FACTOID # 4: Just 1% of the houses in Nevada were built before 1939.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Elmhurst College

Elmhurst College was founded in 1871. It is a private four year institution affiliated with the United Church of Christ. It is located on 38 acres (154,000 m²) of land in Elmhurst, Illinois, a suburb of Chicago. There were approximately 2,600 students enrolled in Elmhurst College in 2003. 1871 (MDCCCLXXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... The United Church of Christ (UCC) is a mainline Protestant Christian denomination principally in the United States, generally considered within the Reformed tradition, and formed in 1957 by the merger of two denominations, the Evangelical and Reformed Church and the Congregational Christian Churches. ... Incorporated Village in 1982. ...

Contents


Degrees

Elmhurst College offers the following degrees:

  • Bachelor of Arts
  • Bachelor of Liberal Studies
  • Bachelor of Music
  • Bachelor of Science
  • Master of Arts
  • Master of Business Administration
  • Master of Education
  • Master of Science
  • Master in Professional Accounting

History

In 1871 a Chicago businessman Thomas Bryan and his wife Jennie gave land in Elmhurst, Illinois to the German Evangelical Synod of the Northwest. This land was given for the purpose of establishing a school to prepare young men for the theological seminary and to train teachers for parochial schools. The Elmhurst Proseminary opened later that year. The first students-all male-studied Latin, Greek, English, German, music, history, geography, mathematics, science, and religion. All classes, including English, were taught in German. Incorporated Village in 1982. ...


In 1919, the Proseminary became the Elmhurst Academy and Junior College. It offered lots of great classes, yay,(in English) both pre-theological and classical education programs. The expanded curriculum included courses in public speaking, physical education, economics, psychology, and the history of education. In 1923, the Academy and Junior College assumed the name Elmhurst College, and became a four-year college for men, offering the Bachelor of Arts degree. Women first enrolled in 1930. In 1949, Elmhurst College offered its first Evening Session for adult students.


Timeline of the College

  • 1871 - School established in Elmhurst, Illinois.
  • 1872 - First class taught.
  • 1875 - Phillip Meusch becomes second president.
  • 1879 - Old Main dedicated, enrollment reaches 103 students.
  • 1880 - Goebel becomes third president.
  • 1887 - Irion becomes fourth president.
  • 1901 - "Elmhurst College" first appears on cover of school catalog.
  • 1907 - Reinhold Neibuhr enrolls at Elmhurst College.
  • 1917 - Catalog is published in English for the first time.
  • 1919 - Schick become president of Elmhurst College.
  • 1920 - The first school newspaper and the first three fraternities arrive on campus.
  • 1921 - Elmhurst celebrates its Golden Jubilee.
  • 1923 - Elmhurst College has its first Homecoming.
  • 1924 - Helmut Richard Niebuhr becomes president of the College.
  • 1925 - First three students graduate from the College's four year program.
  • 1928 - Lehmann becomes seventh president of Elmhurst College.
  • 1930 - The College opens its doors to women, 46 enroll.
  • 1934 - Elmhurst is accredited as a four-year college.
  • 1948 - Dinkmeyer becomes Elmhurst's eight president.
  • 1949 - Evening Sessions begin.
  • 1957 - Robert C. Stanger becomes president.
  • 1965 - Kleckner becomes the 10th president of the College.
  • 1967 - Gwendolyn Brooks teaches creative writing during the Spring Term.
  • 1971 - Elmhurst celebrates its centenial, Frick becomes president.
  • 1975 - The College's endowment tops $1 million.
  • 1985 - The women's vollyball team wins its second NCAA championship in three years.
  • 1994 - Cureton becomes president of the college.
  • 1998 - Elmhurst launches its first graduate programs.
  • 1999 - North Hall dedicated.
  • 2001 - The Elmhurst College Jazz Band performs at the Chicago Jazz Festival in Grant Park.
  • 2004 - Circle Hall dedicated.

Reinhold Neibuhr was a theologian and social activist writing during the time of World War II and following. ... Helmut Richard Niebuhr (1894-1962) was an American Christian ethicist best known for his 1951 book Christ and Culture and his 1960 book Radical Monotheism and Western Culture. ... Gwendolyn Brooks Gwendolyn Brooks (June 7, 1917 – December 3, 2000) was an award-winning African American woman poet. ...

Presidents of Elmhurst College

  • 1871-1874 Carl Frederick Kranz, First President
  • 1874-1880 Phillip Frederick Meusch, Second President
  • 1880-1887 Peter Goebel, Third President
  • 1887-1919 Daniel Irion, Class of 1874, Fourth President
  • 1919-1924 Herman J. Schick, Class of 1897, Fifth President
  • 1924-1927 Helmut Richard Niebuhr, Class of 1912, Sixth President
  • 1928-1948 Timothy Lehmann, Class of 1899, Seventh President
  • 1948-1957 Henry W. Dinkmeyer, Class of 1911, Eight President
  • 1957-1965 Robert C. Stanger, Class of 1918, Ninth President
  • 1965-1971 Donald C. Kleckner, Tenth President
  • 1971-1994 Ivan E. Frick, Eleventh President
  • 1994-Present Bryant L. Cureton, Twelfth President

Carl Frederick Kranz is recognized as the founding president of Elmhurst College in Elmhurst, Illinois. ... Phillip Frederick Meusch, a minister who came to the United States from Germany in 1850, built the Proseminarys faculty and student body as its second inspector. ... Peter Goebel was the third president of Elmhurst College. ... Helmut Richard Niebuhr (1894-1962) was an American Christian ethicist best known for his 1951 book Christ and Culture and his 1960 book Radical Monotheism and Western Culture. ...

Campus Facilities

Accelerator Laboratory

The accelerator Art space houses a 750,000-volt Cockcroft-Walton particle accelerator. The accelerator now shares the building space with the new-age art gallery.


A. C. Buehler Library

Fresh from a $1.5 million upgrade, the A. C. Buehler Library aspires to be the model small-college library. Comfortable, welcoming, and ready to provide help on both academic and technical questions, the campus library and its staff provide an excellent bridge between the "printed page" library of the 20th century and the moder, technology-based information source. The A. C. Buehler Library is also home to the finest collection of Chicago Imagistart in the world.


Computer Science and Technology Center

The CSTC, opened in 1988, is home to the College's open-access computer laboratories and much more. It houses the department of mathematics, computer science and information systems, foreign languages and literatures, and geography and environmental planning. The Instructional Media Center, located on the first floor, houses audio-visual material. The CSTC also contains several general purpose classrooms, the Gretsch Recording Studio, the weather station, and specialized laboratories.


The Frick Center

Built in 1961 and recently expanded and renovated (1999-2001), the Frick Center houses lounges, dining facilities, a game room, the mailroom, meeting rooms, and student radio station, WRSE-FM. The offices of the Student Government Association are housed here, as is the Union Board, the yearbook, and the college newspaper The Leader. Formerly known as the College Union, this building was renamed in 1994 to honor the College's eleventh president, Dr. Ivan E. Frick, and his wife, Ruth Hudson Frick.


Goebel Hall

Originally built in 1928 as the College's gymnasium, Goebel is named for the College's third president. It houses the Offices of Admission and Financial Aid, Registration and Records, Advising, Student Accounts, Academic Affairs, and the campus book store. Its more recent renovation and enlargement was completed in 1989.


Hammerschmidt Memorial Chapel

Completed in 1959 and renovated in 1993, the Chapel has a large auditorium for worship or assembly, a prayer chapel, classrooms, and English and Philosophy faculty offices. The auditorium seats roughly 1,000 people, and is used for events and performances of all types.


Irion Hall

Constructed in 1911 and named for the fourth president of the College, Irion was extensively renovated in 1978 to provide better facilities for the Speech-Language-Hearing Clinic and the Department of Music. The building's Buik Recital Hall is used for concerts, recitals, and lectures.


Kranz Forum

Located immediately east of the Frick Center, Kranz Forum is the site of a statue of Reinhold Niebuhr, a pre-eminent 20th-century theologian and 1910 graduate of Elmhurst College. The statue was sculpted by Robert Berks, whose works include the eight-foot bust of John F. Kennedy at the Kennedy Center for the Preforming Arts, the statue of Justice Louis D. Brandeis at Brandeis University, and busts of U.S. presidents Abraham Lincoln, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Harry S Truman, and John F. Kennedy, which occupy prominent positions in the Oval Office of the White House. Reinhold Niebuhr (June 21, 1892 – June 1, 1971) was a Protestant theologian best known for his study of the task of relating the Christian faith to the reality of modern politics and diplomacy. ... Robert Berks, an American sculptor, created hundreds of bronze sculptures and monuments including the Mary McLeod Bethune memorial and the Albert Einstein memorial in Washington, D.C. Another of his statues, that of the Swedish botanist and physician Carolus Linnaeus, can be found in the Heritage Garden of the Chicago... John Fitzgerald Kennedy (May 29, 1917 – November 22, 1963), often referred to as John F. Kennedy, JFK or Jack Kennedy, was the 35th President of the United States. ... Louis D. Brandeis Louis Dembitz Brandeis (November 13, 1856 - October 3, 1941) was an important American litigator, Justice, advocate of privacy, and developer of the Brandeis Brief. ... Brandeis University is a private university in Waltham, Massachusetts, United States. ... Abraham Lincoln (February 12, 1809 – April 15, 1865), sometimes called Abe Lincoln and nicknamed Honest Abe, the Rail Splitter, and the Great Emancipator, was an American politician who served as the 16th President of the United States (1861 to 1865), and the first president from the Republican Party. ... FDR redirects here. ... For the victim of Mt. ... John Fitzgerald Kennedy (May 29, 1917 – November 22, 1963), often referred to as John F. Kennedy, JFK or Jack Kennedy, was the 35th President of the United States. ... The Oval Office is the official office of the President of the United States, in the West Wing of the White House, built in 1909. ... The southern side of the White House The White House is the official residence and principal workplace of the President of the United States of America. ...


Langhorst Athletic Field

Home to Elmhurst football, soccer and track and field (with its 400-meter rubber track), Langhorst is named in honor of the late Professor of Physical Education Oliver M. Langhorst, Class of 1930, to recognize his 36 years of faithful service to the College. The fully enclosed Langhorst Press Box overlooks the field.


Lehmann Hall

Named for the sevent Elmhurst College president, Lehmann was erected in 1951 and renovated in 1990. It houses the Office of the President, the Office of College Advancement, the Office of Financial Affairs, Human Resources, Campus Security, Administrative Computer Services, and Central Printing Services. Faculty offices for the Center for Business and Economics are also located in Lehmann Hall.


Memorial Hall

Memorial Hall houses the College's highly respected Deicke Center for Nursing Education. Formerly Memorial Library, this building was erected in 1921 to honor the 900 young men of the Evangelical Synod who lost their lives in World War I.


Mill Theater

The Mill Theater and Scene Shop operate in what was once a millwork factory and lumberyard. The buildings now contain a 200-seat, flexible-seating theater with state of the art lighting and sound. The theater lobby is newly renovated. The Mill Theater also contains costume and prop shops, and a classroom.


Old Main

Built in 1878, Old Main was completely renovated in 1978 and further updated in 1994. It contains classrooms, art and theology faculty offices, and modern art studios. Old Main is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.


R. A. Faganel Hall, Physical Education

The physical education building opened in 1983 and was named R.A. Faganel Hall in 2000. The main level includes basketball/volleyball courts, handball/racquetball courts, a wrestling room, multipurpose room, training room, locker rooms, Hall of Fame, and trophy cases. Faculty offices for the Department of Kinesiology and the Athletic Office are on the second floor, together with a classroom and biomechanics testing laboratory. The adjacent Tom and Diane Tyrrell Fitness Center, built in 1999, houses state-of-the-art facilities for weight training, physical fitness, and athletic training.


Arthur J. Schaible Science Center

Constructed in 1966 and recently renovated, the Scaible Science Center houses the departments of biology, chemistry, history, physics, political science, psychology, sociology, and urban studies. In addition to lecture halls and laboratories for general instruction, there are specialized laboratories and equipment for faculty and student research. The Science Center also houses Illinois Hall, a 115 seat lecture space with enhanced acoustics and new technical and electronic capabilities, opened in 2001.


Circle Hall

The newest addition to the Elmhurst College campus. Circle Hall opened in the fall of 2004. It houses the Education department, Speech-Language Pathology department (including the Speech clinic) and the Center for Professional Excellence.


Residence Halls

Students who live on campus reside in five residence halls. Dinkmeyer Hall, built in 1956, is named for the eighth president of the College and also houses the Elmhurst College Drop-in Child Care Center. Niebuhr Hall, named for Helmut Richard Niebuhr (Class of 1912 and the sixth president of the College) and Reinhold Neibuhr (Class of 1910 and a famed theologian) also houses the Wellness Center, which includes student health services and counseling services, and the Department of Theology and Religion. North Hall, opened in 1999, also houses the Brinkmeier Vista Lounge and the Office of Residence Life, as well as conference and meeting facilities. Schick Hall, built in 1922 and expanded in 1967 and 1970, is named for the fifth president of the College. Stanger Hall, built in 1968, is named for the ninth president of the College and his father, who was a professor. All five have sprinklers for fire safety. Helmut Richard Niebuhr (1894-1962) was an American Christian ethicist best known for his 1951 book Christ and Culture and his 1960 book Radical Monotheism and Western Culture. ... Reinhold Neibuhr was a theologian and social activist writing during the time of World War II and following. ...


Majors

Undergraduate Majors

  • Accounting
  • American Studies
  • Art
  • Biology
  • Business Administration
  • Chemistry
  • Communication Studies
  • Computer Science
  • Early Childhood Education
  • Economics
  • Elementary Education
  • English
  • Environmental Management
  • Exercise Science
  • Finance
  • French
  • Geography and Environmental Planning
  • German
  • Health Science
  • History
  • Information Systems
  • Interdepartmental
  • Interdisciplinary Communications Studies
  • International Business
  • Jazz Studies
  • Liberal Arts (Adult Students Only)
  • Logistics and Transportation Management
  • Management
  • Marketing
  • Mathematics
  • Music
  • Music Business
  • Music Education
  • Musical Theater
  • Nursing
  • Philosophy
  • Physical Education
  • Physics
  • Political Science
  • Professional Communication
  • Psychology
  • Religion and Service
  • Secondary Education
  • Sociology
  • Spanish
  • Special Education
  • Speech-Language Pathology
  • Theater
  • Theology and Religion
  • Theological Studies and Christian Ministry
  • Urban Studies

Philosopher in Meditation (detail), by Rembrandt. ...

Graduate Programs

  • Master of Education in Teacher Leadership
  • Master of Science in Nursing
  • Master of Business Administration
  • Master of Science in Computer Network Systems
  • Master of Education in Early Childhood Special Education
  • Master of Arts in Industrial/Organizational Psychology
  • Master in Professional Accountancy
  • Master of Arts in English Studies
  • Master of Science in Supply Chain Management

Athletics

The Elmhurst College Bluejays compete in the CCIW a conference in the NCAA Division III. Elmhurst competes in 17 varsity sports for men and women.


Women's Teams

  • Bowling
  • Cross Country
  • Soccer
  • Golf
  • Tennis
  • Volleyball
  • Basketball
  • Track & Field
  • Softball

Men's Team

  • Football
  • Cross Country
  • Soccer
  • Wrestling
  • Basketball
  • Track & Field
  • Baseball
  • Golf
  • Tennis

Traditions and Symbols of the College

The College Seal

At the request of Dr. H. Richard Niebuhr, president of the College between 1924 & 1927, the College seal was designed by Robert Leonhardt, first registrar of the College, who also served as coach of the football team. It incorportates the image of an open book used by several institutions in their seals (Yale uses one, the University of Pennsylvania two, Harvard three and Brown four). Not surprisingly, since Dr. Niebuhr had earned his Ph.D. at Yale, Elmhurst's seal uses a single volume. The open book is clearly intended to symbolize the Bible and bears the legend from Psalm 36:9, "In Lumine Tuo Videbimus Lumen" (In Thy Light We Shall See Light). The torch behind the Bible symbolizes leadership in imparting knowledge, truth, and inspiration. Around the edges of the seal are the Latin words for Elmhurst College and the founding date, 1871. Yale can refer to an educational institution: Yale University, one of the United States oldest universities. ... The University of Pennsylvania (Penn is the moniker used by the university itself [2]) is a private, nonsectarian research university located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ... Harvard University is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, and a member of the Ivy League. ... The color brown is produced by mixing complementary colors, such as red and green, orange and blue, or yellow and purple. ... Yale can refer to an educational institution: Yale University, one of the United States oldest universities. ...


The College Mace

Once a heavy club used on the medival battlefield, the mace has become a symbol of authority. Carried in a formal procession, it represents the presence at the ceremony of the essence of the institution. At Elmhurst College, the mace is borne by the College Marshal at all official convocations. The College's mace was created by Mike Hattori of Chicago in 1991 at the request of Dr. Ivan E. Frick, president of the College from 1971-1994. It is designed to rest vertically in a stand symbolizing the emergence of Elmhurst from its roots in the educational traditions of the Renaissance and Reformation. The founding date of 1871 is engraved on the wooden spiraling shaft. The top of the mace displays the College seal, the seal of the United Church of Christ, the towers of Old Main and Hammerschmidt Memorial Chapel, and a crown of elm leaves. The United Church of Christ (UCC) is a mainline Protestant Christian denomination principally in the United States, generally considered within the Reformed tradition, and formed in 1957 by the merger of two denominations, the Evangelical and Reformed Church and the Congregational Christian Churches. ...


The College Hash Bell

The large handbell rung at Elmhurst College ceremonies is a reminder of the long history of the College. This is the bell that kept the school on schedule in its early years, and generations of alumni have recalled fondly the loud clanging that woke students in the morning, assembled them for classes and activities, and then called them from their chores to dinner in the evening. One of the earliest Elmhurst catalogs declares: "Life in the institution is regulated entirely by the stroke of the bell." Why it came to be called "the Hash Bell" remains a mystery, although it certainly divided up the day as "hash marks" do a football field, and hash may well have been on the dinner menu all too frequently. In any case, the Hash Bell is now a cherished symbol of our community and of the discipline and mutual responsibility to which we are called.


The Victory Bell

This is a large bell located in the corner of Langhorst Field, which is rung by every member of the team, after every victory the Elmhurst College football team brings to the school.


The Presidential Medallion

The Presidential Medallion is an emblem symbolic of the Presidency of Elmhurst College. A replica of the Elmhurst College seal, it is worn by the College President at all ceremonial occasions. The medallion, which is suspended from a gold chain, is three inches in diameter. The circumscription, "COLLEGIUM ELMHURSTIENSE, MDCCCLXXI," frames the center of an open Bible superimposed on a lighted torch.


The Haunted Mill Theater

The Mill Theatre was acquired by Elmhurst College in the early 1960's. Before becoming the primary theatrical space for the college it functioned as a paper mill, operated by the Hammerschmidt family. During its tenure as a paper mill, there were numerous deaths that occurred on the property due to the hazardous nature of the facility. To this day there are strange accounts of voices and odd aparitions within the Mill Theatre.


Clubs & Organizations

Academic and Professional

  • American Chemical Society
  • American Marketing Association
  • Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development (ASCD)
  • Council of Exceptional Children
  • Elmhurst College Entrepreneurship Organization
  • Elmhurst College Human Resource Association
  • Elmhurst College Math Club
  • Geographical Society
  • Global Historian
  • Illinois Education Association
  • Music Business Student Union
  • Music Educators National Conference
  • National Science Teachers Association
  • National Student Speech, Language and Hearing Association
  • Psychology Club
  • Society of Physics Students
  • Student Nurses Association

Cultural and International

  • Black Language
  • Black Student Union
  • Foreign Language Club
  • H.A.B.L.A.M.O.S
  • International Club
  • Straight and Gay for Equality (SAGE)

Political and Debate

  • College Republicans
  • Mock Trial Team
  • Model United Nations
  • Political Science Students Association
  • Progressive Political Students

Religious

  • Campus Crusade for Christ
  • Fellowship of Christian Athletes
  • Jewish Life
  • Muslim Student Association
  • Catholic Student Association
  • Spiritual Life Council
  • UCC Fellowship

Recreational

  • Union Board
  • Elmhurst College Movie and Weekend Gamers Society
  • Elmhurst Gamers Society
  • Online Athletes
  • Student Athletic Advisory Council
  • Women's Swim Club

Special Interest

Phi Mu Alpha (ΦΜΑ) Sinfonia (sometimes referred to as Sinfonia rather than ΦΜΑ) is a collegiate social fraternity for men of musicianly character. ... WRSE (88. ...

Media

  • The Leader, Elmhurst College's award-winning student newspaper

Community Service

  • Elmhurst College Volunteer Committee
  • Alpha Phi Omega
  • Orientation Student Leaders
  • Student Ambassadors
  • Best Buddies

Alpha Phi Omega (commonly known as APO, but also ΑΦΩ, A-Phi-O, and A-Phi-Q) is a co-ed service fraternity organized to provide community service, leadership and social opportunities to college students. ...

Greek Life

Elmhurst College is home to five sororities and four fraternities. While the term fraternity can be used to describe any number of social organizations, including the Lions Club and the Shriners, fraternities and sororities are most commonly known as social organizations of higher education students in the United States and Canada but there are fraternities in the whole world (for... While the term fraternity can be used to describe any number of social organizations, including the Lions Club and the Shriners, fraternities and sororities are most commonly known as social organizations of higher education students in the United States and Canada but there are fraternities in the whole world (for...


Fraternities

Sororities Alpha Phi Alpha (ΑΦΑ) is an intercollegiate service fraternity generally recognized as the first established by African Americans. ... Alpha Sigma Phi (ΑΣΦ, commonly abbreviated to Alpha Sig) is a social fraternity with 68 active chapters, colonies, and interest groups. ... Headquartered in Indianapolis, Indiana, ΛΧΑ (Lambda Chi Alpha) is one of the largest mens general fraternities in North America with more than 250,000 initiated members and chapters (called Zetas) at more than 300 universities. ... Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc. ...

Alpha Phi (ΑΦ) is a fraternity for women founded at Syracuse University on September 30, 1872. ... nickname: S G Rho, Sigmas, Rhos Founded November 12, 1922 International Headquarters Cary, North Carolina Official Colors Royal Blue and Gold Official Flower Yellow Tea Rose Symbol Poodle Coat of Arms Motto: Greater Service, Greater Progress Sigma Gamma Rho Website The Sigma Gamma Rho (ΣΓΡ) Sorority, Incorporated was founded on November... Sigma Kappa (ΣΚ) is a sorority founded in 1874 at Colby College in Waterville, Maine, founded by five women: Mary Caffrey Low Carver, Elizabeth Gorham Hoag, Ida Mabel Fuller Pierce, Frances Elliott Mann Hall and Louise Helen Coburn. ... Sigma Lambda Gamma (ΣΛΓ), nationally recognized as the Gammas, is a sorority founded on April 9, 1990, at the University of Iowa. ...

Performing Ensembles

  • College Choir
  • Women's Chorus
  • Chamber Singers
  • Choral Union
  • Vocal Jazz Ensemble
  • Elmhurst College and Community Band
  • Jazz Band
  • Percussion Ensemble
  • Elmhurst Symphony Orchestra
  • Guitar Ensemble (Classical)
  • Jazz Combos

Performing Groups

  • Theater
  • Cheerleaders
  • Jazzy Jays
  • Pom Pon Squad
  • Praise Band
  • Wasteful Thinking Improv Troupe

External links and references

College Conference of Illinois and Wisconsin
AugustanaCarthageElmhurstIllinois WesleyanMillikinNorth CentralNorth ParkWheaton

  Results from FactBites:
 
Elmhurst College - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2059 words)
The Elmhurst College Bluejays compete in the CCIW a conference in the NCAA Division III.
At Elmhurst College, the mace is borne by the College Marshal at all official convocations.
A replica of the Elmhurst College seal, it is worn by the College President at all ceremonial occasions.
Elmhurst, IL (488 words)
Elmhurst shares the agricultural roots of its DuPage neighbors, but also served as an elegant center for great estate owners during the late nineteenth century and was DuPage's largest city in the 1920s.
The fire of 1871 brought wealthy refugees to Elmhurst and marked the onset of Elmhurst's gilded age, an era of elegant socializing that lasted into the twentieth century.
Elmhurst grew as a railroad suburb with many urban amenities, including Elmhurst College (whose campus is an accredited arboretum), the Lizzadro Museum of Lapidary Art (1962), the Elmhurst Art Museum, a public library, a park district, the Wilder Park conservatory (1923), the Elmhurst Historical Museum (1956), and the Elmhurst Symphony Orchestra (1960).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m