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Encyclopedia > Elmer Bernstein
Elmer Bernstein
Born April 4, 1922
New York, New York, USA
Died August 18, 2004 (aged 82)
Ojai, California, USA.

Elmer Bernstein (pronounced "Bern-steen"[1]) (April 4, 1922August 18, 2004) was an Academy and two-time Golden Globe award winning American film score composer. is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar). ... Nickname: The Big Apple Official website: City of New York Government Counties (Boroughs) Bronx (The Bronx) New York (Manhattan) Queens (Queens) Kings (Brooklyn) Richmond (Staten Island) Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Geographical characteristics Area Total 468. ... is the 230th day of the year (231st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... shelby was here 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar). ... is the 230th day of the year (231st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... shelby was here 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... The Golden Globe Awards are American awards for motion pictures and television programs, given out each year during a formal dinner. ... A film score is a set of musical compositions written to accompany a film. ... A composer is a person who writes music. ...


Bernstein was born in New York City. During his childhood he performed professionally as a dancer and an actor and won several prizes for his painting. He gravitated toward music by his own choice at the age of twelve, at which time he was given a scholarship in piano by Henriette Michelson, a Juilliard teacher who guided him throughout his entire career as a pianist. She took him to play some of his improvisations for composer Aaron Copland. Copland was encouraging and selected Israel Citkowitz as a teacher for the young boy. Bernstein's music has some stylistic similarities to Copland's music,most notably in his western scores and in his spirited score for the 1958 film adaptation of Erskine Caldwell's novel, God's Little Acre. New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... The Juilliard School is a performing arts conservatory in New York City, informally but definitively identified as simply Juilliard, and most famous for its musically-trained alumni. ... Aaron Copland Aaron Copland (November 14, 1900 – December 2, 1990) was an American composer of concert and film music. ...


He wrote the theme songs or other music for more than 200 films and TV shows, including The Magnificent Seven, The Great Escape, The Ten Commandments (1956), The Man with the Golden Arm, To Kill a Mockingbird, Robot Monster, Ghostbusters and the fanfare used in the National Geographic television specials. His theme in The Magnificent Seven is also familiar to television viewers, as the theme was used in commercials for Marlboro cigarettes. Bernstein also provided the score to many of the short films of Ray and Charles Eames. The Magnificent Seven is a 1960 western film directed by John Sturges about a group of hired gunmen tasked with protecting a Mexican village from bandits. ... The Great Escape, written by James Clavell, W.R. Burnett, and Walter Newman (uncredited), and directed by John Sturges is a popular 1963 World War II film, based on a true story about Allied prisoners of war with a record for escaping from German prisoner-of-war camps. ... The Ten Commandments is a 1956 motion picture dramatizing the Biblical story of Moses, an Egyptian prince-turned deliverer of the Hebrew slaves. ... Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Man with the Golden Arm is a 1955 film which tells the story of a heroin addict who got clean while in prison but struggles to stay straight in the outside world. ... To Kill a Mockingbird is a 1962 film directed by Robert Mulligan and based on the novel of the same name by Harper Lee. ... Robot Monster is a 1953 science fiction B-movie made in 3-D. Like the more famous Plan 9 from Outer Space it is known in bad-film fandom for being so bad, its good and has the dubious honor of being considered one of the Worst films ever... Ghostbusters is a 1984 sci-fi comedy film about three eccentric New York City parapsychologists. ... The National Geographic Society was founded in the USA on January 27, 1888, by 33 men interested in organizing a society for the increase and diffusion of geographical knowledge. ... Marlboro logo Marlboro is a brand of cigarette made by Altria. ... Charles (1907–1978) and Ray Eames (1912–1988) were American designers, married in 1941, who worked and made major contribuitions in many fields of design including industrial design, furniture design, art, graphic design, film and architecture. ...


Bernstein was recognized by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association with Golden Globes for his scores for To Kill a Mockingbird and Hawaii. In 1963 he was awarded the Emmy for Excellence in Television for his score of The Making of The President, 1960. He is the recipient of Western Heritage Awards for The Magnificent Seven (1960) and The Hallelujah Trail (1965). He received five Grammy nominations from the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences and garnered two of Broadway's coveted Tony Award nominations for How Now Dow Jones and Merlin. Hollywood Foreign Press Association (HFPA) is an organization comprised of journalists who work in the film industry. ... The Golden Globe Awards are American awards for motion pictures and television programs, given out each year during a formal dinner. ... To Kill a Mockingbird is a 1962 film directed by Robert Mulligan and based on the novel of the same name by Harper Lee. ... Hawaii is a 1966 American motion picture based on the novel of the same name by James A. Michener. ... The Magnificent Seven is a 1960 western film directed by John Sturges about a group of hired gunmen tasked with protecting a Mexican village from bandits. ... The Hallelujah Trail is a 1965 Western spoof directed by John Sturges and starring Burt Lancaster and Lee Remick. ... Grammy Award statuette The Grammy Awards, presented by the Recording Academy (an association of Americans professionally involved in the recorded music industry) for outstanding achievements in the recording industry, is one of four major music awards shows held annually in the United States (the Billboard Music Awards, the American Music... The National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences is known variously as NARAS or The Recording Academy. ... Broadway theatre[1] is the most prestigious form of professional theatre in the U.S., as well as the most well known to the general public and most lucrative for the performers, technicians and others involved in putting on the shows. ... What is popularly called the Tony Award (formally, the Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Theatre) is an annual award celebrating achievements in live American theater, including musical theater, primarily honoring productions on Broadway in New York. ... How Now, Dow Jones is a Broadway musical comedy. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


Additional honors included Lifetime achievement awards from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP), The Society for the Preservation of Film Music, the USA, Woodstock, Santa Barbara, Newport Beach and Flanders International Film Festivals and the Foundation for a Creative America. In 1996, Bernstein was honored with a star on Hollywood Boulevard. In 1999, he received an Honorary Doctorate of Music from Five Towns College in New York and was honored by the American Film Institute in Los Angeles. Bernstein again was honored by ASCAP with its marquee Founders Award in 2001, and with the NARAS Governors Award in June 2004. He received 14 Academy Award nominations, but his only win was for Thoroughly Modern Millie. An award is something given to a person or group of people to recognize excellence in a certain field. ... Pickford Center for Motion Picture Study in Hollywood, California Founded on May 11, 1927 in California, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) is a professional honorary organization dedicated to the advancement of the arts and sciences of motion pictures. ... The American Society of Composers, Authors, and Publishers (ASCAP) is an organization known as a collecting society that protects intellectual property, ensuring that music which is broadcast, commercially recorded, or otherwise used for profit, pays a fee to compensate the creators of that music. ... Hollywood Boulevard as taken from the Kodak Theatre Hollywood Boulevard is an avenue in Hollywood, Los Angeles, California, United States, beginning at Sunset Boulevard in the east and running northwest to Vermont Avenue, where it straightens out and runs due west to Laurel Canyon Boulevard. ... An Honorary degree (Latin: honoris causa ad gradum) is a degree awarded to someone by an institution that he or she may have never attended, it may be a bachelors, masters or doctorate degree - however, the latter is most common. ... Five Towns College is an institution of higher learning located in Dix Hills, Long Island, New York (USA). ... NY redirects here. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... This article is about the 1967 film. ...


In addition to his film music, Bernstein wrote the scores for two Broadway musicals, both of which were famous flops of their eras: How Now, Dow Jones in 1968 and Merlin in 1983. Musical theater (or theatre) is a form of theater combining music, songs, dance, and spoken dialogue. ... How Now, Dow Jones is a Broadway musical comedy. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


Along with many in Hollywood, Bernstein faced censure during the McCarthy era of the 1950s. He was "gray-listed" (not banned, but kept off major projects) due to sympathy with left-wing causes, and had to work on low-budget science fiction films such as Robot Monster and Cat-Women of the Moon. ... Joseph Raymond McCarthy (November 14, 1908 – May 2, 1957) was a Republican U.S. Senator from the state of Wisconsin between 1947 and 1957. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... In politics, left-wing, political left, leftism, or simply the left, are terms which refer (with no particular precision) to the segment of the political spectrum typically associated with any of several strains of socialism, social democracy, or liberalism (especially in the American sense of the word), or with opposition... Robot Monster is a 1953 science fiction B-movie made in 3-D. Like the more famous Plan 9 from Outer Space it is known in bad-film fandom for being so bad, its good and has the dubious honor of being considered one of the Worst films ever... Cat-Women of the Moon is a 1953 Science fiction 3-D film directed by Arthur Hilton. ...


John Landis grew up near Bernstein, and befriended him through his children. Years later, he requested Bernstein do the music for National Lampoon's Animal House, over the studio's objections. He explained to Bernstein that he thought that Bernstein's score, playing it straight as if the comedic Delta frat characters were actual heroes, would emphasize the comedy further. Bernstein accepted the job, and it sparked a second wave in his career, where he continued to do high-profile comedies such as Airplane!, as well as most of Landis's films for the next 15 years. John Landis (born August 3, 1950 in Chicago) is an American movie actor, director, writer, and producer. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ...


When Martin Scorsese announced that he was re-making Cape Fear, he requested Bernstein do the job of adapting Bernard Hermann's original score to the new film. Bernstein leapt at the opportunity to work with Scorsese, and to pay homage to Hermann; Scorsese and Bernstein subsequently worked together on two more films in the 1990's. Martin Marcantonio Luciano Scorsese (IPA: AmE: ; Ita: []) (born November 17, 1942) is an American film director, writer and producer and founder of the World Cinema Foundation. ... This article contains a trivia section. ... Bernard Herrmann (June 29, 1911–December 24, 1975) was a composer, best known for his film scores, particularly for Alfred Hitchcock-directed films. ...


Bernstein died of cancer in his sleep, at his home in Ojai, California. Downtown Ojai Ojai (pronounced ) is a city in Ventura County, California, United States. ...


He was not related to composer/conductor Leonard Bernstein. Leonard Bernstein in 1971 Leonard Bernstein (IPA pronunciation: )[1] (August 25, 1918 – October 14, 1990) was an American conductor, composer, and pianist. ...

Contents

Partial filmography

Far from Heaven is a 2002, Academy Award-nominated film written and directed by Todd Haynes and starring Julianne Moore, Dennis Quaid, Ryan Ward, Dennis Haysbert, and Patricia Clarkson. ... Wild Wild West (1999) is a film directed by Barry Sonnenfeld, starring Will Smith, Kevin Kline (in two roles, Artemus Gordon and President Ulysses S. Grant), Kenneth Branagh and Salma Hayek. ... The Deep End of the Ocean is the title of a 1999 film about an American middle class, suburban family that is torn apart when the youngest son is kidnapped and raised by a mentally ill woman, until he appears at the frontdoor step of his real mother and asks... Hoodlum is a 1997 United Artists film that gives a partially fictional account of the gang war between the Italian/Jewish mafia alliance and the black gangsters of Harlem that took place in the late 1920s and early 1930s. ... The Rainmaker is also a 1995 novel by John Grisham that was made into a 1997 motion picture starring Matt Damon, Danny DeVito, Claire Danes and Jon Voight. ... Devil In a Blue Dress is a 1994 movie starring Denzel Washington, Jennifer Beals, Tom Sizemore and Don Cheadle. ... Canadian Bacon is a 1995 comedy/satire, and the only fictional film written, directed and produced by Michael Moore. ... The Age of Innocence is an Academy Award-winning film released in 1993 by Columbia Pictures, directed by Martin Scorsese and starring Daniel Day-Lewis, Michelle Pfeiffer and Winona Ryder. ... Image used on the Playbill for Lost in Yonkers Lost in Yonkers is a play by Neil Simon that opened on Broadway in 1991. ... Mad Dog and Glory is a 1993 film written by Richard Price and directed by John McNaughton. ... Rambling Rose is a 1991 film set in 1930s Georgia starring Laura Dern and Diane Ladd. ... A Rage in Harlem is a 1991 film starring Forest Whitaker, Robin Givens and Gregory Hines based on Chester Himes novel of the same name. ... Oscar is a movie from 1991 directed by John Landis and starring Sylvester Stallone. ... The Grifters is a 1990 neo-noir film directed by Stephen Frears. ... My Left Foot, is a 1989 film which tells the story of Christy Brown, an Irishman born with cerebral palsy, who can only move his left foot. ... Da is a 1988 film directed by Matt Clark and starring, among others, notable American actors Martin Sheen and Barnard Hughes. ... ¡Three Amigos! is a 1986 comedy western film, produced by George Folsey, Jr. ... The Color of Money was a 1984 novel by American writer Walter Tevis, continuing the story of Fast Eddie Felson from The Hustler (1959). ... Legal Eagles is a 1986 crime dramedy film written and directed by Ivan Reitman, and starring Robert Redford, Debra Winger and Daryl Hannah. ... The National Geographic Society, headquartered in Washington, D.C. in the United States, is one of the worlds largest not-for-profit educational and scientific organizations. ... The Black Cauldron can refer to. ... Spies Like Us is the name of a 1985 comedy film directed by John Landis, starring Chevy Chase, Dan Aykroyd, and Donna Dixon. ... Bolero can mean: Bolero, a dance Bolero, an item of clothing—a short jacket with long sleeves, normally worn by men. ... Ghostbusters is a 1984 sci-fi comedy film about three eccentric New York City parapsychologists. ... Michael Jacksons Thriller is a 14-minute music video for the song of the same name released on December 2, 1983 and directed by John Landis. ... Class is a 1983 American movie that was directed by Lewis Carlino. ... This is an article on the 1983 movie. ... Heavy Metal is a 1981 Canadian animated film from executive producer Leonard Mogel, who also was the publisher of Heavy Metal magazine. ... An American Werewolf in London is a comedy/horror film released in 1981, written and directed by John Landis. ... Stripes is a 1981 American comedy film starring Bill Murray, Harold Ramis, and Warren Oates. ... Heavy metals, in chemistry, are chemical elements of a particular range of atomic weights. ... Airplane! is an American comedy film, first released on 27 June 1980, produced, directed, and written by David Zucker, Jim Abrahams, and Jerry Zucker. ... The Blues Brothers is a 1980 musical comedy directed by John Landis and starring John Belushi and Dan Aykroyd as Joliet Jake and Elwood Blues, characters developed from a Saturday Night Live musical sketch. ... It has been suggested that Saturn 3 (film) be merged into this article or section. ... WHO KNOWS. ... DVD cover Meatballs is a 1979 movie comedy, about a summer-camp. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Powers of Ten is a 1977 short documentary film written and directed by Charles Eames and his wife, Ray. ... Once an Eagle is a nine hour American television mini-series released in 1976 and directed by Richard Michaels and E.W. Swackhamer. ... The Shootist is a novel written by Glendon Swarthout, published in 1975. ... Ellery Queen was an American television mystery series that ran for one season from 1975 to 1976 on NBC. It starred Jim Hutton (father of Timothy) as Ellery Queen, and David Wayne as his father, Inspector Richard Queen. ... McQ is a 1974 crime/drama film starring John Wayne, Eddie Albert, Diana Muldaur, and Colleen Dewhurst. ... Cahill U.S. Marshal is a 1973 Western film starring John Wayne as a driven lawman in a black hat. ... The Rookies was a television series running from 1972 until 1976. ... The Bridge at Remagen is a war film released in 1969. ... Guns of the Magnificent Seven (1969) is the second sequel to the seminal western The Magnificent Seven ( itself based on Kurosawas Seven Samurai). ... True Grit by Charles Portis first appeared as a 1968 short story in The Saturday Evening Post. ... Released at the height of the hippie era, the film I Love You, Alice B. Toklas, based on a book (?), tells the story of one Harold Fine (Peter Sellers), a self-described square lawyer, and his theatrical mother. ... This article is about the 1967 film. ... Return of the Seven(1966) aka Return of the Magnificent Seven is the belated first sequel to the 1960 seminal western The Magnificent Seven. ... Soundtrack album for the film version starring Dean Martin. ... The Big Valley was a television Western which ran on ABC from 1965 through 1969. ... The Sons of Katie Elder is a 1965 western film directed by Henry Hathaway and starring John Wayne and Dean Martin. ... The Hallelujah Trail is a 1965 Western spoof directed by John Sturges and starring Burt Lancaster and Lee Remick. ... Baby the Rain Must Fall is a 1965 Robert Mulligan film starring Lee Remick and Steve McQueen. ... The National Geographic Society, headquartered in Washington, D.C. in the United States, is one of the worlds largest not-for-profit educational and scientific organizations. ... The Carpetbaggers is the title of a 1961 bestselling novel by Harold Robbins, which was adapted into a 1964 film of the same title. ... The World of Henry Orient is a 1964 comedy film directed by George Roy Hill. ... The Great Escape, written by James Clavell, W.R. Burnett, and Walter Newman (uncredited), and directed by John Sturges is a popular 1963 World War II film, based on a true story about Allied prisoners of war with a record for escaping from German prisoner-of-war camps. ... 1963 film Hud with Paul Newman Hud is a 1963 film which tells the story of a modern-day cowboy who conflicts with his father over the best way to keep their ranch from dying. ... To Kill a Mockingbird is a 1962 film directed by Robert Mulligan and based on the novel of the same name by Harper Lee. ... Birdman of Alcatraz is a 1962 film starring Burt Lancaster and directed by John Frankenheimer. ... The Comancheros is a 1961 western film directed by Michael Curtiz and starring John Wayne and Stuart Whitman. ... The Young Doctors is a 1961 film starring Ben Gazzara, Fredric March, Ina Balin, Eddie Albert, Phyllis Love, Aline MacMahon, George Segal and Dolph Sweet. ... The Magnificent Seven is a 1960 western film directed by John Sturges about a group of hired gunmen tasked with protecting a Mexican village from bandits. ... The Rat Race is a 1960 film (not to be confused with Rat Race of 2001) directed by Robert Mulligan starring Tony Curtis and Debbie Reynolds. ... Gods Little Acre is a 1933 novel by Erskine Caldwell, which was filmed in 1958 by director Anthony Mann and lensed in black and white by master cameraman Ernie Haller [[1]]. The novel was so controversial that a literary board in New York attempted to censor it, leading to... The Tin Star is a 1957 American western movie directed by Anthony Mann and starring Henry Fonda and Anthony Perkins, in one of Perkins first roles. ... Sweet Smell of Success is a 1957 film which tells the story of a powerful newspaper columnist who uses his connections to ruin his sisters relationship with a man he deems inappropriate. ... The Ten Commandments is a 1956 motion picture dramatizing the Biblical story of Moses, an Egyptian prince-turned deliverer of the Hebrew slaves. ... The Man with the Golden Arm is a 1955 film which tells the story of a heroin addict who got clean while in prison but struggles to stay straight in the outside world. ... The cast of radios Gunsmoke: Howard McNear (Doc), William Conrad (Matt), Georgia Ellis (Kitty) and Parley Baer (Chester) Gunsmoke is an American radio and television Western drama series created by director Norman MacDonnell and writer John Meston. ... Cat-Women of the Moon is a 1953 Science fiction 3-D film directed by Arthur Hilton. ... Robot Monster is a 1953 science fiction B-movie made in 3-D. Like the more famous Plan 9 from Outer Space it is known in bad-film fandom for being so bad, its good and has the dubious honor of being considered one of the Worst films ever... Sudden Fear is a 1952 film noir which tells the story of an actor who attempts to seduce a female film director in order to prove to her that he can play a romantic lead. ...

Works for Broadway theater

Statue of Peter Pan in Bowring Park, St. ... Incidental music is music in a play, television program, radio program or some other form not primarily musical. ... A composer is a person who writes music. ... How Now, Dow Jones is a Broadway musical comedy. ... A composer is a person who writes music. ... What is popularly called the Tony Award® but is formally the Antoinette Perry Award is an annual American award celebrating achievements in theater, including musical theater. ... // 1940s 1949 Kiss Me, Kate - Music and lyrics by Cole Porter, book by Bella and Samuel Spewack. ... What is popularly called the Tony Award® but is formally the Antoinette Perry Award is an annual American award celebrating achievements in theater, including musical theater. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... A composer is a person who writes music. ... Incidental music is music in a play, television program, radio program or some other form not primarily musical. ... A composer is a person who writes music. ... What is popularly called the Tony Award® but is formally the Antoinette Perry Award is an annual American award celebrating achievements in theater, including musical theater. ...

References

  1. ^ Karlin, Fred. Listening to Movies. New York City: Schirmer., 1994., p. 264.

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
The Seattle Times: Movies: Elmer Bernstein, 1922-2004: Oscar-winning composer of classic scores (500 words)
Bernstein "was among a group of composers who stood in the pantheon of film composing." His scores for "The Man With the Golden Arm" and "The Magnificent Seven" are classics, she said, and his credit sequence work for "Mockingbird" "stands as one of the best main titles, visually and musically."
Bernstein composed much of his work in the 1960s, '70s and '80s, when scores were written to complement a specific film, and not with an eye to album sales outside the theater.
Bernstein is survived by his wife, Eve; sons Peter and Gregory; daughters Emilie and Elizabeth; and five grandchildren.
Elmer Bernstein - Biography - AOL Music (1840 words)
Bernstein arrived in Hollywood just as the studio system was entering a period of decline (and ultimate collapse), in the wake of the birth of commercial television and the consent decree signed by the studios that forced them to give up their theater chains.
Bernstein used jazz as the basis of his score for the film, and the result was a groundbreaking soundtrack that became the first of Bernstein's film music to get a commercial release -- it also received an Oscar nomination, the first of many for the composer.
Bernstein's big orchestral score achieved great popularity and the composer's name was suddenly known and recognized among casual filmgoers in the same manner as his much older contemporaries Max Steiner and Franz Waxman.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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