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Encyclopedia > Elessar Telcontar
Character from Tolkien's Legendarium


Viggo Mortensen portrays Aragorn in

Peter Jackson's The Lord of the Rings films. J. R. R. Tolkien in 1972, in his study at Merton Street (from by H. Carpenter) John Ronald Reuel Tolkien (January 3, 1892 – September 2, 1973) is best known as the author of The Hobbit and its sequel The Lord of the Rings. ... A legendarium is a book or series of books consisting of a collection of legends. ... Uploaded LOTR: Return of the King movie poster by fair use/fair dealing usage This work is copyrighted. ... Viggo Mortensen as Aragorn Viggo Peter Mortensen, Jr. ... Peter Jackson in New York (USA), at the premiere of King Kong, December 5, 2005 Peter Jackson CNZM (born October 31, 1961, Pukerua Bay) is a New Zealand-born filmmaker best-known as the director of the epic film trilogy The Lord of the Rings, which he, along with Fran... The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring movie poster (2001) The Lord of the Rings film trilogy comprises three live action films, directed by Peter Jackson and released by New Line Cinema. ...

Name Aragorn
Other names Elessar (Elfstone), Estel [hope (in Sindarin)], Envinyatar [The Renewer (in Quenya)], Telcontar [Strider (in Quenya)], Wingfoot, Longshanks, (The) Dúnadan, Thorongil, Isildur's Heir
Titles Chieftain of the Dúnedain
King of the Reunited Kingdom of Gondor and Arnor
Lord of the Western Lands
King of the West
Lord of the White Tree
Race Men
Culture Dúnedain, Gondorian, House of Isildur
Gender Male
Realm Reunited Kingdom of Arnor and Gondor
 (originally from Arnor, with Gondorian ancestry)
Life span March 1, 2931 T.A. – 120 F.A. (210 years)
Weapon Andúril f.k.a Narsil

In J. R. R. Tolkien's legendarium, Aragorn II was the 16th Chieftain of the Dúnedain of the North (T.A. 2931 – F.A. 120) who was later crowned King Elessar Telcontar, 26th King of Arnor, 35th King of Gondor and First High King of the Reunited Kingdom. A name is a label for a thing, person, place, product (as in a brand name) and even an idea or concept, normally used to distinguish one from another. ... (In the context of property law, title refers to ownership or documents of ownership; see title (property). ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth and The Undying Lands, the Dúnedain (singular: Dúnadan) were the Men who descended from the Númenóreans who survived the fall of their island kingdom and came to Eriador in Middle-earth led by Elendil and... Probable area of the reunited kingdom in Middle-earth marked in red Properly, the Reunited Kingdom of Arnor and Gondor is a fictional realm from J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth. ... One rendition of the flag of Gondor Gondor is a fictional country from J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth. ... In the fiction of J.R.R. Tolkien, Arnor, or the Northern Kingdom, was a kingdom of the Dúnedain in the land of Eriador in Middle-earth. ... Fantasy fiction tends to draw upon a common set of creatures that are easily recognizable to fans of the fantastic genre and have some pre-determined traits. ... The race of Men in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth books, such as The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings, refers to humanity and does not denote gender. ... The word culture, from the Latin colo, -ere, with its root meaning to cultivate, generally refers to patterns of human activity and the symbolic structures that give such activity significance. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth and The Undying Lands, the Dúnedain (singular: Dúnadan) were the Men who descended from the Númenóreans who survived the fall of their island kingdom and came to Eriador in Middle-earth led by Elendil and... Gondor is a fictional location from J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth. ... In the liteary works of JRR Tolkien, the House of Isildur was the Royal House of Arnor and after the sundering of the North-Kingdom of Arthedain, Cardolan, and Rhudaur. ... The word gender describes the state of being male, female, or neither. ... The shield and spear of the Roman God Mars are often used to represent the male sex In heterogamous species, male is the sex of an organism, or of a part of an organism, which typically produces smaller, mobile gametes (spermatozoa) that are able to fertilise female gametes (ova). ... A Realm is a primary synonym for a world usually other than our own. ... Probable area of the reunited kingdom in Middle-earth marked in red Properly, the Reunited Kingdom of Arnor and Gondor is a fictional realm from J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth. ... Life span is one of the most important parameters of any living organism. ... Look up March in Wiktionary, the free dictionary March is the third month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of seven Gregorian months with the length of 31 days. ... The Third Age is a fictional time period from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth. ... The Fourth Age is a fictional time period from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth. ... The bayonet, still used in war as both knife and spearpoint. ... Image:Anduril large. ... The shards of Narsil in Peter Jacksons The Fellowship of the Ring. ... J. R. R. Tolkien in 1972, in his study at Merton Street (from by H. Carpenter) John Ronald Reuel Tolkien (January 3, 1892 – September 2, 1973) is best known as the author of The Hobbit and its sequel The Lord of the Rings. ... A legendarium is a book or series of books consisting of a collection of legends. ... This is a list of Chieftains of the Dúnedain Rangers of Arnor (aka Rangers of the North) from the fictional universe of Middle-earth by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... The Third Age is a fictional time period from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth. ... The Fourth Age is a fictional time period from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth. ... This is a list of kings of Arnor from the fictional universe of Middle-earth novels by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... This is a list of kings of Gondor from the fictional universe of Middle-earth by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... Probable area of the reunited kingdom in Middle-earth marked in red Properly, the Reunited Kingdom of Arnor and Gondor is a fictional realm from J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth. ...

Contents


Biography

Aragorn, who was named after his ancestor, Aragorn I, was born on March 1 in 2931 of the Third Age, the son of Arathorn II and his wife Gilraen. Through his ancestor Elendil whom he had an astonishing resemblance to [citation needed], Aragorn was a descendant of Elros Tar-Minyatur, Elrond's twin brother and the first king of Númenor. Aragorn I is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth. ... March 1 is the 60th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (61st in leap years). ... The Third Age is a fictional time period from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth. ... Arathorn II is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth. ... In J.R.R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium, Gilraen was the mother of Aragorn II, the last chieftain of the Dúnedain. ... In Middle-earth, the fantasy universe of J. R. R. Tolkien, Elendil was a heroic figure. ... Elros Tar-Minyatur (F.A. 525 - S.A. 442, ruled 32 - 442 S.A.) is a fictional character of Middle-earth, created by J. R. R. Tolkien. ...


When Aragorn was only two years old, his father was slain when an arrow pierced him in the eye, while hunting Orcs. Like many of his ancestors, Aragorn was fostered in Rivendell by the elf-lord Elrond Halfelven. At the request of his mother, his identity was kept secret, as she feared he would be slain like his father and grandfather if his true identity as the Heir of Isildur became known. Aragorn was named Estel (Sindarin for "Hope") instead, and was not told about his heritage until he came of age in 2951. Orcs in Moria, from the 1978 animated film adaptation of The Lord of the Rings. ... Location of Rivendell in Middle-earth marked in red Rivendell (Sindarin: Imladris) is an Elven outpost in Middle-earth, a fictional realm created by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... Elrond the Half-elven (F.A. 525 - ?) is a fictional character of Middle-earth, created by fantasy author J. R. R. Tolkien. ... Sindarin is an artificial language (or conlang) developed by J. R. R. Tolkien. ...


At that time, Elrond revealed to "Estel" his true name and ancestry, and delivered to him the shards of Narsil and the Ring of Barahir. He withheld the Sceptre of Annuminas from him till he "came of the right" to possess them. It was also around this time that, in the woods of Imladris (the Elvish name of Rivendell), Aragorn met and fell in love with Arwen, daughter of Elrond, who had newly returned from her mother's homeland of Lórien. The shards of Narsil in Peter Jacksons The Fellowship of the Ring. ... Sindarin is an artificial language (or conlang) developed by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... Location of Rivendell in Middle-earth marked in red Rivendell (Sindarin: Imladris) is an Elven outpost in Middle-earth, a fictional realm created by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... Lady Arwen Undómiel (usually called Arwen Evenstar, which is Undómiel in Quenya) (T.A. 241–F.A. 121) Queen of the Reunited Kingdom of Arnor and Gondor, is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth, the betrothed of Aragorn in Tolkiens... location of Lórien in Middle-earth marked in red This article is about the Lórien of J. R. R. Tolkiens works. ...


From then on, Aragorn assumed his proper role as the sixteenth Chieftain of the Dúnedain, the Rangers of the North, and went into the Wild, where dwelt the remnants of his people, whose kingdom had been destroyed through civil and regional wars centuries before. –Gimli In J. R. R. Tolkiens fiction, the Rangers of the North, also known as the Dúnedain of the North were the descendants of the Dúnedain from the lost kingdom of Arnor. ...


In 2953, he was not present in Rivendell for the last meeting of the White Council. Aragorn met Gandalf the Grey in 2956, and they became close friends. At Gandalf's advice he and his followers began to guard a small land known as the Shire, inhabited by the diminutive and agrarian Hobbits, and he became known among the peoples just outside the Shire's borders as Strider. In Middle-earth In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, the White Council, or Council of the Wise, was a group of Elves and Wizards of Middle-earth, formed in 2463 TA. to contest the growing power of Dol Guldur at the request of Galadriel. ... Gandalf is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens masterwork, The Lord of the Rings, where he appears as an archetypal wizard, taking a leading role in the War of the Ring. ... The fields of the Shire in the Lord of the Rings movie trilogy The Shire is a fictional region of J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth, described in The Lord of the Rings and other works. ... Hobbits are a subset of the race of Men from J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth, sometimes considered a separate race. ...


From 2957 to 2980, Aragorn took great journeys, serving in the armies of King Thengel of Rohan, and Steward Ecthelion II of Gondor. Many of his tasks helped to raise morale in the West and counter the growing threat of Sauron and his allies, and he earned invaluable experience which he would later put to use in the War of the Ring. Aragorn served his lords in disguise and his name in Gondor and Rohan during that time was Thorongil (Eagle of the Star). With a small Gondorian squadron of ships, he led an assault on the long-standing rebel province of Umbar in 2980, burning many of the Corsairs' ships and personally slaying their lord during the battle on the Havens. After the victory at Umbar, "Thorongil" left the field and to the dismay of his men, went East. In J.R.R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium, Thengel (T.A. 2905-2980) was the sixeenth King of Rohan. ... It has been suggested that Rohirrim be merged into this article or section. ... Ecthelion II is, in J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, the twenty-fifth Ruling Steward of Gondor. ... One rendition of the flag of Gondor Gondor is a fictional country from J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth. ... For other uses, see Sauron (disambiguation). ... Combatants Free peoples of Middle-earth: Gondor, Rohan, Dale, Esgaroth, Erebor, The Shire, Lothlórien, the Woodland Realm Evil forces: Under Sauron: Mordor, Rhûn, Harad, Umbar, Khand Under Saruman: (actually a third party) Isengard, Dunland Commanders Gandalf† (but resurrected) Aragorn Théoden† Denethor† Dain II† Brand† Galadriel and Celeborn... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional world of Arda, a great haven to the far south of Gondor in Middle-earth. ...


Later in 2980, he visited Lórien, and there once again met Arwen. He gave her the heirloom of his House, the Ring of Barahir, and Arwen pledged her hand to him in marriage, renouncing her Elvish lineage and accepting the Gift of Men: death. Ring of Barahir is a fictional ring from J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium. ... The Gift of Men in Middle-earth refers to gift of Ilúvatar to his Younger Children, which remains a source of some confusion for Tolkien enthusiasts. ...


Elrond withheld from Aragorn permission to marry his daughter until such time as his foster son should be king of both Gondor and Arnor. To Elrond's as well as Aragorn's knowledge, to marry a mortal his daughter would be required to herself choose mortality, and thus deprive the deathless Elrond of his daughter while the world lasted. Elrond was also concerned for Arwen's own happiness, fearing that in the end she might find death, both her own and that of her beloved, difficult to bear.


In 3009, Aragorn went at Gandalf's request into Rhovanion in search of Gollum. He finally caught the creature in the Dead Marshes in sight of Mordor, and brought him as a captive to Thranduil's halls in Mirkwood, where Gandalf questioned him. In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Rhovanion or Wilderland was a large region of northern Middle-earth. ... Gollum is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth. ... The Dead Marshes is a fictional place from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe, Middle-earth. ... ONE DOES NOT SIMPLY ROCK INTO MORDOR! http://tweaker. ... King Thranduil was a character in the fictitious world of Middle-earth created by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... Mirkwood was the name of the Maeotian marshes which separated the Goths from the Huns in the Norse Hervarar saga. ...


On September 30, 3018, Aragorn was waiting in the Inn of the Prancing Pony in Bree, near the northeastern borders of the Shire, where he introduced himself to Frodo Baggins, and began his role in the War of the Ring. Aragorn was aged 87 at that time, nearing the prime of life for one of royal Númenórean descent. September 30 is the 273rd day of the year (274th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 92 days remaining. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, the Inn of the Prancing Pony was an inn where Frodo Baggins met Aragorn. ... Bree is a fictional village in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth, east of the Shire and south of Fornost Erain. ... Frodo Baggins (T.A. 2968 – ?) is the main character of J. R. R. Tolkiens monumental and mythological novel, The Lord of the Rings. ... Númenor is a fictional location from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth and is intended to be his version of Atlantis. ...


The restoration of the line of Elendil to the throne of Gondor is a subplot of The Lord of the Rings; Aragorn's adventures not only aid Frodo in his Quest, but also bring him closer to his own kingship — which, although his by lineage, has due to historical and legal circumstances been left open for centuries, with the people of Gondor under the rule of Stewards, while it was widely doubted whether any of the royal line still lived. Shortly after Isildur's departure, Meneldil had severed Gondor from Arnor, although the formal title of High King remained with the northern line. This had been reinforced by the Steward Pelendur in T.A. 1945 when he rejected Arvedui's claim to the Throne of Gondor during a succession crisis (Eärnil, a member of the House of Anárion, was eventually chosen as King instead). By the time of the War, many in Gondor were used to the rule of the Stewards, and felt in any case that the Line of Isildur no longer had enough dignity to claim kingship over Gondor. The Steward Denethor, for instance, declared that he would not bow to a descendant of Isildur. Thus, Aragorn had to convince the people of Gondor that he "deserved" to be king, which he managed to do by his achievements and qualities of character, especially during and immediately after the Battle of the Pelennor Fields (see below). The term lineage can refer to several things. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth, Isildur was a Dúnadan of Númenor, elder son of Elendil. ... Meneldil (S.A. 3318 - T.A. 158) is a fictional character in J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens Lord of the Rings, Pelendur was Steward of Gondor in the year 1944 Third Age. ... Arvedui is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Denethor II is the twenty-sixth and last Ruling Steward of Gondor. ... Combatants Gondor, Rohan Mordor, Harad, Rhûn, Khand Commanders Denethor†, Gandalf, Imrahil, Théoden†, Aragorn, Éomer The Witch-king of Angmar†, Gothmog Strength In Minas Tirith: Minas Tirith Garrison and Northern Army of Gondor (strength unknown) supported by small southern contingent (<3000). ...


Aragorn was the founder of the West's endgame strategy in the War of the Ring. Prior to the downfall of Isengard, there was no clear plan which recommended itself to Gondor and Rohan, but when Aragorn recovered the Palantír of Orthanc, a stone which allowed direct communication with Sauron, he was determined to show himself as the Heir of Isildur. In wresting the Stone from Sauron's will, he drew the Dark Lord's Eye from Mordor, thereby giving Frodo a better chance to fulfill his Quest. It is also possible that in doing this he fooled Sauron into believing that he possessed the One Ring. Certainly he and Gandalf believed it was the catalyst for Sauron's invasion of Gondor. In chess, the endgame (or end game or ending) refers to the stage of the game when there are few pieces left on the board. ... Location of Isengard in Middle-earth marked in red In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Isengard, a translation of the Sindarin Angrenost, was a large fortress. ... The ring-inscription appearing to Isildur (top) and Frodo (bottom) in Peter Jacksons The Fellowship of the Ring. ...


He proved beyond any doubt his right to kingship when he commanded the Dead Men of Dunharrow. This could only be done by a descendant of Isildur, and was the fulfilment of two prophesies: one by Isildur when he cursed the Dead Men, and another by Malbeth the Seer two thousand years later. In the fictional works of J. R. R. Tolkien, the Dead Men of Dunharrow (also referred as the Shadow Host, the Grey Host, the oath-breakers, or simply the Dead) were the shades of Men of the White Mountains (Ered Nimrais), who were cursed to remain in Middle-earth by...


Aragorn's unexpected arrival at the Battle of Pelennor Fields leading Gondor's Southern Army turned the tide of the battle and brought about the decisive victory over Mordor's armies. On his approach to the landings, Aragorn notably flew, not the white banner of Gondor under the Stewards, but the royal banner of the House of Elendil. The Battle of the Pelennor Fields was a battle for the city of Minas Tirith in J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings. ...


Essential to Aragorn's personal popularity in Gondor were his abilities as a healer, which he exercised most notably on the evening following the Battle of the Pelennor Fields. Aragorn healed Faramir, Denethor's heir, who had been expected to die; this won him the immediate recognition of the Steward as the rightful heir to the throne, and his humility and self-sacrifice gained him the hearts of the inhabitants of Gondor's capital city. The people hailed him as King that same evening. Spoiler warning: Faramir, Steward of Gondor and Prince of Ithilien (T.A. 2983 – F.A. 82) is a wise man of nobility and the second of Denethors two sons in J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy universe of Middle-earth. ...


Despite his immediate success and popularity, however, and despite his claim to the throne through raising the royal banner, Aragorn decided not to pursue the matter for the time being. He knew that if he aggressively promoted his claim, rival claimants or debates as to his legitimacy were not out of the question, and this could be a fatal distraction for Gondor at a time when the West needed to be united against Sauron. So, to avoid conflict, after he had healed people during the night of March 15/16, he left Minas Tirith and symbolically refused to enter it again until he was crowned King on May 1.


In order to ensure safe passage across Mordor for Frodo to fulfill his quest, Aragorn then led the Army of the West out from Minas Tirith to make a diversionary feint on the Black Gate of Mordor itself in the Battle of the Morannon. Gandalf had been given supreme command of the war effort after the Pelennor Fields, and acted as chief spokesman in the parley with the Mouth of Sauron; but Aragorn commanded the Allied troops during the battle and its aftermath. His role, along with the battle as a whole, was necessarily overshadowed by the collapse of Barad-Dûr and of Sauron's empire, though there is every reason to believe he commanded skilfully throughout the day. Shortly afterwards, he took part in victory celebrations at the Field of Cormallen, and then proceeded to his crowning at Minas Tirith. Minas Tirith (IPA: ) is a fictional city in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth writings. ... The Black Gate or Morannon is a fictional location in J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth. ... Combatants Gondor, Rohan, Eagles Mordor, Harad, Rhun Commanders Gandalf, Imrahil, Éomer, Aragorn, Gwaihir Sauron, Mouth of Sauron Strength about 6,000–7,000 Men (3,000 Men of Southern Gondor, 2,000 Men of Minas Tirith and 2,000 Rohirrim), unknown number of eagles, one Maia, one Hobbit, one Elf... In J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth, the Mouth of Sauron was the Dark Lord Saurons servant and representative. ... Barad-dûr and Mount Doom in Peter Jacksons film The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King. ...


Upon Sauron's defeat, in late 3019, Aragorn was crowned as King Elessar (Sindarin, translated as Elfstone), a name given to him by Galadriel. He married Arwen shortly afterwards, and ruled the Reunited Kingdom of Gondor and Arnor until 120 of the Fourth Age. His reign was marked by great harmony and prosperity within Gondor and Arnor, and by a great renewal of cooperation and communication between Men, Elves, and Dwarves, fostered by his vigorous rebuilding campaign following the war. He died at the age of 210, after 120 years of reign. He was succeeded on the throne by his son, Eldarion. Arwen, gravely saddened by the loss of her husband, gave up her now-mortal life shortly afterwards. Sindarin is an artificial language (or conlang) developed by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... Lady Galadriel is a character in the fiction of J.R.R. Tolkien. ... Properly, the Reunited Kingdom of Arnor and Gondor is a fictional realm from J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth. ... The Fourth Age is a fictional time period from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth. ... The Dwarves of J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth are beings of short stature who all possess beards, and are often friendly with Hobbits although long suspicious of Elves. ... Eldarion is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth. ...


Aragorn and Arwen also had a number of daughters, whose names are not included in Tolkien's legendarium.


Portrayal in adaptations

Aragorn as depicted in the 1978 film.
Aragorn as depicted in the 1978 film.
Aragorn as depicted in the 1980 TV special.
Aragorn as depicted in the 1980 TV special.

Aragorn was voiced by John Hurt in Ralph Bakshi's 1978 animated film version of The Lord of the Rings. Image File history File links BakshiAragorn. ... Image File history File links BakshiAragorn. ... J.R.R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings is the title of an animated film produced and directed by Ralph Bakshi, and released to theaters in 1978. ... Image File history File links ROTKTVAragorn. ... Image File history File links ROTKTVAragorn. ... DVD cover The Return of the King is an animated adaptation of the novel by J. R. R. Tolkien which was released by Rankin/Bass as a TV special in 1980. ... John Hurt (Mississippi John Hurt is an early American folk and country blues singer, 1893–1966) John Vincent Hurt CBE (born January 22, 1940) is an Academy Award nominated English actor. ... Ralph Bakshi is a director of animated and occasionally live-action films. ... // Events February 1 - Bob Dylans film Renaldo and Clara, a documentary of the Rolling Thunder Revue tour premieres in Los Angeles, California March 1 - Charlie Chaplins coffin is stolen from a Swiss cemetery 3 months after burial March - Leigh Brackett completes the first draft for Star Wars Episode... The Lord of the Rings is the title of an animated film produced by Ralph Bakshi, and released to theaters in 1978. ...


He was voiced by Theodore Bikel in the 1980 Rankin/Bass animated version of The Return of the King, made for television. Theodore Bikel. ... // Events April 30 - The Roger Daltrey film, McVicar, opens in London. ... Rankin/Bass Productions, Inc. ... DVD cover The Return of the King is an animated adaptation of the novel by J. R. R. Tolkien which was released by Rankin/Bass as a TV special in 1980. ...


Robert Stephens voiced the character in the 1981 BBC Radio serial of The Lord of the Rings. Sir Robert Stephens (July 14, 1931 – November 12, 1995) was a leading actor in the early years of Britains Royal National Theatre. ... 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... BBC Radio is a service of the British Broadcasting Corporation which has operated in the United Kingdom under the terms of a Royal Charter since 1927. ... In 1981 BBC Radio 4 broadcast a dramatisation of J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings in 26 half-hour stereo instalments. ...


In the Lord of the Rings movie trilogy (20012003) by Peter Jackson, Aragorn is played by Danish-American actor Viggo Mortensen, who took over the role from Stuart Townsend after a month of rehearsals. In the movie Aragorn must overcome his self-doubt to choose the kingship. This element of self-doubt is not present in Tolkien's novel, where Aragorn intends to claim the throne at an appropriate time, ever since Elrond revealed his heritage to him. Appearance-wise, he is arguably the closest to Tolkien's brief but detailed description: lean, dark and tall, with grey eyes and a stern pale face. Mortensen's portrayal is slightly younger than the novel's character, despite the fact that he was specifically hired because he was 41 at the time, as his 'shaggy dark hair' is 'flecked with grey', whereas in the film his hair is completely brown. He is also shorter, as Tolkien afterwards said him to be 6'6", and Mortensen is only 5'11". The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring movie poster (2001) The Lord of the Rings film trilogy comprises three live action films, directed by Peter Jackson and released by New Line Cinema. ... This is a list of film-related events in 2001. ... This is a list of film-related events in 2003. ... Peter Jackson in New York (USA), at the premiere of King Kong, December 5, 2005 Peter Jackson CNZM (born October 31, 1961, Pukerua Bay) is a New Zealand-born filmmaker best-known as the director of the epic film trilogy The Lord of the Rings, which he, along with Fran... Viggo Mortensen as Aragorn Viggo Peter Mortensen, Jr. ... Townsend portrays the vampire Lestat de Lioncourt in the film adaptation of The Queen of the Damned Stuart Townsend (born December 15, 1972 in Howth, County Dublin, Ireland) is an Irish actor and boxer. ...


Daniel Day-Lewis, who stands over 6'1", was offered the role of Aragorn but declined. Daniel Day-Lewis in the 1988 film The Unbearable Lightness of Being Daniel Michael Blake Day-Lewis (born 29 April 1957) is an Academy Award-winning English/Irish actor. ...


Trivia

  • Aragorn was called the Dúnadan ("Man of the West" Númenorean, given by Bilbo in Rivendell), Longshanks (given by Bill Ferny in Bree), and Wingfoot (given by Éomer). He was the founder of the House of Telcontar (Telcontar is "Strider" in Quenya, after the mistrustful nickname given him by the rustics of the North), which ruled Gondor well into the Fourth Age of Middle-Earth; in records, his full ruling name is given as Elessar Telcontar ("Elfstone Strider").
  • In the earliest unpublished versions of The Lord of the Rings (see: The History of The Lord of the Rings), the character that later became Aragorn was called Trotter instead of Strider, and was a hobbit instead of a Man. He had wooden feet, because he had once been tortured in Mordor or Moria.
  • In the film trilogy, Aragorn acquires a horse previously ridden by Théodred. The horse is named Brego, presumably after the early King of Rohan.

Númenor is a fictional location from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth and is intended to be his version of Atlantis. ... Bilbo can refer to: Theodore G. Bilbo, a politician who upheld racial segregation and became Senator for the State of Mississippi. ... Bill Ferny is a fictional character in J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings. ... Bree is a fictional village in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth, east of the Shire and south of Fornost Erain. ... For the Mercian figure, see Eomer In J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium, Éomer was the eighteenth King of Rohan, and first of the Third Line. ... In the fictional universe of J. R. R. Tolkien, the House of Telcontar, previously the House of Elendil, is the Royal House of the Reunited Kingdom of Arnor and Gondor. ... Quenya is one of the languages spoken by the Elves in the works of J. R. R. Tolkien. ... The History of The Lord of the Rings is a 4-volume work by Christopher Tolkien that documents the process of J. R. R. Tolkiens writing of his masterwork The Lord of the Rings (LotR). ... Torture is any act by which severe pain, whether physical or psychological, is intentionally inflicted on a person as a means of intimidation, a deterrent, revenge, a punishment, or as a method for the extraction of information or confessions (i. ... Theodred Théodred (T.A. 2978-3019) is a fictional character in The Lord of the Rings by J.R.R. Tolkien. ... In J.R.R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium, Brego was the second King of Rohan. ...

See also

In the fictional universe of J. R. R. Tolkien, the House of Telcontar, previously the House of Elendil, is the Royal House of the Reunited Kingdom of Arnor and Gondor. ...

External link

  • Aragorn at The Thain's Book
Preceded by:
Arathorn II
Chieftains of the Dúnedain
2933 TA – 3019 TA
Succeeded by:
None
Line of Kings Restored
Preceded by:
None
Reunited by Aragorn
Kings of the Reunited Kingdom
3019 TA – 120 FA
Succeeded by:
Eldarion
The Fellowship of the Ring
Frodo · Sam · Merry · Pippin · Gandalf · Aragorn · Legolas · Gimli · Boromir

 
 

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