sane. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Goodbye Yellow Brick Road is a ballad performed by musician Elton John. ... Candle in the Wind is a song with music by Elton John and lyrics by Bernie Taupin. ... Saturday Nights Alright For Fighting (sometimes written Saturday Nights Alright (For Fighting)) is a rock & roll song performed by musician Elton John. ... Funeral for a Friend/Love Lies Bleeding is the opening song on the two-part album Goodbye Yellow Brick Road by Elton John. ...


John then formed his own MCA-distributed label Rocket Records and signed acts to it — notably Neil Sedaka ("Bad Blood", on which he sang background vocals) and Kiki Dee — in which he took personal interest. Instead of releasing his own records on Rocket, he opted for $8 million offered by MCA. When the contract was signed in 1974, MCA reportedly took out a $25 million insurance policy on John's life. The Rocket Record Company was a record label founded by Elton John, with Bernie Taupin, Gus Dudgeon and Steve Brown among others, in 1972. ... Neil Sedaka 2005 Neil Sedaka (born March 13, 1939 in Brooklyn, New York) is an American pop singer, pianist, and songwriter often associated with the Brill Building. ... Kiki Dee (born Pauline Matthews on 6 March 1947, in Little Horton near Bradford, West Yorkshire, England) is a highly successful singer/songwriter, with a career that has lasted over 40 years. ...


In 1974 a collaboration with John Lennon took place, resulting in Elton John covering The Beatles' "Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds" and Lennon's "One Day at a Time", and in return Elton John and band being featured on Lennon's "Whatever Gets You Thru The Night". In what would be Lennon's last live performance, the pair performed these two number 1 hits along with the Beatles classic "I Saw Her Standing There" at Madison Square Garden. Lennon made the rare stage appearance to keep the promise he made that he would appear on stage with Elton if "Whatever Gets You Thru The Night" became a number 1 single. John Winston Ono Lennon, MBE (October 9, 1940 – December 8, 1980), (born John Winston Lennon, known as John Ono Lennon) was an iconic English 20th century rock and roll songwriter and singer, best known as the founding member of The Beatles. ... Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds is a song written mainly by John Lennon (credited to Lennon/McCartney) in 1967, and recorded by The Beatles for their album Sgt. ... It has been suggested that I Saw Him Standing There be merged into this article or section. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ...

Elton John's cryptic personality was revealed with the autobiographical album Captain Fantastic and the Brown Dirt Cowboy.
Elton John's cryptic personality was revealed with the autobiographical album Captain Fantastic and the Brown Dirt Cowboy.

Caribou was released in 1974, and although it reached number 1, it was widely considered a lesser quality album. Reportedly recorded in a scant two weeks between live appearances, it featured "The Bitch Is Back" and John's versatility in orchestral songs with "Don't Let the Sun Go Down on Me". At the end of the year, the compilation album Elton John's Greatest Hits was released and reached number 1. Cover for album Captain Fantastic and the Brown Dirt Cowboy by Elton John. ... Cover for album Captain Fantastic and the Brown Dirt Cowboy by Elton John. ... Captain Fantastic and the Brown Dirt Cowboy is the ninth album by British singer/songwriter Elton John, released in 1975). ... Caribou is the eighth studio album by British singer/songwriter Elton John, released in 1974 (see 1974 in music). ... The Bitch Is Back is a song by Elton John, written with Bernie Taupin. ... Dont Let The Sun Go Down On Me is the first single from British musician Elton Johns 1974 album Caribou; it was released that year during the latter half of May in Great Britain, and on June 10 in the United States. ... Elton Johns Greatest Hits is an album containing some of Elton Johns greatest hits. ...


Pete Townshend of The Who asked John to play a character called the "Pinball Wizard" in the film of the rock opera Tommy, and to perform the song of the same name. Drawing on power chords, John's version was recorded and used for the movie release in 1975 and the single came out in 1976 (1975 in the US). The song charted at number 7 in England. Bally subsequently released a "Captain Fantastic" pinball machine featuring an illustration of Elton John in his movie guise. Peter Dennis Blandford Townshend (born May 19, 1945 in Chiswick, London), is an award-winning English rock guitarist, singer, songwriter, and composer. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Tommy (1969) is the first of The Whos two full-scale rock operas (the second being Quadrophenia), and the first musical work explicitly billed as a rock opera. ... In music, a power chord is a bare fifth, or a similar chord, usually played on electric guitar with distortion. ... Bally Technologies logo Bally (with its distinctive Rolling Ball logo) Bally Technologies, Inc. ...


In the 1975 autobiographical album Captain Fantastic and the Brown Dirt Cowboy, Elton John revealed his previously ambiguous personality, with Taupin's lyrics describing their early days as struggling songwriters and musicians in London. The lyrics and accompanying photo booklet are infused with a specific sense of place and time that is otherwise rare in John's music. "Someone Saved My Life Tonight" was the hit single from this album and captured an early turning point in John's life. Captain Fantastic and the Brown Dirt Cowboy is the ninth album by British singer/songwriter Elton John, released in 1975). ... Someone Saved My Life Tonight is an Elton John song from his album Captain Fantastic and the Brown Dirt Cowboy. ...


The album's release signalled the end of the Elton John Band, as an unhappy and overworked John dismissed Olsson and Murray, two people who had contributed much of the band's signature sound and who had helped build his live following since the beginning. Johnstone and Ray Cooper were retained, Quaye and Roger Pope returned, and the new bassist was Kenny Passarelli; this rhythm section provided a heavier-sounding backbeat. James Newton-Howard joined to arrange in the studio and to play keyboards. John introduced the lineup before a crowd of 75,000 in London's Wembley Stadium. Wembley Stadium is a football stadium in Wembley, London, England. ...


Rock-oriented Rock of the Westies entered the US albums chart at number 1 like Captain Fantastic, a previously unattained feat. However, the material was almost universally regarded as not on a par with previous releases. The musical and vocal chemistry Olsson and Murray brought to Elton's previous releases was seen as lacking by some, both on the album and in the concerts that supported it. Rock of the Westies is the tenth album by British singer/songwriter Elton John, released in 1975 (see 1975 in music). ...


Commercially, Elton owed much of his success during the mid-1970s to his concert performances. He filled arenas and stadiums worldwide, and was arguably the hottest act in the rock world. John was an unlikely rock idol to begin with, as he was short of stature at 5'7" (1.70 m), chubby, and gradually losing his hair. But he made up for it with impassioned performances and over-the-top fashion sense. Also known for his glasses (he started wearing them as a youth to copy his idol Buddy Holly), his flamboyant stage wardrobe now included ostrich feathers, $5,000 spectacles that spelled his name in lights, and dressing up like the Statue of Liberty, Donald Duck, or Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart among others at his concerts made them a success and created interest for his music. A fashion consists of a current (constantly changing) trend, favoured for frivolous rather than practical, logical, or intellectual reasons. ... Charles Hardin Holley (September 7, 1936 – February 3, 1959), better known as Buddy Holly, was an American singer, songwriter, and a pioneer of rock and roll. ... Binomial name Carolus Linnaeus, 1758 The present-day distribution of Ostriches. ... Liberty Enlightening the World (French: La liberté éclairant le monde), known more commonly as the Statue of Liberty (Statue de la Liberté), is a large statue that was presented to the United States by France in 1886, standing at Liberty Island, New York in the mouth of the Hudson River... Donald Duck is an animated cartoon and comic-book character from Walt Disney Productions. ... Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (IPA: , baptized Johannes Chrysostomus Wolfgangus Theophilus Mozart) (January 27, 1756 – December 5, 1791) was a prolific and influential composer of the Classical era. ...


To celebrate five years of unparalleled success since he first appeared at the venue, in 1975 John played a two-night, four-show stand at The Troubadour. With seating limited to under 500 per show, the chance to purchase tickets was determined by a postcard lottery, with each winner allowed two tickets. Everyone who attended the performances received a hardbound "yearbook" of the band's history.


In 1976, the live album Here and There in May, then the downbeat Blue Moves in October, which contained the memorable but even gloomier hit "Sorry Seems to Be the Hardest Word". His biggest success in 1976 was the "Don't Go Breaking My Heart", a peppy duet with Kiki Dee that topped both the American and British charts. Finally, in an interview with Rolling Stone that year entitled "Elton's Frank Talk", a stressed John stated that he was bisexual. Here and There is a live album by British singer/songwriter Elton John, released in 1976 (see 1976 in music). ... Blue Moves is the eleventh studio album by British singer/songwriter Elton John, released in 1976 (see 1976 in music). ... Sorry Seems To Be The Hardest Word is a song written by Elton John and Bernie Taupin. ... Dont Go Breaking My Heart was a duet by Elton John and Kiki Dee. ... This article is about the magazine. ... In human sexuality, bisexuality describes a man or woman having a sexual orientation to persons of either or both sexes (a man or woman who sexually likes both sexes; people who are sexually and/or romantically attracted to both males and females). ...


Besides being the most commercially successful period, 1970 - 1976 is also held in the most regard critically. Of the six Elton John albums to make Rolling Stone's 2003 The 500 Greatest Albums of All Time list, all are from this period, with Goodbye Yellow Brick Road ranked highest at number 91; similarly, the three Elton John albums given five stars by All Music Guide are all from this period too (Tumbleweed Connection, Honky Château, and Captain Fantastic). Promotional Book Cover The 500 Greatest Albums of All Time was the cover story of a special issue of Rolling Stone magazine published in November 2003. ... The All Music Guide (AMG) is a metadata database about music owned by All Media Guide. ...


During the same period, John made a self-effacing guest appearance on the popular Morecambe and Wise show on the BBC. The two comics spent the episode pointing him in the direction of everywhere except the stage in order to prevent him singing. Morecambe and Wise Morecambe and Wise were a famous British comic double act comprising Eric Morecambe and Ernie Wise. ... The British Broadcasting Corporation, which is usually known as the BBC, is the largest broadcasting corporation in the world in terms of audience numbers, employing 26,000 staff in the United Kingdom alone and with a budget of more than GB£4 billion. ...


Hiatus

Elton's career took a hit after 1976. In November 1977 John announced he was retiring from performing; Taupin began collaborating with others. John secluded himself in any of his three mansions, appearing publicly only to attend the matches of Watford, an English football team of whom he was a lifelong devotee, and that he later bought. Some speculated that John's retreat from stardom was prompted by adverse reactions to the Rolling Stone article. Watford Football Club are an English professional football club based in Watford, Hertfordshire. ...


Now only producing one album a year, John issued A Single Man in 1978, employing a new lyricist, Gary Osborne; the album featured no Top 20 singles. In 1979, accompanied by Ray Cooper, John became the first Western pop star to tour the Soviet Union (as well as one of the first in Israel, then mounted a two-man comeback tour of the U.S. in small halls. John returned to the singles chart with "Mama Can't Buy You Love" (number 9, 1979), a song from an EP recorded in 1977 with Philadelphia soul producer Thom Bell. A disco-influenced album, Victim of Love, was poorly received. A Single Man is an album by British singer/songwriter Elton John, released in 1978 (see 1978 in music). ... Ray Cooper Ray Cooper (born August 19, 1942 in Watford, Hertfordshire) is an English musician. ... Thom Bell was the record producer behind much of the Philadelphia soul subgenre of soul music in the 1970s. ... Discothèque redirects here. ... Victim of Love is an Elton John album released in 1979. ...


1980s

In 1979, John and Taupin reunited. 21 at 33, released the following year, was a significant career boost, aided by his biggest hit in four years, "Little Jeannie" (number 3 US), although the lyrics were written by Gary Osborne. (John also worked with lyricists Tom Robinson and Judie Tzuke during this period as well.) His 1981 follow-up, The Fox, was recorded in part during the same sessions and also included collaborations with both lyricists. On 13 September 1980 Elton John performed a free concert to an estimated 400,000 fans on The Great Lawn in Central Park in New York City, with Olsson and Murray back in the Elton John Band, and within hearing distance of his friend John Lennon's apartment building. Three months later Lennon would be murdered in front of that same building. Elton mourned the loss in his 1982 hit "Empty Garden (Hey Hey Johnny)", from his Jump Up! album, his second under a new U.S. recording contract with Geffen Records. He performed the tribute at a sold-out Madison Square Garden show in August 1982, joined on stage by Yoko Ono and Sean Ono Lennon, Elton's godchild. 21 at 33 is a 1980 Elton John album. ... Little Jeannie is a song by Elton John and Gary Osborne, recorded by Elton John and released as a single in 1980, and also on that years album 21 at 33. ... Gary Osborne is a singer and songwriter (most notably a lyricist) from the United Kingdom. ... Tom Robinson (born June 1, 1950, in Cambridge) is an English songwriter and broadcaster probably best-known for the UK hit songs 2-4-6-8 Motorway (1977), Sing If Youre Glad To Be Gay (1978) and War Baby (1983). ... Singer/songwriter Judie Tzuke was born Judie Myers in London, England on 3 April 1956. ... The Fox is a 1981 album by Elton John. ... is the 256th day of the year (257th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... Central Park is a large public, urban park (843 acres or 3. ... Southeast view of the Dakota from Central Park West The Dakota in the 1880s The Dakota, constructed from October 25, 1880 to October 27, 1884,[1] is an apartment building located on the northwest corner of 72nd Street and Central Park West in New York City. ... Jump Up! 1982 was the second album recorded by British singer Elton John for Geffen Records. ... Geffen Records is an American record label, owned by Universal Music Group, and operates as one third of UMGs Interscope-Geffen-A&M label group. ... Yoko Ono Lennon (小野 洋子 Ono Yōko (ONO Yōko), born February 18, 1933) is a Japanese-American artist and musician. ... Sean Taro Ono Lennon (aka Sean Ono Lennon, born October 9, 1975) is the son of musician and peace activist John Lennon by his second wife, artist Yoko Ono. ...


However, the 1980s were years of personal upheaval for John. In 1984 he surprised many by marrying sound engineer Renate Blauel since many presumed that he was gay[citation needed]. While the marriage lasted four years, John later maintained that he had realised that he was homosexual before he married, proving them right. In 1986 he lost his voice while touring Australia and shortly thereafter underwent throat surgery. John continued recording prolifically, but years of cocaine and alcohol abuse, initiated in earnest around the time of Rock of the Westies' 1975 release, were beginning to take their toll. In 1987 he won a libel case against The Sun who had written about his allegedly having underaged sex; afterwards he said, "You can call me a fat, balding, talentless old queen who can't sing — but you can't tell lies about me." Renate Blauel is a German music engineer who was married to Elton John. ... Look up sun in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


With original band members Johnstone, Murray and Olsson together again, Elton was able to return to the charts with the 1983 hit album Too Low For Zero, which included "I'm Still Standing" and "I Guess That's Why They Call It The Blues", the latter of which featured Stevie Wonder on harmonica and reached number 4 in the US, giving Elton John his biggest hit there since "Little Jeannie." Indeed while he would never again match his 1970s success, he placed hits in the U.S. Top Ten throughout the 1980s — "Little Jeannie" (number 3, 1980), "Sad Songs (Say So Much)" (number 5, 1984), "Nikita" boosted by a mini-movie pop video directed by Ken Russell (number 7, 1986), an orchestral version of "Candle in the Wind" (number 6, 1987), and "I Don't Wanna Go On With You Like That" (number 2, 1988). His highest-charting single was a collaboration with Dionne Warwick, Gladys Knight, and Stevie Wonder on "That's What Friends Are For" (number 1, 1985); credited as Dionne and Friends, the song raised funds for AIDS research. His albums continued to sell, but of the six released in the latter half of the 1980s, only Reg Strikes Back (number 16, 1988) placed in the Top 20 in the United States. Too Low For Zero is a 1983 Elton John album. ... Im Still Standing is a song on English pop-rock performer Elton Johns 1983 album, Too Low for Zero. ... I Guess Thats Why They Call It The Blues is a song by British singer Elton John featuring Stevie Wonder on harmonica. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Nikita is a song by English singer Elton John about the Cold War from his 1985 album Ice on Fire. ... Marie Dionne Warrick (born December 12, 1940 in East Orange, New Jersey), known professionally as Dionne Warwick, is an African-American singer best known for her work with Hal David and Burt Bacharach as songwriters and producers. ... Gladys Maria Knight (born May 28, 1944 in Atlanta, Georgia) is an American R&B/soul singer and actress. ... Thats What Friends Are For is a song and a series of charity concerts. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ...


In 1984, Watford reached the FA Cup final at Wembley Stadium, fulfilling a lifelong ambition for John, who by now was owner and chairman of the club. During the traditional pre-match ritual of the crowd singing "Abide With Me", John burst into tears. Watford lost the game 2-0 to Everton, who always played in blue kit. After the game a large banner was unfurled among the Everton supporters, saying "SORRY ELTON - I GUESS THAT'S WHY THEY CALL US THE BLUES". This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Abide With Me is a well-known Christian hymn composed by Henry Francis Lyte in 1847. ... Everton Football Club is an English football club located in the city of Liverpool. ...


In 1985, John was one of the many performers at Live Aid, playing the Wembley Stadium leg of the marathon concert. He played "Bennie and the Jets" and "Rocket Man"; performed "Don't Go Breaking My Heart" with Kiki Dee for the first time in years; and introduced his friend George Michael, still then of Wham!, to sing "Don't Let The Sun Go Down On Me". Ethiopia, as its borders were in 1985. ... Georgios Kyriacos Panayiotou (Greek: ) (born June 25, 1963), better known as George Michael, is an English [1] singer-songwriter who performs soul influenced pop, and who (as a solo artist and half of the duo Wham!) has enjoyed massive global success since 1982. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


This was an example of John's endearing support of young artists and embrace of all new music, which continues to this day. He enlisted Michael to sing backing vocals on his single "Wrap Her Up", and also recruited teen idol Nik Kershaw as an instrumentalist on "Nikita". John also recorded material with Millie Jackson in 1985. Wrap Her Up is a romantic song on English pop-rock performer Elton Johns 1985 album, Ice on Fire. ... Nik Kershaw Nik Kershaw (born Nicholas David Kershaw on March 1, 1958) is an English singer-songwriter, popular during the 1980s. ... Millie Jackson is an African-American R&B singer. ...


In 1988, he performed five sold-out shows at New York's Madison Square Garden, giving him 26 for his career, breaking the Grateful Dead's house record. But that year also marked the end of an era. Netting over $20 million, 2,000 items of John's memorabilia were auctioned off at Sotheby's in London, as John bade symbolic farewell to his excessive theatrical persona. (Among the items withheld from the auction were the tens of thousands of records John had been carefully collecting and cataloguing throughout his life.) In later interviews, he deemed 1989 the worst period of his life, comparing his mental and physical deterioration to Elvis Presley's last years. Grateful Dead was an American rock band formed in 1965 in San Francisco, California. ...


1990s

Elton John was deeply affected by the plight of Ryan White, an Indiana teenager with AIDS. Along with Michael Jackson, John befriended and supported the boy and his family until White's death in 1990. Himself a mess and confronted by his then-lover, John checked into a Chicago hospital in 1990 to combat his drug abuse, alcoholism, and bulimia. In recovery, he lost weight and underwent hair replacement, and subsequently took up residence in Atlanta, Georgia. Also in 1990, John would finally achieve his first UK number one hit on his own, with "Sacrifice" (coupled with "Healing Hands") from the previous year's album Sleeping with the Past; it would stay at the top spot for six weeks. This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Michael Joseph Jackson (August 29, 1958), commonly known as MJ as well as the King of Pop, is an American musician, entertainer, and pop icon whose successful career and controversial personal life have been a part of pop culture for the last three decades. ... Drug abuse has a wide range of definitions related to taking a psychoactive drug or performance enhancing drug for a non-therapeutic or non-medical effect. ... Alcoholism is the consumption of, or preoccupation with, alcoholic beverages to the extent that this behavior interferes with the drinkers normal personal, family, social, or work life, and may lead to physical or mental harm. ... Bulimia nervosa, more commonly known as bulimia, is a psychological condition in which the subject engages in recurrent binge eating followed by intentionally doing one or more of the following in order to compensate for the intake of the food and prevent weight gain: vomiting inappropriate use of laxatives, enemas... Hair transplantation involves relocating (transplanting) bald resistant hair follicles from the back and sides of the head (the donor areas) to a person’s bald or thinning areas. ... Hotlanta redirects here. ... Sacrifice is a love song performed by musician Elton John. ... Track listing All songs written by Elton John and Bernie Taupin. ...


The 1991 film documentary Two Rooms described the unusual writing style that John and Bernie Taupin use, which involves Taupin writing the lyrics on his own, and John then putting them to music, with the two never in the same room during the process. That same year, the Two Rooms: Celebrating the Songs of Elton John & Bernie Taupin tribute album came out, featuring contributions from many top British and American rock and pop performers. Also in 1991, John's "Basque" won the Grammy Award for Best Instrumental Composition, and a guest concert appearance he had made on George Michael's reverent treatment of "Don't Let the Sun Go Down on Me" was released as a single and topped the charts in both the U.S. and UK. On November 24, 1991 Queen singer Freddie Mercury, a close friend of John's, died of AIDS. John was one of the few invited to attend the singer's private funeral services. Two Rooms is an album celebrating the prolific career of Elton John and Bernie Taupin as song writing partners. ... A tribute album is a recorded collection of cover versions of a specific artists songs. ... The Grammy Award for Best Score Soundtrack Album for a Motion Picture, Television or Other Visual Media has been awarded since 1960. ... Queen are an English rock band formed in 1970 in London by Brian May, Freddie Mercury and Roger Taylor, with John Deacon joining the following year. ... Freddie Mercury (born Farrokh Bulsara; 5 September 1946 – 24 November 1991) was a British musician, best known as the lead singer of the English rock band Queen. ...


In 1992 he established the Elton John AIDS Foundation, intending to direct 90 percent of the funds it raised to direct care, and 10 percent to AIDS prevention education. He also announced his intention to donate all future royalties from sales of his singles in the U.S. and UK to AIDS research. That year, he released the U.S. number 8 album The One, his highest-charting release since 1976's Blue Moves, and John and Taupin signed a music publishing deal with Warner/Chappell Music for an estimated $39 million over 12 years, giving them the largest cash advance in music publishing history. John performed "Bohemian Rhapsody" and "The Show Must Go On" with Queen at the Freddie Mercury Tribute Concert, an AIDS charity event held at Wembley Stadium, London in honour of Queen's late front man Freddie Mercury. "Bohemian Rhapsody" featured a duet with Axl Rose, a reconciliatory gesture given Rose's previous homophobic reputation. This article needs to be wikified. ... Bohemian Rhapsody is a song written by Freddie Mercury and originally recorded by the band Queen for their 1975 album A Night at the Opera. ... The show must go on is a well-known phrase in show-business, meaning that regardless of what happens (such as the lead breaking a leg), the show must still be put on for the waiting patrons. ... Queen are an English rock band formed in 1970 in London by Brian May, Freddie Mercury and Roger Taylor, with John Deacon joining the following year. ... An open air concert on Easter Monday, April 20th 1992 at Londons Wembley Stadium, televised live to over one billion people. ... Freddie Mercury (born Farrokh Bulsara; 5 September 1946 – 24 November 1991) was a British musician, best known as the lead singer of the English rock band Queen. ... W. Axl Rose[1] (born William Bruce Rose, Jr. ...


In September of the same year, he performed "November Rain" with Rose's band Guns N' Roses for the 1992 MTV Video Music Awards at the Pauley Pavilion in Los Angeles. The following year, he released Duets, a collaboration with 15 artists ranging from Tammy Wynette to RuPaul. This also included a new collaboration with Kiki Dee, entitled "True Love", which reached the Top 10 of the UK charts, and a duet with Eric Clapton on "Runaway Train", which also charted. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Guns N Roses (abbreviated as GNR) is a nine-piece American hard rock band, formed in Los Angeles, California in 1985. ... The MTV Video Music Awards were established in 1984 by MTV to celebrate the top music videos of the year. ... Edwin W. Pauley Pavilion, informally and commonly known as Pauley Pavilion, is an indoor arena located on the campus of UCLA in Los Angeles, California. ... Duets started out as a 1993 Christmas project of Elton Johns that soon grew into an album of its own. ... Tammy Wynette (May 5, 1942 – April 6, 1998) was a country singer and songwriter. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Eric Patrick Clapton CBE (born 30 March 1945), nicknamed Slowhand, is a Grammy Award winning English guitarist, singer and composer. ...


In 1994, along with Tim Rice, he wrote the songs for the Disney animated film The Lion King. (Rice was reportedly stunned by the rapidity with which John was able to set his words to music.) The Lion King went on to become the highest-grossing traditionally-animated feature of all time, with the songs playing a key part. Three of the five songs nominated for the Academy Award for Best Song that year were John and Rice songs from The Lion King, with "Can You Feel the Love Tonight" winning. (John acknowledged his domestic partner, Canadian film-maker David Furnish, at the ceremonies.) In versions sung by John, both that and "Circle of Life" became big hits, while the other songs such as "Hakuna Matata" achieved popularity with all ages as well. "Can You Feel the Love Tonight" would also win John the Grammy Award for Best Male Pop Vocal Performance. After the release of the soundtrack, the album remained at the top of Billboard's charts for nine weeks. On November 10, 1999, the RIAA announced that the album The Lion King had sold 15 million copies and therefore was certified as a diamond record with room to spare. Sir Timothy Miles Bindon Rice (born 10 November 1944) is an English lyricist for musical theatre, a radio presenter, television gameshow panelist and an author. ... The Walt Disney Company (NYSE: DIS) is one of the largest media and entertainment corporations in the world. ... The Lion King is a 1994 animated feature Academy Award-winning film produced by Walt Disney Feature Animation and released by Walt Disney Pictures. ... The Academy Award for Best Song is one of the awards given to people working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are songwriters and composers. ... The Lion King is the original motion picture soundtrack for Walt Disneys The Lion King. ... Can You Feel the Love Tonight is a song performed by Elton John for the soundtrack of the 1994 Disney animated film The Lion King. ... Circle of Life is an Academy Award-nominated song from Disneys 1994 animated film The Lion King, composed by Elton John with lyrics by Tim Rice. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Grammy Award for Best Male Pop Vocal Performance has been awarded since 1966. ... is the 314th day of the year (315th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1999 Gregorian calendar). ... The RIAA Logo. ... Music recording sales certification is a system of certifying that a music recording has sold a certain number of copies. ...

The cover of the Princess Diana tribute, "Candle In The Wind"

Elton John was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in his first year of eligibility in 1994. He and Bernie Taupin had previously been inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame in 1992. Elton John was made a Commander of the Order of the British Empire in 1995. Image File history File links Summary The cover of the single from 1997, the tribute to Princess Diana(Candle In The Wind). ... Image File history File links Summary The cover of the single from 1997, the tribute to Princess Diana(Candle In The Wind). ... Candle in the Wind is a song with music by Elton John and lyrics by Bernie Taupin. ... The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame at sunset. ... The Songwriters Hall of Fame is an arm of the National Academy of Popular Music. ... Commanders Badge of the Order of the British Empire The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire is an order of chivalry established on 4 June 1917 by George V. The Order includes five classes in civil and military divisions, in order of seniority: Knight or Dame Grand Cross...


In 1995 John released Made in England (number #3, 1995), which featured the hit single "Believe" (number #15, 1995). Also, a compilation called Elton John's Love Songs was released the following year. Made in England is an album by Elton John. ... Elton Johns Love Songs is a 1996 Elton John greatest hits album released by Island Records. ...


The year 1997 found extreme highs and lows for John. Early in the year, vestiges of the flamboyant Elton resurfaced as he threw a 50th birthday party, costumed as Louis XIV, for 500 friends (the costume cost more than $80,000). John also performed with the surviving members of Queen in Paris at the opening night (17th January, 1997) of "Le Presbytere N'a Rien Perdu De Son Charme Ni Le Jardin Du Son Eclat," a work by French ballet legend Maurice Bejart which draws upon AIDS and the deaths of Freddie Mercury and the company's principal dancer Jorge Donn. This was only the second time the three surviving members of Queen had performed together live since Mercury had died. Unfortunately, later in 1997 John lost two close friends, designer Gianni Versace and Diana, Princess of Wales. Louis XIV King of France and Navarre By Hyacinthe Rigaud (1701) Louis XIV (Louis-Dieudonné) (September 5, 1638&#8211;September 1, 1715) reigned as King of France and King of Navarre from May 14, 1643 until his death. ... Queen are an English rock band formed in 1970 in London by Brian May, Freddie Mercury and Roger Taylor, with John Deacon joining the following year. ... City flag City coat of arms Motto: Fluctuat nec mergitur (Latin: Tossed by the waves, she does not sink) The Eiffel Tower in Paris, as seen from the esplanade du Trocadéro. ... Maurice Béjart (born January 1, 1927) is the French choreographer who runs the Béjart Ballet. ... Freddie Mercury (born Farrokh Bulsara; 5 September 1946 – 24 November 1991) was a British musician, best known as the lead singer of the English rock band Queen. ... Jorge Donn was a ballet dancer, born on February 25, 1947 in Buenos Aires and died of AIDS on November 30, 1992 in Lausanne, Switzerland. ... Queen are an English rock band formed in 1970 in London by Brian May, Freddie Mercury and Roger Taylor, with John Deacon joining the following year. ... Gianni Versace (December 2, 1946 – July 15, 1997) was an accomplished Italian designer of both clothing and theater costumes. ... Diana, Princess of Wales (Diana Frances;[2] née Spencer; 1 July 1961 – 31 August 1997) was the first wife of Charles, Prince of Wales. ...


In September, Taupin altered the lyrics of "Candle in the Wind" for a special version mourning the death of Diana, and John performed it at her funeral in Westminster Abbey. A recorded version, "Candle in the Wind 1997", then became the fastest and biggest selling single of all time, eventually going on to sell 5 million copies in the United Kingdom, 11 million in the USA and around 33 million worldwide, with the proceeds of approximately £55 million going to the Diana, Princess of Wales Memorial Fund. John would later win the Grammy Award for Best Male Pop Vocal Performance for the single, which has never been performed since Princess Diana's funeral. John stated at the time it would be a completely one-off performance to make it special and, so far, he has stuck to his word. The Collegiate Church of St Peter, Westminster, which is almost always referred to by its original name of Westminster Abbey, is a mainly Gothic church, on the scale of a cathedral (and indeed often mistaken for one), in Westminster, London, just to the west of the Palace of Westminster. ... The Diana, Princess of Wales Memorial Fund was set up after the death of Diana, Princess of Wales, in 1997. ...


2000–present

In the 2000s, John began frequently collaborating with other artists. In 2000, John and Tim Rice teamed again to create songs for DreamWorks' animated film The Road To El Dorado and was also the narrator. In the musical theatre world, addition to a 1998 adaptation of The Lion King for Broadway, John also composed music for a Disney production of Aida in 1999 with lyricist Tim Rice, for which they received the Tony Award for Best Original Score and the Grammy Award for Best Musical Show Album. He also released a live compilation album called One Night Only - The Greatest Hits from the show he did at Madison Square Garden in New York that same year. This article is about the film studio. ... The Road To El Dorado DVD cover The Road To El Dorado is an animated film by DreamWorks SKG released in 2000. ... The Fantasticks is the longest-running musical in history Musical theatre is a form of theatre combining music, songs, spoken dialogue and dance. ... Broadway theatre[1] is the most prestigious form of professional theatre in the U.S., as well as the most well known to the general public and most lucrative for the performers, technicians and others involved in putting on the shows. ... Aida is a musical drama in two acts based on Giuseppe Verdis Italian-language opera by the same name, which is in turn based on a story by Auguste Mariette. ... The Tony Award for Best Original Score is the Tony Award given to the composers and lyricists of the best original score written for a musical in that year. ... The Grammy Award for Best Musical Show Album has been awarded since 1959. ... Track listing Goodbye Yellow Brick Road Philadelphia Freedom Dont Go Breaking My Heart With Kiki Dee Rocket Man Daniel Crocodile Rock Sacrifice Can You Feel The Love Tonight Bennie and the Jets Your Song With Ronan Keating Sad Songs (Say So Much) With Bryan Adams Candle in the Wind...


In 2001 he declared that Songs from the West Coast would be his final studio album, and that he would now concentrate on just live performances. In 2004, however, he released a new album, Peachtree Road. This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Peachtree Road is an album released by Elton John in early November 2004. ...


Also in 2001, John accepted an offer to appear as a guest on the BBC topical quiz show Have I Got News For You. However, he changed his mind just hours before recording was due to begin, and so the producers recruited Ray Johnson, a taxi driver from Colchester, Essex, who worked part-time as an Elton John lookalike. He said next to nothing during the programme, while captions praising Johnson and slagging off John were added to the final cut of the programme when it was broadcast 24 hours later. This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... Look up taxi in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The town of Colchester is the main settlement in the East of England borough of Colchester, Essex. ... Essex is a county in the East of England. ... A look-alike is a person who bears a close physical resemblance to a celebrity, politician or royalty. ...


John continued his successful collaborations with other artists during the 2000s. 'Your Song' was re-recorded several times during the first part of the decade with Alessandro Safina, British Cellist Julian Lloyd Webber etc. Alessandro Safina is an Italian tenor known for his powerful, smooth voice, as well as his charisma onstage. ...


Moreover, in 2002, John duetted with Eminem on the rapper's "Stan" at the Grammy Awards which appears on Eminem's compilation album Curtain Call: The Hits as its bonus track. This went a long way towards absolving Eminem of charges of homophobia and thus paving the way for Eminem's greater mainstream acceptance.[citation needed] He also performed the song "Friends" for the soundtrack to The Country Bears written by Taupin along with starring as himself working in a garden. Marshall Bruce Mathers III (born October 17, 1972), better known as Eminem or Slim Shady, is a Grammy and Academy Award-winning American rapper, record producer and actor from the Detroit, Michigan area. ... Stan is the third track on the Eminem album The Marshall Mathers LP (2000). ... Grammy Award statuette The Grammy Awards, presented by the Recording Academy (an association of Americans professionally involved in the recorded music industry) for outstanding achievements in the recording industry, is one of four major music awards shows held annually in the United States (the Billboard Music Awards, the American Music... A protest by The Westboro Baptist Church; a group identified by the Anti-Defamation League as virulently homophobic. ... The Country Bears is a 2002 live-action film produced by Walt Disney Pictures, based loosely on the Disney attraction Country Bear Jamboree. ...


Previously, in 2003, British boyband Blue had released a version of "Sorry Seems to be the Hardest Word", which included John. It went to number 1 in the UK as well as many other European countries. Elton achieved yet another number 1 single in the UK in 2005, being featured on 2Pac's posthumous song "Ghetto Gospel" from the rapper's album, Loyal to the Game. The song sampled "Indian Sunset" from John's 1971 album, Madman Across the Water. "Indian Sunset" was later released on the single "Electricity", which John wrote for the 2005 West End production of Billy Elliot the Musical. The single benefited from some clever marketing. Over 75% of the sales were downloads, thanks to an Elton John competition where fans could send a text message including an answer to the question and then receive a download of the track. "Electricity" remains one of his biggest solo hits of the 2000s. Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Blue (boy band) Blue were a successful English boy band similar to other boybands such as A1 consisting of four members: Lee Ryan, Duncan James, Antony Costa, and Simon Webbe. ... Years after his death, Tupac Shakur is still considered one of the most influential hip hop artists of all time. ... Ghetto Gospel is a song by rapper Tupac Shakur, which was remixed and released on his 2004 album Loyal to the Game. ... Loyal to the Game is an album containing previously unreleased music recorded by Tupac Shakur before his death in 1996. ... Indian Sunset is a 1971 song, written & recorded by Elton John with lyrics by his long-time songwriting partner, Bernie Taupin. ... West End theatre is a popular term for mainstream professional theatre in London, or sometimes more specifically for shows staged in the large theatres of Londons Theatreland. Along with New Yorks Broadway theatre, West End theatre is usually considered to represent the highest level of commercial theatre in... Matthew Koon, Billy Elliot, 2006, The Billy Elliot Fansite Billy Elliot the Musical is an award-winning musical based on the 2000 film Billy Elliot. ...


However, his biggest hit was "Are You Ready For Love". Although it was pretty much ignored when it was first recorded during the late 1970s Thom Bell sessions, it became something of a Balearic fixture and eventually got a re-release on Southern Fried Records in 2004. "Are You Ready For Love" proceeded to go straight to number 1 in the UK and on Billboard's Hot Dance Music/Club Play chart. Capital Palma de Mallorca Official language(s) Spanish and Catalan Area  â€“ Total  â€“ % of Spain Ranked 17th  4,992 km²  1. ... Southern Fried Records is a London-based, independent, electronic dance music record label founded and owned by Norman Cook, better known by his stage name, Fatboy Slim. ... Billboards Hot Dance Music/Club Play chart is a weekly national survey of what songs are most popular in U.S. dance clubs. ...


Elton John was one of the performers at the Live 8 concert at Hyde Park in London on 2 July 2005. He performed as third act of the day and had also been promoting the concerts together with Bob Geldof Bono etc. At the concert in London, he played "The Bitch is Back", "Saturday Night's Alright for Fighting" and lastly, T. Rex's "Children of the Revolution" with The Libertines and Babyshambles' frontman, Pete Doherty. The main Live 8 concert was held at Hyde Park, London, England on 2 July 2005, in front of over 200,000 people. ... is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Robert Frederick Xenon Geldof, KBE[1], known as Bob Geldof (born 5 October 1951) [2], is an Irish singer, songwriter, actor and political activist. ... Paul David Hewson (born 10 May 1960), known as Bono (IPA: ), is the lead singer and principal lyricist of the Irish rock band U2. ... The Bitch Is Back is a song by Elton John, written with Bernie Taupin. ... T. Rex (originally known as Tyrannosaurus Rex, also occasionally spelled T Rex or T-Rex), were an English rock band fronted by Marc Bolan. ... Children of the Revolution was a #2 hit single in September 1972 for the British rock band T. Rex. ... This article is about the band The Libertines. ... This article is about the band Babyshambles. ... Peter Doherty (born March 12, 1979) is an English musician, artist and poet. ...


Returning again to musical theatre, John composed music for a West End Theatre production of Billy Elliot the Musical in 2005 with playwright Lee Hall. John's only theatrical project with Bernie Taupin so far is Lestat: The Musical, based on the Anne Rice vampire novels. However it was slammed by the critics and closed in May 2006 after 39 performances.[17]. As for other movies, in 2002, his 1970s track "Tiny Dancer" was prominently featured in the film Almost Famous, and then his "The Heart of Every Girl" was the end title song from 2003's Mona Lisa Smile. Lee Hall (born 1966 Newcastle upon Tyne) is an English playwright and screenplay writer. ... Anne Rice (born on October 4, 1941) is a best-selling American author of gothic and later religious themed books. ... Tiny Dancer is a 1971 song by Elton John with lyrics by Bernie Taupin, which appears on Johns fifth album, Madman Across the Water. ... Almost Famous is a 2000 film written and directed by Cameron Crowe and released in 2000. ... Mona Lisa Smile is a 2003 film that was produced by Revolution Studios and Columbia Pictures, directed by Mike Newell, written by Lawrence Konner and Mark Rosenthal, and starring Julia Roberts, Maggie Gyllenhaal, Kirsten Dunst, and Julia Stiles. ...


Also in 2005, Elton John recorded a duet with Australian country music artist Catherine Britt, titled "Where We Both Say Goodbye". The duet peaked at #38 on the U.S. Billboard Hot Country Songs charts. Catherine Britt (born 31st December 1984, the youngest child with 3 older brothers) is a Country music artist from Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia. ... Hot Country Songs is a chart released weekly by Billboard magazine in the United States. ...


Elton John's Christmas Party compilation album with two of his own Christmas songs and the rest being various artists he chose to be on there was initially released exclusively to Hear Music outlets at every Starbucks coffee shop on November 10 2005. It sought to give away two dollars from each and every sale to the charity Elton John AIDS Foundation. The following year, on October 10, 2006, the album was re-released to the general market eleven months after its original and first release. But six songs of the original twenty-one were omitted from the new release. Therefore, it was left with only fifteen. Elton Johns Christmas Party is a Christmas-themed compilation album from British singer-songwriter Elton John. ... is the 314th day of the year (315th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... October 10 is the 283rd day of the year (284th in leap years). ...


On September 19, 2006, Elton John and Bernie Taupin released a sequel to Captain Fantastic and the Brown Dirt Cowboy, reflecting again on the phenomenal success, the sadnesses, the creativity and the optimism within their 40 year songwriting partnership; The Captain & The Kid features ten new songs, including the first single "The Bridge", and for the first time ever, photographs of both John and Taupin are featured on the album front cover. is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Captain & The Kid is an autobiograpical album by Elton John and his lyricist Bernie Taupin released in September 2006. ... The Bridge is the first single off Elton Johns 2006 album The Captain & The Kid. The single is a simple, stripped-down production focused on Elton John and his solo piano, and it is considered as one of the singers finest songs in many years. ...


Among his many honours, Elton John was named a Disney Legend for his numerous outstanding contributions to Disney's films and theatrical works[18] on October 9, 2006, by The Walt Disney Company. It is the company's highest honour. Another measure of fame came back in July 2005 when Madame Tussauds made a statue of Elton John to his measurements; it took more than 1,000 hours to complete. The Disney Legends awards are given annually by The Walt Disney Company to honor individuals who have made a notable contribution to the company. ... is the 281st day of the year (282nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Madame Tussauds and the London Planetarium. ...


In May 2006, Pet Shop Boys released their album Fundamental, the limited edition included "In Private", a new version of the Dusty Springfield single they had written in 1989. The song, this time, had been recorded as a duet with John and was later released as bonus track on Pet Shop Boys' top 20 hit "Minimal". His string of UK #1 duets continued later that year when the Scissor Sisters' released "I Don't Feel Like Dancin'", which John co-wrote. Recorded in Las Vegas, it featured John on piano and was included on their album Ta-Dah. "I Don't Feel Like Dancin'" became the fourth best selling single in the UK in 2006 and it stayed in the UK top 40 for 27 weeks. John also co-wrote "Intermission" from the same album. Pet Shop Boys are an English synthpop/pop music duo, consisting of Neil Tennant who provides main vocals, keyboards and very occasionally guitar, and Chris Lowe on keyboards and occasionally on vocals. ... Fundamental will be the ninth studio album by British band Pet Shop Boys which is due for release on 22 May 2006. ... Dusty Springfield OBE (16 April 1939 - 2 March 1999) was a popular English singer whose career spanned four decades. ... Minimal is a song by British synthpop band Pet Shop Boys and is featured on their 2006 album Fundamental. ... The Scissor Sisters American alternative band who formed in 2001. ... International cover The cover of the UK single. ... Ta-Dah is the second studio album by American 5-piece band Scissor Sisters, released in September 2006. ...


On November 12, 2006, in the Observer's Music Monthly "When Elton Met Jake" [19] John spoke in an interview with openly gay Scissor Sisters band member, Jake Shears as they talked about being gay music stars and other matters. Mixed emotions and numerous misquotes came from John's comment of organized religion. Prior to that, he has also criticized the Roman Catholic Church's position on condoms whom he had blamed for the death of some of his friends who suffered from HIV/AIDS. is the 316th day of the year (317th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... Jake Shears (born Jason Sellards on October 3, 1977 in Arizona) is the vocalist for the American music group the Scissor Sisters. ... Churchianity is a negative description of organized religion that characterizes it as emphasizing the institutional forms of Christianity (traditions, rituals, committees, and programs) and omitting the actual gospel teachings of Jesus Christ that forms the basis of Christianity. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The Roman Catholic Church or Catholic... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ...


In 2007, Elton John was featured in Timbaland's new album Timbaland Presents Shock Value, in the song "2 Man Show." Elton is also rumoured to be featured on a possible new Eminem album, which he has long awaited. Elton's also making a guest appearance on The Detox by Dr. Dre which will be released later this year.[citation needed] Timbaland Presents Shock Value is the latest duet album from record producer Timbaland. ... This article is about the Dr. Dre album. ... This article or section needs copy editing for grammar, style, cohesion, tone and/or spelling. ...


March 2007 saw John celebrating his 60th birthday in more ways than one. He engaged in a joint party with artist Sam Taylor-Wood in the East End[20] and performed at Madison Square Garden for the 60th time (which is a record) to mark his 60th birthday.[21] He performed songs including Your Song, Rocket Man, Candle In the Wind and I'm Still Standing. Sam Taylor-Wood (born London 1967) is a contemporary artist working mostly in video and photography. ... The term East End is most commonly used to refer to the East End of London. ...


To celebrate his record-setting achievement at Madison Square Gardens, a banner marking "Most Performances by a Single Artist" at the Garden will be raised to the rafters and placed within Madison Square Garden's Music Hall of Fame. Moreover, he released a greatest-hits compilation CD, entitled Rocket Man - Number Ones on March 27, 2007. Rocket Man - Number Ones was released in 17 different versions worldwide, including a CD/DVD combo. Finally, on March 26, Elton's staggering back catalogue - almost 500 songs from 32 albums - became available for legal download. "I knew that the entire catalog - not just the hits - needed care and attention to be released in this way," he said in a statement. "Now that it's happening, I'm pleased for the fans' sake."[22] Elton John performed at Madison Square Garden in a three-hour long and thirty-three song concert that is also streamed live via *MSN Music that day called Empty Garden. It also inspired a television special called Happy Birthday Elton! to occur which aired on ITV1 and My Network TV. The concert was started with the audience singing "Happy Birthday". He opened with a classic song from his second album, "Sixty Years On", doubly paying homage to his 60th birthday. The show also featured behind-the-scenes footage from the superstar's private party, where Kate Thornton met and greeted famous guests. The show also saw famous friends of John giving their opinion of him.[23] is the 86th day of the year (87th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is now the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... March 26 is the 85th day of the year (86th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... ITV1 is the name, in England, Wales and the Scottish borders, for a terrestrial, free-to-air television channel, broadcast in the United Kingdom by the ITV network. ... My Network TV (sometimes written MyNetworkTV, and unofficially abbreviated MNT or MNTV) is an upcoming television network in the United States, owned by News Corporation, which is scheduled to launch on September 5, 2006. ... Kate Thornton (born February 7, 1973 in Cheltenham) is a English journalist and television presenter. ...


On July 1, 2007, John performed at the Concert For Diana. He started the concert with Your Song and finished the concert with three songs; Saturday Night's Alright (For Fighting), Tiny Dancer, and Are You Ready For Love. He then commenced a European Tour and played at Live at the Marquee (festival) in Cork on July 9th 2007 to a rapturous reception. is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Concert for Diana (The Peoples Princess) was a concert held at the new Wembley Stadium in London, England, United Kingdom in honour of the late Diana, Princess of Wales on 1 July 2007, which would have been her 46th birthday; 2007 is also the 10th anniversary of her death. ... Saturday Nights Alright For Fighting is a rock & roll song performed by musician Elton John. ... For the album by Dream Theater, see Live at the Marquee. ... For other uses of Cork, see Cork (disambiguation). ...


In interviews Elton has listed a number of other projects of his in various stages, including an adaptation of Romeo and Juliet.[24] He also told Rolling Stone magazine that he plans for his next record to be in the R&B/hip-hop genre. "I want to work with Pharrell {Williams}, Timbaland, Snoop {Dogg}, Kanye {West}, Eminem and just see what happens. It may be a disaster, it could be fantastic, but you don't know until you try."[25] John claims to be a big fan of Blackstreet's 1996 hit, No Diggity. He is currently working on the upcoming album and is supposed to be released during October 2007. Romeo and Juliet in the famous balcony scene by Ford Madox Brown For other uses, see Romeo and Juliet (disambiguation). ... Rhythm and blues (or R & B) is a musical marketing term introduced in the United States in the late 1940s by Billboard magazine. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Hip hop music. ... Pharrell Williams (born April 5, 1973) is an American producer, singer, rapper, and songwriter. ... Timothy Z. Mosley (born March 10, 1971), better known as Timbaland, is an American musical composer and R&B record producer and rapper whose style influenced both genres even helping to blur the distinction between the two, as well as Pop and Dance music. ... Calvin Cordozar Broadus, Jr. ... Kanye Omari West (pronounced /kɑn. ... BLACKstreet are an American R&B group founded in 1992 by Teddy Riley, a New Jack Swing pioneer known for his work as a member of Guy. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... No Diggity is a 1996 song by Blackstreet featuring Dr. Dre. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


He will also play on 8 September 2007 in Vevey, a small village situated on Lake Geneva, Switzerland. Of this he said "The market square in Vevey is one of the most beautiful and magic places in Europe. Since visiting the area by chance in Summer 2003, I have always wanted to sing there. My friend Shania Twain who lives there, convinced me to set up that gig". (Note: Shania Twain actually lives in the nearby town of Corseaux). Vevey. ... Lake Geneva or Lake Léman (French Lac Léman, le Léman, or Lac de Genève) is the second largest freshwater lake in Central Europe (after Lake Balaton). ... Shania Twain, OC (born Eilleen Regina Edwards, August 28, 1965, Windsor, Ontario) is a Canadian singer and songwriter in the country and pop music genres. ... Corseaux is a municipality in the district of Vevey of the Canton of Vaud, Switzerland. ...


Other memorable concert projects in the decade have so far included Face-to-Face tours with fellow pianist Billy Joel which have been a fan favourite throughout the world since the mid-1990s. In October 2003 Elton announced that he had signed an exclusive agreement to perform 75 shows over three years at Caesars Palace on the Las Vegas Strip. The show, entitled The Red Piano, was a multimedia concert featuring massive props and video montages created by David LaChapelle. Effectively, he and Celine Dion share performances at Caesar's Palace throughout the year - while one performs, one rests. The first of these shows took place on 13 February 2004.[26] A two year global tour sandwiched between commitments in Las Vegas, some of the venues of which are new to Elton. William Martin Billy Joel (born May 9, 1949) is an American singer, pianist, songwriter, and composer. ... Caesars Palace is a hotel and casino located on the Las Vegas Strip in Las Vegas, Nevada. ... The south end of The Strip. ... Cover of David LaChapelle book, David LaChapelle (born March 11, 1969[1] Fairfield, Connecticut, United States) is a photographer and director who works in the fields of fashion, advertising, and fine art photography, and is noted for his surreal and often humorous style. ... Céline Marie Claudette Dion Angélil, OC, OQ, (born March 30, 1968) is a Canadian pop vocalist and occasional songwriter. ... is the 44th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... shelby was here 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Personal life

Document of Civil Partnership

John has had a complicated personal history in both his sexual orientation, as well as personal battles with drugs, depression, bulimia, baldness, and spending. In 2007, the Sunday Times Rich List estimated John's wealth to be £225 million and ranked him as the 319th richest British person.[27] Image File history File links Civil_partnership_elton_john. ... Image File history File links Civil_partnership_elton_john. ... Sexual orientation refers to the direction of an individuals sexuality, normally conceived of as falling into several significant categories based around the sex or gender that the individual finds attractive. ... Clinical depression (also called major depressive disorder, or unipolar depression when compared to bipolar disorder) is a state of intense sadness, melancholia or despair that has advanced to the point of being disruptive to an individuals social functioning and/or activities of daily living. ... Bulimia nervosa, commonly known as bulimia, is an eating disorder. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Sunday Times Rich List 2007 was published on 29 April 2007. ...


Sexual orientation and extended relationships

In a 1976 Rolling Stone interview he announced that he was bisexual . He stated his belief that everyone is bisexual to a degree. On rigid notions of macho gender expression, he cited Shirley MacLaine: "Shirley MacLaine said the right thing to Tom Snyder on TV. She said, 'Oh c'mon, Tom. Let's stop all this stupid macho business. It really is a bit passé now.'"[28]. Year 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... Tom Snyder, former host of CBS The Late Late Show Tom Snyder (born May 12, 1936 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin) is an American television personality best known for The Tomorrow Show. ...


John married German recording engineer Renate Blauel on Valentine's Day, 1984, but they divorced four years later. John later renounced his bisexuality and came out as being gay instead. Saint Valentines Day or Valentines Day is on February 14. ... Year 1984 (MCMLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1984 Gregorian calendar). ... GAY can mean: Gay, a term referring to homosexual men or women The IATA code for Gaya Airport Category: ...


He met his partner David Furnish, a former advertising executive and now film maker, in 1993. On 21 December 2005, they entered into a civil partnership. The night before the event, a host of his closest celebrity friends helped him celebrate his stag party at the cabaret nightclub Too2Much in London's West End.[29] On the actual day, a low-key ceremony with their parents, photographer Sam Taylor-Wood and her husband Jay Jopling, and John and Furnish's dog Arthur in attendance was held at the Guildhall, Windsor, followed by a lavish party at their Berkshire mansion,[30] thought to have cost £1 million.[31] Many famous guests were invited, but were delayed just outside John's Windsor household in a traffic jam of guests waiting to get inside.[32] Commercialism redirects here. ... December 21 is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A bachelor party (also called a stag party, stag night, or bucks party (Australia)) is a party held for a bachelor shortly before he is married, to commemorate his final opportunity to engage in activities a new wife might not approve of. ... Sam Taylor-Wood (born London 1967) is a contemporary artist working mostly in video and photography. ... Jay Jopling (born 1963) is a British contemporary art dealer and gallerist. ... The Guildhall in Windsor, Berkshire is the town hall. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Traffic jams are common in heavily populated areas. ...


John does not have any children, but does have ten godchildren as of March 2006. Besides the aforementioned Sean Ono Lennon, these include Elizabeth Hurley's son Damian Charles, David and Victoria Beckham's son Brooklyn, and the daughter of Seymour Stein. A godparent, in many denominations of Christianity, is someone who sponsors a childs baptism. ... Elizabeth Jane Hurley (born 10 June 1965) is an English actress, fashion model, producer and designer. ... David Beckham David Robert Joseph Beckham OBE (born May 2, 1975) is an English footballer born in Leytonstone, London. ... Victoria Beckham (née Adams), (born April 17, 1974 in Harlow, Essex, England) is an English singer, songwriter and fashion designer. ... Seymour Stein is an entrepreneur in the music industry whose career spans from the 50s onwards. ...


Within the music industry, Elton is sometimes known as "Sharon", a nickname originally given to him by good friend Rod Stewart.[33] In return, Elton calls Rod "Phyllis". Roderick David Stewart, CBE (born January 10, 1945), is a Scottish singer born and raised in London. ...


Drugs, alcohol and health

Throughout his career, John has battled addictions to alcohol and cocaine. By 1975, the pressures of stardom began to take a serious toll on the musician. During "Elton Week" in Los Angeles that year, John suffered a drug overdose.[34] He also battled the eating disorder bulimia. In a CNN Interview with Larry King in 2002, King asked if John was aware of Princess Diana's eating disorder. John replied, "Yes, I did. We were both bulimic."[35] This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Cocaine is a crystalline tropane alkaloid that is obtained from the leaves of the coca plant. ... A drug overdose occurs when a drug is ingested in quantities and/or concentrations large enough to overwhelm the homeostasis of a living organism, causing severe illness or death. ...


He is also rumoured to have struggled with significant financial difficulties caused by his profligate spending. In the mid-late 1990s, John formed a friendship with pop singer Michael Jackson, who later dedicated his 1997 album Blood on the Dance Floor to him for the support John had given him during his struggle with addiction to prescription painkillers. Morphine (INN) (IPA: ) is a highly potent opiate analgesic drug and is the principal active agent in opium and the prototypical opiate. ...


In 1987 he had an operation to remove polyps from his vocal cords. Physicians speculated that John's heavy use of marijuana may have contributed to the formation of the polyps.[36]. A Cannabis sativa plant The drug cannabis, also called marijuana, is produced from parts of the cannabis plant, primarily the cured flowers and gathered trichomes of the female plant. ...


After many years of struggling with drug and alcohol addiction, John finally checked himself into a rehabilitation clinic in 1990. He has cited the highly-publicised case of Ryan White, who died that same year of complications from AIDS (and at whose funeral John performed), as a major motivating factor in his decision to enter rehab. He decided to continue persevering through all of this strife. In July 1999, he was fitted with a pacemaker due to an irregular heart beat. This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... A pacemaker A pacemaker (or artificial pacemaker, so as not to be confused with the hearts natural pacemaker) is a medical device designed to regulate the beating of the heart. ...


Residence

Aside from his main home, 'Woodside' at Old Windsor in the English county of Berkshire, John splits his time in his various residences in Atlanta, Georgia; Nice, France; Holland Park in London; and Venice, Italy. Elton John is a noted art collector, and is believed to have one of the largest private photography collections in the world. Map sources for Old Windsor at grid reference: SU 983 744 Old Windsor is a village in Berkshire, south of the large town of Windsor, Berkshire and near to the villages of Englefield Green and Datchet. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem - the United Kingdom anthem God Save the Queen is commonly used England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto)1 Unified  -  by Athelstan 927 AD  Area  -  Total... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Holland Park is a district and a public park in the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea, in west central London in England. ... Venice (Italian: Venezia, Venetian: Venezsia, Latin: Venetia) is a city in northern Italy, the capital of region Veneto, and has a population of 271,251 (census estimate January 1, 2004). ... A museum normally has a collection of often unique objects that forms the core of its activities for exhibitions, education, research, etc. ... Photography [fÓ™tÉ‘grÓ™fi:],[foÊŠtÉ‘grÓ™fi:] is the process of recording pictures by means of capturing light on a light-sensitive medium, such as a film or sensor. ...


Spending

During the 2000 court case, where John sued both his former manager John Reid, the CEO of Reid's company and accountants Price Waterhouse Coopers, he admitted spending £30 million in just under two years - an average of £1.5 million a month, the High Court in London heard. The singer's lavish lifestyle saw him spend more than £9.6m on property and £293,000 on flowers between January 1996 and September 1997. John accused the pair of being negligent, and PWC of failing in their duties. Mark Hapgood QC for defendants PWC suggested that John went "spending mad" following a £42m deal with recording company Polygram in February 1996. When quizzed by Mr Hapgood about the £293,000 spent on flowers, John said: Yes, I like flowers. John stated that the terms of the contract, whereby John paid Reid 20% of his gross earnings, were agreed in St Tropez in the summer of 1984 - but that he could not remember the exact occasion on which the deal was made.[37] After losing the case, he faced an £8 million bill for legal fees. PolyGram was the name from 1972 of the major label recording company started by Philips as a holding company for its music interests in 1945. ... Saint-Tropez is a commune of the Var département in southern France, located on the French Riviera. ...


Elton John decided with his fleet manager John Newman to sell 20 of his collection of 28 cars at Christie's - including several Ferraris, Aston Martins, and six post-war Bentleys. His reason for selling them was stated as: I do not find enough time to drive them. The sale raised £2 million[38] The cars sold included: The Christies auction house in South Kensington, London Christies American branch in Rockefeller Center, New York Christies is a fine art auction house, the largest and by some accounts the oldest in the world. ...

  • 1993 Jaguar XJ220 - the most expensive car in the collection, with a 213mph top speed and only 852 miles on the clock - sold for £234,750. The auction room was told how Sir Elton's chauffeur refused to drive the car after he "twitched it" on a flyover and was scared by its power.
  • 1978 Aston Martin V8 Vantage Coupe - known as "The Beast", because of its roar, went for £80,750. The car was painted in black, red and yellow; the colours of Sir Elton's favourite Watford Football Club.
  • Two Ferraris - a 1992 512 Testarossa and a 1987 Testarossa given to John by MCA Records on the occasion of his 40th birthday. Rod Stewart had been among a group of friends who had ridden in the car.[39]
  • 1973 Rolls-Royce Phantom VI - Lawrence Cohen from Hertfordshire spent over twice as much on a car valued at £110,000. It was fitted with a 36-speaker stereo system which cost £28,000. It was so powerful that it once blew out the rear window, after which the glass in the car had to be reinforced.
  • 1985 Bentley Continental Convertible - in Tudor Red, the car used in the video for Nikita. The car's body was specially crafted by coachbuilder Mulliner Park Ward of Harlesden, and a long list of special fitments include colour-coded radiator veins and parchment trim piped in red.
  • 1969 Rolls-Royce Silver Cloud Mk3 - supplied new in Arizona, it was a purchase by John in Atlanta and named Daisy after the film Driving Miss Daisy which was filmed close to his Atlanta home. Flown to the UK in 1994 by KLM, it spent two years being restored at the cost of £100,000. It sold for £90,000.

In 2003, Elton John sold the contents of his Holland Park home in a bid to create more room for his collection of contemporary art. The auctioneer's Sotheby's catalogue had a list of more than 400 items, expected to fetch £800,000, including: Biedermeier furniture; early 16th and 17th century items including an Edward Bower estimated at £20,000-£30,000 and a portrait of Elizabeth Honeywood from the circle of William Larkin, which was estimated at £30,000-£40,000. John's bedroom featured a painting by 19th-century French artist Jacques-Noël-Marie Frémy, which was exhibited at the 1814 Paris Salon, and is estimated at £12,000-£18,000.[40] The Jaguar XJ220 was a supercar produced by Fords Jaguar luxury marque in collaboration with Tom Walkinshaw Racing as Jaguar Sport between 1992 and 1994. ... 1978 Aston Martin V8 Vantage Coupe The original Aston Martin V8 Vantage was hailed at the time of its 1977 introduction as Britains First Supercar for its 170 mph (274 km/h) top speed. ... Ferrari Enzo. ... The Ferrari Testarossa is an automobile made by Ferrari that which went into production in 1984 as the successor to the Ferrari 512 BB. It shouldnt be confused with the earlier Testa Rossas, GT sports cars that ran in the World Championships, including the 24 Hours of Le Mans. ... The Music Corporation of America was a United States based corporation in the music business. ... The Phantom VI was an ultra-exclusive Rolls-Royce model from the 1970s and 1980s produced in London at Mulliner Park Ward. ... The Corniche was Rolls-Royces coupe and convertible version of the Silver Shadow produced between 1971 and 1996. ... Introduction Mulliner Park Ward was a coachbuilder based in London UK. The company produced Rolls-Royce Motor cars including the Rolls-Royce Phantom and the Rolls-Royce Corniche. ... Harlesden is a district in the London Borough of Brent. ... 1962 Rolls Royce Silver Cloud The Rolls-Royce Silver Cloud is believed by many to be the most aesthetically pleasing vehicle ever produced by the British manufacturer. ... Driving Miss Daisy is a 1987 play by Alfred Uhry adapted into a 1989 Warner Bros. ... Sothebys (NYSE: BID) is the worlds second oldest international auction house in continuous operation. ...


Despite his extravagant lifestyle and excessive spending, John's fortune is estimated at £250 million, making him one of the wealthiest people in the music and entertainment industry.


Sports and other interests

  • In 1976, Elton John became involved in Watford Football Club and fulfilled a childhood dream by becoming its chairman and director. He invested large sums of money and the club rose into the First Division after a number of key acquisitions. He sold the club to Jack Petchey in 1987, but remained their life-long president. In 1997 he re-purchased the club from Petchey and once again became chairman. He stepped down in 2002 when the club needed a full-time chairman although he continued as president of the club. Although no longer the majority shareholder, he stills holds a significant financial interest. In June 2005 he held a concert at Watford's Vicarage Road ground, donating the funds to the club.
  • A longtime tennis enthusiast, Elton wrote the song "Philadelphia Freedom" in tribute to longtime friend Billie Jean King and her World Team Tennis franchise of the same name. John and King also co-host an annual pro-am event to benefit AIDS charities, most notably John's own Elton John AIDS Foundation, for which King is a chairperson. The fund was involved in The Reign, too.
  • John is a co-owner of the Sunset Strip restaurant “Le Dome” in Hollywood.[citation needed]

It has been suggested that Harry the Hornet be merged into this article or section. ... In sport, the First Division is usually the highest division of a league, and will often have promotion and relegation with divisions below. ... Vicarage Road, a stadium in Watford, Hertfordshire, England, is the home of the football club Watford F.C. and their tenants, the Saracens rugby union club. ... For other uses, see Tennis (disambiguation). ... Billie Jean Moffitt King (born November 22, 1943 in Long Beach, California) is a retired tennis player from the United States. ... World Team Tennis is a league of team tennis in the United States. ... Elton John AIDS Foundation is a charity fund that was started by Elton John to help fight HIV, AIDS, and other sexually transmitted diseases. ... The Reign is an annual musical-award show, designed by a group of inner-city children in 2003 to raise funding and awareness for HIV/AIDS-prevention education for men, women and children living with HIV and AIDS, as well as working with the Fresh Air Fund and the Elton... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... ...

Charity

John has long been associated with AIDS charities after the deaths of his friends Ryan White and Freddie Mercury, raising large amounts of money and using his public profile to raise awareness of the disease. For example, in 1986 he joined with Dionne Warwick, Gladys Knight, and Stevie Wonder to record the single "That's What Friends Are For", with all profits being donated to the American Foundation for AIDS Research. The song won Elton and the others the Grammy Award for Best Pop Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocal (as well as Song of the Year for its writers, Burt Bacharach and Carole Bayer Sager). In April 1990, John performed "Skyline Pigeon" at the funeral of White, a teenage hemophiliac he had befriended. The American Foundation for AIDS Research (amfAR) is an organization dedicated to the support of AIDS research, AIDS prevention, treatment education, and the advocacy of sound AIDS-related public policy. ... The Grammy Award for Best Pop Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocal has been awarded since 1966. ... The Song of the Year is one of the two most prestigious awards in the Grammies, if not in all of the American music industry. ... This biographical article needs additional references for verification. ... Carole Bayer Sager (born March 8, 1947 in New York City, New York) is an American lyricist, songwriter and singer best-known for writing the lyrics to many popular songs performed on Broadway and in Hollywood films. ... Skyline Pigeon was Elton Johns first minor hit in Great Britian. ... Haemophilia or hemophilia is the name of any of several hereditary genetic illnesses that impair the bodys ability to control bleeding. ...


John founded the Elton John AIDS Foundation in 1992 as a charity to fund programmes for HIV/AIDS prevention, for the elimination of prejudice and discrimination against HIV/AIDS-affected individuals, and for providing services to people living with or at risk of contracting HIV/AIDS. This cause continues to be one of his personal passions. In early 2006, Elton donated the smaller of two bright-red Yamaha pianos from his Las Vegas show to auction on eBay to raise public awareness and funds for the foundation. The Yamaha Corporation (ヤマハ株式会社; TYO: 7951 ) is a Japanese company with a large number of product areas. ...


To raise money for his AIDS charity, John hosts annually a glamorous White Tie & Tiara Ball, to which many famous celebrities are invited. On June 28, 2007, the 9th annual White Tie & Tiara Ball took place. The menu consisted of a truffle souffle followed by Surf and Turf (fillet mignon with Maine lobster tail) and a giant Knickerbocker Glory icecream. An auction followed the dinner held by Stephen Fry. A Rolls Royce ‘Phantom’ drophead coupe and a piece of Tracey Emin's artwork both raised £800, 000 for the charity fund, with the total amount raised reaching £3.5 million.[41] Later on in the event, John sang "Delilah" with Tom Jones and "Big Spender" with Shirley Bassey.[42] Tickets for the Ball cost £1,000 a head. The event raised £4.6 million for his AIDS Foundation in 2006.[43] is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article or section cites very few or no references or sources. ... Front cover of Tracey Emins memoir, Strangeland, published in 2005. ... Delilah was a song recorded by Queen on their 1991 album Innuendo. ... Sir Thomas Jones Woodward, KBE (born 7 June 1940), known by his stage name as Tom Jones, is a Grammy Award winning Welsh popular music singer particularly noted for his powerful voice. ... Big Spender is a song written by Cy Coleman and Dorothy Fields for the musical play Sweet Charity. ... Dame Shirley Veronica Bassey, DBE (born January 8, 1937 ) (age 70) in Cardiff, Wales), is a Welsh singer, perhaps best-known for performing the theme songs to the James Bond films Goldfinger (1964), Diamonds Are Forever (1971), and Moonraker (1979). ...


Every year since 2004, he has opened a shop (this year in Manhattan, before in London and Atlanta), selling his second hand clothes. Called "Elton's Closet" the sale this year of 10,000 items was expected to raise $400,000[44]


Musical style and voice

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In the 1970s, Elton John's sound immediately set him apart from most others by being piano-based in a rock 'n' roll world dominated by guitars. Another early characteristic was a set of dynamic string arrangements by Paul Buckmaster. Coupled with Taupin's often cryptic but emotionally resonant lyrics, the results were unique in the history of music. Songs in this style included "Sixty Years On", "Burn Down the Mission", "Take Me to the Pilot", "Levon", "Madman Across the Water", and the best-known of these, "Tiny Dancer". Image File history File links Unbalanced_scales. ... A string instrument (or stringed instrument) is a musical instrument that produces sound by means of vibrating strings. ... In music, an arrangement refers either to a rewriting of a piece of existing music with additional new material or to a fleshing-out of a compositional sketch, such as a lead sheet. ... Take Me to the Pilot is a country rock song performed by British musician Elton John. ... Madman Across the Water is a 1970 song written by Elton John and Bernie Taupin which appeared on the album of the same name in 1971. ...


"Your Song", one of his earliest popular hits, incorporates some other features found in many of his songs:

  • It is in binary form, with the verse repeated before the chorus begins;
  • The piano accompaniment is prominent, though the song also features an orchestra;
  • It uses a slowly building crescendo that brings the song to a tutti climax. Other songs that follow this pattern include "Don't Let the Sun Go Down On Me" and "Rocket Man".

John also has a distinctive vocal style. In particular, his phrasing is often a bit metronomic and sometimes has a curiously off-kilter, "rushed" quality especially at the end of lines (example: the phrase "like a puppy child" in the song "Amoreena"). He also, at least in his classic period in the 1970s, would sometimes sweep up from his normal tenor into a Four Seasons-like falsetto. This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Crescendo may mean: In musical notation, crescendo refers to a passage of music during which the volume gradually increases. ... In music, a tutti section in a concerto is one in which the orchestra plays and the soloist does not. ... Dont Let The Sun Go Down On Me is the first single from British musician Elton Johns 1974 album Caribou; it was released that year during the latter half of May in Great Britain, and on June 10 in the United States. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Elton John underwent throat surgery to remove potentially cancerous nodules from his vocal cords in January 1987 while on tour, a necessity he originally said was due to an infection, but later said was the result of excessive drug abuse.[45]


The problems with his voice can clearly be heard in his raspy singing on the Live In Australia album (released 1987). He made a full recovery from the surgery, but he continued to use illegal drugs until 1990. The surgery in 1987 also had an after-effect on John's voice, and he found that he could no longer sing in falsetto as well as he previously could, and that he now sang in a lower range. During an interview with James Lipton, John had claimed to embrace this new tone, feeling it gave a more "masculine" quality that contrasted with his earlier work. Live in Australia with the Melbourne Symphony Orchestra is a live album by Elton John and the Melbourne Symphony Orchestra recorded at the Sydney Entertainment Centre. ... Retail selling Street selling is the bottom of the chain and can be accomplished through purchasing from prostitutes, through cloaked retail stores or refuse houses for users in the act located in red-light districts which often also deal in paraphernalia, dealers marketing merriment at night clubs and other events... James Lipton (born September 19, 1926 in Detroit, Michigan) is an American writer, poet, and dean emeritus of the Actors Studio Drama School in New York City. ...


The change in Elton John's voice has been largely played down, though he stated, commenting fifteen years after the surgery, that he was "singing better than ever." Studio effects were evidently added to his voice on his first UK number 1 hit "Sacrifice" (1990). The release of Songs From The West Coast, his 2001 album, showed very clearly how different his voice is to his prime. This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ...


Popularity

Elton John continues to inspire musicians today, particularly Rufus Wainwright, Ben Folds, Adrian Evans, and Ryan Adams. Thom Yorke (Radiohead), Billie-Joe Armstrong (Green Day) and Axl Rose (Guns N' Roses) are also said to be fans. Final Fantasy music composer Nobuo Uematsu was also greatly influenced by him throughout his life, claiming "no one writes a melody like him." Rufus McGarrigle Wainwright (born July 22, 1973) is a Canadian-American singer-songwriter. ... Benjamin Scott Folds (born September 12, 1966, in Winston-Salem, North Carolina) is an American singer-songwriter and the former frontman of the musical group Ben Folds Five. ... Not to be confused with Bryan Adams David Ryan Adams (born November 5, 1974) is an American alt-country/rock singer-songwriter from Jacksonville, North Carolina. ... Thomas Edward Yorke, born October 7, 1968 in Wellingborough, Northamptonshire, England, is an English musician, best known as the lead singer of the English rock band Radiohead. ... Radiohead are an English rock band that formed in Oxfordshire in 1986. ... Billie Joe Armstrong (born February 17, 1972) is the main songwriter, lead vocalist, and guitarist for the Rock band Green Day. ... Green Day is an American rock band band comprising three core members: Billie Joe Armstrong (guitar, lead vocals), Mike Dirnt (bass, backing vocals) and Tré Cool (drums). ... For the first installment in the series, see Final Fantasy (video game). ... Nobuo Uematsu , born March 21, 1959) is a Japanese composer of video game music, and one of the most well-known, prolific, and versatile in the field. ...


Awards and accomplishments

  • In 1991, John's "Basque" won the Grammy Award for Best Instrumental Composition.
  • Elton and Bernie Taupin were inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame in 1992.
  • Elton John was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1994.
  • Elton John was made a Commander of the Order of the British Empire in 1995.
  • In September 1997, Taupin altered the lyrics of "Candle in the Wind" for a special version mourning the death of Diana, Princess of Wales, and John performed it at her funeral in Westminster Abbey. A recorded version, "Candle in the Wind 1997", then became the fastest selling single of all time, eventually going on to sell over 30 million copies worldwide, with the proceeds of approximately £55 million going to the Diana, Princess of Wales Memorial Fund. John would later win the Grammy Award for Best Male Pop Vocal Performance for the single.
  • Elton John was knighted by Queen Elizabeth II on 24 February 1998, granting him the title of "Sir". The honour was for his charitable work.
  • A recipient of a Kennedy Center Honor in 2004, along with Joan Sutherland, John Williams, Warren Beatty, Ossie Davis and Ruby Dee.

Candle in the Wind 1997 is a specially released single from Elton John released as a tribute to the late Diana, Princess of Wales. ... The British honours system is a means of rewarding individuals personal bravery, achievement or service to the United Kingdom. ... Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of sixteen sovereign states, holding each crown and title equally. ... February 24 is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... The Kennedy Center as seen from the Potomac River. ... Joan Sutherland as Haydns Euridice, Vienna 1967 Dame Joan Sutherland OM, AC, DBE (born November 7, 1926) is an Australian dramatic coloratura soprano noted for her contribution to the bel canto revival of the 1950s and 1960s. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Henry Warren Beatty (born March 30, 1937), better known as Warren Beatty, is an Academy Award and Golden Globe-winning American actor, producer, screenwriter, and director. ... Ossie Davis in The Green Pastures, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1951 Ossie Davis (December 18, 1917 – February 4, 2005) was an African American film actor, director and social activist. ... Ruby Dee (born October 27, 1924) is an African American actress, poet, playwright, screenwriter, journalist, and activist. ...

Discography

For a complete album discography, see Elton John discography.

An Elton John discography. ...

Singles

For a complete singles discography, see Elton John singles discography.

An Elton John singles discography. ...

Elton John Band

Current members
Previous band members
Other Notable Contributors and Guests

Guy Babylon(born December 20, 1956 in New Windsor, Maryland), is a keyboard player, most noted for his work with Elton John. ... Bob Birch (center) playing bass at an Elton John gig. ... Johnstone(left) performing Funeral For a Friend at an Elton John concert. ... John Mahon is a professional percussionist and backing vocalist, most noted for his recent work with Elton John. ... Olsson (back) performing at an Elton John concert at the Royal Opera House. ... Dee Murray (April 3, 1946 - January 15, 1992; born David Murray Oates in Southgate, London) was a British bassist, best known as a member of Elton Johns original rock band. ... Ray Cooper Ray Cooper (born August 19, 1942 in Watford, Hertfordshire) is an English musician. ... This article is about James Howard, the composer. ... Caleb Quaye (born 1948 in London, England), is a rock guitarist and studio musician best known for his work in the 1960s and 1970s with Elton John, Mick Jagger, Pete Townsend, Paul McCartney and Hall and Oates. ... Charlie Morgan, born on 9 August 1955 as John Charles Morgan in Hammersmith, London, England, is a homosexual who likes taking pictures of his guns. ... Bernie Taupin (born May 22, 1950) is an English lyricist most famous for his collaboration with Elton John. ... Gus Dudgeon (1942 - 2002) was a British record producer, and the inventor of audio sampling as a musical device. ... Paul Buckmaster is an artist, arranger, and composer. ... Lesley Duncan was a British singer-songwriter during the 1970s. ... Dusty Springfield OBE (16 April 1939 - 2 March 1999) was a popular English singer whose career spanned four decades. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Grappelli (left) and Jean-Luc Ponty (right). ... Kiki Dee (born Pauline Matthews on 6 March 1947, in Little Horton near Bradford, West Yorkshire, England) is a highly successful singer/songwriter, with a career that has lasted over 40 years. ... Bruce Arthur Johnston (born Benjamin Baldwin and then adopted, on June 27, 1942 in Peoria, Illinois) is a member of The Beach Boys and a Grammy Award-winning songwriter for composing I Write the Songs. ... Carl Wilson on the cover of his eponymous 1981 album. ... Toni Tennille (born, Cathryn Antoinette Tennille on May 8, 1940, in Montgomery, Alabama) is one-half of the 1970s Grammy Award winning duo Captain & Tennille. ... Tower of Power is a horn-based soul band from Oakland, California. ... John Winston Ono Lennon, MBE (October 9, 1940 – December 8, 1980), (born John Winston Lennon, known as John Ono Lennon) was an iconic English 20th century rock and roll songwriter and singer, best known as the founding member of The Beatles. ... Labelle (with the b written in small caps, while the spelling LaBelle exclusivelly refers to the stage surname of the groups lead vocalist, Patti LaBelle) was an American R&B/soul group, who successfully melded dance music with funk and glam rock, resulting in such memorable songs as Lady... David Van Cortlandt Crosby (born August 14, 1941) is an American guitarist, singer, and songwriter. ... Graham Nash on cover of his recording, Wild Tales, 1973 Graham William Nash (born February 2, 1942) is an English-born singer-songwriter known for his light tenor vocals and songwriting contributions in pop group The Hollies and folk-rock band Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young, and as a photography collector... The London Symphony Orchestra (LSO) is one of the major orchestras of the United Kingdom. ... The Melbourne Symphony Orchestra was founded by the Australian Broadcasting Corporation in 1934 as one of its radio orchestras. ... David Sanborn in concert in San Francisco. ... David Paich (born David Frank Paich on June 25, 1954 in Los Angeles, California) is a session musician from the 1980s, keyboard player, vocalist and main composer of the Los Angeles based rock/pop band Toto. ... Jeffrey Thomas Porcaro (April 1, 1954 – August 5, 1992) was a highly regarded session drummer and a founding member of the Grammy Award winning band Toto. ... Peter Dennis Blandford Townshend (born May 19, 1945 in Chiswick, London), is an award-winning English rock guitarist, singer, songwriter, and composer. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For the medieval chroniclers named John, deacon of. ... Nik Kershaw Nik Kershaw (born Nicholas David Kershaw on March 1, 1958) is an English singer-songwriter, popular during the 1980s. ... Frederick Dewayne Hubbard (born April 7, 1938 in Indianapolis, Indiana) is an American jazz trumpeter. ... Eric Patrick Clapton CBE (born 30 March 1945), nicknamed Slowhand, is a Grammy Award winning English guitarist, singer and composer. ... David Jon Gilmour CBE (born March 6, 1946 in Cambridge, Cambridgeshire) is an English guitarist, singer, and songwriter best known as a member of the band Pink Floyd. ... Kathryn Dawn Lang, OC (born November 2, 1961), best known by the stage name k. ... P.M. Dawn are a hip hop / R&B musical group. ... Richard Wayne Penniman (born December 5, 1932), better known by the stage name Little Richard, is an American singer, songwriter, and pianist, who began performing in the 1940s and recording from 1951. ... Donald Hugh Don Henley (born July 22, 1947 in Gilmer, Texas) is an American rock musician who is the drummer and one of the lead singers and songwriters of the band Eagles. ... Christopher Anton Rea (born 4 March 1951) is a singer-songwriter, from Middlesbrough, England. ... Tammy Wynette (May 5, 1942 – April 6, 1998) was a country singer and songwriter. ... Gladys Maria Knight (born May 28, 1944 in Atlanta, Georgia) is an American R&B/soul singer and actress. ... Paul Antony Young, better known as Paul Young (born 17 January 1956) is an English pop artist. ... Bonnie Raitt, (born November 8, 1949) is an American Blues-R&B singer, songwriter, and guitarist who was born in Burbank, California, the daughter of Broadway musical star John Raitt. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Georgios Kyriacos Panayiotou (Greek: ) (born June 25, 1963), better known as George Michael, is an English [1] singer-songwriter who performs soul influenced pop, and who (as a solo artist and half of the duo Wham!) has enjoyed massive global success since 1982. ... Deon Estus is a British bassist and singer. ... Paul Carrack, 2003 Paul Carrack (born April 22, 1951 in Sheffield, England) is a British keyboardist, singer and songwriter. ...

References

  1. ^ This middle name, after the horse named Hercules on the British sitcom Steptoe and Son, appears little used (it only receives 9,340 Google results as of 02/07/07), however The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed. uses the name in its entry. It is officially part of his name, as reflected in this certificate notifying the change of name of a company director (Elton John).
  2. ^ He was made a CBE in 1996 - In the 1998 New Year's Honours list he was made a Knight Bachelor
  3. ^ http://www.mansfield.altervista.org/worldchart.htm
  4. ^ http://www.ukmix.org/forums/viewtopic.php?t=30699
  5. ^ The Immortals: The First Fifty. Rolling Stone Issue 946. Rolling Stone.
  6. ^ http://www.onthisveryspot.com/spot/Elton_John_Birthplace
  7. ^ http://www.onthisveryspot.com/spot/111_Potter_Street
  8. ^ a b c d e Elton John, Philip Norman, Fireside, 1991
  9. ^ a b c d e f g His Song: The Musical Journey of Elton John, Elizabeth Rosenthal, Billboard Books, 2001
  10. ^ Playboy Interview: Elton John, Eugenie Ross-Leming and David Standish, Playboy Magazine, January 1976
  11. ^ Elton John, Mick St. Michael, Smithmark, 1994
  12. ^ In His Own Words: Elton John, ed. Susan Black, Omnibus Press, 1993
  13. ^ A Voice Louder Than Rock and Roll, Caleb Quaye with Dale A. Berryhill, Vision, 2006
  14. ^ http://www.onthisveryspot.com/spot/EJ_Frome_Court
  15. ^ http://www.sandieshaw.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=773&sid=017e2a49eed0aa995e7346cf214a7a90
  16. ^ In his 1981 book "Thank U Very Much - Mike McCartney's Family Album" Scaffold singer Mike McGear (McCartney) describes a meeting with Elton John during which John advises him he used to sing background vocals for the group.
  17. ^ http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/entertainment/5013218.stm
  18. ^ http://legends.disney.go.com/legends/detail?key=Elton+John
  19. ^ Guardian.co.uk: "When Elton Met Jake November 12 2006"
  20. ^ http://www.dailymail.co.uk/pages/live/articles/showbiz/showbiznews.html?in_article_id=442194&in_page_id=1773&ico=Homepage&icl=TabModule&icc=picbox&ct=5
  21. ^ http://www.nme.com/news/elton-john/27292 NME article on 60th birthday concert at Madison Square Gardens
  22. ^ Elton John to Put Entire Music Catalog Online. March 21, 2007.
  23. ^ http://www.itv.com/listings/Programme.aspx?itvgenre=2&channeldate=29/03/2007&channelid=HTW&scheduleid=29086531&prognum=961813&episode=961813&isfilm=No&types=subtitles
  24. ^ http://www.stipkocontent.com/contentengine/publish/buzzine/interviews/article_1604.shtml
  25. ^ 6ABC.com article: "Elton John Wants to Make Hip-hop Album"
  26. ^ http://www.eltonjohn.com/home_index.asp?page=now/projects/redpiano.asp
  27. ^ http://business.timesonline.co.uk/tol/business/specials/rich_list/rich_list_search/?urllink=http://www.timesonline.co.uk/richlist/person/0,,47269,00.html
  28. ^ http://www.rollingstone.com/artists/davidbowie/articles/story/8718858/elton_john_its_lonely_at_the_top
  29. ^ http://www.itv.com/news/d2e43dd7a7c16245875bc3ac947c7586.html
  30. ^ http://www.dailymail.co.uk/pages/live/articles/showbiz/showbiznews.html?in_article_id=372279&in_page_id=1773
  31. ^ http://www.dailymail.co.uk/pages/live/articles/showbiz/showbiznews.html?in_article_id=372165&in_page_id=1766
  32. ^ http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/entertainment/4546670.stm
  33. ^ http://www.telegraph.co.uk/opinion/main.jhtml?xml=/opinion/2003/11/02/do0210.xml&sSheet=/opinion/2003/11/02/ixop.html
  34. ^ "Elton John", Biography Channel, 2005
  35. ^ CNN.com: "Larry King Live: Interview With Elton John Aired January 25, 2002"
  36. ^ http://www.femalefirst.co.uk/celebrity/11352004.htm
  37. ^ http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/1024745.stm
  38. ^ http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/entertainment/showbiz/1283409.stm
  39. ^ http://www.forbes.com/2001/06/04/0604vow.html
  40. ^ http://www.findaproperty.com/story.aspx?storyid=4831
  41. ^ http://www.telegraph.co.uk/fashion/main.jhtml?xml=/fashion/2007/06/29/efwhite129.xml
  42. ^ http://www.chopard.com/worldwide/fl/eltonjohn07/eltonjohn2007.htm
  43. ^ http://www.dailymail.co.uk/pages/live/articles/showbiz/showbiznews.html?in_article_id=464885&in_page_id=1773&ico=Homepage&icl=TabModule&icc=picbox&ct=5
  44. ^ http://www.theage.com.au/news/people/elton-john-turns-rags-to-riches-for-charity/2006/04/11/1144521337887.html
  45. ^ http://www.femalefirst.co.uk/celebrity/11352004.htm

Steptoe and Son is a British sitcom written by Ray Galton and Alan Simpson about two rag and bone men living in Oil Drum Lane, a fictional street in Shepherds Bush, London. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (3883x2398, 1087 KB)The certificate used for Elton Johns deed poll, dated February 9, 1972. ... is the 316th day of the year (317th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... March 21 is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ...

See also

John/Taupin is a songwriting team that consists of Elton John and Bernie Taupin. ... This is a non-definitive list of best selling recording artists, embracing worldwide single and album sales. ... This is a list of number-one hits in the United States by year from the Billboard Hot 100. ... This is a list of recording artists who have reached number one on Billboard magazines weekly pop singles chart(s). ... This is a list of number-one dance hits as recorded by Billboard Magazine’s Hot Dance Club Play chart — a weekly national survey of popular songs in U.S. dance clubs. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... This is a list of recording artists who have reached number one on Billboard magazines Hot Dance Club Play chart. ... Used from 1969 to 1972, Elton John and Bernie Taupin used this instrument to co-write the music that made them famous. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Elton John
  • Elton John at MusicBrainz
  • Elton John's official website
  • Elton John AIDS Foundation (EJAF)
  • Elton John at the Internet Movie Database
  • Disney Legends profile
  • Elton John at Live 8
  • Larry King Lieve: Transcript of Elton John Interview on 25 January 2002
  • Spots related to Elton John's childhood and career
Persondata
NAME John, Sir Elton Hercules
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Dwight, Reginald Kenneth
SHORT DESCRIPTION English Singer-songwriter, Pianist, Record producer
DATE OF BIRTH March 25, 1947
PLACE OF BIRTH Pinner, Middlesex, London, England
DATE OF DEATH
PLACE OF DEATH

  Results from FactBites:
 
Elton John (2456 words)
John emerged from the obscurity of a British song publisher’s office in a meteoric rise to superstar status during the Seventies.
Given to roughly equal numbers of ballads and rockers, John’s output was as critical to this decade as the Beatles were to the Sixties and Presley to the Fifties.
Elton John, is born in the London suburb of Pinner.
Elton John (8620 words)
Elton was a heavily sought-after session player between 1968 and 1970, graduating from backing vocalist and keyboard player to lead singer on a series of quickie cover versions that were recorded for Top 40 LP compilation discs - back then, record companies figured it was cheaper to re-record than license.
Elton's regular gang - Taupin, Gudgeon, Quaye, Buckmaster, Brown, etc. - all take their places here, but bass, drum, and guitar players are alternated frequently, and future band members Johnstone, Cooper, Olsson, and Murray - and even Roger Pope and future Yes member/cult favorite Rick Wakeman - all appear.
John's effective piano is mixed prominently, his voice is strong, and both the melodies and string arrangements are attention-grabbing.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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