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Encyclopedia > Electronic Frontier Foundation
EFF Logo
EFF Logo

The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) is an international non-profit advocacy and legal organization based in the United States with the stated purpose of being dedicated to preserving free speech rights such as those protected by the First Amendment to the United States Constitution in the context of today's digital age. Its stated main goal is to educate the press, policymakers and the general public about civil liberties issues related to technology; and to act as a defender of those liberties. The EFF is supported by donations and is based in San Francisco, California, with staff members in Toronto, Ontario and Washington, D.C. and Brussels,[1] the seat of the European Union. They are also accredited observers at the World Intellectual Property Organization. [2] Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... A non-profit organization (abbreviated NPO, or non-profit or not-for-profit) is an organization whose primary objective is to support an issue or matter of private interest or public concern for non-commercial purposes, without concern for monetary profit. ... An organisation (or organization — see spelling differences) is a social arrangement which pursues collective goals, which controls its own performance, and which has a boundary separating it from its environment. ... “First Amendment” redirects here. ... A digital system is one that uses discrete values (often electrical voltages), especially those representable as binary numbers, or non-numeric symbols such as letters or icons, for input, processing, transmission, storage, or display, rather than a continuous spectrum of values (ie, as in an analog system). ... Civil liberties is the name given to freedoms that protect the individual from government. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Largest metro area Greater Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Latin: Loyal she began, loyal she remains) Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Official languages English (de facto) Government - Lieutenant-Governor David C. Onley - Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 106 - Senate seats 24 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st) Area... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... For other places with the same name, see Brussels (disambiguation). ... The World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) (French: Organisation mondiale de la propriété intellectuelle or OMPI) is one of the specialized agencies of the United Nations. ...

The EFF uses the blue ribbon as symbolism for their Free Speech defense.

EFF has taken action in several ways; it provides or funds legal defense in court, defends individuals and new technologies from the chilling effects of what it considers baseless or misdirected legal threats, provides guidance to the government and courts, organizes political action and mass mailings, supports some new technologies which it believes preserve personal freedoms, maintains a database and web sites of related news and information, monitors and challenges potential legislation that it believes would infringe on personal liberties and fair use, and solicits a list of what it considers patent abuses with intentions to defeat those that it considers without merit. This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... It has been suggested that Legal terrorism be merged into this article or section. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For fair use in trademark law, see Fair use (US trademark law). ... Patent misuse in the United States, is an affirmative defense used in patent litigation after the defendant has been found infringed a patent. ...

Contents

History

Mitch Kapor, EFF founder
Mitch Kapor, EFF founder

The Electronic Frontier Foundation was founded in July 1990 by Mitch Kapor, John Gilmore and John Perry Barlow. The founders met through the online community at The WELL. Initial funding was provided by Kapor, Steve Wozniak, and an anonymous benefactor.[3] Mitch Kapor, usable under fair use This work is copyrighted. ... Mitch Kapor, usable under fair use This work is copyrighted. ... Mitch Kapor Mitch Kapor (center) with Bill Gates and Fred Gibbons, during their time working on developing applications for the Apple Macintosh, 1984 Mitchell David Kapor (born 1950) is the founder of Lotus Development Corporation and the designer of Lotus 1-2-3, the killer application often credited with making... Mitch Kapor Mitch Kapor (center) with Bill Gates and Fred Gibbons, during their time working on developing applications for the Apple Macintosh, 1984 Mitchell David Kapor (born 1950) is the founder of Lotus Development Corporation and the designer of Lotus 1-2-3, the killer application often credited with making... John Gilmore John Gilmore is one of the founders of the Electronic Frontier Foundation, the Cypherpunks mailing list, and Cygnus Solutions. ... John Perry Barlow (born Jackson Hole, Wyoming, October 3, 1947) is an American poet, essayist, retired Wyoming cattle rancher, and former lyricist for the Grateful Dead. ... Look up well in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Stephan Gary Woz Wozniak (born August 11, 1950 in San Jose, California) is an American computer engineer and the co-founder of Apple Computer (now Apple Inc. ...


The creation of the organization was motivated by the massive search and seizure on Steve Jackson Games executed by the United States Secret Service early in 1990. Similar but officially unconnected law-enforcement raids were being conducted across the United States at about that time as part of a state-federal task force called Operation Sundevil. However, the Steve Jackson Games case, which became EFF's first high-profile case, was the major rallying point where EFF began promoting computer- and Internet-related civil liberties. EFF's second big case was Bernstein v. United States led by Cindy Cohn, where programmer and professor Daniel Bernstein sued the government for permission to publish his encryption software, Snuffle, and a paper describing it. More recently the organization has been involved in defending Edward Felten, Jon Johansen and Dmitry Sklyarov. The 1993 case of Steve Jackson Games, Inc. ... Steve Jackson Games (SJG) is a game company that creates and publishes role-playing, board, and card games. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Counter Assault Team. ... Operation Sundevil was a 1990 nation-wide United States Secret Service crackdown on illegal computer hacking activities. Along with the Chicago Task Force and the Arizona Organized Crime and Racketeering Bureau, they conducted raids in Austin, Cincinnati, Detroit, Los Angeles, Miami, New York, Newark, Phoenix, Pittsburgh, Richmond, Tucson, San Diego... Bernstein v. ... Cindy A. Cohn is the Legal Director for the Electronic Frontier Foundation as well as its General Counsel. ... Daniel Julius Bernstein (sometimes known simply as djb) is a professor at the University of Illinois at Chicago, a mathematician, a cryptologist, and a programmer. ... “Encrypt” redirects here. ... Snuffle is an encryption system designed by Daniel Bernstein and the subject of his court case, Bernstein v. ... Edward William Felten (born March 25, 1963) is a professor of computer science and public affairs at Princeton University. ... Jon Lech Johansen (born November 18, 1983), also known as DVD Jon, is a Norwegian who was involved in the release of the DeCSS software. ... Dmitry Sklyarov (Дмитрий Скляров) (born December 18, 1974) is a Russian computer programmer best known for his 2001 run-in with American law enforcement over software copyright restrictions. ...


The organization was originally located at Mitch Kapor's K.E.I.[4] in Cambridge, Massachusetts. By the fall of 1993, the main EFF offices were housed in Washington, D.C., headed up by Jerry Berman. During this time, some of EFF's attention focused on the business of influencing national policy, a business that was not entirely palatable to parts of the organization. In 1994, Mr. Berman parted ways with EFF and formed the Center for Democracy and Technology. EFF moved offices across town, where Drew Taubman briefly took the reins as director. In 1995, under the auspices of director Lori Fena, after some downsizing and in an effort to regroup and refocus on their base support, the organization moved offices to San Francisco, California. There, it took up temporary residence at John Gilmore's Toad Hall, and soon afterward moved into the Hamm's building at 1550 Bryant St. After Fena moved onto the EFF board of directors for a while, the organization was led by Tara Lemmey. Just prior to the EFF's move into its new and present offices at 454 Shotwell St. in SF's Mission District, long-time EFF Legal Director Shari Steele became, and remains as of mid-2006, the Executive Director. In the spring of 2006, EFF announced the opening of an office in Washington, D.C. with two new staff attorneys.[5] Mitch Kapor Mitch Kapor (center) with Bill Gates and Fred Gibbons, during their time working on developing applications for the Apple Macintosh, 1984 Mitchell David Kapor (born 1950) is the founder of Lotus Development Corporation and the designer of Lotus 1-2-3, the killer application often credited with making... Location in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country United States State Massachusetts County Middlesex County Settled 1630 Incorporated 1636 Government  - Type Mayor-council city  - Mayor Kenneth Reeves (D) Area  - City  7. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... Jerry Berman founded the Center for Democracy and Technology. ... The Center for Democracy and Technology (CDT) is a Washington, DC based non-profit advocacy group that works to promote democratic values and constitutional liberties in the Digital Age. ... “San Francisco” redirects here. ... John Gilmore John Gilmore is one of the founders of the Electronic Frontier Foundation, the Cypherpunks mailing list, and Cygnus Solutions. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ...


Media

John Gilmore, EFF founder

The EFF publishes a weekly newsletter known as the EFFector since its founding. Other works that cover EFF's history in-depth from a policy and legal cases perspective include: Image File history File links John-gilmore. ... Image File history File links John-gilmore. ... John Gilmore John Gilmore is one of the founders of the Electronic Frontier Foundation, the Cypherpunks mailing list, and Cygnus Solutions. ... A newsletter is a regularly distributed publication generally about one main topic that is of interest to its subscribers. ...

  • Robert B. Gelman & Stanton McCandlish's Protecting Yourself Online: The Definitive Resource on Safety, Freedom & Privacy in Cyberspace.
  • Mike Godwin's Cyber Rights: Defending Free Speech in the Digital Age.
  • Bruce Sterling's The Hacker Crackdown covers Operation Sundevil and the formation of the EFF in great detail, including profiles of Mitch Kapor and John Perry Barlow. The book is available as a freeware eBook.
  • Several other books of the 1990s also go into EFF's activities in some depth. Their more recent work in the sphere of fair use and intellectual property law is better documented at their web site and in periodicals.
  • Electronic Frontier Foundation bulks up, renews focus on litigation. An article which recaps EFF's history, details the 2000 transition to Shari Steele's leadership, and discusses the concomitant strategy changes.

Mike Godwin Mike Godwin is an American attorney and author. ... Michael Bruce Sterling (born April 14, 1954) is an American science fiction author, best known for his novels and his seminal work on the Mirrorshades anthology, which defined the cyberpunk genre. ... The Hacker Crackdown: Law and Disorder on the Electronic Frontier is a book written by science fiction writer Bruce Sterling in 1992. ... Operation Sundevil was a 1990 nation-wide United States Secret Service crackdown on illegal computer hacking activities. Along with the Chicago Task Force and the Arizona Organized Crime and Racketeering Bureau, they conducted raids in Austin, Cincinnati, Detroit, Los Angeles, Miami, New York, Newark, Phoenix, Pittsburgh, Richmond, Tucson, San Diego... Mitch Kapor Mitch Kapor (center) with Bill Gates and Fred Gibbons, during their time working on developing applications for the Apple Macintosh, 1984 Mitchell David Kapor (born 1950) is the founder of Lotus Development Corporation and the designer of Lotus 1-2-3, the killer application often credited with making... John Perry Barlow (born Jackson Hole, Wyoming, October 3, 1947) is an American poet, essayist, retired Wyoming cattle rancher, and former lyricist for the Grateful Dead. ...

Major supporters

is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Pro bono is a phrase derived from Latin meaning for the good. The complete phrase is pro bono publico, for the public good. It is used to designate legal or other professional work undertaken voluntarily and without payment, as a public service. ... Eben Moglen is a professor of law and legal history at Columbia University, and is the founder, Director-Counsel and Chairman of Software Freedom Law Center, whose client list includes numerous pro bono clients, such as the Free Software Foundation. ... Not to be confused with Lawrence Lessing. ... Stanford may refer: Stanford University Places: Stanford, Kentucky Stanford, California, home of Stanford University Stanford Shopping Center Stanford, New York, town in Dutchess County. ... Brad Templeton (born near Toronto in 1960), son of Charles Templeton and Sylvia Murphy, is a software engineer and entrepreneur. ... John Perry Barlow (born Jackson Hole, Wyoming, October 3, 1947) is an American poet, essayist, retired Wyoming cattle rancher, and former lyricist for the Grateful Dead. ... John Gilmore John Gilmore is one of the founders of the Electronic Frontier Foundation, the Cypherpunks mailing list, and Cygnus Solutions. ... David Farber is currently a professor at Carnegie-Mellon University in Pittsburgh. ... Kim Polese and Joe Kraus at the Web 2. ... Not to be confused with Lawrence Lessing. ... Pamela Samuelson is a Professor at the University of California at Berkeley with a joint appointment in the School of Information Management and Systems and Boalt Hall, the School of Law. ... Brewster Kahle speaking 20 November 2002 Brewster Kahle (last name pronounced kale, like the vegetable) was an early member of the Thinking Machines team and later went on to found WAIS (sold to AOL) and later Alexa Internet (sold to Amazon. ... Edward William Felten (born March 25, 1963) is a professor of computer science and public affairs at Princeton University. ... John Buckman is the founder of the largest online store/recording company/media website which uses Creative Commons as license, Magnatune. ...

Criticisms


The EFF has a strong base of supporters who prioritize wholesale changes to law (including legalizing potentially unauthorized trading of copyrighted files over peer-to-peer networks, implying some change of the copyright laws) over stopping abuses of the law (such as stopping abusive patents and DMCA complaints). By the same token, the EFF does not officially condone the trading of copyrighted material. Likewise the EFF has helped defend Skylink and OPG against DMCA abuse. It also began its so-called Patent Busting Project. Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... A peer-to-peer (or P2P) computer network is a network that relies on the computing power and bandwidth of the participants in the network rather than concentrating it in a relatively few servers. ... The Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) is a United States copyright law which implements two 1996 WIPO treaties. ...


The EFF has been criticized by anti-spam individuals and groups for its official opposition to certain anti-spam techniques that do not deliver all wanted messages to the end-user. The EFF argues that the decision as to what is spam and what is not resides with the recipient, not intermediaries such as ISPs, and that there are efficient spam filters available to the end-user. It further argues that the problem resides in those creating spam rather than the lack of effective filters. This article is about electronic spam. ...


Prior to the EFF's defense of 2600: The Hacker Quarterly magazine in 2001, the hacker community criticized EFF as "missing in action" with regards to their legal troubles. Fall 2004 (21:3) 2600 Issue 2600: The Hacker Quarterly is a traditional (printed) magazine named for the fact that phreakers in the 1960s found that the transmission of a 2600 Hertz tone (which could be produced perfectly with a plastic toy whistle given away free with Capn Crunch... MIA is a three-letter acronym that is most commonly used to designate a combatant who is Missing In Action, and has not yet returned or otherwise been accounted for as either dead (KIA) or a prisoner of war (POW). ...


History, milestones, cases

  • 1990: EFF is founded and the groundwork is laid for the successful representation of Steve Jackson Games in a Federal court case to prosecute the United States Secret Service for unlawfully raiding their offices and seizing computers.
  • 1990: Mike Godwin joins the organization as the first staff counsel.
  • 1991: Esther Dyson and Jerry Berman join EFF Board
  • 1991: Steve Jackson Games v. United States Secret Service. EFF files in federal court.
  • 1992: EFF gives first annual Pioneer Awards at 2nd Computers, Freedom, and Privacy conference in Washington, DC
  • 1992: Cliff Figallo became the new director of EFF-Cambridge
  • December 1992: Jerry Berman becomes Acting Executive Director
  • 1993: Steve Jackson Games, Inc. v. United States Secret Service. Steve Jackson Games wins its case against the United States Secret Service.
  • 1993: Offices moved to 1001 G Street office in Washington, D.C.
  • 1993: Big Dummy's guide to the Internet made available for free download.
  • October 1993: Stanton McCandlish joins the organization as online activist.
  • 1994: Drew Taubman named Executive Director
  • 1994: Center for Democracy and Technology is formed by Jerry Berman
  • 1994: Scientology versus The Internet
  • 1995: Bernstein v. United States. Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals rules in favor of Daniel J. Bernstein, holding that software source code is speech protected by the First Amendment and that the government's regulations preventing its publication were unconstitutional.
  • 1995: EFF moves to San Francisco
  • 1995–1996: EFF opens its "Blue Ribbon Campaign" in direct response to the Communications Decency Act
  • 1996: EFF co-founds TRUSTe, the first Privacy Seal company, with CommerceNet, a non-profit industry consortium.
  • 1998: EFF builds Deep Crack, a machine that decrypts a DES-encrypted message after only 56 hours of work, winning RSA Security's DES Challenge II-2.
  • 1999: EFF and Anonymizer launch the Kosovo Privacy Project, an anonymous and secure email and Web surfing service conceived by Alex Fowler and Patrick Ball to ensure the protection of Kosovars, Serbs, and others reporting on the Kosovo War within the region from reprisal from Serbian officials.
  • 2001: Felten v. RIAA. EFF supports Edward Felten in suing RIAA after Secure Digital Music Initiative (SDMI), RIAA, and Verance Corporation threaten Felten with legal action under the terms of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) over Felten's plan to present a paper about methods for defeating the SDMI watermarks. The case is dismissed.
  • April 2002: EFF supports the Chilling Effects Clearinghouse effort to organize a database of IP law abuse and educate potential victims.
  • November 2002: Universal v. Reimerdes ("2600 magazine case"). EFF loses its appeal before the Second Circuit Court of Appeals, establishing a legal precedent to permit prior restraint. 2600 magazine is restrained from publishing links to the Second Circuit code under provisions of the DMCA and declines to appeal to the Supreme Court.
  • December 2003: RIAA v. Verizon, D.C. Cir. EFF supports Verizon Communications in a successful challenge to a lower court ruling holding that the company must reveal the identity of a Verizon customer accused of copyright infringement using the peer-to-peer file-sharing software KaZaA. The DC Circuit Court of Appeals agrees with Verizon and EFF that the special subpoena provisions in the DMCA apply to potentially infringing material stored on an ISP server, not material stored on an individual's own computer.
  • 2004: DirecTV v. Treworgy, 11th Circuit. EFF helps defend "smart card" technology owner Mike Treworgy after DirecTV sued him based on the fact that he purchased hardware that could be used to intercept the company's satellite TV signals. Treworgy prevails in the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals, which finds that DirecTV cannot sue individuals for "mere possession" of smart-card technology. In separate negotiations with DirecTV, EFF succeeds in getting the company to drop its "guilt-by-purchase" litigation strategy altogether.
  • 2004-02-18: EFF files amicus curiae brief in 1-800 Contacts, Inc. v. WhenU.Com and Vision Direct, Inc. appeal (see 1-800 Contacts)
  • April 19, 2004: EFF initiates the Patent Busting Project to challenge "illegitimate patents that suppress non-commercial and small business innovation or limit free expression online"
  • May 2004: Doe v. Ashcroft. EFF files amicus supporting ACLU's challenge to the constitutionality of 18 U.S.C. § 2709, which authorizes the FBI to compel the production of subscriber and communications records in the possession of a broad range of ISPs, potentially covering billions of records from tens of thousands of entities. These demands, known as National Security Letters, were issued without judicial oversight of any kind, yet allowed the FBI to obtain a vast amount of constitutionally protected information. In September 2004, Judge Victor Marrero of the Southern District of New York issues a landmark decision striking down the NSL statute and the associated gag provision.
  • August 2004: Chamberlain v. Skylink. EFF helps defend Skylink in the Federal Circuit that puts limits on the controversial "anti-circumvention" provision of the DMCA. Chamberlain, the manufacturer of garage doors, invoked the provision to stop Skylink from selling a "universal" remote control that works with Chamberlain garage doors. The court rejected Chamberlain's claims, noting that if it adopted the company's interpretation of the DMCA, it would threaten many legitimate uses of software within electronic and computer products—something the law aims to protect.
  • August 19, 2004: MGM v. Grokster. EFF prevails before the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals with a decision affirming the "Betamax doctrine"—the rule following the Supreme Court's 1984 holding that a company that creates a technology cannot be held liable for copyright violations by users if the technology has substantial legal uses. The Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals rules that neither were liable for infringements by people using their software to distribute copyrighted works. However, on June 27, 2005 U.S. Supreme Court reverses, finding the defendants liable for copyright infringement, though the Court preserved the Betamax doctrine. Co-defendant Grokster eventually settles with MGM and disbands the company.
  • October 6, 2004: EFF submits a brief in cooperation with eight other public interest organizations, challenging the FCC's authority to impose the broadcast flag mandate, which was to go into effect during July 2005.
  • October 15, 2004: EFF successfully represents the non-profit ISP Online Policy Group (OPG) and two Swarthmore College students who published major security flaws in Diebold Election Systems voting machines. From the press release: "Diebold is the first company to be held liable for violating section 512(f) of the DMCA. which makes it unlawful to use DMCA takedown threats when the copyright holder knows that infringement has not actually occurred."
  • 2004: JibJab Media v. Ludlow Music, N.D. Cal. EFF successfully defends JibJab, the creators of a parody flash animation piece using Woody Guthrie's "This Land Is Your Land", and uncovered evidence that the classic folk song is in fact already part of the public domain.
  • November 2004: EFF files brief opposing the FCC's proposal to expand CALEA to broadband Internet access providers and VoIP systems.
  • December 2004: EFF starts promoting and supporting Tor, a second generation Onion Routing network that allows people to communicate anonymously.
  • June 2005: EFF issues a Legal Guide for Bloggers, designed to be a basic roadmap to the legal issues one may confront as a blogger, to let bloggers know their rights.
  • October 2005: EFF investigates and documents how the Xerox DocuColor printer's serial number, as well as the date and time of the printout, are encoded in a repeating 15 by 8 dot pattern in the yellow channel on printed pages. EFF is working to reverse engineer additional printers. (see Printer identification encoding)
  • November 2005: EFF files suit against Sony BMG Music Entertainment—along with two leading national class action law firms—demanding that the company repair the damage done by Fortium Technologies (then First 4 Internet)'s XCP and SunnComm MediaMax software it included on over 24 million music CDs (see 2005 Sony BMG CD copy protection scandal).
  • January 2006: Hepting vs. AT&T. EFF files a class action lawsuit against AT&T alleging that AT&T allowed the NSA to potentially tap the entirety of its clients' Internet and Voice over IP communications.
  • August 2006: EFF files a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission, accusing AOL of violating the Federal Trade Commission Act and asking for the FTC to take action. EFF alleges that AOL has engaged in deceptive and unfair trade practices with the disclosure of 20 million search queries of 650,000 anonymized users, intended for research purposes (see AOL for details). AOL is failing to "implement reasonable and appropriate measures to protect personal consumer information from public disclosure." Beyond that, AOL's failure to "employ proper security measures … to protect personal consumer information from public disclosure" constitutes an unfair trade practice.
  • November 2006: EFF files a lawsuit, on behalf of blogger Jeffrey Diehl, against Michael Crook, a webmaster Diehl claimed filed false DMCA claims against his and other websites. The case is settled in early 2007.
  • July 2007: The United States Patent and Trademark Office denied the EFF’s request for the reexamination of NeoMedia's patent #6,199,048.

Steve Jackson Games (SJG) is a game company that creates and publishes role-playing, board, and card games. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Counter Assault Team. ... Mike Godwin Mike Godwin is an American attorney and author. ... Esther Dyson in San Francisco in 2005 Esther Dyson (born 14 July 1951 in Zürich, Switzerland) is a self-described authority on emerging digital technology, and considered a founding member of the digerati. ... Jerry Berman founded the Center for Democracy and Technology. ... Steve Jackson Games (SJG) is a game company that creates and publishes role-playing, board, and card games. ... The EFF Pioneer Award is an annual prize for people who have made significant contributions to the empowerment of individuals in using computers. ... Computers, Freedom, and Privacy (CFP) is an annual conference, beginning in 1991, about the intersection of computer technology, freedom, and privacy issues. ... Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United... The 1993 case of Steve Jackson Games, Inc. ... Steve Jackson Games (SJG) is a game company that creates and publishes role-playing, board, and card games. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Counter Assault Team. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... The Center for Democracy and Technology (CDT) is a Washington, DC based non-profit advocacy group that works to promote democratic values and constitutional liberties in the Digital Age. ... Jerry Berman founded the Center for Democracy and Technology. ... Scientology versus the Internet is a colloquial term for a long-running online dispute between the Church of Scientology and a number of the Churchs online critics. ... Bernstein v. ... The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit is a federal court with appellate jurisdiction over the district courts in the following districts: District of Alaska District of Arizona Central District of California Eastern District of California Northern District of California Southern District of California District of Hawaii... Daniel Julius Bernstein (sometimes known simply as djb; born October 29, 1971) is a professor at the University of Illinois at Chicago, a mathematician, a cryptologist, and a programmer. ... Computer software (or simply software) refers to one or more computer programs and data held in the storage of a computer for some purpose. ... Source code (commonly just source or code) is any series of statements written in some human-readable computer programming language. ... The first ten amendments to the United States Constitution are known as the Bill of Rights. This is a complete list of all ratified and unratified amendments to the United States Constitution which have received the approval of the Congress. ... Constitutionality is the status of a law, a procedure, or an acts accordance with the laws or guidelines set forth in the applicable constitution. ... The Communications Decency Act (CDA) was arguably the first attempt by the United States Congress to regulate pornographic material on the Internet, in response to public concerns in 1996. ... The EFFs US$250,000 DES cracking machine contained over 18,000 custom chips and could brute force a DES key in a matter of days — the photo shows a DES Cracker circuit board fitted with several Deep Crack chips In cryptography, the EFF DES cracker (nicknamed Deep... The Data Encryption Standard (DES) is a cipher (a method for encrypting information) selected as an official Federal Information Processing Standard (FIPS) for the United States in 1976, and which has subsequently enjoyed widespread use internationally. ... RSA, The Security Division of EMC Corporation (NYSE: EMC), is headquartered in Bedford, Massachusetts, and maintains offices in Ireland, the United Kingdom, Singapore, and Japan. ... The term Kosovo War or Kosovo Conflict is often used to describe two sequential and at times parallel armed conflicts (a civil war followed by an international war) in the southern Serbian province called Kosovo (officially Kosovo and Metohia), part of the former Federal Republic of Yugoslavia. ... Edward William Felten (born March 25, 1963) is a professor of computer science and public affairs at Princeton University. ... SDMI (Secure Digital Music Initiative) was a forum formed in late 1998, comprised of more than 200 IT, consumer electronics, security technology, ISP and recording industry companies with the purpose of developing technology specifications that protect the playing, storing and distributing of digital music. ... The Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) is a United States copyright law which implements two 1996 WIPO treaties. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Fall 2004 (21:3) 2600 Issue 2600: The Hacker Quarterly is a traditional (printed) magazine named for the fact that phreakers in the 1960s found that the transmission of a 2600 Hertz tone (which could be produced perfectly with a plastic toy whistle given away free with Capn Crunch... The United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit is a federal court with appellate jurisdiction over the district courts in the following districts: District of Connecticut Northern, Southern, Eastern, and Western Districts of New York District of Vermont The Second Circuit hears argument at the Thurgood Marshall U... Prior restraint is a legal term referring to a governments actions that prevent materials from being published. ... The United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit is a federal court with appellate jurisdiction over the district courts in the following districts: District of Connecticut Northern, Southern, Eastern, and Western Districts of New York District of Vermont The Second Circuit hears argument at the Thurgood Marshall U... The Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) is a United States copyright law which implements two 1996 WIPO treaties. ... Verizon Communications, Inc. ... This article or section should include material from Bell Atlantic This article or section should include material from GTE Verizon Communications (NYSE: VZ) is a local exchange telephone company formed by the merger of Bell Atlantic, a former Bell Operating Company, and GTE, which was the largest independant local exchange... A peer-to-peer (or P2P) computer network is a network that relies on the computing power and bandwidth of the participants in the network rather than concentrating it in a relatively few servers. ... Kazaa Media Desktop (once capitalized as KaZaA, but now usually left as Kazaa) is a peer-to-peer file sharing application using the FastTrack protocol. ... The Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) is a United States copyright law which implements two 1996 WIPO treaties. ... “ISP” redirects here. ... A standard DirecTV satellite dish with 1 LNB on a roof DirecTV (trademarked as DIRECTV) is a direct broadcast satellite (DBS) service based in El Segundo, California, USA, that transmits digital satellite television and audio to households in the United States, the Caribbean and Latin America except for Mexico. ... A standard DirecTV satellite dish with 1 LNB on a roof DirecTV (trademarked as DIRECTV) is a direct broadcast satellite (DBS) service based in El Segundo, California, USA, that transmits digital satellite television and audio to households in the United States, the Caribbean and Latin America except for Mexico. ... A standard DirecTV satellite dish with 1 LNB on a roof DirecTV (trademarked as DIRECTV) is a direct broadcast satellite (DBS) service based in El Segundo, California, USA, that transmits digital satellite television and audio to households in the United States, the Caribbean and Latin America except for Mexico. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Amicus curiae (plural amici curiae) is a legal Latin phrase, literally translated as friend of the court, that refers to a person or entity that is not a party to a case that volunteers to offer information on a point of law or some other aspect of the case to... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... is the 109th day of the year (110th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Patent Busting Project is an EFF initiative launched April 19, 2004 to challenge patents that the EFF claim are illegitimate and suppress innovation or limit online expression. ... A heavily redacted page from the original lawsuit. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... The United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, or simply the Federal Circuit, was founded in 1982 to combine similar federal cases to a specialized appellate court. ... The Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) is a United States copyright law which implements two 1996 WIPO treaties. ... is the 231st day of the year (232nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit is a federal court with appellate jurisdiction over the following United States district courts: District of Alaska District of Arizona Central, Eastern, Northern, and Southern Districts of California District of Guam District of Hawaii District of Idaho District of Montana... The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit is a federal court with appellate jurisdiction over the following United States district courts: District of Alaska District of Arizona Central, Eastern, Northern, and Southern Districts of California District of Guam District of Hawaii District of Idaho District of Montana... is the 178th day of the year (179th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 279th day of the year (280th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The FCCs official seal. ... A broadcast flag is a set of status bits (or flags) sent in the data stream of a digital television program that indicates whether or not it can be recorded, or if there are any restrictions on recorded content. ... is the 288th day of the year (289th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Diebold Election Systems, Inc. ... A voting machine is a device to record and register votes to be counted as per any voting system, with or without printing a ballot for the voter to verify. ... The Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) is a United States copyright law which implements two 1996 WIPO treaties. ... The JibJab logo, with its Victorian era appearance, illustrates the influence of Terry Gilliam on the duos animation JibJab is a website featuring Flash cartoons. ... Woodrow Wilson Guthrie (July 14, 1912–October 3, 1967) was a prolific American songwriter and folk musician. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: This Land Is Your Land This Land Is Your Land is one of the United States most famous folk songs. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... The FCCs official seal. ... The Communications Assistance for Law Enforcement Act (CALEA) is a controversial United States wiretapping law passed in 1994 (Pub. ... how VoIP works A typical analog telephone adapter for connecting an ordinary phone to a VoIP network Ciscos implementation of VoIP - IP Phone Voice over Internet Protocol, also called VoIP, IP Telephony, Internet telephony, Broadband telephony, Broadband Phone and Voice over Broadband is the routing of voice conversations over... Tor (The Onion Router) is a free software implementation of second-generation onion routing – a system enabling its users to communicate anonymously on the Internet. ... The term EFF may refer to: The Election Fighting Fund, a fund which the NUWSS set up to raise money for the early Labour Party during the early 1910s. ... Printer identification encoding is a technology used by many manufacturers of printers, in which the model, serial number and other identifying information about the printer is printed on every page produced. ... The Sony BMG Music Entertainment logo. ... Fortium Technologies (aka First 4 Internet) is a British company based in Bridgend, South Wales that develops and licenses Rootkit technology for CDs, DVDs and porn in an attempt to prevent unauthorized copying. ... XCP - the XML Control Protocol - is a drop-in replacement for traditional Transmission Control Protocol, or TCP. External links XCP Consortium Categories: Internet protocols | XML | TLAs ... SunnComm International Inc. ... MediaMax CD-3 is a software package created by SunnComm and sold as a form of copy protection for compact discs. ... The 2005 Sony BMG CD copy protection scandal was a public scandal dealing with Sony BMG Music Entertainments surreptitious distribution of rootkit software on audio compact discs. ... Hepting vs. ... This article is about the current AT&T. For the 1885-2005 company, see American Telephone & Telegraph. ... “NSA” redirects here. ... how VoIP works A typical analog telephone adapter for connecting an ordinary phone to a VoIP network Ciscos implementation of VoIP - IP Phone Voice over Internet Protocol, also called VoIP, IP Telephony, Internet telephony, Broadband telephony, Broadband Phone and Voice over Broadband is the routing of voice conversations over... | logo_caption = | seal = US-FederalTradeCommission-Seal. ... For other uses, see AOL (disambiguation). ... The Federal Trade Commission Act of 1934 established the Federal Trade Commission, a bipartisan body of two hundred members appointed by the President of the United States for seven year terms. ... For other uses, see AOL (disambiguation). ... The Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) is a controversial United States copyright law which criminalizes production and dissemination of technology that can circumvent measures taken to protect copyright, not merely infringement of copyright itself, and heightens the penalties for copyright infringement on the Internet. ...

Finances

Charity Navigator has given EFF four out of four stars for its financial efficiency and capacity.[7] Charity Navigator is an independent, non-profit organization that evaluates American charities. ...


References

  1. ^ http://www.eff.org/global/europe/
  2. ^ http://www.eff.org/IP/WIPO/
  3. ^ Formation documents and mission statement for the EFF
  4. ^ http://www.kei.com/
  5. ^ McCullagh, Declan. "EFF reaches out to D.C. with new office", CNET News.com, April 27, 2006. 
  6. ^ http://www.eff.org/about/20040218_eff_pr.php
  7. ^ Electronic Frontier Foundation. Charity Navigator. Retrieved on 2007-06-05.

Charity Navigator is an independent, non-profit organization that evaluates American charities. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... is the 156th day of the year (157th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also

In December 2004, Apple Computer filed a lawsuit in Santa Clara county against unnamed individuals who allegedly leaked information about new Apple products to several online news sites, including AppleInsider and PowerPage. ... Electronic Frontiers Australia Inc. ... Electronic Frontier Canada (EFC) is a Canadian on-line civil rights organization founded to ensure that the principles embodied in the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms remain protected as new computing, communications, and information technologies are introduced into Canadian society. ... The Free Software Foundation (FSF) is a non-profit corporation founded in October 1985 by Richard Stallman to support the free software movement (free as in freedom), and in particular the GNU project. ... Hepting v. ... The GNU logo, drawn by Etienne Suvasa The GNU Project was announced in 1983 by Richard Stallman. ... League for Programming Freedom (LPF) was founded in 1989 by Richard Stallman to unite free software developers as well as developers of proprietary software to fight against software patents and the extension of the scope of copyright. ... The Open Rights Group (ORG) is a UK-based organisation that hopes to preserve digital rights and freedoms by serving as a hub for other cyber-rights groups campaigning on similar digital rights issues. ...

External links

  • Electronic Frontier Foundation official site
  • "Technopolitics", originally published in the Australian magazine 21C, tells the early history of EFF.

Image File history File links WikiNews-Logo. ... Wikinews is a free-content news source and a project of the Wikimedia Foundation. ...

Publications

  • EFFector
  • Legal Guide for Bloggers

  Results from FactBites:
 
EFF - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (136 words)
The Electronic Frontier Foundation, a non-profit advocacy group based in San Francisco, California.
The Evergreen Freedom Foundation, a conservative think-tank and advocacy group based in the State of Washington.
This page disambiguates a three-character combination which might be any or all of an abbreviation, an acronym, an initialism, a word in English, or a word in another language.
Electronic Frontier Foundation - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2225 words)
The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) is a non-profit advocacy and legal organization based in the United States with the stated purpose of being dedicated to preserving free speech rights such as those protected by the First Amendment to the United States Constitution in the context of today's digital age.
EFF helped defend "smart card" technology owner Mike Treworgy after DirecTV sued him based on the fact that he purchased hardware that could be used to intercept the company's satellite TV signals.
EFF prevailed before the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals with a decision affirming the "Betamax doctrine"—the rule following the Supreme Court's 1984 holding that a company that creates a technology cannot be held liable for copyright violations by users if the technology has substantial legal uses.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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