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Encyclopedia > Elia Kazan
Elia Kazan

Birth name Elias Kazanjoglou
Born September 7, 1909
Constantinople, Ottoman Empire
Died September 28, 2003 (aged 94)
New York, US
Spouse(s) Molly Day Thatcher (1932-1963)
Barbara Loden (1967-1980)
Frances Rudges (1982-2003)
Academy Awards
Best Director
1947 Gentleman's Agreement
1954 On the Waterfront
Academy Honorary Award
1999 Lifetime Achievement
Golden Globe Awards
Best Director - Motion Picture
1948 Gentleman's Agreement
1955 On the Waterfront
1957 Baby Doll
1964 America, America
Tony Awards
Best Direction of a Play
1947 All My Sons
1949 Death of a Salesman
1959 J.B.

Elia Kazan, (Greek: Ηλίας Καζάν, IPA: 'iliɑ), (September 7, 1909September 28, 2003) was a Greek-American film and theatre director, film and theatrical producer, screenwriter, novelist and cofounder of the influential Actors Studio in New York in 1947. Elia Kazan File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Map of Constantinople. ... Motto دولت ابد مدت Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (The Eternal State) Anthem Ottoman imperial anthem Borders in 1680, see: list of territories Capital Söğüt (1299–1326) Bursa (1326–65) Edirne (1365–1453) Constantinople (Ä°stanbul, 1453–1922) Language(s) Ottoman Turkish Government Monarchy [[Category:Former monarchies}}|Ottoman Empire, 1299]] Sultans  - 1281–1326... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... NY redirects here. ... United States may refer to: Places: United States of America SS United States, the fastest ocean liner ever built. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... The Academy Award for Directing is one of the awards given to people working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; the awards are voted on by other people within the industry. ... Gentlemans Agreement is a 1947 film about a journalist (played by Gregory Peck) who falsely represents himself as a Jew to research anti-semitism in the affluent community of Darien, Connecticut. ... On the Waterfront is an Oscar-winning American 1954 film about mob violence and corruption among longshoremen, and it has become a standard of its kind. ... The Academy Honorary Award is given irregularly by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences to celebrate motion picture achievements that are not covered by existing Academy Awards. ... The Golden Globe Award The Golden Globe Awards are American awards for motion pictures and television programs, given out each year during a formal dinner. ... Golden Globe Award for Best Director - Motion Picture has been awarded annually since 1944 by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association. ... Gentlemans Agreement is a 1947 film about a journalist (played by Gregory Peck) who falsely represents himself as a Jew to research anti-semitism in the affluent community of Darien, Connecticut. ... On the Waterfront is an Oscar-winning American 1954 film about mob violence and corruption among longshoremen, and it has become a standard of its kind. ... Baby Doll is a 1956 film which tells the story of the childlike bride of a Mississippi cotton gin owner, who becomes the pawn in a battle between her husband and his enemy. ... America, America (alternative title The Anatolian Smile) is a 1963 Elia Kazan film about two young men, an Armenian and a Greek, who escape from their villages in Anatolia during the Armenian Genocide of the early 1900s. ... What is popularly called the Tony Award (formally, the Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Theatre) is an annual award celebrating achievements in live American theater, including musical theater, primarily honoring productions on Broadway in New York. ... The Tony Award for Best Direction has been given since 1947. ... All My Sons is the name of a 1947 play by Arthur Miller. ... Cover to the Penguin Group edition. ... I CAN BLOW!!! J.B. is a play in verse written by Archibald MacLeish and published in 1958. ... Articles with similar titles include the NATO phonetic alphabet, which has also informally been called the “International Phonetic Alphabet”. For information on how to read IPA transcriptions of English words, see IPA chart for English. ... is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The film director, on the right, gives last minute direction to the cast and crew, whilst filming a costume drama on location in London. ... A theatre director is a principal in the theatre field who oversees and orchestrates the mounting of a play by unifying various endeavors and aspects of production. ... A film producer creates the conditions for making movies. ... A theatrical producer is the person ultimately responsible for overseeing all aspects of mounting a theatrical production. ... Screenwriters, scenarists or script writers, are authors who write the screenplays from which movies and television programs are made. ... A novel is an extended work of written, narrative, prose fiction, usually in story form; the writer of a novel is a novelist. ... The Actors Studio is a theatrical school and workshop located in the Old Labor Stage on 44th Street in New York City. ...

Contents

Early life

He was born Elias Kazanjoglou in 1909 in Constantinople (present-day Istanbul), then capital of the Ottoman Empire, to Greek parents.[1][2] According to some sources he was born in Kayseri. In 1913, when he was four, his family emigrated to the United States and settled in New York City, where his father, George Kazanjoglou, became a rug merchant. Kazan's father expected that his son would go into the family business, but his mother, Athena, encouraged Kazan to make his own decisions. Year 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Map of Constantinople. ... Istanbul (Turkish: , Greek: , historically Byzantium and later Constantinople; see other names) is Turkeys most populous city, and its cultural and financial center. ... Motto دولت ابد مدت Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (The Eternal State) Anthem Ottoman imperial anthem Borders in 1680, see: list of territories Capital Söğüt (1299–1326) Bursa (1326–65) Edirne (1365–1453) Constantinople (Ä°stanbul, 1453–1922) Language(s) Ottoman Turkish Government Monarchy [[Category:Former monarchies}}|Ottoman Empire, 1299]] Sultans  - 1281–1326... Kayseri (Greek: Καισάρεια), in the antiquity Mazaka and later Caesarea, is an industrialized city in Turkey. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ...


Kazan attended public schools in New York City and New Rochelle, New York. After graduating from Williams College, Massachusetts, Kazan studied at Yale University's School of Drama. In the 1930s Kazan acted with New York's Group Theatre, alongside (among others) Lee Strasberg, Clifford Odets, and Stella and Luther Adler. During this period Kazan earned his nickname 'Gadg,' short for Gadget - he never learned to love the name. For about 19 months in 1934-36, Kazan was a member of a secret Communist cell.[citation needed] New Rochelle City Hall New Roc City New Rochelle (French: Nouvelle-Rochelle) is a city in the southeast portion of the U.S. state of New York in Westchester County, 16 miles (26 km) from Grand Central Terminal in New York City and 2 miles north of the border with... Williams College is a private liberal arts college located in Williamstown, Massachusetts. ... “Yale” redirects here. ... The Group Theatre was a theater collective, formed in New York in 1931 by Harold Clurman, Cheryl Crawford and Lee Strasberg. ... Lee Strasberg (November 17, 1901 – February 17, 1982) was an American director, actor, producer, and acting teacher. ... Clifford Odets photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1937 Clifford Odets (July 18, 1906 - August 18, 1963) was an American socialist playwright, screenwriter, and social protester. ... Stella Adler (February 10, 1901 – December 21, 1992) was an American actress, and for decades was regarded as Americas foremost acting teacher. ... Luther Adler (May 4, 1903 – December 8, 1984) was an American actor best known for his work in theater, but who also worked in film and television. ...


Group Theater and Actors Studio

Theatrical career

He became one of the most visible members of the Hollywood elite. Kazan's theater credits included acting in Men in White, Waiting for Lefty, Johnny Johnson, and Golden Boy, and directing A Streetcar Named Desire (1951) and Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (1955), two of the plays that made Tennessee Williams a theatrical and literary force, and All My Sons (1947) and Death of a Salesman, (1949) the plays which did much the same for Arthur Miller. He received three Tony Awards, winning for All My Sons, Death of a Salesman, and J.B. ... LOLZ GOOD MOVIE LMAO This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... Waiting for Lefty was the first play by Clifford Odets to be produced (though not the first one written), and it is his best known work. ... Johnny Johnson is a musical written by Kurt Weill (music) and Paul Green (book and lyrics), with direction by Lee Strasberg and musical direction by Lehman Engel. ... Golden Boy is the title of a play by Clifford Odets, first staged in 1937 by the Group Theatre. ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ... Cat on a Hot Tin Roof is a Tony-nominated play by Tennessee Williams. ... Thomas Lanier Williams III (March 26, 1911 – February 25, 1983), better known by the pseudonym Tennessee Williams, was a major American playwright and one of the prominent playwrights of the twentieth century. ... All My Sons is the name of a 1947 play by Arthur Miller. ... Cover to the Penguin Group edition. ... Arthur Asher Miller (October 17, 1915 – February 10, 2005) was an American playwright and essayist. ... What is popularly called the Tony Award® but is formally the Antoinette Perry Award is an annual American award celebrating achievements in theater, including musical theater. ... I CAN BLOW!!! J.B. is a play in verse written by Archibald MacLeish and published in 1958. ...


Film director

Kazan's history as a film director is scarcely less noteworthy. He won two Academy Awards for Best Director, for Gentleman's Agreement (1947) and On the Waterfront (1954). He elicited remarkable performances from actors such as Marlon Brando and Oscar winners Vivien Leigh, Karl Malden and Kim Hunter in A Streetcar Named Desire (1951) (the film version of Tennessee Williams' play), James Dean and Oscar winner Jo Van Fleet in East of Eden (adapted from the John Steinbeck novel), and Andy Griffith in A Face in the Crowd. The Academy Award for Directing is an accolade given to the person that the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences feels was best director of the past year. ... Gentlemans Agreement is a 1947 film about a journalist (played by Gregory Peck) who falsely represents himself as a Jew to research anti-semitism in the affluent community of Darien, Connecticut. ... 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1947 calendar). ... On the Waterfront is an Oscar-winning American 1954 film about mob violence and corruption among longshoremen, and it has become a standard of its kind. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Marlon Brando, Jr. ... Vivien Leigh, Lady Olivier (November 5, 1913 – July 8, 1967) was a two-time Academy Award winning English actress. ... Karl Malden portraying Gen. ... Kim Hunter (November 12, 1922 – September 11, 2002) was an Academy Award-winning American film and stage actress. ... A Streetcar Named Desire is an Academy Award-winning 1951 film adaptation of the Pulitzer Prize-winning play of the same name by Tennessee Williams. ... Thomas Lanier Williams III (March 26, 1911 – February 25, 1983), better known by the pseudonym Tennessee Williams, was a major American playwright and one of the prominent playwrights of the twentieth century. ... James Byron Dean (February 8, 1931 – September 30, 1955) was an American film actor. ... Jo Van Fleet (December 30, 1914 – June 10, 1996) was an Academy Award-winning American theater and film actress. ... East of Eden is a 1955 movie, directed by Elia Kazan, and based on the novel of the same name by John Steinbeck. ... John Ernst Steinbeck (February 27, 1902 – December 20, 1968) was one of the best-known and most widely read American writers of the 20th century. ... For other uses, see East of Eden (disambiguation). ... Andy Samuel Griffith (born June 1, 1926) is an American actor, Grammy Award winning singer[1], writer and producer from Mount Airy, North Carolina. ... A Face in the Crowd (1957) is an epic motion picture starring Andy Griffith, Patricia Neal, and Walter Matthau, directed by Elia Kazan. ...


HUAC controversy

Kazan's later career was marked by his testimony before the House Un-American Activities Committee (HUAC) during the postwar "Red Scare", in which he "named names." Some others who named names, for a variety of reasons, included Jerome Robbins, Robert Taylor, Sterling Hayden, Leo Townsend, Burl Ives, Budd Schulberg and Lela Rogers (mother of Ginger Rogers). HUAC hearings House Committee on Un-American Activities (HUAC or HCUA) (1938–1975) was an investigative committee of the United States House of Representatives. ... Some factual claims in this article need to be verified. ... Jerome Robbins in Three virgins and a devil. ... There are many people known as Bob Taylor or Robert Taylor, including: Robert Taylor (developer) (born 1972-present), Owner of FlashExtensions. ... Sterling Hayden (March 26, 1916 - May 23, 1986) was an American actor. ... Burl Icle Ivanhoe Ives (14 June 1909 – 14 April 1995), an Academy Award winner, was an acclaimed American folk music singer, author, and actor. ... Picture of writer Budd Schulberg (born March 27, 1914 in New York City, New York) is an American screenwriter and novelist. ... Ginger Rogers (July 16, 1911 – April 25, 1995) was an Academy Award-winning American film and stage actress and singer. ...


Kazan had briefly been a member of the Communist Party in his youth, when working as part of a theater troupe, the Group Theater, in the 1930s. At the time, the Group Theater included several theater professionals who had Communist or other left-wing sympathies. A committed Socialist, Kazan felt betrayed by Stalin's atrocities and the ideological rigidity of Communists in general. He was personally offended when Party functionaries tried to intervene in the artistic decisions of his theater group. The Communist Party of the United States of America (CPUSA) is a Marxist-Leninist political party in the United States. ... The Group Theatre was a left-wing theater collective, formed in New York in 1931 by Harold Clurman, Cheryl Crawford and Lee Strasberg. ... Face The 1930s (years from 1930–1939) were described as an abrupt shift to more radical and conservative lifestyles, as countries were struggling to find a solution to the Great Depression, also known in Europe as the World Depression. ... Socialism is a social and economic system (or the political philosophy advocating such a system) in which the economic means of production are owned and controlled collectively by the people. ... Iosif (usually anglicized as Joseph) Vissarionovich Stalin (Russian: Иосиф Виссарионович Сталин), original name Ioseb Jughashvili (Georgian: იოსებ ჯუღაშვი&#4314...


At first, although Kazan agreed to testify before HUAC, and readily admitted his former membership in the Communist Party, he refused to name others who had been members. But Kazan felt increasing pressure from Hollywood studio management to cooperate with the Committee and provided the names of former Party members or those connected with Party activities, in order to preserve his career.


He knew that the names were already known to the Committee, since HUAC had already obtained copies of Communist Party membership archives, and that his testimony would be used primarily to increase media attention. After a delay, during which he asked for and received permission to release the names of former members of the Party, he was recalled to testify, and at the second examination Kazan provided testimony to the Committee.


The 'naming of names' by some in Hollywood was used as a tactic by HUAC to validate the Committee's actions and galvanize reaction against those who were merely friends or relations of the accused, so-called fellow travelers. One of those named as being a Party member was the wife of noted actor John Garfield, with whom Kazan had worked in the Group Theatre troupe, and who was being investigated by HUAC. HUAC failed to uncover any evidence of Communist Party membership by Garfield himself, but Garfield was nonetheless subpoenaed. John Garfield John Garfield (born March 4, 1913 in New York City; died May 21, 1952 in New York City) was an American actor. ... HUAC hearings House Committee on Un-American Activities (HUAC or HCUA) (1938–1975) was an investigative committee of the United States House of Representatives. ...


As Kazan later explained, he felt that it was in the best interest of the country and his own liberal beliefs to cooperate with HUAC's anti-communist efforts in order to counter Communists in Hollywood who were co-opting the liberal agenda. Kazan felt no allegiance to Communism, and had been disillusioned by the Soviet Union's brutal record of murder and repression during Stalin's Purges, and the Polish massacres of World War II. He still resented the Party's attempt to force their agenda on him during his theatre group days. American playwrights Lillian Hellman and Arthur Miller publicly and bitterly disagreed with Kazan's reasoning. Ironically, though Kazan testified to HUAC under threat of ostracism and blacklisting by the Hollywood studios, he was in turn shunned and ostracized by many of his former friends. Always a confirmed liberal and progressive, even socialist in his political outlook, Kazan now found himself hated by the left, yet mistrusted by many on the right. Some have perceived elements of Kazan's own reaction to his critics in the film On the Waterfront. Lillian Florence Hellman (June 20, 1905 – June 30, 1984) was a successful American playwright, linked throughout her life with many left-wing causes. ... Arthur Asher Miller (October 17, 1915 – February 10, 2005) was an American playwright and essayist. ...

Kazan in 1967
Kazan in 1967

Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2354x3000, 800 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Elia Kazan ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2354x3000, 800 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Elia Kazan ...

The life of a Greek-American

In 1967, Kazan published The Arrangement, a novel about an emotionally-battered middle-aged Greek-American living a double life in California as both an advertising executive, under the name "Eddie Andreson", and a serious, muckraking magazine writer under the name "Evans Arness", neither of which was his birth name, Evangelos Arness. The character's "arrangement" of his life takes a huge toll on him, eventually leading him to a suicide attempt and a nervous breakdown. Critics saw parallels to Kazan's own life, most notably that the character had briefly been a member of the Communist Party prior to World War II and of course, the character's Anatolian Greek background and Americanization of his birth name. Kazan disclaimed any autobiographical elements and stated that the novel was a work of fiction, nothing more or less. It served as the basis for his 1969 film of the same name. For the film based on this novel, see The Arrangement (1969 film). ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... Commercialism redirects here. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Cover of the first English edition of 1793 of Benjamin Franklins autobiography. ... For the novel upon which this film is based, see The Arrangement (1967 novel). ...


Honorary Award

In 1999, Kazan received an honorary Oscar for lifetime achievement. He was accompanied by Martin Scorsese and Robert De Niro who warned the audience sotto voce not to misbehave. Robert De Niro himself had appeared in a film about the Hollywood Red Scare. While many in Hollywood who had experienced the Red Scare felt that enough time had passed that it was appropriate to bury the hatchet and recognize Kazan's great artistic accomplishments, others did not. Some left-leaning Hollywood celebrities expressed outrage, and former blacklisted writer Abraham Polonsky stated that he wished Kazan would be shot onstage.[3] Some footage from the 1999 Oscars suggests that fully three-quarters of those present in the audience gave him a standing ovation, including Lynn Redgrave, Karl Malden, Meryl Streep and the very liberal Warren Beatty (Beatty later said that he was applauding because Kazan had directed him in his first film Splendor in the Grass, but was not endorsing the decision he made). However, the footage also showed actors such as Ed Harris, Nick Nolte, Ian McKellen, Richard Dreyfuss, Amy Madigan, Ed Begley, Jr. and Holly Hunter sitting on their hands or refusing to applaud. Still others, such as Steven Spielberg and Sherry Lansing applauded politely, but did not rise. Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... Martin Marcantonio Luciano Scorsese (IPA: AmE: ; Ita: []) (born November 17, 1942) is an Academy Award, Golden Globe, BAFTA, and Directors Guild of America award winning American film director, writer and producer and founder World Cinema Foundation. ... Robert Mario De Niro Jr. ... Sotto voce (literally under voice), an Italian expression, means to speak under ones breath or to speak confidentially. ... ... Some factual claims in this article need to be verified. ... Abraham Lincoln Polonsky (December 5, 1910 - October 26, 1999) was an American screenwriter blacklisted by the Hollywood movie studio bosses in the 1950s. ... Lynn Rachel Redgrave OBE (born 8 March 1943 in London) is an English actress born into the famous acting Redgrave family. ... Karl Malden portraying Gen. ... Mary Louise Streep, mostly known as Meryl Streep (born June 22, 1949) is a two-time Academy Award-winning, six-time Golden Globe-winning, two-time SAG-winning, Grammy Award-nominated and BAFTA Award-winning American actress who has worked in theatre, television, and film. ... Henry Warren Beatty (born March 30, 1937), better known as Warren Beatty, is an Academy Award and Golden Globe-winning American actor, producer, screenwriter, and director. ... Splendor in the Grass, an American movie from 1961, tells a story of sexual repression. ... Edward Allen Ed Harris (born November 28, 1950) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor, best known for his performances in The Right Stuff, Apollo 13 and Pollock, among many others. ... Nicholas King Nolte born February 8, 1941 is a Oscar-nominated American actor, model, and producer. ... Sir Ian Murray McKellen, CBE (born May 25, 1939) is a veteran English stage and screen actor, the recipient of a Tony Award and two Oscar nominations. ... Richard Stephen Dreyfuss (born October 29, 1947) is an Oscar-winning American actor. ... Amy Madigan (born 11 September 1950) is an American actress who is known for her role as Annie Kinsella in the 1989 film Field of Dreams. ... Edward James Begley, Jr. ... Holly Hunter (born March 20, 1958 in Conyers, Georgia) is an Academy Award-winning American actress. ... Steven Allan Spielberg KBE (born December 18, 1946)[1] is an American film director and producer. ... Sherry Lansing (born July 31, 1944 in Chicago, Illinois as Sherry Lee Heimann) is the former CEO of Paramount Studios and the first woman to head a major studio. ...


Personal life

Elia Kazan was married three times. His first wife was Molly Day Thacher, playwright; married from 1932 until her death in 1963 which produced two daughters and two sons. Then to Barbara Loden, actress; married from 1969 until her death in 1980 producing two sons. Finally, to Frances Rudge, from 1982 until his death in 2003 from natural causes at his home in New York. He was 94 years old. Mary Molly Kazan (1907 - 1963), the daughter of Alfred Beaumont Thacher and the granddaughter of Thomas Anthony Thacher; she was an American playwright and the first wife of the acclaimed, but controversial film director Elia Kazan. ... Year 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1932 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Barbara Loden was born on July 8, 1932 in Marion, North Carolina, USA. She died of cancer on September 5, 1980. ... For the Stargate SG-1 episode, see 1969 (Stargate SG-1). ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Dope Hiphop crew out of Sydney Australia. ... NY redirects here. ...


Awards and nominations

Academy awards

Gentlemans Agreement is a 1947 film about a journalist (played by Gregory Peck) who falsely represents himself as a Jew to research anti-semitism in the affluent community of Darien, Connecticut. ... On the Waterfront is an Oscar-winning American 1954 film about mob violence and corruption among longshoremen, and it has become a standard of its kind. ... A Streetcar Named Desire is an Academy Award-winning 1951 film adaptation of the Pulitzer Prize-winning play of the same name by Tennessee Williams. ... East of Eden is a 1955 movie, directed by Elia Kazan, and based on the novel of the same name by John Steinbeck. ... America, America (alternative title The Anatolian Smile) is a 1963 Elia Kazan film about two young men, an Armenian and a Greek, who escape from their villages in Anatolia during the Armenian Genocide of the early 1900s. ... America, America (alternative title The Anatolian Smile) is a 1963 Elia Kazan film about two young men, an Armenian and a Greek, who escape from their villages in Anatolia during the Armenian Genocide of the early 1900s. ...

Cannes film festival

  • 1952: Nominated for Grand Prize of the Festival, Viva Zapata! (1952)
  • 1955: Won Best Dramatic Film, East of Eden (1955), nominated for Palme d'Or (Golden Palm) East of Eden (1955)
  • 1972: Nominated for Palme d'Or, The Visitors (1972)

Palme dOr The Palme dOr (Golden Palm) is the highest prize given to a film at the Cannes Film Festival. ...

Venice film festival

  • 1948: Nominated for Golden Lion (Leone d'Oro), Gentleman's Agreement (1947)
  • 1950: Won International Award, Panic in the Streets (1950)
  • 1950: Nominated for Golden Lion, Panic in the Streets (1950)
  • 1951: Won Special Jury Prize, A Streetcar Named Desire (1951), " For having produced a stage play on screen, poetically interpreting the humanity of the characters, thanks to masterly direction."
  • 1951: Nominated for Golden Lion, A Streetcar Named Desire (1951)
  • 1954: Won Italian Film Critics Award, On the Waterfront (1954)
  • 1954: Won Silver Lion, On the Waterfront (1954)
  • 1954: Nominated Golden Lion, On the Waterfront (1954)
  • 1955: Won OCIC Award, On the Waterfront (1954)

The Golden Lion (it: Leone dOro) is the name of the highest prize given to a film at the Biennale Venice Film Festival. ...

Filmography

1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... This article is about the 1945 film. ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1947 calendar). ... Boomerang! is a 1947 film based on a true story about the early career of Attorney General Homer Cummings. ... Gentlemans Agreement is a 1947 film about a journalist (played by Gregory Peck) who falsely represents himself as a Jew to research anti-semitism in the affluent community of Darien, Connecticut. ... Pinky is a 1949 film which tells the story of a young lightskinned African American woman passing as white, who becomes torn between the needs of her grandmother and the love of a white doctor. ... 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1949 calendar). ... Panic in the Streets is a black and white, 96-minute film released by 20th Century Fox in 1950. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A Streetcar Named Desire is an Academy Award-winning 1951 film adaptation of the Pulitzer Prize-winning play of the same name by Tennessee Williams. ... Year 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Viva Zapata! is a 1952 biographical drama film directed by Elia Kazan. ... 1952 (MCMLII) was a Leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Year 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... On the Waterfront is an Oscar-winning American 1954 film about mob violence and corruption among longshoremen, and it has become a standard of its kind. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... East of Eden is a 1955 movie, directed by Elia Kazan, and based on the novel of the same name by John Steinbeck. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... Baby Doll is a 1956 film which tells the story of the childlike bride of a Mississippi cotton gin owner, who becomes the pawn in a battle between her husband and his enemy. ... Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A Face in the Crowd (1957) is an epic motion picture starring Andy Griffith, Patricia Neal, and Walter Matthau, directed by Elia Kazan. ... Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ... Wild River is a 1960 film which tells the story of a young Tennessee Valley Authority administrator who comes to a small town in Tennessee to build a dam, despite opposition from the locals. ... 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1960 calendar). ... Splendor in the Grass, an American movie from 1961, tells a story of sexual repression. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... America, America (alternative title The Anatolian Smile) is a 1963 Elia Kazan film about two young men, an Armenian and a Greek, who escape from their villages in Anatolia during the Armenian Genocide of the early 1900s. ... Year 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the novel upon which this film is based, see The Arrangement (1967 novel). ... For the Stargate SG-1 episode, see 1969 (Stargate SG-1). ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Last Tycoon (1976), is a film based upon the book The Last Tycoon by F. Scott Fitzgerald. ... Year 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Bibliography

  • America America (1963)
  • The Arrangement (1967)
  • The Assassins (1972)
  • The Understudy (1975)
  • Kazan Reader' (1977)
  • Acts of Love (1978)
  • The Anatolian (1983)
Awards
Preceded by
William Wyler
for The Best Years of Our Lives
Academy Award for Best Director
1947
for Gentleman's Agreement
Succeeded by
John Huston
for Treasure of the Sierra Madre
Preceded by
Fred Zinnemann
for From Here to Eternity
Academy Award for Best Director
1954
for On the Waterfront
Succeeded by
Delbert Mann
for Marty

For the film based on this novel, see The Arrangement (1969 film). ... William Wyler (July 1, 1902–July 27, 1981) was a prolific, Oscar-winning motion picture director. ... The Best Years of Our Lives is a 1946 movie about three servicemen (an air force officer, an infantry sergeant, and an ordinary sailor) trying to piece their lives back together after coming back home from World War II. It is based on a novel by MacKinlay Kantor, Glory for... The Academy Award for Directing is one of the awards given to people working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; the awards are voted on by other people within the industry. ... Gentlemans Agreement is a 1947 film about a journalist (played by Gregory Peck) who falsely represents himself as a Jew to research anti-semitism in the affluent community of Darien, Connecticut. ... John Marcellus Huston (August 5, 1906 – August 28, 1987) was an American film director and actor. ... The Treasure of the Sierra Madre is a 1948 John Huston film in which two down-and-outers (Humphrey Bogart and Tim Holt) in Mexico (bothering director John Huston for money in fun opening cameo) hook up with an old-timer (Walter Huston, the directors father) to prospect for... Fred Zinnemann (April 29, 1907–March 14, 1997) was an Austrian-American film director. ... From Here to Eternity is a 1953 movie based on a James Jones novel in which characters work through ordinary bouts of intimidation and infidelity on a military base in the days preceding the attack on Pearl Harbor. ... On the Waterfront is an Oscar-winning American 1954 film about mob violence and corruption among longshoremen, and it has become a standard of its kind. ... Delbert Martin Mann, Jr. ... For other uses, see Marty (disambiguation). ...

See also

The Actors Studio is a theatrical school and workshop located in the Old Labor Stage on 44th Street in New York City. ... The Group Theatre was a theater collective, formed in New York in 1931 by Harold Clurman, Cheryl Crawford and Lee Strasberg. ...

References

  1. ^ Elia Kazan (1909-2003) - Elia Kazanjoglous
  2. ^ The John F. Kennedy center for the Performing Arts: ELIA KAZAN
  3. ^ "Some Rude to Kazan"

Further reading

  • Kazan, Elia (1988). Elia Kazan: A Life. New York: Knopf. ISBN 0-394-55953-3. 
  • Schickel, Richard (2005). Elia Kazan: A Biography. New York: HarperCollins Publishers. ISBN 0-06-019579-7. 
  • (1999) in Young, Jeff: Kazan - The Master Director Discusses His Films: Interviews with Elia Kazan. New York: Newmarket Press. ISBN 1-55704-338-8. 

External links

Persondata
NAME Kazan, Elia
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Kazanjoglou, Elias
SHORT DESCRIPTION Greek-American film and theatre director, film and theatrical producer, screenwriter, novelist
DATE OF BIRTH September 7, 1909
PLACE OF BIRTH Constantinople (present-day Istanbul)
DATE OF DEATH September 28, 2003, age 94
PLACE OF DEATH New York, US

  Results from FactBites:
 
Elia Kazan - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1132 words)
Elia Kazan, (Greek Ηλίας Καζάν), (September 7, 1909 – September 28, 2003) was an American film and theatre director and producer.
Kazan's theater credits included directing A Streetcar Named Desire (1947) and Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (1955), two of the plays that made Tennessee Williams a theatrical and literary force, and All My Sons (1947) and Death of a Salesman, (1949) the plays which did much the same for Arthur Miller.
Kazan had briefly been a member of the Communist Party in his youth, when working as part of a theater troupe, the Group Theater, in the 1930s.
Reference.com/Encyclopedia/Elia Kazan (836 words)
Elia Kazan, (Greek Ηλίας Καζάν), (September 7, 1909 – September 28, 2003) was an American film and Theatre director and producer.
Kazan's later career was clouded, however, by the fact that he was one of the few Hollywood luminaries who "named names" before the House Un-American Activities Committee during the postwar "Red Scare".
A committed liberal, Kazan felt betrayed by the atrocities of Stalin and the ideological rigidity of the Stalinists.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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