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Encyclopedia > Eli Lilly and Company
Eli Lilly and Company
Type Public (NYSE: LLY)
Founded 1876
Headquarters Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Key people Sidney Taurel, Chairman
John C. Lechleiter, President & CEO
Derica Rice, CFO
Eli Lilly, Founder
Industry Pharmaceuticals,
Healthcare
Products Prozac,
Humalog,
Cialis,
Strattera,
Darvocet
Revenue $18.633 billion USD (2007)
Employees 40,600 (2007)
Website www.lilly.com

Eli Lilly and Company (NYSELLY) is a global pharmaceutical company and one of the world's largest corporations. Eli Lilly's global headquarters is located in Indianapolis, Indiana, in the United States. The company was founded in 1876 by a pharmaceutical chemist, Eli Lilly, after whom the company was ultimately named. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... New York Stock Exchange (June 2003) The New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) is one of the largest stock exchanges in the world. ... Year 1876 (MDCCCLXXVI) // January 31 - United States orders all Indigenous peoples in the United States to move onto reservations February 2 - The National League of Professional Baseball Clubs of Major League Baseball is formed. ... Indianapolis redirects here. ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... Sidney Taurel was born February 9, 1949 in Casablanca, Morocco. ... Colonel Eli lilly (1839–1898) was a soldier, pharmaceutical chemist, and industrialist, founder of the eponymous Eli Lilly and Company pharmaceutical corporation. ... Pharmacology (in Greek: pharmacon is drug, and logos is science) is the study of how chemical substances interfere with living systems. ... Health care or healthcare is one of the worlds largest and fastest growing professions. ... Background Fluoxetine hydrochloride (brand names include Prozac®, Symbyax® (compounded with olanzapine), Sarafem®, Fontex® (Sweden), Fluctine (Austria, Germany), Prodep (India), Fludac (India)) is an antidepressant drug used medically in the treatment of depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder, bulimia nervosa, premenstrual dysphoric disorder, and many other disorders. ... Novo Nordisks NovoLog® substituting a single amino acid prevents hexamers from forming and allows a quicker onset Aventiss Lantus® substituting a single amino acid and adding two extra amino acids to the c-terminus of the b-chain shifts the isoelectric point so that less of the analogue... Categories: PDE5 inhibitors | Stub | Sexology ... Atomoxetine hydrochloride is a prescription drug used in the treatment of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). ... Manufactured and distributed by Eli Lilly and Company, Darvocet is a brand name for mild narcotic analgesic drug which combines Acetaminophen and Propoxy or Propoxyphene, prescribed for the relief of mild to moderate pain, with or without fever. ... For the tax agency in Ireland of the same name, see Revenue Commissioners. ... USD redirects here. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... This article is about work. ... A website (alternatively, web site or Web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or more web servers, usually accessible via the Internet. ... The New York Stock Exchange (NYSE), nicknamed the Big Board, is a New York City-based stock exchange. ... Pharmacology (in Greek: pharmacon is drug, and logos is science) is the study of how chemical substances interfere with living systems. ... The Indianapolis skyline Indianapolis is the capital of the U.S. state of Indiana. ... For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ... Year 1876 (MDCCCLXXVI) // January 31 - United States orders all Indigenous peoples in the United States to move onto reservations February 2 - The National League of Professional Baseball Clubs of Major League Baseball is formed. ... A chemist pours from a round-bottom flask. ... Colonel Eli lilly (1839–1898) was a soldier, pharmaceutical chemist, and industrialist, founder of the eponymous Eli Lilly and Company pharmaceutical corporation. ...

Contents

Company profile

A Fortune 500 corporation, Eli Lilly had revenues of $18.6 billion in 2007, making it the 148th largest company in the United States and the 10th largest corporation by global pharmaceutical sales. The company is publicly traded on the New York Stock Exchange and is a member of the S&P 500 stock index. Eli Lilly is one of the Nifty Fifty stocks that propelled the late 20th century bull market. The Fortune 500 is a ranking of the top 500 United States corporations as measured by gross revenue. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... The New York Stock Exchange (NYSE), nicknamed the Big Board, is a New York City-based stock exchange. ... The S&P 500 is an index containing the stocks of 500 Large-Cap corporations, most of which are American. ... The Nifty Fifty were fifty stocks listed on the New York Stock Exchange that propelled the bull market of the early 1970s. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999 in the... A bull market is a prolonged period of time when prices are rising in a financial market faster than their historical average. ...

Eli Lilly and Company's global headquarters, in Indianapolis, Indiana, United States
Eli Lilly and Company's global headquarters, in Indianapolis, Indiana, United States

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2592x1944, 934 KB) Summary Eli Lilly Headquarters Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Eli Lilly and Company Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2592x1944, 934 KB) Summary Eli Lilly Headquarters Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Eli Lilly and Company Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. ... The Indianapolis skyline Indianapolis is the capital of the U.S. state of Indiana. ... For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ...

History

Eli Lilly and Company grew from a tiny laboratory in Indianapolis in 1876 to one of the world's largest pharmaceutical companies.


Colonel Eli Lilly, a pharmacist who had served as a Union officer in the American Civil War, acquired a laboratory on Pearl Street in Indianapolis in 1876 and started Eli Lilly and Company. His innovative process of gelatin-coating pills helped establish the success of the company. When Eli Lilly died in 1898, his son Josiah K. Lilly Sr. took control of the company. Josiah inherited his father's civic mindedness and ordered the company to send much needed medicine to support recovery efforts following the 1906 San Francisco earthquake. Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Josiah K. Lilly Sr. ... Sarah San Francisco Earthquake redirects here. ...


In 1919, Lilly hired biochemist George Henry Alexander Clowes as director of biochemical research. Clowes' negotiations with researchers who developed insulin at the University of Toronto helped launch the first successful large-scale production of insulin in 1923. The success of insulin enabled the company to attract well-respected scientists and, with them, make more medical advances. Not to be confused with inulin. ... The University of Toronto (U of T) is a public research university in the city of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ...


Eli Lilly, the grandson of Col. Lilly, was named as the company's president in 1932. In 1934, the company made its first venture overseas when a Lilly office was opened in England. World War II brought production at Lilly to a new high with the manufacturing of Merthiolate and blood plasma. In 1943, the company began full-scale production of penicillin. Eli Lilly (1885-1977) was a pharmaceutical industrialist and President of Eli Lilly and Company. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The structure of Thimerosal Thimerosal (sometimes spelled as thimerosol and thiomersal[1]) (trade name: Merthiolate) is an organometallic compound used commonly since the 1930s as a preservative in some vaccines. ... Penicillin core structure Penicillin (abbreviated PCN) is a group of β-lactam antibiotics used in the treatment of bacterial infections caused by susceptible, usually Gram-positive, organisms. ...


Eli Lilly International Corp. was formed in 1943 as a subsidiary to encourage business trade abroad. In 1945, the company opened a new plant on South Kentucky Avenue in Indianapolis and, by 1948, Lilly employed nearly 7,000 people. Also in 1948, Eli Lilly relinquished the presidency to his brother Josiah Lilly Jr. In 1952, the first public shares of stock were offered and, in 1953, Eugene N. Beesley was named president. He was the first non-family member to run the company. Josiah K. Lilly Jr. ...


In 1953 the Central Intelligence Agency gave Eli Lilly Company a $400,000 grant to manufacture and supply lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) for the CIA. This was the first mass production of the chemical, and was used by a branch of the CIA known as MKULTRA. CIA redirects here. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ...


Lilly continued to expand. In 1950, Tippecanoe Laboratories, in Lafayette, Indiana, increased antibiotic production with its patent on erythromycin. In 1954, Elanco Products Co. was formed for the production of veterinary pharmaceuticals. In 1969, the company opened a new plant in Clinton, Indiana. In 1968, Lilly Research Centre Ltd. near London, England was built. It was the company's first research facility outside the United States. Nickname: Coordinates: , Country State County Tippecanoe Townships Fairfield, Wea Platted 1825 Incorporated 1853 Government  - Mayor Tony Roswarski Area  - City 20. ... Staphylococcus aureus - Antibiotics test plate. ... Erythromycin is a macrolide antibiotic which has an antimicrobial spectrum similar to or slightly wider than that of penicillin, and is often used for people who have an allergy to penicillins. ... Veterinary medicine is the application of medical diagnostic and therapeutic principles to companion, domestic, exotic, wildlife, and production animals. ... Clinton is a city located in Vermillion County, Indiana. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ...


Lilly made an uncharacteristic, but ultimately profitable, move in 1971 when it bought cosmetic manufacturer Elizabeth Arden for $38 million. Sixteen years later, Lilly sold Arden to Fabergé in 1987 for $657 million. Elizabeth Arden (1939) Elizabeth Arden (December 31, 1878 - October 18, 1966) was a Canadian businesswoman who built a cosmetics empire in the United States. ... // When Gustav Faberge opened his jewellery business during 1842 in St Petersburg he decided to call his new venture Fabergé. Possibly this was because a ‘g’ in Russian is pronounced ‘jay’, or simply because he considered the accent gave the name more style. ...


Richard Wood was named CEO of Lilly in 1973. During the 1970s and 1980s, Eli Lilly and Company saw a flurry of drug production: antibiotic Keflex in 1971; heart drug Dobutrex in 1977; Ceclor, which would become the world's top selling oral antibiotic, in 1979; leukemia drug Eldisine; antiarthritic Oraflex; and analgesic Darvon. Cephalexin structure (racemic) Cephalexin (also called Cefalexin) is a drug that is a member of the cephalosporin class of antibiotics. ... Dobutamine is a beta-1 adrenergic agonist. ... Staphylococcus aureus - Antibiotics test plate. ... Leukemia or leukaemia (Greek leukos λευκός, white; aima αίμα, blood) is a cancer of the blood or bone marrow and is characterized by an abnormal proliferation (production by multiplication) of blood cells, usually white blood cells (leukocytes). ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ...


Lilly ventured into medical instruments through the acquisition of IVAC Corp., which manufactures vital signs and intravenous fluid infusion monitoring systems. Lilly also purchased Cardiac Pacemaker, a manufacturer of heart pacemakers. An intravenous drip in a hospital Intravenous therapy or IV therapy is the administration of liquid substances directly into a vein. ... A pacemaker, scale in centimeters A pacemaker (or artificial pacemaker, so as not to be confused with the hearts natural pacemaker) is a medical device which uses electrical impulses, delivered by electrodes contacting the heart muscles, to regulate the beating of the heart. ...


In 1989, a joint agri-chemical venture between Elanco Products Co. and Dow Chemical created DowElanco. In 1997, Lilly sold its 40 percent share in the company to Dow Chemical for $1.6 billion. The Dow Chemical Company (NYSE: DOW) is a multinational corporation headquartered in Midland, Michigan, USA. In terms of market capitalization, it is the second-largest chemical company in the world, smaller than only DuPont. ...


In 1991, Vaughn Bryson was named CEO of Eli Lilly. During his 18-month tenure, the company reported its first quarterly loss ever. Randall L. Tobias, former vice-chairman of AT&T, was named Bryson's replacement in 1993. He was the first official recruited outside of the company. Sidney Taurel, former chief operating officer of Lilly was named CEO in 1998, replacing Tobias. Taurel was named chairman in January 1999. Randall L. Tobias, U.S. Global AIDS Coordinator, was sworn in on October 6th, 2003. ... This article is about the current AT&T. For the 1885-2005 company, see American Telephone & Telegraph. ... Sidney Taurel was born February 9, 1949 in Casablanca, Morocco. ...


Eli Lilly announced a major expansion plan in July 1999, totaling $1 billion and expected to create 7,500 jobs over 10 years, but Lilly lost exclusive rights to Prozac in 2001 and profits fell drastically. With this job creation announcement, the state of Indiana agreed to give several hundreds of millions of dollars to Eli Lilly in the form of tax abatements and other grants. Lilly, however, has failed to comply with this plan and has actually cut jobs dramatically (2007). Lilly has kept the money, but has never formed any new jobs as they first announced. The current governor, Mitch Daniels, used to be an executive at Eli Lilly, and has chosen not to investigate the matter, even though it has cost tax payers hundreds of millions of dollars. The company has since made a comeback with sales on Zyprexa and Cymbalta. Mitchell Elias Mitch Daniels, Jr. ... Olanzapine (Zyprexa® or in a combination with fluoxetine as Symbyax®) was the second atypical antipsychotic to gain FDA approval and has become one of the most commonly used atypical antipsychotics. ... Categories: Medicine stubs | Chemistry stubs | Serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors ...


In 1998, Eli Lilly formed a joint venture with ICOS Corporation, a Bothell, Washington based biotechnology company, to develop and commercialize Cialis for the treatment of erectile dysfunction. In October 2006, Eli Lilly announced its intention to acquire ICOS, for $2.1 billion, or $32 a share. The initial attempt to acquire ICOS failed under pressure from large institutional shareholders, causing Lilly to offer $34 per share. ISS, a proxy advisory firm, advised ICOS shareholders to reject the proposal as undervalued. However, the acquisition was approved by ICOS shareholders and Eli Lilly completed its acquisition of the company on January 29, 2007. Since ICOS had no other products in development beyond Cialis, Eli Lilly promptly closed ICOS operations and terminated nearly 500 ICOS employees, except for 127 employees working at the biologics facility. In December 2007, CMC Biopharmaceuticals A/S (CMC), a Copenhagen, Denmark-based provider of contract biomanufacturing services, bought the Bothell-based biologics facility from Eli Lilly and retained the existing 127 employees. Bothell is a city located in the state of Washington. ... Tadalafil is an orally administered drug used to treat male erectile dysfunction (impotence). ... Erectile dysfunction (ED) or impotence is a sexual dysfunction characterized by the inability to develop or maintain an erection of the penis. ... For other organizations called ICOS, see ICOS (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Copenhagen (disambiguation). ...


Pharmaceutical brands

Among the company's major pharmaceutical breakthroughs are cephalosporin, erythromycin, insulin, and, with Prozac (fluoxetine), the world's first selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor for the treatment of clinical depression. The cephalosporins, are a class of β-lactam antibiotics. ... Erythromycin is a macrolide antibiotic which has an antimicrobial spectrum similar to or slightly wider than that of penicillin, and is often used for people who have an allergy to penicillins. ... Not to be confused with inulin. ... Background Fluoxetine hydrochloride (brand names include Prozac®, Symbyax® (compounded with olanzapine), Sarafem®, Fontex® (Sweden), Fluctine (Austria, Germany), Prodep (India), Fludac (India)) is an antidepressant drug used medically in the treatment of depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder, bulimia nervosa, premenstrual dysphoric disorder, and many other disorders. ... SSRI redirects here; for other uses, see SSRI (disambiguation). ... On the Threshold of Eternity. ...


Among other distinctions, Lilly is the world's largest manufacturer and distributor of medications used in a broad range of psychiatric and mental health-related conditions, including clinical depression, generalized anxiety disorder, narcotic addiction, insomnia, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and others. An MRI scan of a human brain and head. ... Mental health is a term used to describe either a level of cognitive or emotional wellbeing or an absence of a mental disorder. ... On the Threshold of Eternity. ... Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is an anxiety disorder that is characterized by excessive, uncontrollable and often irrational worry about everyday things, which is disproportionate to the actual source of worry. ... 19th century Heroin bottle This article is about the drug classification. ... This article is about the sleeping disorder. ... For other uses, see Bipolar. ...


Prozac

Further information: Fluoxetine

Over the years there have been many accusations by patients and their families of SSRIs causing suicidal ideation and aggressive (or homicidal) behavior. The scientific evidence supporting this claim has been criticized by drug advocates, but alternative medicine sites often claim that patients committed suicide or engaged in aggressive and / or criminal acts using SSRIs.[26] Manufacturers of SSRIs historically have vehemently denied any such link and have always blamed the disease rather than the treatment. Prozac redirects here. ...


In the United States there is a required box warning for suicide risk in children. In the UK, all "antidepressant" medications except Prozac have been banned for people under 18. In late 2004 the first U.S. black box warning was added which applied only to children 12 and under. Recently experts recommended expanding the warning to adults. In general the risk of suicide is twice as great when taking an SSRI regardless of the type of diagnosis or whether the patient was considered a healthy volunteer for trial purposes.


On Dec 13, 2006, a U.S. Food and Drug Administration advisory panel recommended that "black-box" warnings on SSRIs be raised from 18 to 25 years old. The FDA is not obliged to follow the recommendations of its advisory committees but usually does.


An October 2006 study promoted the idea that SSRIs may decrease youth suicide overall.[27] A more recent study [8] released in November 2006, however concluded only "The aggregate nature of these observational data precludes a direct causal interpretation of the results. More SSRI prescriptions... may reflect antidepressant efficacy".


According to these facts, antidepressant prescriptions for children increased by almost 8% in the first six months of 2004, if this is the case, it is difficult to link an increased suicide rate the same year to reduced use of antidepressants.


So despite the suggestions of a connection between the drop in SSRI prescriptions (even this fact is a matter of debate) and the spike in child and teen suicides, much more research will be needed before a conclusive link can be drawn.


In fact the only SSRI that is licensed for use in children in the UK and USA is Prozac. All other SSRIs have been banned from paediatric use as their safety and efficacy have not been proven. Even of its own paediatric trials of Seroxat, Glaxo said[9] “"The best which could have been achieved was a statement that although safety data was reassuring, efficacy had not been demonstrated."


A September 2007 study, to be published in American Journal of Psychiatry suggests newer antidepressants led to more suicides in teenagers.[28]


Prozac has been a breakthrough therapy, and was one of the first such therapies in its class to treat clinical depression by blocking the uptake of serotonin within the human brain. For the professional wrestling stable, see Ravens Nest#Serotonin. ... For other uses, see Brain (disambiguation). ...


Prozac has given rise to a number of comparably-functioning therapies for the treatment of clinical depression and other central nervous system disorders such as obsessive compulsive disorder, bulimia nervosa, and panic disorders. Prozac works by inhibiting the reuptake of serotonin in the human brain. It is prescribed to more than fifty-four million people worldwide. A diagram showing the CNS: 1. ... For other things named OCD, see OCD (disambiguation). ... Bulimia nervosa is an eating disorder characterised by recurrent binge eating, followed by compensatory behaviors, referred to as purging.[1] The most common form—practised more than 75% of people with bulimia nervosa—is self-induced vomiting; fasting, the use of laxatives, enemas, diuretics, and overexercising are also common. ...


Cymbalta

Further information: Duloxetine

Another Lilly manufactured anti-depressant, Cymbalta, a serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor used predominantly in the treatment of major depressive disorders and generalized anxiety disorder, ranks with Prozac as one of the most financially successful pharmaceuticals in industry history. Duloxetine (brand names Cymbalta, Yentreve, and in parts of Europe, Xeristar or Ariclaim) is a drug which primarily targets major depressive disorder (MDD), generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), pain related to diabetic peripheral neuropathy and in some countries stress urinary incontinence (SUI). ... Duloxetine (brand names Cymbalta, Yentreve, and in parts of Europe, Xeristar or Ariclaim) is a drug which primarily targets major depressive disorder (MDD), generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), pain related to diabetic peripheral neuropathy and in some countries stress urinary incontinence (SUI). ... Serotonin Norepinephrine Serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) are a class of antidepressant used in the treatment of clinical depression and other affective disorders. ...


Cialis

Further information: Tadalafil

In 2003, Eli Lilly introduced Cialis (tadalafil), a competitor to Pfizer's blockbuster Viagra for erectile dysfunction. Cialis maintains an active period of 36 hours, causing it sometimes to be dubbed the "weekend pill". Cialis was developed in a partnership with biotechnology company ICOS. On December 18, 2006 Lilly bought ICOS in order to gain full control of the product. Tadalafil is an orally administered drug used to treat male erectile dysfunction (impotence). ... Tadalafil is an orally administered drug used to treat male erectile dysfunction (impotence). ... Pfizer Incorporated (NYSE: PFE) is a major pharmaceutical company, which ranks number one in the world in sales[2]. The company is based in New York City. ... // ... Erectile dysfunction (ED) or impotence is a sexual dysfunction characterized by the inability to develop or maintain an erection of the penis. ... Weekend Pill Cialis Since the advent of Viagra, discussion on sex and erectile dysfunction (ED) has found its place from boardroom to bedroom. ... Insulin crystals Biotechnology is technology based on biology, especially when used in agriculture, food science, and medicine. ... For other organizations called ICOS, see ICOS (disambiguation). ... is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


With its television advertisement for Cialis during the 2004 Super Bowl Halftime Show, Eli Lilly was one of several companies whose costly 2004 Super Bowl Halftime advertisements were largely overshadowed by the Janet Jackson and Justin Timberlake Super Bowl XXXVIII halftime show controversy. Janet Jackson performs at the AOL TopSpeed Super Bowl XXXVIII Halftime Show. ... The winning Super Bowl team receives the Vince Lombardi Trophy. ... This article is about the singer. ... Justin Randall Timberlake (born January 31, 1981[1]), sometimes known as JT, is an American pop and R&B singer, songwriter, record producer, dancer, and actor. ... Janet Jackson covers her exposed breast immediately after Justin Timberlake tears off part of her wardrobe to expose it Super Bowl XXXVIII, which was broadcast live on February 1, 2004 from Houston, Texas, was noted for a controversial halftime show in which Janet Jacksons bare breast was exposed by...


Gemzar

Further information: gemcitabine

In 1996, the FDA approved Gemzar for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. Gemzar is commonly used in the treatment of pancreatic cancer (usually in coordination with 5-FU chemotherapy and radiology). Gemzar also is routinely used in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer. Gemcitabine is a nucleoside used as chemotherapy. ... The United States Food and Drug Administration is the government agency responsible for regulating food, dietary supplements, drugs, cosmetics, medical devices, biologics and blood products in the United States. ... Gemcitabine is a nucleoside used as chemotherapy. ... Pancreatic cancer is a malignant tumor of the pancreas. ... Chemotherapy, in its most general sense, refers to treatment of disease by chemicals that kill cells, specifically those of micro-organisms or cancer. ... Lung cancer is a disease of uncontrolled cell growth in tissues of the lung. ...


Methadone

Further information: methadone

Eli Lilly was the first distributor of methadone, an analgesic used frequently in the treatment of heroin, opium and other opioid and narcotic drug addictions. Methadone (Dolophine, Amidone, Methadose, Physeptone, Heptadon and many others) is a synthetic opioid, used medically as an analgesic, antitussive and a maintenance anti-addictive for use in patients on opioids. ... Methadone (Dolophine, Amidone, Methadose, Physeptone, Heptadon and many others) is a synthetic opioid, used medically as an analgesic, antitussive and a maintenance anti-addictive for use in patients on opioids. ... An analgesic (colloquially known as a painkiller) is any member of the diverse group of drugs used to relieve pain (achieve analgesia). ... For other uses, see Heroin (disambiguation). ... This article is about the drug. ... An opioid is a chemical substance that has a morphine-like action in the body. ... 19th century Heroin bottle This article is about the drug classification. ... Drug addiction, or dependency is the compulsive use of drugs, to the point where the user has no effective choice but to continue use. ...


Thimerosal

Further information: Thimerosal

Eli Lilly has developed the controversial vaccine preservative Thiomersal (also called Merthiolate). Thimerosal is effectual by causing susceptible bacteria to autolyze. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... A vaccine is an antigenic preparation used to establish immunity to a disease. ... Thiomersal (INN) (C9H9HgNaO2S), formerly and still commonly known in the United States as thimerosal, is an organomercury compound (approximately 49% mercury by weight) used as an antiseptic and antifungal agent. ...


Secobarbital

Further information: Secobarbital

Eli Lilly has manufactured Secobarbital, a barbiturate derivative with anaesthetic, anticonvulsant, sedative and hypnotic properties. Lilly marketed Secobarbital under the brand name Seconal. Secobarbital (marketed by Eli Lilly and Company under the brand names Seconal® and Tuinal) is a barbiturate derivative drug. ... Secobarbital (marketed by Eli Lilly and Company under the brand names Seconal® and Tuinal) is a barbiturate derivative drug. ... Barbituric acid, the basic structure of all barbiturates Barbiturates are drugs that act as central nervous system depressants, and by virtue of this they produce a wide spectrum of effects, from mild sedation to anesthesia. ... Anesthesia (AE), also anaesthesia (BE), is the process of blocking the perception of pain and other sensations. ... The anticonvulsants, sometimes also called antiepileptics, belong to a diverse group of pharmaceuticals used in prevention of the occurrence of epileptic seizures. ... A sedative is a substance that depresses the central nervous system (CNS), resulting in calmness, relaxation, reduction of anxiety, sleepiness, and slowed breathing, as well as slurred speech, staggering gait, poor judgment, and slow, uncertain reflexes. ... For other uses, see Hypnotized (song). ...


Secobarbital is indicated for the treatment of epilepsy, temporary insomnia and as a pre-operative medication to produce anaesthesia and anxiolysis in short surgical, diagnostic, or therapeutic procedures which are minimally painful. With the onset of new therapies for the treatment of these conditions, Secobarbital has been less utilized, and Lilly ceased manufacturing it in 2001. This article is about the sleeping disorder. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


Secobarbital overdoses

Secobarbital gained considerable attention during the 1970s, when it gained popularity as a recreational drug. On September 18, 1970, rock guitarist legend Jimi Hendrix died from a secobarbital overdose. On June 22, 1969 secobarbital overdose was the cause of death of actress Judy Garland. The drug was a central part of the plot of the hugely popular novel The Valley of the Dolls by Jacqueline Susann in which three highly successful Hollywood women each fall victim, in various ways, to the drug. The novel was later released as a film by the same name. This article is about the genre. ... Jimi Hendrix (November 27, 1942 – September 18, 1970) was an American guitar virtuoso, singer and songwriter. ... Judy Garland (born Frances Ethel Gumm; June 10, 1922 - June 22, 1969) was an Academy Award-nominated American film actress and singer, best known for her role as Dorothy Gale in The Wizard of Oz (1939). ... Valley of the Dolls is the title of a best selling novel by Jacqueline Susann, published in 1966, and the Hollywood film which followed it in 1967. ... Jacqueline Susann (August 20, 1918 – September 21, 1974 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) was a Jewish-American author known for her mass-appeal novels. ... Greetings from Hollywood Hollywood is a district of the city of Los Angeles, California, U.S.A., that extends from Vermont Avenue on the east to just beyond Laurel Canyon Boulevard above Sunset and Crescent Heights Boulevards on the west; the north to south boundary east of La Brea Avenue...


Other Eli Lilly therapies

Pemetrexed chemical structure Pemetrexed (brand name Alimta) is a chemotherapy drug. ... Lung cancer is a disease of uncontrolled cell growth in tissues of the lung. ... Exenatide (also Exendin-4, marketed as Byetta) is the first of a new class of medications approved for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. ... Diabetes mellitus type 2 or Type 2 Diabetes (formerly called non-insulin-dependent diabetes (NIDDM), obesity-related diabetes, or adult-onset diabetes) is a metabolic disorder that is primarily characterized by insulin resistance, relative insulin deficiency, and hyperglycemia. ... Amylin Pharmaceuticals is a biopharmaceutical company based in San Diego, CA that was founded in 1987. ... Duloxetine (brand names Cymbalta, Yentreve, and in parts of Europe, Xeristar or Ariclaim) is a drug which primarily targets major depressive disorder (MDD), generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), pain related to diabetic peripheral neuropathy and in some countries stress urinary incontinence (SUI). ... Manufactured and distributed by Eli Lilly and Company, Darvocet is a brand name for mild narcotic analgesic drug which combines Acetaminophen and Propoxy or Propoxyphene, prescribed for the relief of mild to moderate pain, with or without fever. ... An analgesic (colloquially known as a painkiller) is any member of the diverse group of drugs used to relieve pain (achieve analgesia). ... Raloxifene is an oral selective estrogen receptor modulator which is used in the prevention of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. ... Osteoporosis is a disease of bone - leading to an increased risk of fracture. ... Teriparatide (Forsteo®) is a recombinant form of parathyroid hormone, used in the treatment of advanced osteoporosis. ... Gemcitabine is a nucleoside used as chemotherapy. ... Chemotherapy, in its most general sense, refers to treatment of disease by chemicals that kill cells, specifically those of micro-organisms or cancer. ... Pancreatic cancer is a malignant tumor of the pancreas. ... Novo Nordisks NovoLog® substituting a single amino acid prevents hexamers from forming and allows a quicker onset Aventiss Lantus® substituting a single amino acid and adding two extra amino acids to the c-terminus of the b-chain shifts the isoelectric point so that less of the analogue... Humatrope (somatotropin) is a polypeptide hormone of rDNA origin. ... Growth hormone (GH) or somatotropin (STH) is a protein hormone which stimulates growth and cell reproduction in humans and other animals. ... Atomoxetine is the first non-stimulant drug approved for the treatment of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). ... Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), is a neurobehavioural developmental disorder[1] [2] [3] affecting about 3-5% of the worlds population under the age of 19[4]. It typically presents itself during childhood, and is characterized by a persistent pattern of inattention and/or hyperactivity, as well as forgetfulness... Fluoxetine hydrochloride is an antidepressant drug used medically in the treatment of depression, body dysmorphic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, bulimia nervosa, premenstrual dysphoric disorder, hypochondriasis and panic disorder. ... For other uses, see Bipolar. ... Drotrecogin alpha (activated) (Xigris®, marketed by Eli Lilly) is a recombinant form of human activated protein C that has anti-thrombotic, anti-inflammatory, and profibrinolytic properties. ... Sepsis (in Greek Σήψις, putrefaction) is a serious medical condition, resulting from the immune response to a severe infection. ... Olanzapine (oh-LAN-za-peen, sold as Zyprexa®, Zyprexa Zydis®, or in combination with fluoxetine, as Symbyax®) was the third atypical antipsychotic to gain approval by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and has become one of the most commonly used atypical antipsychotics. ... For other uses, see Bipolar. ...

Personnel

A number of global leaders in the fields of health policy, management, and scientific research have worked at Lilly, including:[1]

Prominent Lilly board members have included: Ernesto Bustamante Ernesto Bustamante, Peruvian scientist born in Lima May 19, 1950. ... Dr. Richard D. DiMarchi is the current Chairman in Biomolecular Sciences and Professor of Chemistry at Indiana University. ... Mitchell Elias Mitch Daniels, Jr. ... For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ... The Hudson Institute is a right-leaning U.S. think tank, founded in 1961 in Croton-on-Hudson, New York, by the futurist Herman Kahn and other colleagues from the RAND Corporation. ... The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) is a body within the Executive Office of the President of the United States which is tasked with coordinating United States Federal agencies. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... Roald Hoffmann (born July 18, 1937 as Roald Safran --- Hoffmann is the surname of his stepfather) is an American theoretical chemist of Polish-Jewish origin. ... The Nobel Prize (Swedish: ) was established in Alfred Nobels will in 1895, and it was first awarded in Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine, Literature, and Peace in 1901. ... A chemist pours from a round-bottom flask. ... Michael Johns (born September 8, 1964 in Allentown, Pennsylvania) is an American health care executive, former federal government of the United States official and conservative policy analyst and writer. ... For other uses, see White House (disambiguation). ... The Heritage Foundation is one of the most prominent conservative think tanks in the United States. ... Claude H. Nash (born 1943) is Vice President, Research and Development at the University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute (since September 2003). ... ViroPharma Incorporated, a pharmaceutical company, develops and sells drugs that address serious diseases treated by physician specialists and in hospital settings. ... Peter M. Nicholas cofounded medical device firm Boston Scientific with partner John Abele. ... The Boston Scientific Corporation (NYSE: BSX) (abbreviated BSC), is a worldwide developer, manufacturer and marketer of medical devices whose products are used in a range of interventional medical specialties, including interventional cardiology, peripheral interventions, neuromodulation, neurovascular intervention, electrophysiology, cardiac surgery, vascular surgery, endoscopy, oncology, urology and gynecology. ... Randall L. Tobias, U.S. Global AIDS Coordinator, was sworn in on October 6th, 2003. ... The United States Agency for International Development (or USAID) is the US government organization responsible for most non-military foreign aid. ...

George Herbert Walker Bush (born June 12, 1924) was the 41st President of the United States, serving from 1989 to 1993. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... The Vice President of the United States[1] (sometimes referred to as VPOTUS,[2] Veep, or VP) is the first person in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the president. ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... Martin Stuart Feldstein (born November 25, 1939) is an American economist. ... Harvard redirects here. ... Kenneth Lee Ken Lay (April 15, 1942 – July 5, 2006) was an American businessman, best known for his role in the widely-reported corruption scandal that led to the downfall of Enron Corporation. ... Enron Creditors Recovery Corporation (formerly Enron Corporation) (former NYSE ticker symbol: ENE) was an American energy company based in Houston, Texas. ... Calvin William Verity Jr. ...

Accolades

In 2006, Fortune magazine named Eli Lilly and Company one of the top 100 companies in the United States for which to work. Also in 2006, Barron's Magazine named the company among the top 500 best managed companies in the U.S. The company was named one of the top 10 best companies for working mothers in 2004 by Working Mothers magazine. Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Fortune magazine is Americas second longest-running business magazine after Forbes magazine. ... Barrons magazine is an American weekly newspaper covering U.S. financial information, market developments, and relevant statistics. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Controversy

Main article: Eli Lilly Controversy

Eli Lilly has been involved in numerous controversies, including political and medical ethics controversies. For example, they withheld important information about the drug Zyprexa (Olanzapine). Eli Lilly and Company is one of the United States oldest and leading pharmaceutical companies but has been involved in numerous controversies, including political controversies and medical ethics controversies. ...


LAWSUITS


In one of the only three cases to ever go to trial for SSRI indication in suicide, Eli Lilly was caught corrupting the judicial process by making a deal with the plaintiff's attorney to throw the case, in part by not disclosing damaging evidence to the jury. The case, known as the Fentress Case involved a Kentucky man, Joseph Wesbecker, on Prozac, who went to his workplace and opened fire killing 7 people, and injuring 12 others before turning the gun on himself. The jury returned a 9-to-3 verdict in favor of Lilly. The judge, in the end, took the matter to the Kentucky Supreme Court, which found that "there was a serious lack of candor with the trial court and there may have been deception, bad faith conduct, abuse of judicial process and, perhaps even fraud." The judge later revoked the verdict and instead, recorded the case as settled. The value of the secret settlement deal has never been disclosed, but was reportedly "tremendous".[56]


See also

Lilly Endowment Inc. ... ‹The template below has been proposed for deletion. ...

References

External links


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Eli Lilly and Company (393 words)
Eli Lilly and Company is a leading, innovation-driven corporation committed to developing a growing portfolio of best-in-class and first-in-class pharmaceutical products that help people live longer, healthier and more active lives.
Lilly is the first pharmaceutical research company to back such federal legislation, which is similar to various laws in place in several states.
Lilly announced the start of a Phase III clinical trial studying LY450139, an investigational gamma secretase inhibitor for the treatment of mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease.
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Eli Lilly is one of the Nifty Fifty stocks that propelled the late 20th century bull market.
Eli Lilly is a leading global manufacturer and distributor of pharmaceutical therapies for cancer, cardiovascular disease, central nervous system and endocrine system disorders, diabetes, infectious diseases, and other diagnoses.
Eli Lilly was the first distributor of methadone, an analgesic used frequently in the treatment of heroin, opium and other opiod and narcotic drug addictions.
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