FACTOID # 13: New York has America's lowest percentage of residents who are veterans.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Ellsworth Vines
Ellsworth Vines as an amateur in 1933
Ellsworth Vines as an amateur in 1933

Ellsworth Vines (September 28, 1911March 17, 1994) was an American tennis champion of the 1930s, the World No. 1 player for 3 years, twice as an amateur and once as a professional. In the opinion of Jack Kramer, himself a great player, Vines was, along with Don Budge one of the two greatest players who ever lived. Image File history File links Vines_1933. ... Image File history File links Vines_1933. ... September 28 is the 271st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (272nd in leap years). ... 1911 (MCMXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar). ... March 17 is the 76th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (77th in Leap years). ... 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal. // Events January Bill Clinton January 1 : North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) goes into effect. ... A tennis net Tennis is a sport played between either two players (Singles) or two teams of two players (doubles). Players use a stringed racquet to strike a ball, a hollow rubber ball covered in felt, over a net into the opponents court. ... World No. ... Jack Kramer as an amateur in 1947 John Albert Kramer (b. ... John Donald Budge (June 13, 1915 - January 26, 2000) was a champion tennis player who became famous as the first man to win in a single year the four tournaments that the Grand Slam of tennis comprises. ...


Budge was consistently the best, according to Kramer's 1979 autobiography, but, at the very top of his game, Vines was unbeatable by anyone: "...On his best days, Vines played the best tennis ever. Hell, when Elly was on, you'd be lucky to get your racket on the ball once you served it."[1]

Vines as an amateur in 1932 on the cover of Time Magazine
Vines as an amateur in 1932 on the cover of Time Magazine

Tall and thin, Vines possessed a game with no noticeable weaknesses, except, according to Kramer, because of his great natural athletic ability, laziness. He was particularly known for his powerful forehand and his very fast serve, both of which he generally hit absolutely flat with no spin. Although he could play the serve-and-volley game, he generally played an all-court game, preferring to hit winners from the baseline. Playing in the white flannel trousers that were standard dress for the time, he greatly impressed the youthful Kramer in a 1935 match in Southern California: "And here is Ellsworth Vines, 6'2-1/2" tall, 155 pounds, dressed like Fred Astaire and hitting shots like Babe Ruth." Kramer made up his mind on the spot to concentrate on tennis. Image File history File links Ellsworth_Vines_Time_Cover. ... Image File history File links Ellsworth_Vines_Time_Cover. ... (Clockwise from upper left) Time magazine covers from May 7, 1945; July 25, 1969; December 31, 1999; September 14, 2001; and April 21, 2003. ... Serve and volley is a strategy used in lawn tennis (and rarely in real tennis) where a player serves and immediately moves forward to make the next shot a volley and hopefully a winner. ... Fred Astaire Fred Astaire (May 10, 1899 – June 22, 1987), born Frederick Austerlitz in Omaha, Nebraska, was an American film and Broadway stage dancer, choreographer, singer and actor. ... For the band named Babe Ruth, see Babe Ruth (band). ...


Vines had "the perfect slim body," according to Kramer, "that was coordinated for anything. Elly won Forest Hills the first time when he was still only nineteen, but at the same time he was also devoting himself to basketball at the University of Southern California. He went there, on a basketball scholarship." (However, he would never play on the basketball team; the school's official all-time roster does not list him.) Forest Hills is the name of some places in the United States of America: Forest Hills, Kentucky Forest Hills, Massachusetts (a suburb of Boston) Forest Hills, Michigan (a census-designated place) Forest Hills, Pennsylvania Forest Hills is also the name of a neighborhood in the borough of Queens in New... Sara Giauro shoots a three-point shot, FIBA Europe Cup for Women Finals 2005. ... Edward L. Doheny Jr. ...


After becoming bored with tennis while only in his late twenties, Vines became a professional golfer and, over the years, had a number of high finishes in tournaments, including one professional victory and a semi-final position in the prestigious 1951 PGA Championship when it was a match-play tournament. "He was twice in the top ten of golf money winnings," writes Kramer, "and he was surely the best athlete ever in the two sports." He compares Vines, however, to another great tennis player, Lew Hoad. "Both were very strong guys. Both succeeded at a very young age.... Also, both were very lazy guys. Vines lost interest in tennis (for golf) before he was thirty, and Hoad never appeared to be very interested. Despite their great natural ability, neither put up the outstanding records that they were capable of. Unfortunately, the latter was largely true because both had physical problems." This list of golf players, known as golfers includes the most notable players of the sport, who are almost exclusively professionals in the sport. ... Logo for the 2006 PGA The PGA Championship is an annual golf tournament, conducted by the Professional Golfers Association of America as part of the PGA TOUR. The PGA Championship is one of the four Major Championships in mens golf, and it is the golf seasons final major... Lewis Alan Hoad, born November 23, 1934 in Glebe, New South Wales, Australia - died July 3, 1994 in Fuengirola, Spain, was a champion tennis player. ...


Vines was inducted into the International Tennis Hall of Fame in Newport, Rhode Island, in 1962. The International Tennis Hall of Fame is a not-for-profit tennis museum at the Newport Casino in Newport, Rhode Island, USA. It maintains a Hall of Fame for prominent personalities and players from the tennis world. ... Newport as seen from the International Space Station. ... 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar). ...

Contents


Grand Slam singles finals

Wins (3)

Year Championship Opponent in Final Score in Final
1931 U.S. Championships George Lott 7-9, 6-3, 9-7, 7-5
1932 Wimbledon Championships Henry Austin 6-4, 6-2, 6-0
1932 U.S. Championships (2) Henri Cochet 6-4, 6-4, 6-4

1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link is to a full 1931 calendar). ... US Open logo The United States Open tennis tournament, commonly referred to as the U.S. Open (or as simply the Open in the U.S. only), is the fourth and final event of the Grand Slam tennis tournaments. ... George Lott was an outstanding American tennis player and tennis coach. ... 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will take you to a full 1932 calendar). ... Wimbledon logo Wimbledon is the oldest and most prestigious event in the sport of tennis. ... Henry Bunny Austin (born on August 20, 1906 in London, England – died on August 20, 2000) was a male tennis player from Great Britain. ... Henri Jean Cochet (December 14, 1901 in Villeurbanne, near Lyon - April 1, 1987) was a champion tennis player, one of the famous Four Musketeers from France who dominated tennis in the late 1920s and early 1930s. ...

Runner-ups (1)

Year Championship Opponent in Final Score in Final
1933 Wimbledon Championships Jack Crawford 6-4, 9-11, 2-6, 6-2, 4-6

1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... Jack Crawford (22 March 1775 in the East End of the Sunderland, England - 10 November 1831) was a sailor of the Royal Navy known as the Hero of Camperdown. ...

Notes

  1. ^ In his 1979 autobiography Kramer considered the best player ever to have been either Don Budge (for consistent play) or Ellsworth Vines (at the height of his game). The next four best were, chronologically, Bill Tilden, Fred Perry, Bobby Riggs, and Pancho Gonzales. After these six came the "second echelon" of Rod Laver, Lew Hoad, Ken Rosewall, Gottfried von Cramm, Ted Schroeder, Jack Crawford, Pancho Segura, Frank Sedgman, Tony Trabert, John Newcombe, Arthur Ashe, Stan Smith, Björn Borg, and Jimmy Connors. He felt unable to rank Henri Cochet and René Lacoste accurately but felt they were among the very best.

John Donald Budge (June 13, 1915 - January 26, 2000) was a champion tennis player who became famous as the first man to win in a single year the four tournaments that the Grand Slam of tennis comprises. ... Bill Tilden running for a backhand in the 1920s William Tatem Tilden II (February 10, 1893 – June 5, 1953), often called Big Bill, was an American tennis player who was the World No. ... Fred Perry hitting a backhand volley Frederick John Perry (May 18, 1909 - February 2, 1995) was an English tennis player and three-time Wimbledon champion. ... Bobby Riggs Robert Larimore Bobby Riggs (February 25, 1918–October 25, 1995) was a 1930s/40s tennis champion who gained even more fame in 1973 at the age of 55 as a result of challenge matches against two of the top female players in the world. ... Ricardo Alonso González (May 9, 1928 – July 3, 1995), who was generally known as Pancho Gonzales, was the World No. ... Country: Australia Residence: San Diego, California, USA Height: 5 ft 8 in (172 cm) Weight: 150 lb (68 kg) Plays: Left Turned pro: 1962 Retired: 1974 Highest singles ranking: 1 Singles titles: 39 Career prize money: US$1,564,213 Grand Slam Record Titles: 11 Australian Open W (60, 62... Lewis Alan Hoad, born November 23, 1934 in Glebe, New South Wales, Australia - died July 3, 1994 in Fuengirola, Spain, was a champion tennis player. ... Ken Robert Rosewall, born November 2, 1934 in Sydney, Australia, was a champion tennis player. ... Gottfried von Cramm (July 7, 1909 - November 8, 1976) was a German tennis champion. ... Fred(e)rick Rudolph Ted Schroeder (born July 20, 1921) was an American male tennis player. ... Jack Crawford John Herbert Crawford, known as Jack Crawford, was a great Australian tennis player of the 1930s. ... Pancho Segura hitting his famous two-handed forehand Pancho Segura, born Francisco Olegario Segura (June 20, 1921) was a leading tennis player of the 1940s and 1950s, both as an amateur and as a professional. ... Frank Allan Sedgman, born October 29, 1927, in Mt. ... Marion Anthony Trabert (born August 16, 1930 in Cincinnati, Ohio) is a former star tennis player and longtime tennis author, TV commentator, instructor, and motivation speaker. ... John Newcombe. ... Country: United States Height: 185 cm (6 ft 1 in) Weight: 73 kg (160 lb) Plays: Right Turned pro: 1966 Retired: 1980 Highest singles ranking: 1 (1968 and 1975) Singles titles: 34 Career prize money: $2,584,909 Grand Slam Record Titles: 3 Australian Open W (1970) French Open QF... Stan Smith (born December 14, 1946 in Pasadena, California) is an American tennis player who, with his partner Bob Lutz, was one of the best doubles players of all time. ... (June 6, 1956, Södertälje, Sweden) is a former tennis champion who was the World No. ... Country: United States Residence: Belleville, IL Height: 177 cm (5 ft 10 in) Weight: 70 Kg (155 lb) Plays: Left-handed Turned pro: 1972 Highest singles ranking: 1 (29 July 1974) Singles titles: 109 Career Prize Money: US$8,461,040 Grand Slam Record Titles: 8 Australian Open W (1974... Henri Jean Cochet (December 14, 1901 in Villeurbanne, near Lyon - April 1, 1987) was a champion tennis player, one of the famous Four Musketeers from France who dominated tennis in the late 1920s and early 1930s. ... René Lacoste Jean René Lacoste (July 2, 1904 - October 12, 1996) was a famous French tennis player, businessman, and innovator, nicknamed the crocodile by fans; he is now mostly known as being the namesake of the Lacoste tennis shirt, which he introduced in 1929. ...

Sources

  • The Game, My 40 Years in Tennis (1979), Jack Kramer with Frank Deford (ISBN 0-399-12336-9)

This page refers to the year 1979. ...

See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
Between The Lines (7381 words)
Vines was especially strong, though it was his errors that were costly at the end of the long second set, won by Lott-Stoefen, 14-12.
Meanwhile Vines proved invariably superior to Stoefen in their back-court slugging duels, though towering Lester was able to stay close on nights when his serve was working well.
Vines in late October voiced the plausible case that indoors the top pros would be much better than the top amateurs.
Don Budge - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1191 words)
Budge was considered to have the best backhand in the history of tennis, at least until the advent of Ken Rosewall in the 1950s and '60s.
Tennis great, and longtime promoter, Jack Kramer has written that Budge was, in the long run, the greatest player who ever lived although Ellsworth Vines topped him when at the height of his game.
In 1939 he beat the two reigning kings of professional tennis, Ellsworth Vines and Fred Perry, 21 matches to 18 and 18 matches to 11.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m