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Encyclopedia > Elseworlds
Elseworlds logo.
Elseworlds logo.

Elseworlds is the publication imprint for a group of comic books produced by DC Comics that take place outside the company's canon. According to its tagline: "In Elseworlds, heroes are taken from their usual settings and put into strange times and places - some that have existed, and others that can't, couldn't or shouldn't exist. The result is stories that make characters who are as familiar as yesterday seem as fresh as tomorrow." Unlike its Marvel Comics counterpart What If...?, which bases its stories on a single point of divergence from the regular continuity, most Elseworlds stories instead take place in entirely self-contained continuities whose only connection to the canon DC continuity are the presence of familiar DC characters. Elseworlds logo. ... A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... [[ For the bands, see Superheroes (band) and Super Heroines. ... Marvel Comics is an American comic book line published by Marvel Publishing, Inc. ... What If Vol. ...

Contents

History

"Imaginary Stories"

For several years from the late 1950s to the mid-1980s, particularly during the 1960s Silver Age of Comic Books era, DC Comics published various stories about their title characters which did not take place in their regular continuity. Most of these stories were labeled "Imaginary Stories" and featured alternate histories of characters, such as "The Amazing Story of Superman-Red and Superman Blue!". Although the majority of Imaginary Stories were published in various Superman comics, a few Imaginary Stories appeared in Batman comics and other DC publications. Showcase #4 (Oct. ... Superman in his electric blue costume, the Man of Energy (May 1997). ... Superman is a fictional character and comic book superhero , originally created by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian artist Joe Shuster and published by DC Comics. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ...


The last official "Imaginary Story" ever published—"Whatever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow?"—was written by Alan Moore and appeared in Superman #423 and Action Comics #583 (both September 1986). The Elseworlds series of self-contained stories are essentially Imaginary Stories under a newer label and a wider scope of possibilities. Alan Moore (born November 18, 1953, in Northampton) is an English writer most famous for his influential work in comics, including the acclaimed graphic novels Watchmen, V for Vendetta and From Hell. ... Superman began as a feature in Action Comics #1 in June 1938. ... Cover of Action Comics #1, which featured the debut of Superman. ...


Elseworlds imprint

Batgirl from Elseworld's Thrillkiller.

The first Elseworlds title was Batman: Gotham by Gaslight (1989), by Brian Augustyn and Mike Mignola and edited by Mark Waid, which featured a Victorian Age version of the superhero Batman hunting Jack the Ripper, who has come to Gotham City. This title was not originally published as an Elseworlds comic, but its success led to the Elseworlds concept and this title was retroactively declared the first Elseworlds. Image File history File links BatgirlTK.jpg‎ This is a scan of Batgirl from Thrillkiller This image is a single panel from a comic strip or the interior of a single issue of a comic book and the copyright for it is most likely owned by either the publisher of... Image File history File links BatgirlTK.jpg‎ This is a scan of Batgirl from Thrillkiller This image is a single panel from a comic strip or the interior of a single issue of a comic book and the copyright for it is most likely owned by either the publisher of... Mike Mignola (born in Berkeley, California on September 16, 1960) is a American comic book artist and writer. ... Mark Waid (born March 21, 1962 in Hueytown, Alabama) is an American comic book writer. ... Queen Victoria (shown here on the morning of her Accession to the Throne, June 20, 1837) gave her name to the historic era. ... [[ For the bands, see Superheroes (band) and Super Heroines. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... Jack the Ripper is the pseudonym given to an unidentified serial killer active in the largely impoverished Whitechapel area of London, England in the second half of 1888. ... This article is about the fictional place. ... A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ...


The first book to feature the familiar Elseworlds logo is Batman: Holy Terror.


DC sporadically published various Elseworlds titles up to 2004, but as of 2005, no other Elseworlds books have been planned. Around the time of the release of Batman Detective No. 27, editor Mike Carlin noted that DC had scaled back the production of Elseworlds books in order to "put the luster back on them." Several titles that were announced as Elseworlds books prior to this have yet to see publication, such as Generations 4 (Announced by John Byrne, but possibly back-burnered due to lack of good press for & low fan response to Generations 3), Superboy's Legion 2 (rumored sequel by Alan Davis; presumably planned after he finished JLA: Another Nail) and The Teen Titans Swingin' Elseworlds Special (cancelled, possibly due to controversial material concerning John F. Kennedy).
John Lindley Byrne (born July 6, 1950) is a British-born naturalised American author and artist of comic books. ... Superman & Batman: Generations is an Elseworlds comic book series written and illustrated by John Byrne. ... Alan Davis (born 1956) is a British writer and artist of comic books. ... Teen Titans redirects here. ... John Fitzgerald Kennedy (May 29, 1917 – November 22, 1963), also referred to as John F. Kennedy, Kennedy, John Kennedy, Jack Kennedy, or JFK, was the thirty-fifth President of the United States. ...


Noted titles

Cover of the Elseworld title, Batman: Book of the Dead 1. Moench-Kitson-McCarthy.

Other Elseworlds titles include: Download high resolution version (966x1495, 160 KB)Batman: Book of the Dead 1. ... Download high resolution version (966x1495, 160 KB)Batman: Book of the Dead 1. ...

  • JLA: The Nail, which theorizes a world without Superman, in which the Justice League of America has still been formed, but chaos reigns without a proper champion of the world's ideals;
  • Superman's Metropolis, a trilogy, based on German Expressionism cinema, written by Jean-Marc Lofficier, Randy Lofficier and illustrated by Ted McKeever;
  • Batman: I, Joker, where a futuristic Gotham City is led by a cult that follows Batman's descendant, a self-proclaimed god known only as "The Bruce";
  • Flashpoint, where Barry (The Flash) Allen takes a bullet meant for John F. Kennedy, paralyzing him from the neck down.
  • In Thrillkiller, Batgirl and Robin fight a female Joker in the 1960's, while detective Bruce Wayne becomes the Batman after Robin's death.
  • Superman: Speeding Bullets reimagines the story of Kal-El as his ship crashes at Wayne Manor in Gotham City instead of Smallville, thus making him Batman instead of Superman.
  • Superman: Red Son ponders Superman growing up in the Soviet Union and later succeeding Stalin as Soviet Premier.
  • Another noteworthy Elseworld is the Batman and Dracula trilogy, written by Doug Moench with Kelley Jones and Malcolm Jones III, in which the infamous vampire lord comes to Gotham City and is confronted by Batman, who subsequently becomes a vampire himself.
  • One of the most famous Elseworlds titles is Kingdom Come, a miniseries in which a new, violent generation of superheroes replaces the aging idealism of DC's classic heroes, and the conflict between the two groups ignites an apocalyptic battle. The Kingdom is the sequel to Kingdom Come.

To readers of DC comics, Elseworlds can fall under any writing style not affiliated with the DC comics universe. Titles like Batman: The Dark Knight Returns (1986), Superman: Whatever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow? (1986), The Batman Chronicles #21 (May 2000, solicited as Elseworlds, but has no logo), Bizarro Comics (June 2001, which featured the story "Letitia Lerner, Superman's Babysitter" from the cancelled Elseworlds 80-Page Giant), Batman: The Dark Knight Strikes Again (2001), Batman: Digital Justice (1990), and Superman: Secret Identity (2004) were referred to as Elseworlds in the DC Universe without the name brand logo. Except when otherwise noted, most of the stories in the monthly series Batman: Legends of the Dark Knight are considered canon, even though some have tales of Batman in the future, which are deemed non-canonical. In 1994, DC Comics Elseworlds collaborated with the DC yearly summer Annual edition comic books. The last Elseworlds series published was Batman: Year 100 in 2006, which did not have the Elseworlds logo printed on it. Superman is a fictional character and comic book superhero , originally created by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian artist Joe Shuster and published by DC Comics. ... The Justice League is a DC Comics superhero team. ... Supermans Metropolis is a DC Comics comic book Elseworlds trilogy, based on German Expressionism cinema, written by Jean-Marc Lofficier, Randy Lofficier and Roy Thomas (first volume only) and illustrated by Ted McKeever. ... A trilogy is a set of three works of art, usually literature or film, that are connected and can be seen as a single work, as well as three individual ones. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Jean-Marc Lofficier (born June 22, 1954) is a French Occitan author of books about films and television programs, as well as numerous comic books and translations of a number of animation screenplays. ... Jean-Marc Lofficier (born June 22, 1954) is a French author of books about film and television programs, as well as numerous comic books and translations of a number of animation screenplays. ... Cover of the collected edition of Eddy Current Ted McKeever is an award-winning American Comics artist. ... This article is about the fictional place. ... This article does not discuss cult in its original sense of religious practice; for that usage see Cult (religious practice). ... The Flash. ... John Fitzgerald Kennedy (May 29, 1917 – November 22, 1963), also referred to as John F. Kennedy, Kennedy, John Kennedy, Jack Kennedy, or JFK, was the thirty-fifth President of the United States. ... Spoiler warning: Superman: Red Son is a comic book published by DC Comics unveiled under their Elseworlds imprint in April, 2003. ... Josef Vissarionovich Dzhugashvili (Georgian: , Ioseb Besarionis Dze Jughashvili; Russian: , Iosif Vissarionovich Dzhugashvili) (December 18 [O.S. December 6] 1878[2] – March 5, 1953), better known by his adopted name, Joseph Stalin (alternatively transliterated Josef Stalin), was General Secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Unions Central Committee from... Premier of the Soviet Union is the commonly used English term for the offices of Chairman of the Council of Peoples Commissars of the USSR (Председатель Совета Народных Комиссаров СССР; Predsedatel Soveta Narodnykh Komissarov SSSR) (1923-1946) and Chairman of the Council of Ministers of the USSR (Председатель Совета Министров СССР; Predsedatel Soveta Ministrov SSSR) (1946-1991), who... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... Doug Moench (born February 23, 1948) is an American comic book writer. ... Kelley Jones (born July 23, 1962 in Sacramento, CA) is a comic book artist best known for his runs on Batman with writer Doug Moench and on Sandman (DC Comics/Vertigo) with writer Neil Gaiman. ... Malcolm Jones III (born 1970, died 1996) was an American comics artist best known as an inker on The Sandman, where he added his illustrative line and textures to the work of pencillers such as Mike Dringenberg, Kelley Jones and Colleen Doran. ... The cover to Absolute Kingdom Come by Alex Ross (2006) Kingdom Come was a four-issue comic book limited series published in 1996 by DC Comics. ... A miniseries (sometimes mini-series), in a serial storytelling medium, is a production which tells a story in a limited number of episodes. ... Look up Apocalypse in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Kingdom is a comic book miniseries published by DC Comics, written by Mark Waid. ... The premiere issue of the series Spoiler warning: The Dark Knight Returns (known as DKR by fans) is a superhero comic book story published by DC Comics between 1985 and 1986, starring Batman. ... Panel from Letitia Lerner, Supermans Babysitter Letitia Lerner, Supermans Babysitter is a comic book story by Kyle Baker, co-written with Liz Glass. ... The cover of the Elseworlds 80-Page Giant The Elseworlds 80-Page Giant was to be an 80-page collection of Elseworlds stories, published by DC comics. ... The Dark Knight Strikes Again is a Batman graphic novel by Frank Miller. ... Batman: Legends of the Dark Knight, commonly referred to as simply Legends of the Dark Knight is a DC comic book featuring Batman. ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... An annual publication, more often called simply an annual, is a book or a magazine, comic book or comic strip published yearly. ...


Relationship to the mainstream DC continuity

While the Elseworlds line originally had no formal relation to the main DC continuity, this situation has changed with the re-introduction of the multiverse at the end of the weekly series 52. In the new weekly series "Countdown", it is revealed that several of the more famous elseworlds univereses are now part of the new multiverse, including gotham by Gaslight, the Batman and Dracula trilogy, Superman: Red Son, and Kingdom Come. It has not yet been revealed if these new universes contain the exact histories of the titles that inspired thm, or are new timelines based in those worls. A Roman law prohibits the execution of old and crippled slaves. ...


See also

What If Vol. ... Marvel Comics is an American comic book line published by Marvel Publishing, Inc. ... This is a list of Elseworlds publications from DC Comics, separated by main character, and in alphabetical order by title. ... The Earths of the Multiverse and the different variations of the Flash inhabiting each one. ... Hypertime is a fictional concept presented in the 1998 comic book series The Kingdom, both a catch-all explanation for any continuity discrepancies in DC Universe stories and a variation or superset of the Multiverse that existed before Crisis on Infinite Earths. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Elseworlds.net - The Unofficial Elseworlds Home Page (442 words)
"In Elseworlds, heroes are taken from their usual settings and put into strange times and places--some that have existed, and others that can't, couldn't, or shouldn't exist.
This 4 part Elseworlds watches the World's Finest pair from 1939 (their first meeting) to 2919.
It is worth getting but there are better Elseworlds (JLA: the Nail, JSA: The Liberty Files.) If you haven't got it and want to, buy the collected edition, as there's not much use in buying all 4 issues.
Elseworlds - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (560 words)
Elseworlds is the publication imprint for a group of comic books produced by DC Comics that take place outside the company's canon.
The first Elseworlds title was Batman: Gotham by Gaslight (1989), by Brian Augustyn and Mike Mignola and edited by Mark Waid, which featured a Victorian Age version of the superhero Batman hunting Jack the Ripper, who has come to Gotham City.
One of the most famous Elseworlds titles is Kingdom Come, a miniseries in which a new, violent generation of superheroes replaces the aging idealism of DC's classic heroes, and the conflict between the two groups ignites an apocalyptic battle.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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