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Encyclopedia > Elmer Keiser Bolton

Elmer Keiser Bolton (1886-1968) was a prominent American and one of the first industrial research directors. He formulated many basic concepts for directing industrial research at E.I. du Pont de Nemours and Company. During his tenure DuPont developed synthetic dyes, floatation chemicals, rubber chemicals, neoprene rubber, nylon fiber and Teflon. 1886 is a common year starting on Friday (click on link to calendar) // Events January 18 - Modern field hockey is born with the formation of The Hockey Association in England. ... 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ... E.I. du Pont de Nemours and Company (NYSE: DD) was founded in July 1802 as a gun powder mill by Eleuthère Irénée du Pont on Brandywine Creek, near Wilmington, Delaware. ...

Contents


Personal Life

Elmer Keiser Bolton was born June 23, 1886 in Frankford, Pennsylvania the oldest of two brothers. His father ran the furnature store on Main Street and both he and his brother attended public school in Frankford and went on to college. Bolton went to Bucknell University in Lewisburg, Pennsylvania and took the Classical Course, receiving a B.A. Degree in 1908. From there he went to Harvard University, receiving his A.M. degree in 1910 and his Ph.D. in organic chemistry in 1913. His thesis advisor was Charles L. Jackson and his disertation concerned the chemistry of periodoquinones. Bucknell University is a highly competitive university located along the Susquehanna River in the rolling countryside of Central Pennsylvania in the town of Lewisburg, 60 miles (97 km) north of Harrisburg. ... Lewisburg is a borough located in Union County, Pennsylvania, 30 miles (48 km) south by east of Williamsport and 60 miles (97 km) north of Harrisburg. ... Official language(s) None Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 33rd 119,283 km² 255 km 455 km 2. ... 1908 (MCMVIII) is a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Harvard University is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA and a member of the Ivy League. ...


Several other prominent contemporaries of Bolton's at Harvard Graduate School were Roger Adams, Farrington Daniels, Frank C. Whitmore, James B. Sumner and James Bryant Conant. Adams was particularly influencial through Bolton's career. They shared diverse interests, yet a drive for accomplishment in organic chemistry. In later years Adams had significant influence on Bolton's ideas about industrial support of chemical research and university students. Harvard Graduate School of Arts and Sciences The Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (also known as GSAS) is the academic unit responsible for all post-baccalaureate degree programs offered through the Faculty of Arts and Sciences at Harvard University. ... Roger Adams (1889-1971) was a leading American organic chemist best known for the Adams catalyst, but who also greatly influenced graduate education in America, trained over 250 Ph. ... Farrington Daniels (1889-1972) is considered one of the pioneers of the modern direct use of solar energy. ... Frank C. Whitmore, nicknamed Rocky, was a chemist who submitted the best piece of evidence for a carbocation mechanism in organic chemistry. ... James Batcheller Sumner (November 19, 1887 - August 12, 1955) was an American chemist. ... James Bryant Conant (March 26, 1893 - February 11, 1978) was a chemist, educational administrator, and public servant. ...


In 1913 Bolton won the Sheldon Fellowship, which he used to work at the Kaiser Wilhelm Institut outside of Berlin, Germany for two years with Professor Richard Willstätter. Here he worked on anthocyanins, a major program for Willstätter, and published three papers on isolation and structures of anthocyanin pigments. Willstätter, apparently impressed by Bolton's ability but frustrated by his tendency to make arithimetic mistakes, commented "You must have been a bank teller." To his surprize Bolton replied that he had been a bank teller, this was how he paid his way through college. 1913 (MCMXIII) is a common year starting on Wednesday. ... For other uses, see Berlin (disambiguation). ... Richard Willstätter Richard Martin Willstätter (August 13, 1872 – August 3, 1942) was a German chemist whose study of the structure of chlorophyll and other plant pigments won him the 1915 Nobel Prize for Chemistry. ... Plants with abnormally high anthocyanin quantities are popular as ornamental plants - here, a selected purple-leaf cultivar of European Beech Anthocyanins (Etymology: greek. ... In biology, pigment is any material resulting in color in plant or animal cells which is the result of selective absorption. ...


Bolton was very impressed by Willstätter's careful, logical approach to tackling a research problem. He felt that this was the result of good training in the German university system. He also observed the relationship between German universities and industry, for which there was no counterpart in the United States. Another aspect of German research that impressed Bolton was the effort to create artificial rubber. This work was significant to German industry, and later to the German war effort in World War II because Germany did not have ready access to sources of natural rubber. Also, the approach being used by the Germans undoubtedly lead to the development of neoprene rubber years later at Dupont Labs. Combatants Allied Powers Axis Powers Commanders {{{commander1}}} {{{commander2}}} Strength {{{strength1}}} {{{strength2}}} Casualties 17 million military deaths 7 million military deaths World War II, also known as the Second World War (sometimes WW2 or WWII), was a mid-20th century conflict that engulfed much of the globe and is accepted as... This article is about the DuPont company. ...


Bolton married Margarite L. Duncan in 1916 and they had three children, a daughter and two sons. He retired from DuPont after a distinguished career in 1951, but continued to follow the scientific literature. He died July 30, 1968 at the age of eighty-two.


World War I and E.I. du Pont de Nemours and Company

Up to the onset of World War I (1914) most organic compounds had been imported from Europe, but disruptions caused by the War presented an opportunity for American chemical companies to become established in this area, and to meet a wartime need. When Bolton returned from Germany in 1915 he discovered American organic chemists struggling to develop methods for manufacturing these compounds. The Dupont Company needed chemist and hired Bolton in 1915. Combatants Entente Powers Central Powers Commanders {{{commander1}}} {{{commander2}}} Strength {{{strength1}}} {{{strength2}}} Casualties > 5 million military deaths > 3 million military deaths World War I, also known as the First World War and (before 1939) the Great War, the War of the Nations, War to End All Wars was a world conflict... E.I. du Pont de Nemours and Company (NYSE: DD) was founded in July 1802 as a gun powder mill by Eleuthère Irénée du Pont on Brandywine Creek, near Wilmington, Delaware. ... Combatants Entente Powers Central Powers Commanders {{{commander1}}} {{{commander2}}} Strength {{{strength1}}} {{{strength2}}} Casualties > 5 million military deaths > 3 million military deaths World War I, also known as the First World War and (before 1939) the Great War, the War of the Nations, War to End All Wars was a world conflict... World map showing Europe Europe is conventionally considered one of the seven continents which, in this case, is more a cultural and political distinction than a physiogeographic one. ... This article is about the DuPont company. ...


Bolton joined the Chemical Department at the Experimental Station outside Wilmington, Delaware, where most of DuPont's research was conducted. Being groomed for advancement, he started working on the synthesis of glycerol. By 1916 Bolton was selected to lead the Dye Group that was newly formed to research the synthesis of dyes. The United States had little knowledge of dye manufacture at this time, so later in 1916 Bolton traveled to England to learn about British technology in this area, and upon return he was assigned to the Wilmington Office to be advisor on dyes and intermediates. In 1918 he transferred to the Dyestuffs Department and was assistant general manager of the Lodi Works where silk colorants were made. In 1919 he returned to the Chemical Department as manager of the Organic Division. During this time he learned a lot about developing manufacturing processes and developed two principles; that high priority must be given to cost and time effectiveness of research, and that a manufacturing process should be perfected using pure materials then later adapted to use materials available to the plant. Bolton's friend from Harvard, Roger Adams shared much of Bolton's philosophy in his work at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Motto: A Place To Be Somebody Nickname: Founded Incorporated 1638 1832  County New Castle County Borough {{{borough}}} Parrish {{{parrish}}} Mayor James M. Baker (Dem) Area  - Total  - Water 44. ... Official language(s) None Capital Dover Largest city Wilmington Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 49th 6,452 km² 48 km 161 km 21. ... Yarn drying after being dyed in the early American tradition, at Conner Prairie living history museum. ... Harvard University is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, and a member of the Ivy League. ... Roger Adams (1889-1971) was a leading American organic chemist best known for the Adams catalyst, but who also greatly influenced graduate education in America, trained over 250 Ph. ... Roger Adams (1889-1971) was a leading American organic chemist best known for the Adams catalyst, but who also greatly influenced graduate education in America, trained over 250 Ph. ... University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign   The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, also known as UIUC and the U of I (the officially preferred abbreviation), is the largest campus in the University of Illinois system. ...


In 1922 DuPont reorganized its research by dividing the entire research enterprise into four parts, each assigned to one of its four production areas. Bolton was made director of research for the Dyestuffs Department where his ability in this capacity was quickly realized. Dye manufacture requires the synthesis of a large number of intermediate compounds, and Bolton realised these could be used in many activities outside the Dyestuffs Department. By 1923 his lab was working on accelerators for manufacture of synthetic rubber and soon after extended the research to include antioxidants for gasoline and rubber, floatation agents, insecticides, seed disinfectants, and large scale manufacture of tetra-ethyl lead. Synthetic rubber is a type of artificially-made polymer material which acts as an elastomer. ... An antioxidant is a chemical that prevents the oxidation of other chemicals. ... Insecticide application by crop spraying An insecticide is a pesticide whose purpose is to kill or to prevent the multiplication of insects. ... Disinfection The destruction of pathogenic and other kinds of microorganisms by physical or chemical means Disinfectants are chemical substances used to kill viruses and microbes (germs), such as bacteria and fungi. ... Tetra-ethyl lead (also known as TEL, lead tetraethyl and tetraethyllead) is a toxic organometallic chemical compound, with formula (CH3CH2)4Pb, which was once used as a gasoline (petrol) additive. ...


The Stevenson Act and Synthetic Rubber

In the early 1920s the supply and demand of natural rubber became a concern in international trade. In November of 1922 England enacted the Stevenson Act that was intented to protect rubber producers by restricting production. This caused a great deal of concern in the United States because an expanding supply of rubber was needed to support the growing number of automobiles in use. Bolton saw this as an opportune time to start research on synthetic rubber. However, research did not begin in ernest until 1925 when the high price of rubber was attracting considerable attention and other scientists such as Thomas Edison were also taking an interest in the problem. Rubber is an elastic hydrocarbon polymer which occurs as a milky emulsion (known as latex) in the sap of a number of plants but can also be produced synthetically. ... Thomas Alva Edison (February 11, 1847 – October 18, 1931) was an inventor and businessman who developed many devices which greatly influenced life in the 20th Century. ...


Work on synthetic rubber began with the polymerization of butadiene obtained from the hydrogenation of diacetylene, and at first not much progress was made. At the end of 1925 Bolton met a chemist from University of Notre Dame named Father Nieuwland who had discovered a way to polymerize acetalyene using a cuprous oxide catalyst. Unfortunately the resulting polymer would explode when struck, but Bolton believed the process could be modified to produce a stabile compund that would replace butadiene in the reaction. Bolton brought Nieuwland into the project as a consultant to DuPont, and Nieuwland taught the the DuPont chemists how to use his catalyst. A continous-flow reactor was developed that would produce a good yield of the stabile polymer Bolton was looking for. However, while the polymer was highly chemical resistant, it degraded with exposure to light. Polymerization is a process of reacting monomer molecules together in a chemical reaction to form linear chains or a three-dimensional network of polymer chains [1]. There are many forms of polymerization and different systems exist to categorize them. ... Butadiene can refer to either one of two hydrocarbon chemical compounds which are alkenes that are isomers of each other. ... Hydrogenation is a chemical reaction in which unsaturated bonds between carbon atoms are reduced by attachment of a hydrogen atom to each carbon. ... Diacetylene is an unsaturated hydrocarbon with chemical formula HCCCCH. Categories: Stub ... Not to be confused with the University of Notre Dame Australia The University of Notre Dame is a leading Roman Catholic institution of higher learning located outside South Bend, Indiana, United States. ... Copper(I) oxide or cuprous oxide (Cu2O) is an oxide of copper. ... A catalyst (Greek: καταλύτης, catalytēs) is a substance that accelerates the rate (speed) of a chemical reaction (see also catalysis). ...


In 1927 DuPont's Chemical Director C.M.A. Stine persuaded the company to take on a fundamental research project for synthetic rubber and received $250,000 in funding for this purpose. In 1928 Wallace Carothers, an instructor at Harvard University was hired to lead the newly formed group. Bolton operated within this group and by 1929 had discovered that his polymer could be readily converted into 2-chlorobutadiene (choroprene) with a copper catalyzed addition of hydrogen chloride. This material was both chemical and light resistant, with the properties of a synthetic rubber. Dr. Wallace Hume Carothers (April 27, 1896 - April 29, 1937) was the leader of organic chemistry at DuPont. ... Harvard University is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA and a member of the Ivy League. ... Hydrogen chloride, also known under the name HCl, is a highly corrosive and toxic colorless gas that forms white fumes on contact with humidity. ...


The new material was announced at the Rubber Division of the American Chemical Society on November 2, 1931, and was called Duprene (today it is called neoprene). By this time the Stevenson Act had been repealed and the Great Depression had begun. Rubber prices were low and the new material cost twenty times what natural rubber cost. Therefore it never became a substitute for natural rubber, but it did find commercial use in applications where a rubber compound was needed that was more resistant to oils and outdoor degradation. Applications of neoprene include: the Rigid-hulled inflatable boat; diving suits, and diveskins; gloves, balaclavas, sleepsacks, Knee high boots, wetsocks and other protective clothing; radar absorbent material; plumbing fixtures; gaskets, hoses, seals and belts; foam (mousepad, wetsuit); orthopedic braces; and solid fuel rocket propellant (see AGM-114 Hellfire). The American Chemical Society (ACS) is a learned society (professional association) based in the United States that supports scientific inquiry in the field of chemistry. ... Neoprene is the trade name for a family of synthetic rubbers based on polychloroprene. ... The Great Depression was a massive global economic recession (or depression) that ran from 1929 to approximately 1939. ... Two RIBs at Castletown, Portland, England A rigid-hulled inflatable boat, RIB or RHIB is a light-weight but high performance and high capacity boat constructed with a solid, shaped hull and flexible tubes at the gunwale. ... Two divers, one wearing a 1 atmosphere diving suit and the other standard diving dress, preparing to explore the wreck of the RMS Lusitania, 1935. ... For open water swimming, snorkeling and diving, diveskins are used when diving in water temperatures above 25 degrees C, 77 degrees F. They are made from spandex and provide little thermal protection but simply protect the skin from stings and abrasion. ... A glove (Middle English from Old English glof) is a type of garment which covers the hand. ... Balaclava and gun A balaclava, balaclava helmet or ski mask is a form of headgear covering the whole head, exposing only the face (and often only the eyes). ... Sleepsacks are an increasingly popular type of bondage (BDSM) gear. ... Knee-high boots, muckers, or fishing boots are boots that rise to the knee, or slightly thereunder. ... F-117 Stealth Fighter Stealth technology covers a range of techniques used with aircraft, ships and missiles, in order to make them less visible (ideally invisible) to radar and other detection methods. ... A plumbing fixture is a device which is part of a system to deliver and drain away water, but which is also configured to enable a particular use. ... This article is about mechanical seals. ... A hose is a hollow tube designed to carry fluids from one location to another. ... Categories: Technology stubs | Seals (mechanical) ... Belt can refer to the following objects: Look up belt in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Foam The most general definition of foam is a substance that is formed by trapping many gas bubbles in a liquid or solid. ... Optical mouse on a mousepad A mousepad (or mouse mat) is a surface for enhancing the movement of a computer mouse. ... A woman heads out surfing in a wetsuit This article is about the use of wetsuits in a range of water sports, for protective clothing specialised for scuba diving, see diving suit. ... An orthopaedic brace (also orthosis or orthotic) is a device used to: immobilise a joint or body segment, restrict movement in a given direction, assist movement, reduce weight-bearing forces, or correct the shape of the body. ... AGM-114 Hellfire Type Air-To-Ground Missile Nationality United States Era Cold War Launch platform Helicopter, UAV Target armoured vehicles History Builder Lockheed Martin Date of design   Production period   Service duration   Operators See main text Variants See main text Number built   Specifications Type   Diameter 17. ...


Synthetic Fibers

When Wallace Carothers arrived at DuPont in 1928 one of the tasks his group took on was the development of synthetic fibers for textiles. At that time a number of natural polymers such as latex and celluloid were known and some synthetic polymers such as bakelite were also known and relatively common. The General Bakelite Company company was producing about 200,000 tons of Bakelite annually. Unfortunately the existing polymers could not be drawn into fibers and spun into thread, so the opportunity was to manufacture thread from synthetic polymers to replace natural fibers such as cotton. Dr. Wallace Hume Carothers (April 27, 1896 - April 29, 1937) was the leader of organic chemistry at DuPont. ... 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... Synthetic Fibers are the result of an extensive search by scientists to increase and improve upon the supply of naturally occurring animal and plant fibers that have been used in making cloth. ... This article is about the type of fabric. ... A polymer is a long, repeating chain of atoms, formed through the linkage of many molecules called monomers. ... The extraction of Latex from a tree; Latex is used in Rubber production Latex, as found in nature, is the milky sap of many plants that coagulates on exposure to air. ... Celluloid is the name of a class of compounds created from nitrocellulose and camphor, plus dyes and other agents, generally regarded to be the first thermoplastic. ... A polymer is a long, repeating chain of atoms, formed through the linkage of many molecules called monomers. ... Bakelite distributor rotor Bakelite is a brand named material based on the thermosetting phenol formaldehyde resin polyoxybenzylmethylenglycolanhydride, developed in 1907-1909 by Dr. Leo Baekeland. ... Look up Thread on Wiktionary, the free dictionary The word thread has many meanings: A thread is a kind of thin yarn, which is thin fibers spun together. ... Picking cotton in Georgia Cotton is a soft fiber that grows around the seeds of the cotton plant, a shrub native to the tropical and subtropical regions of both the Old World and the New World. ...


The approach taken by Carothers' group was to adapt known synthesises that produced short chain polymers to produce long chain molecules. The first break was finding that bifunctional esterification could produce long molecule chains which today are known as aliphatic polyesters, but at that time were called superpolymers. Then there was the key observation by Julian W, Hill in April, 1930 in which it was seen that the superpolymers could be drawn in the molten state to form thin, transparent fibers that were much stronger that the polymers were in the undrawn state. However, the superpolymers the group was able to synthesize either had too low a boiling point and insufficient chemical resistivity or had too high a melting point to be spun. By late 1932 the entire project was discontinued. In chemistry, non-aromatic and non-cyclic (acyclic) organic compounds are called aliphatic. ... For the film, see the article Polyester (film) Close-up of a polyester shirt SEM picture of a bend in a high surface area polyester fiber with a seven-lobed cross section Polyester is a category of polymers, or, more specifically condensation polymers, which contain the ester functional group in...


Bolton, now the Chemistry department director, refused to give up. Most likely he was aware of the re-discovery of polyethylene by by Eric Fawcett and Reginald Gibson at ICI Chemicals in 1933. In early 1934 Bolton urged Carothers to continue the research, and Carothers decided to take another look at polyamides. Polyethylene or polyethene is a thermoplastic commodity heavily used in consumer products (over 60M tons are produced worldwide every year). ... Eric Fawcett (August 23, 1927-September 2, 2000, was a professor of physics at the University of Toronto for 23 years. ... Imperial Chemical Industries (ICI) is a British chemical company, based in London. ... 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ...


Carothers surmised that the problem with the polyamides that had been made from ε-aminocaproic acid was due to cyclization reactions, so he replaced ε-aminocaproic acid with 9-aminononoic acid which would not cyclize. This produced results that were encouraging, so Carother's group prepared polyamides from a variety of compounds including amino acids, dibase acids and diamines. The leading candidate for development became 5/10 polyamide made from pentamethylenediamine and sebic acid. It had the right melting point, the desired properties in fiber form and could be spun without gel formation. Aminocaproic acid (marketed as Amicar) is a drug used to treat bleeding disorders. ... Aminocaproic acid (marketed as Amicar) is a drug used to treat bleeding disorders. ... In chemistry, an amino acid is any molecule that contains both amino and carboxylic acid functional groups. ... Cadaverine is a foul-smelling molecule produced by protein hydrolysis during putrefaction of animal tissue. ... Spun is a 2002 drama/comedy movie directed by Jonas Ã…kerlund and written by Will De Los Santos and Creighton Vero. ... A gel (from the lat. ...


Bolton at this point made a bold and characteristically visionary decision. He decided that practical synthetic fibers could not be made from castor oil, the only practical source of sebacic acid. To use an agricultural product as a primary feedstock would mean the new synthetic material would have very similar mass production problems as existing natural fibers had. Instead he wanted to use benzene as the feedstock for making both adipic acid and hexamethylenediamine to make a 6/6 polyamide. Castor oil is a vegetable oil obtained from the castor bean (or preferably castor seed as the castor plant (Ricinus communis) is not a member of the bean family). ... Sebacic acid (IUPAC name: 1,10-Decanedioic Acid ) is a bi-carboxylic acid with structure (HOOC)-(COOH), and is naturally occurring. ... A feedstock is a petrochemical used as a raw material to be fed into a machine or processing plant. ... Benzene, also known as C6H6, PhH, and benzol, is an organic chemical compound which is a colorless and flammable liquid with a pleasant, sweet smell. ... Adipic acid is the common name of 1,6-hexanedioic acid, a chemical compound of the class of carboxylic acids. ...


This polymer was first made early in 1935, and thanks to concurrent development of polyamine spinning technologies, could be spun into fibers. The fibers had high strength and elasticity, were insensitive to common solvents and melted at 263 degrees centigrade, well above ironing temperatures.


Bolton insisted that every aspect of the synthesis of this polymer be thoroughly worked out in a pilot plant at the Experimental Station. He insisted that the development begin with pure materials then be adapted to use materials available to a plant in bulk.


On October 27, 1938 DuPont announced it would build a plant at Seaford, Delaware to make nylon, the world's first fully synthetic fiber. The Seaford plant was essentially a scaled up version of the pilot plant, and had remarkably trouble-free startup. Seaford is a city located in Sussex County, Delaware. ... Nylon represents a family of synthetic polymers, a thermoplastic material, invented in 1935 by Wallace Carothers at DuPont. ...


Summary of Accomplishments

Publications

  • E.K. Bolton, Development of Nylon, Industrial and Engineering Chemistry, (Jan 1942)
  • Twenty-one U.S. Patents

Awards and Honors

Bucknell University: Bucknell University is a highly competitive university located along the Susquehanna River in the rolling countryside of Central Pennsylvania in the town of Lewisburg, 60 miles (97 km) north of Harrisburg. ...

  • Honorary D.Sc. degree (1932)
  • Board of Trustees (1937-1967)
  • Trustee Emeritus (1967-1968)
  • regional director (1936-1938)
  • director-at-large (1940-1943)
  • Industrial and Engineering Chemistry and Chemical Engineering News Advisory Board (1948-1949)
  • The Chemical Industry Medal (1941)
  • The Perkin Medal (1945)
  • Elected to the National Academy of Sciences (1946)
  • The Willard Gibbs Medal (1954)

The University of Delaware (UD OR UDel) is the largest university in the state of Delaware. ... The Massachusetts Institute of Technology, or MIT, is a university located in the city of Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA. MIT is one of the worlds leading research institutions in science and technology, as well as in numerous other fields, including management, economics, linguistics, political science, and philosophy. ... Harvard University is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA and a member of the Ivy League. ... The American Chemical Society (ACS) is a learned society (professional association) based in the United States that supports scientific inquiry in the field of chemistry. ... The Perkin Medal is an award given annually by the American section of the Society of Chemical Industry to a scientist residing in America for an innovation in applied chemistry resulting in outstanding commercial development. ... President Harding and the National Academy of Sciences at the White House, Washington, DC, April 1921 The National Academy of Sciences (NAS) is a corporation in the United States whose members serve pro bono as advisers to the nation on science, engineering, and medicine. ...

References

Categories

E.I. du Pont de Nemours and Company (DuPont)

Corporate Directors: Alain Belda | Richard H. Brown | Curtis Crawford | Louisa Duemling | John T. Dillon | Charles Holliday | Lois Juliber | Masahisa Naitoh | Sean O'Keefe | William Reilly | Rodney Sharp | Charles Vest This article is about the DuPont company. ... A corporation is a legal entity (distinct from a natural person) that often has similar rights in law to those of a Civil law systems may refer to corporations as moral persons; they may also go by the name AS (anonymous society) or something similar, depending on language (see below). ... It has been suggested that Board of Trustees be merged into this article or section. ... Alain J. P. Belda has been the Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer of Alcoa since Janaury 2001. ... Richard H. Brown was Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Electronic Data Systems Corporation from 1999 to 2003; Chief Executive Officer of Cable & Wireless plc from 1996 to 1998; Member of the Board of E.I. du Pont de Nemours and Company since 2001 and Home Depot. ... Curtis Crawford has been a director of DuPont since 1998. ... Louisa C. Duemling has been a Director of DuPont since 1982, a trustee of the Maryland/DC Chapter of The Nature Conservancy and a member of the board of managers of Mount Cuba Center, Inc. ... John T. Dillon, former Chairman and CEO of International Paper (paper and forest products). ... Lois D. Juliber has been a director of DuPont since 1995. ... Masahisa Naitoh has been a director of DuPont since January 2000. ... Sean OKeefe (born January 27, 1956) was the 10th Administrator of NASA, leading the space agency from December 2001 to February 2005. ... H. Rodney Sharp III has been a director of DuPont since 1981. ... Charles Chuck Marstiller Vest (born 1941) is a U.S. educator and engineer. ...

Products: ChromaFlair | Corian | Kevlar | Mylar | Neoprene | Nomex | Nylon | Teflon | Tyvek ChromaFlair is the registered trademark for a paint system, created by DuPont, which appears to change colour depending on the light source and viewing angle. ... Corian is a solid surface material composed of acrylic polymer and alumina trihydrate made by DuPont. ... Kevlar (poly-paraphenylene terephthalamide) is the DuPont Company’s brand name for a synthetic material constructed of para-aramid fibers that the company claims is five times stronger than the same weight of steel, while being lightweight, flexible and comfortable. ... Mylar is a trade name of DuPont Teijin Films of Hopewell, VA, United States, for biaxially-oriented polyethylene terephthalate (BOPET) polyester film used for its high tensile strength, chemical and dimensional stability, transparency, and electrical insulation. ... Neoprene is the trade name for a family of synthetic rubbers based on polychloroprene. ... NOMEX® is the brand name of a flame retardant meta-aramid material marketed and first discovered by DuPont in the 1970s. ... Nylon represents a family of synthetic polymers, a thermoplastic material, invented in 1935 by Wallace Carothers at DuPont. ... Teflon is the brand name of a polymer compound discovered by Roy J. Plunkett (1910–1994) of DuPont in 1938 and introduced as a commercial product in 1946. ... Tyvek is a synthetic material made of high-density polyethylene fibers; the name is a registered trademark of the DuPont Company. ...

Annual Revenue: $27.3 billion USD ( image:green up.png1.3% FY 2004) | Employees: 60,000 | Stock Symbol: NYSE: DD | Website: www.dupont.com The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ... Green up arrow for a positive change in revenue from last fiscal year. ... A fiscal year or financial year is a 12-month period used for calculating annual (yearly) financial reports in businesses and other organizations. ... New York Stock Exchange (June 2003) The New York Stock Exchange (NYSE), also nicknamed the Big Board, is the largest stock exchange in the world (by dollar volume) and second largest by number of listings. ...

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