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Encyclopedia > Electric guitar
Two different electric guitars. One model with humbucker pickups and a rosewood fretboard. The other model (Stratocaster) with a maple fretboard and single coil pickups.
Two different electric guitars. One model with humbucker pickups and a rosewood fretboard. The other model (Stratocaster) with a maple fretboard and single coil pickups.


An electric guitar is a type of guitar that uses pickups to convert the vibration of its steel-cored strings into electrical current, which is then amplified. The signal that comes from the guitar is sometimes electronically altered to achieve various tonal effects prior to being fed into an amplifier, which produces the final sound. The electric guitar was first used in jazz and has also long been used in many other popular styles of music, including almost all genres of rock and roll, country music, blues, ambient (or "new-age"), and even contemporary classical music. Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (682x1024, 93 KB)Both the Godin LG (left) and the Fender Squier Stratocaster (right) are solidbody electric guitars, but they differ significantly in design, including scale length, neck and body woods, and pickup type. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (682x1024, 93 KB)Both the Godin LG (left) and the Fender Squier Stratocaster (right) are solidbody electric guitars, but they differ significantly in design, including scale length, neck and body woods, and pickup type. ... Traditional Open Coil (uncovered) humbucker pickup A conventional humbucker (or Humbucking pickup) is a type of electric guitar pickup that uses two coils, both generating string signal. ... The fingerboard, also known as a fretboard, is a part of most stringed instruments. ... A Fender Stratocaster with rosewood fingerboard and three-tone sunburst finish. ... For other uses, see Guitar (disambiguation). ... Three magnetic pickups on an electric guitar. ... An instrument amplifier is an electronic amplifier designed for use with an electric or electronic musical instrument, such as an electric guitar. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... Country music is a blend of popular musical forms originally found in the Southern United States and the Appalachian Mountains. ... Blues music redirects here. ... In the broadest sense, contemporary music is any music being written in the present day. ...

History

The need for an amplified guitar became apparent during the big band era, as jazz orchestras of the 1930s and 1940s increased in size, with larger brass sections. Initially, electric guitars used in jazz consisted primarily of hollow archtop acoustic guitar bodies to which electromagnetic transducers had been attached. A big band is a type of musical ensemble associated with playing jazz music and which became popular during the Swing Era from the early 1930s until the late 1940s, although there are many big-bands around nowadays. ... Jazz guitar refers to the use of guitar in jazz music. ... The name Archtop describe guitars commonly known as Jazz-boxes or Hollow-bodies. The Archtop guitar normally has f-holes (as found on violins/cellos/double basses). ...


Early years

Sketch of Rickenbacker "frying pan" lap steel from 1934 patent application.
Sketch of Rickenbacker "frying pan" lap steel from 1934 patent application.

Electric guitars were originally designed by an assortment of luthiers - guitar makers, electronics enthusiasts, and instrument manufacturers, in varying combinations. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 371 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1680 × 2712 pixel, file size: 218 KB, MIME type: image/png) Other versions Rickenbackerfryingpanpatentsketch. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 371 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1680 × 2712 pixel, file size: 218 KB, MIME type: image/png) Other versions Rickenbackerfryingpanpatentsketch. ... The Frying Pan was the first electric guitar ever produced. ...


Guitar innovator Les Paul experimented with microphones attached to guitars.[1] Some of the earliest electric guitars, then essentially adapted hollow bodied acoustic instruments, used tungsten pickups[citation needed] and were manufactured beginning in 1931 by Electro String Instrument Corporation in Los Santos under the direction of Adolph Rickenbacker and George Beauchamp. Their first design of a hollow body guitar instrument that used tungsten pickups was built by Harry Watson, a craftsman who worked for the Electro String Company. This new guitar which the company called "Rickenbackers" would be the first of its kind.[2] This article is about the musician. ... A hollow body is a type of electric guitar which has a sound box similar to an acoustic guitar. ... A steel string acoustic guitar is a modern form of guitar descended from the classical guitar, but strung with steel strings for a brighter, louder sound. ... A Tungsten is a type of phonograph stylus. ...


The earliest documented use of the electric guitar in performance was during October 1932 in Wichita, Kansas by guitarist and bandleader Gage Brewer who had obtained two instruments directly from George Beauchamp of Los Angeles, California. Brewer publicized them in an article appearing in the Wichita Beacon, October 2, 1932 and through a Halloween performance later that month. George D. Beauchamp (1899 - 1941), inventor of musical instruments and co-founder of National Stringed Instrument Corporation and Rickenbacker. ... is the 275th day of the year (276th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1932 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The first recording of an electric guitar was by jazz guitarist George Barnes who recorded two songs in Chicago on March 1st, 1938: Sweetheart Land and It's a Low-Down Dirty Shame. Many historians incorrectly attribute the first recording to Eddie Durham, but his recording with the Kansas City Five was not until 15 days later.[3] Durham introduced the instrument to a young Charlie Christian, who made the instrument famous in his brief life and is generally known as the first electric guitarist and a major influence on jazz guitarists for decades thereafter. Sir George Barnes (1904-1960) was a British broadcasting executive, who was a station Controller of both BBC Radio and later BBC Television in the 1940s and 1950s. ... Darlene Edwards, 43, Frank Sheppard, 46, Earl Skip Sheppard, 37, Bryan Sheppard, 26, and Richard Brown, 26, all Native Americans, were convicted of setting a fire that caused an explosion and killed six firefighters. ... Charlie Christian (29 July 1916 – 2 March 1942) was an American jazz guitarist. ...


The version of the instrument that is best known today is the solid body electric guitar, a guitar made of solid wood, without resonating airspaces within it. Rickenbacher, later spelled Rickenbacker, did, however, offer a cast aluminum electric steel guitar, nicknamed The Frying Pan or The Pancake Guitar, beginning in 1931. This guitar is reported to have sounded quite modern and aggressive when tested by vintage guitar researcher John Teagle. The company Audiovox built and may have offered an electric solid-body as early as the mid-1930s. A solid body electric instrument is a string instrument such as a guitar, bass or violin built without its normal sound box and relying on its electric pickup system to directly receive the vibrations of the strings. ... The Frying Pan was the first electric guitar ever produced. ... Audiovox (NASDAQ: VOXX) is an electronics company. ...


Another early solid body electric guitar was designed and built by musician and inventor Les Paul in the early 1940s, working after hours in the Epiphone Guitar factory. His log guitar (so called because it consisted of a simple 4x4 wood post with a neck attached to it and homemade pickups and hardware, with two detachable Swedish hollow body halves attached to the sides for appearance only) was patented and is often considered to be the first of its kind, although it shares nothing in design or hardware with the solid body "Les Paul" model sold by Gibson. This article is about the musician. ... Epiphone Emperor The Epiphone Company is a guitar manufacturer. ...


In about 1945, Richard D. Bourgerie, who worked through World War II at Howard Radio Company making electronic equipment for the American military, made an electric guitar pickup and amplifier for professional guitar player George Barnes. Mr. Barnes showed the result to Les Paul, who then arranged for Mr. Bourgerie to have one made for him.


Fender

Sketch of Fender lap steel guitar from 1944 patent application.
Sketch of Fender lap steel guitar from 1944 patent application.

In the year of 1946, radio repairman and instrument amplifier maker Clarence Leonidas Fender—better known as Leo Fender—through his eponymous company, designed the first commercially successful solid-body electric guitar with a single magnetic pickup, which was initially named the "Esquire". This was a departure from the typically hollow-bodied Jazz-oriented instruments of the time and immediately found favor with Country-Western artists in California. The two-pickup version of the Esquire was called the "Broadcaster". However, Gretsch had a drumset marketed with a similar name (Broadkaster), so Fender changed the name to "Telecaster" in homage to the new phenomenon of television.[citation needed] Fender redirects here. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 353 × 598 pixels Full resolution (1600 × 2712 pixel, file size: 604 KB, MIME type: image/png) Other versions Fenderguitarpatentsketch. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 353 × 598 pixels Full resolution (1600 × 2712 pixel, file size: 604 KB, MIME type: image/png) Other versions Fenderguitarpatentsketch. ... Leo Fender working on a guitar Clarence Leonidas Fender (August 10, 1909 - March 21, 1991) was an American luthier who founded Fender Electric Instrument Manufacturing Company, now known as Fender Musical Instruments Corporation, and later founded G&L Musical Products (G&L Guitars). ... The Fender Esquire is a solid body electric guitar manufactured by Fender, and was the first guitar sold by Fender in 1950. ... Gretsch is a U.S. musical instrument manufacturer currently being distributed by guitar company Fender and drum craft company Kaman. ... The Fender Telecaster, also known as a Tele, is typically a dual-pickup, solid-body electric guitar made by Fender. ...


Features of the Telecaster included: an ash body; a maple 25½" scale, 21-fret or 22-fret neck attached to the body with four-bolts reinforced by a steel neckplate; two single-coil, 6-pole pickups (bridge and neck positions) with tone and volume knobs, pickup selector switch; and an output jack mounted on the side of the body. A black bakelite pickguard concealed body routings for pickups and wiring. An inch (plural: inches; symbol or abbreviation: in or, sometimes, ″ - a double prime) is the name of a unit of length in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ...


The bolt-on neck was consistent with Leo Fender's belief that the instrument design should be modular to allow cost-effective and consistent manufacture and assembly, as well as simple repair or replacement. Due to the earlier mentioned trademark issue, some of the first production Telecasters were delivered with headstock decals with the Fender logo but no model identification. These are today very much sought after, and commonly referred to by collectors as "Nocasters".


In 1953, Fender introduced the Fender Stratocaster, or "Strat." The Strat was seen as a deluxe model and offered various product improvements and innovations over the Telecaster. These innovations included an ash or alder double-cutaway body design for badge assembly with an integrated spring vibrato mechanism (called a synchronized tremolo by Fender, thus beginning a confusion of the terms that still continues), three single-coil pickups, and body comfort contours. Leo Fender is also credited with developing the first commercially-successful electric bass guitar called the Fender Precision Bass, introduced in 1951. Stratocaster redirects here. ... Vibrato is a musical effect where the pitch or frequency of a note or sound is quickly and repeatedly raised and lowered over a small distance for the duration of that note or sound. ... A tremolo arm, tremolo bar or whammy bar is a lever attached to the bridge and/or tailpiece of an electric guitar to enable the player to quickly vary the tension and sometimes the length of the strings temporarily, changing the pitch to create a vibrato, portamento or pitch bend... A sunburst-colored Fender Precision Bass The electric bass guitar (or electric bass[1][2]; pronounced , as in base) is a bass stringed instrument played primarily with the fingers (either by plucking, slapping, popping, or tapping) or using a pick. ... The Fender Precision Bass (sometimes shortened to the P-Bass) is an electric bass guitar, and was the first widely-available model of the instrument. ...


Vox

In 1962 Vox introduced the pentagonal Phantom guitar, originally made in England but soon after made by EKO of Italy. It was followed a year later by the teardrop-shaped Mark VI, the prototype of which was used by Brian Jones of The Rolling Stones, and later Johnny Thunders of the New York Dolls. Vox guitars also experimented with onboard effects and electronics. In the mid 1960s, as the sound of electric 12 string guitars became popular, Vox introduced the Phantom XII and Mark XII electric 12 string guitars as well as the Tempest XII which employed a more conventional Fender style body and thus is often overlooked as a Vox classic from the Sixties. The few that were manufactured also came from Italy. Vox also produced other traditional styles of 6 and 12 string electric guitars in both England and Italy. Vox is a musical equipment manufacturer formerly based in Britain, and now owned by Japanese electronics giants Korg, which is most famous for making the AC30 guitar amplifier and the Vox organ. ... Brian Jones (born Lewis Brian Hopkin-Jones on 28 February 1942 in Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, England, died 3 July 1969) was a founding member, lead and rhythm guitarist and backing singer in the British rock group, The Rolling Stones. ... Rolling Stones redirects here. ... Johnny Thunders, born John Anthony Genzale, Jr (July 15, 1952 - April 23, 1991), was a rock and roll guitarist and singer, first with the New York Dolls, the proto-punk glam rockers of the early 1970s. ... For the self-titled debut album, visit New York Dolls (album) The New York Dolls are a rock band formed in New York City in 1971. ...


Construction

Pickups

Main article: Pickup (music)

Compared with an acoustic guitar, which has a hollow body, electric guitars make comparatively little audible sound simply by having their strings plucked. Rather, the movement of the string generates (i.e., "induces") a very small electrical current in the magnetic pickups, which are magnets wrapped with coils of very fine wire. That current is then sent via a wire to an amplifier.[4] The current induced is proportional to such factors as the density of the string or the amount of movement over these pickups. That vibration is, in turn, affected by several factors, such as the composition and shape of the body. Three magnetic pickups on an electric guitar. ... For other uses, see Magnet (disambiguation). ...


Some hybrid electric-acoustic guitars are equipped with additional microphones or piezoelectric pickups (transducers) that sense mechanical vibration from the body. Because in some cases it is desirable to isolate the pickups from the vibrations of the strings, a guitar's magnetic pickups will sometimes be embedded or "potted" in epoxy or wax to prevent the pickup from having a microphonic effect. Microphones redirects here. ... Piezoelectricity is the ability of certain crystals to produce a voltage when subjected to mechanical stress. ... This article is about transducers in engineering. ...


Because of their natural inductive qualities, all magnetic pickups tend to pick up ambient and usually unwanted electromagnetic noises. The resulting noise, the so-called "hum", is particularly strong with single-coil pickups, and aggravated by the fact that very few guitars are correctly shielded against electromagnetic interference. The most frequent cause is the strong 50 or 60 Hz component that is inherent in the frequency generation of current within the local power transmission system. As nearly all amplifiers and audio equipment associated with electrical guitars relies on this power, there is in theory little chance of completely eliminating the introduction of unwanted hum. A hum is a sound with a particular timbre (or sound quality), usually a monotone or with slightly varying tones, often produced by machinery in operation or by insects in flight. ... This article is about the SI unit of frequency. ... For other uses, see Frequency (disambiguation). ... Power line redirects here. ...


Double-coil or "humbucker" pickups were invented as a way to reduce or counter the unwanted ambient hum sounds. Humbuckers have two coils of opposite magnetic and electric polarity. This means that electromagnetic noise hitting both coils should cancel itself out. The two coils are wired in phase, so the signal picked up by each coil is added together. This creates the richer, "fatter" tone associated with humbucking pickups. Traditional Open Coil (uncovered) humbucker pickup A conventional humbucker (or Humbucking pickup) is a type of electric guitar pickup that uses two coils, both generating string signal. ...


The optical pickup [5] senses string and body vibrations using LED light.


Tremolo arms

Main article: Tremolo arm
Detail of a Squier-made Fender Stratocaster. Note the tremolo arm, the 3 single-coil pickups, the volume and tone knobs.
Detail of a Squier-made Fender Stratocaster. Note the tremolo arm, the 3 single-coil pickups, the volume and tone knobs.

Some electric guitars have a tremolo arm (sometimes called a whammy bar or a vibrato bar[6] and occasionally abbreviated as trem), a lever attached to the bridge which can slacken or tighten the strings temporarily, changing the pitch, thereby creating a vibrato effect. A tremolo arm, tremolo bar, vibrato bar, whammy bar, or wang bar is a lever attached to the bridge and/or the tailpiece of an electric guitar or archtop guitar to enable the player to quickly vary the tension and sometimes the length of the strings temporarily, changing the pitch... detail of the body of a Stratocaster Copyright (c) 2004 David Monniaux File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... detail of the body of a Stratocaster Copyright (c) 2004 David Monniaux File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Vibrato is a musical effect where the pitch or frequency of a note or sound is quickly and repeatedly raised and lowered over a small distance for the duration of that note or sound. ...


Early tremolo systems, such as the Bigsby vibrato tailpiece, tended to be unreliable and cause the guitar to go out of tune quite easily, and also had a limited range. Later Fender designs were better, but Fender held the patent on these, so other companies used Bigsby-style tremolo for many years. With the expiration of the Fender patent on the Stratocaster-style tremolo, various improvements on this type of internal, multi-spring tremolo system are now available. The Bigsby vibrato tailpiece (or Bigsby for short) is a type of vibrato device for electric guitar designed by its namesake Paul A. Bigsby. ... Fender redirects here. ... A Fender Stratocaster with rosewood fingerboard and three-tone sunburst finish. ...


Floyd Rose introduced one of the first improvements on the vibrato system in many years when in the late 1970s he began to experiment with "locking" nuts and bridges which work to prevent the guitar from tuning even under the most heavy whammy bar acrobatics. Shred guitar performers such as Eddie Van Halen use the tremolo to create dramatic effects, as can be heard in the Van Halen guitar solo "Eruption." Floyd Rose Original Floyd Rose is the organization that licenses, distributes and manufactures the Floyd Rose Locking Tremolo invented by Floyd D. Rose. ... Shred guitar is a style of electric guitar playing in which rapid passages are performed using sweep-picking, hammer-ons, pull-offs, and other techniques. ... Edward Lodewijk Eddie Van Halen (born January 26, 1955)[1], is a Dutch-American guitarist, keyboardist, songwriter and producer most famous for being the lead guitarist and co-founder of the rock band Van Halen. ... This article is about the band Van Halen. ... Eruption is an instrumental by Van Halen from their first album, Van Halen. ...


Guitar necks

Electric guitars can have necks that vary according to composition as well as shape. The primary metric used to describe a guitar neck is the scale, which is the overall length of the strings from the nut to the bridge. A typical Fender guitar uses a 25.5 inch scale, while Gibson uses a 24.75 inch scale in their Les Paul. The frets are placed proportionally according to the scale length, so the smaller the scale, the tighter the spacing of the frets. The Gibson Les Paul is a solidbody electric guitar originally developed in the early 1950s. ...


Necks are described as bolt-on, set, or neck-through depending on how they are attached to the body. Set necks are glued to the body in the factory, and are said to have greater sustain. Bolt-on necks were pioneered by Leo Fender to facilitate easy adjustment and replacement of the guitar neck. Neck through instruments extend the neck itself to form the center of the guitar body and are also known for long sustain. While a set neck can be carefully unglued by a skilled Luthier, and a bolt-on neck can simply be unscrewed, a neck-through design is difficult or even impossible to repair, depending on the damage. Historically, the bolt-on style has been more popular for ease of installation and adjustment. Some instruments, such as semi-hollow Jazz/Rockabilly instruments and the Gibson Les Paul series have continued to use set/glued necks. Since bolt-on necks can be easily removed, there is an after-market in replacement bolt-on necks from companies such as Warmoth and Mighty Mite. Neck-through or neck-thru or in full form neck through body is a method of electric guitar or bass guitar construction that involves extending the piece (or pieces, in a laminate construction) of wood used for the neck the entire length of the body. ... Fender redirects here. ... An engravers impression of Antonio Stradivari examining an instrument. ...


The materials used in the manufacture of the neck have great influence over the tone of the instrument. Hardwoods are very much preferred, with maple, ash, and mahogany topping the list. The neck and fingerboard can be made from different materials, such as a maple neck with a rosewood fingerboard. In the 1980s, exotic man-made materials such as graphite began to be used, but are pricey and never really replaced wood in production instruments. Such necks can be retrofitted to existing bolt-on instruments. For other uses, see Maple (disambiguation). ... Species Many, see text. ... This article is about the timber. ... Rosewood refers to a number of richly hued timbers, brownish with darker veining. ...


There are several different neck shapes used on guitars, including what are known as C necks, and V necks. These refer to the cross-sectional shape of the neck (especially near the nut). There are also several sizes of fret wire available, with traditional players often preferring thin frets, and metal shredders liking thick frets. Thin frets are considered better for playing chords, while thick frets allow lead guitarists to bend notes with less effort.


An electric guitar with a neck which folds back called the Foldaxe was designed and built for Chet Atkins by Roger Field (featured in Atkins' book "Me and My Guitars."). Steinberger guitars developed a line of exotic instruments lacking headstocks, with tuning done on the bridge instead. Steinberger refers to a series of distinctive electric guitars and bass guitars, designed and originally manufactured by Ned Steinberger. ...


Sound and effects

An acoustic guitar's sound is largely dependent on the vibration of the guitar's body and the air within it; the sound of an electric guitar is largely dependent on a magnetically induced electrical signal, generated by the vibration of metal strings near sensitive pickups. The signal is then "shaped" on its path to the amplifier by using a range of effect devices or circuits that modify the tone and characteristics of the signal. A steel string acoustic guitar is a modern form of guitar descended from the classical guitar, but strung with steel strings for a brighter, louder sound. ... For the Analog Science Fiction and Science Fact publication, see Astounding Magazine. ... Shaping, also known as Body Shaping, is a proprietary system of weight-training exercises aimed primarily at women. ... For the British rock band of the same name, see Amplifier (band). ...


In the 1960s, some guitarists began distorting the sound of the instrument by increasing the gain, or volume, of the preamplifier. This produces a "fuzzy" sound, and when viewed with an oscilloscope the wave forms appear to have had their peaks "clipped" off. This was not actually a new development in the instrument, but rather a shift of aesthetics. This sound was not generally recognized previously as desirable. In the 1960s, the tonal palette of the electric guitar was further modified by introducing an effects box in its signal path. Traditionally built in a small metal chassis with an on/off foot switch, such "stomp boxes" have become as much a part of the instrument for many electric guitarists as the electric guitar itself. In the world of guitar music and guitar amplification, distortion is actively sought, evaluated, and appreciatively discussed in its endless flavors. ... In electronics, gain is usually taken as the mean ratio of the signal output of a system to the signal input of the system. ... For other uses, see Volume (disambiguation). ... A preamplifier (preamp), as its name suggests, is an amplifier which precedes another amplifier. ... In music, timbre, or sometimes timber, (from Fr. ... Effects units are devices that affect the sound of an electric instrument or other audio source (such as recorded material) when plugged in to the electrical signal path the instrument or source sends, most often an electric guitar or bass guitar. ... This article is about the percussion instrument. ...


Typical effects include stereo chorus, fuzz, wah-wah and flanging, compression/sustain, delay, reverb, and phase shift. A chorus effect is: A condition in the way people perceive similar sounds coming from multiple sources. ... A 1965 Gibson Maestro Fuzz Tone FZ-1A, one of the first commercially available fuzz boxes. ... This article is about the effect pedal, also known as a Wah. ... Flanging is a time-based audio effect that occurs when two identical signals are mixed together, but with one signal time-delayed by a small and gradually changing amount, usually smaller than 20 ms (milliseconds). ... Compression is a subtle effect primarily for electric guitar where the highest and lowest points of the sound wave are limited. This boosts the volume of softer picked notes, while capping the louder ones, giving a more even level of volume. ... Delay is an audio effect which records an input signal to an audio storage medium, and then plays it back after a period of time[1]. The delayed signal may either be played back multiple times, or played back into the recording again, to create the sound of a repeating... This article is about audio effect. ... This article is about the audio effect. ...


In 1967, with the release of Little Games, Jimmy Page of The Yardbirds introduced a way of playing the guitar with a violin bow, in the song "Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Sailor". He would produce the sound by running the bow downwards on the strings, while fingering chords. In addition, he would also smack the strings with the bow, making an unusual, brief noise. Little Games is an album by British blues rock band The Yardbirds, released in 1967 (see 1967 in music). ... For the Scottish football (soccer) player, see Jimmy Page (footballer). ... Not to be confused with Yard Birds. ...


In the 1970s, as effects pedals proliferated, their sounds were combined with power-tube distortion at lower, more controlled volumes by using power attenuators such as Tom Scholz' Power Soak as well as re-amplified dummy loads such as Eddie Van Halen's use of a variac, power resistor, post-power-tube effects, and a final solid-state amp driving the guitar speakers. A variac is one approach to power-supply based power attenuation, to make the sound of power-tube distortion more practically available. “Attenuator” redirects here. ... The word Transformer can also mean: The Transformers toys, and the related comics and animated television series which have run from the 1980s onwards. ... The word Transformer can also mean: The Transformers toys, and the related comics and animated television series which have run from the 1980s onwards. ...


By the 1980s and 1990s, digital and software effects became capable of replicating the analog effects used in the past. These new digital effects attempted to model the sound produced by analog effects and tube amps, to varying degrees of quality. There are many free guitar effects computer programs for PCs that can be downloaded from the Internet. By the 2000s, PCs with specially-designed sound cards could be used as digital guitar effects processors. Although digital and software effects offer many advantages, many guitarists still use analog effects.


Some innovations have been made recently in the design of the electric guitar. In 2002, Gibson announced the first digital guitar, which performs analog-to-digital conversion internally. The resulting digital signal is delivered over a standard Ethernet cable, eliminating cable-induced line noise. The guitar also provides independent signal processing for each individual string. Ethernet is a large, diverse family of frame-based computer networking technologies that operate at many speeds for local area networks (LANs). ...


Also, in 2003 amp maker Line 6 released the Variax guitar. It differs in some fundamental ways from conventional solid-body electrics. For example it uses piezoelectric pickups instead of the conventional electromagnetic ones, and has an onboard computer capable of modifying the sound of the guitar to model the sound of many instruments. An instrument amplifier is an electronic amplifier designed for use with an electric or electronic musical instrument, such as an electric guitar. ... The Line 6 logo. ... Variax is a line of electric guitars developed and marketed by Line6, an Agoura Hills, California manufacturer of electric guitars, amplfiers and effects equipment. ... Three magnetic pickups on an electric guitar. ...


Types

Solid body

Solid body electric guitars are guitars that have no holes for sound or an internal cavity to accommodate vibration, such as those used to amplify string vibrations in acoustic guitars. They are generally made of hardwood with a lacquer coating and have six steel strings. The sound that is audible in music featuring electric guitars is produced by pickups on the guitar which convert the string vibrations into an electrical signal. The signal is then fed to an amplifier (or amp) and speaker. Acoustic guitar can refer to the following musical instruments: Nylon and gut stringed guitars: Renaissance guitar Baroque guitar Romantic guitar Classical guitar, the modern version of the original guitar, with nylon strings Flamenco guitar Steel stringed guitars: Steel-string acoustic guitar, also known as western, folk or country guitar Twelve... This article is about audible acoustic waves. ... For other uses, see Music (disambiguation). ... For the British rock band of the same name, see Amplifier (band). ... The Speaker Icon Computer speakers, or multimedia speakers, are external speakers and are usually equipped with a male-end stereo jack plug (usually color-coded lime green as for the PC 99 standard) for computer sound cards; however, there are some that have female RCA connector, and some people link...


One of the first solid body guitars was invented by Les Paul. Gibson did not make their famous 'Les Paul' guitar when they were presented it as they did not believe it would catch on. The first mass produced solid body guitar was Fender's Broadcaster (later to become the 'Telecaster') first made in 1948, five years after Les Paul made his prototype. The Gibson Les Paul appeared soon after to compete with the Broadcaster.[7] This article is about the musician. ... The Gibson Guitar Corporation, of Nashville, Tennessee, USA, is a manufacturer of acoustic and electric guitars. ... The Gibson Les Paul is a solidbody electric guitar originally developed in the early 1950s. ... Fender redirects here. ... 1950s-style Telecaster with natural finish, with metal bridge cover removed. ... For other uses, see Prototype (disambiguation). ...


Hollow body

These guitars have a hollow body and electronic pickups mounted on its body. They work in a similar way to solid body electric guitars except that because the hollow body also vibrates, the pickups convert a combination of string and body vibration into an electrical signal. A hollow body electric guitar is by design an electric guitar with a sound box. ...


Semi-hollow body

Semi-hollow body guitars strike a balance between the characteristics of solid-body and hollow-body guitars, with allegedly greater resonance and sustain than true solid-body guitars[8], as well as lighter overall weight. Typically, a semi-hollow body guitar will have a form factor more similar to a solid-body electric guitar, and may include two sound holes, one, or none.


Metal Body

There are have been a number of metal bodied guitars that have worked with the unique acoustic/sustaining qualities of metal. These are not hollow bodied guitars, like a blues steel bodied, although most are chambered for weight, these metal bodied guitars are built to act and play as solid wood body.


Several metal body were made in the 50's by violin and cello makers, John Veleno took up the torch and in the early 70's He made a polished aluminum guitar, with a distincitve headstock to match. They appeared to be owned by almost every touring act and great list of owners, Clapton, Bolan, Rundgren, Winter, Frenley, Allman Reed and on and on.


Currently now, Liquid Metal Guitars makes a metal body guitar. The process is different now, the body is cnc'd out of a solid block of alumimum and then chrome or gold plated. Liquid Metal Guitars use boutique pick-up manufacturers, such as TV Jones and Lindly Fralin to manufacture pickup sets match the unique sustaining qualities of metal bodies.


Many guitars otherwise sold as solid-bodied instruments, such as the Gibson Les Paul or the PRS Singlecut, are built with "weight relief" holes bored into the body which nonetheless affect the sound of the instrument[9]. The Les Paul Supreme edition is currently described by the manufacturer as a "chambered" instrument, with a weight relief system designed to positively affect the sound. The Gibson Les Paul is a solidbody electric guitar originally developed in the early 1950s. ... PRS Guitars is an American guitar manufacturer, based in Stevensville, Maryland. ...


Acoustic-Electric

Some steel-string acoustic guitars are fitted with pickups purely as an alternative to using a separate microphone. They may also be fitted with a piezo-electric pickup under the bridge, attached to the bridge mounting plate, or with a low mass microphone (usually a condenser mic) inside the body of the guitar that will convert the vibrations in the body into electronic signals, or even combinations of these types of pickups, with an integral mixer/preamp/graphic equalizer. These are called electric acoustic guitars, and are regarded as acoustic guitars rather than electric guitars because the pickups do not produce a signal directly from the vibration of the strings, but rather from the vibration of the guitar top or body. These should not be confused with hollow body electric guitars, which have pickups of the type found on solid body electric guitars. Acoustic-Electric guitars are also known to guitar players as "Semi-Acoustic" guitars. Playing a steel-string guitar without a pick (fingerpicking). ... Three magnetic pickups on an electric guitar. ... Piezoelectricity is the ability of some materials (notably crystals and certain ceramics) to generate an electric potential[1] in response to applied mechanical stress. ... Microphones redirects here. ... An electric acoustic guitar is by design an acoustic guitar fitted with pickups, a microphone, or transducers. ... A hollow body electric guitar is by design an electric guitar with a sound box. ...


Strings

One-string guitars

Although rare, the one-string guitar is sometimes heard, particularly in Delta blues, where improvised folk instruments were popular in the 1930s and 1940s. Eddie "One String" Jones had some regional success with a Mississippi blues musician Lonnie Pitchford played a similar, homemade instrument. In a more contemporary style, Little Willie Joe, the inventor of the Unitar had a considerable rhythm and blues instrumental hit in the 1950s with "Twitchy", recorded with the Hall Orchestra. Delta blues are named for the Mississippi Delta. ... Lonnie Pitchford (b. ... R&B redirects here. ... An instrumental is, in contrast to a song, a musical composition or recording without lyrics or any other sort of vocal music; all of the music is produced by musical instruments. ...


Four-string
Main article: Tenor guitar

The best known four-string guitar player is Tiny Grimes, who played on 52nd Street with the beboppers and played a major role in the Prestige Blues Swingers. Grimes' guitar omitted the bottom two strings. Deron Miller of CKY only uses four strings, but plays a six string guitar with the two highest strings removed. Many banjo players use this tuning: DGBE, mostly in Dixieland. Guitar players find this an easier transition than learning plectrum or tenor tuning. The tenor guitar is a slightly smaller, four-string version of the steel-string acoustic guitar or electric guitar. ... Lloyd Tiny Grimes (July 7, 1916 in Newport News, Virginia, USA - March 4, 1989) was an American jazz and R&B guitarist. ... 52nd Street, properly West 52nd Street, is a cross street in Manhattan in the Broadway district known as Swing Street, the street of jazz, the street that never sleeps or, simply, the street. The blocks of 52nd Street between 5th and 7th avenues were renowned in the mid 20th century... This article is about the genre of music, for the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles character see Bebop and Rocksteady. ... Deron John Miller (born May 21, 1976 in Chester, Pennsylvania, U.S.) is the lead singer, guitarist and songwriter for CKY. Derons previous bands include This End Up, Oil, and Foreign Objects. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Seven-string
Main article: Seven-string guitar

Most Seven-string guitars add a low B string below the low E. Both electric and classical guitars exist designed for this tuning. Another less common seven-string arrangement is a second G string situated beside the standard G string and tuned an octave higher, in the same manner as a twelve-stringed guitar (see below). Seven-string acoustic guitar as it is used in Brazilian choro music. ... Spanish guitar redirects here. ...


Seven string electric guitars were popularized by Steve Vai. Steve Vai and Japanese guitar company Ibanez created the well known Universe series seven string guitars in the 1980s, with a double locking tremolo system for a seven string guitar. These models were based on Vai's six string signature series, the Ibanez Jem. More recently, seven strings experienced a resurgence in popularity, championed by Korn, Fear Factory, Strapping Young Lad, Nevermore, and other Hard rock/Metal bands. Metal Musicians often prefer the Seven-string guitar for its extended lower range and it is often electricly amplified with a high amount of gain or distortion. Steven Steve Siro Vai (born June 6, 1960 in Carle Place, New York) is a Grammy Award winning guitarist, composer, vocalist, and record producer. ... Steven Steve Siro Vai (born June 6, 1960 in Carle Place, New York) is a Grammy Award winning guitarist, composer, vocalist, and record producer. ... This article is about the guitar manufacturer. ... The Ibanez Universe is the worlds first modern, commercial seven-string electric guitar developed by Steve Vai and manufactured by Ibanez. ... Ibanez JEM is an electric guitar manufactured by Ibanez and first produced in 1987. ... This article is about the band. ... Fear Factory is a Los Angeles, California based metal band. ... Strapping Young Lad is an influential progressive extreme metal band from Canada, started by Devin Townsend in 1994. ... For the Queen song of the same name, see Nevermore (song) For the Edgar Allan Poe poem featuring the word, see The Raven Nevermore is an American metal band from Seattle, Washington assembled in 1991 from the ashes of the power metal band Sanctuary. ... Hard Rock redirects here. ... Heavy metal redirects here. ...


Jazz guitarists using a seven-string include veteran jazz guitarists George Van Eps, Bucky Pizzarelli and his son John Pizzarelli. The seven-string guitar has also played an essential role in progressive rock, and is commonly used in bands such as Dream Theater and by experimental guitarists such as Ben Levin. Jazz guitar refers to the use of guitar in jazz music. ... George Van Eps (7 August 1913 – 29 November 1998) was an American jazz guitarist noted both for his recordings as a leader, and for his work as a session musician. ... John Paul Bucky Pizzarelli (born January 9, 1926)) is an American classical jazz guitarist and banjoist, perhaps most notable for his work with jazz guitarist John Pizzarelli, his own son. ... John Paul Pizzarelli Jr. ... Dream Theater is an American progressive metal band formed in 1985 under the name Majesty by John Myung, John Petrucci and Mike Portnoy while they attended Berklee College of Music in Boston, before they dropped out to support the band. ...


Eight-string
Main article: Eight string guitar

Eight-string electric guitars are rare, but not unused. One is played by Charlie Hunter (manufactured by Novax Guitars). The largest manufacturer of 8- to 14-strings is Warr Guitars. Their models are used by Trey Gunn (ex King Crimson) who has his own signature line from the company. Also, Mårten Hagström and Fredrik Thordendahl of Meshuggah used 8 string guitars made by Nevborn Guitars and now guitars by Ibanez. Munky of Nu Metal band Korn is also known to use eight-string Ibanez guitars and it is rumoured that he is planning to release a K8 eight-string guitar similar to his K7 seven-string guitar. In 2008 Ibanez released the Ibanez RG2228-GK which is the first mass produced eight-string guitar. LGM 8 string electric guitar An eight string guitar is a guitar with eight strings. ... Charlie Hunter is an American jazz, rock and fusion guitarist. ... Novax Guitars is a guitar manufacturing company founded by Ralph Novak. ... Trey Gunn with Warr guitar Trey Gunn was a member of the band King Crimson from 1994 to 2003. ... This article is about the musical group. ... Meshuggah is a Swedish five-piece experimental metal band, known for their use of extended polymetric passages, complex drum patterns, odd time signatures, angular, dissonant guitar riffs, and harsh vocals. ... This article is about the guitar manufacturer. ... James Munky Shaffer James Christian Munky Shaffer (born June 16, 1970 in Rosedale, California) is a guitarist with the band KoЯn. ... Nu metal (also called aggro metal, or nü metal using the traditional heavy metal umlaut) is a musical genre that has origins in the mid 1990s. ... This article is about the band. ...


Nine-string

Jethro Tull's first album featured a nine string guitar on one track. For the 18th-century agriculturist after whom the band was named, see Jethro Tull (agriculturist). ...


Josh Smith of the band The Fucking Champs plays a 9-string guitar, with two G, B, and high E strings each, tuned in unison. Matt Pike of the band High On Fire also uses a Custom 9 string guitar made by First Act Guitars. The Fucking Champs are a three-piece math rock band from San Francisco, California. ...


Twelve-string
Main article: Twelve string guitar

Twelve string electric guitars feature six pairs of strings, usually with each pair tuned to the same note. The extra E, A, D, and G strings add a note one octave above, and the extra B and E strings are in unison. The pairs of strings are played together as one, so the technique and tuning are the same as a conventional guitar, although creating a much fuller tone. They are used almost solely to play harmony and rhythm. They are relatively common in folk rock music. Lead Belly is the folk artist most identified with the twelve-string, usually acoustic with pickup. The twelve string guitar is an acoustic or electric guitar with twelve strings, which produces a richer, more ringing tone than a standard six string guitar. ... Bob Dylans folk-rock album, Blonde on Blonde Folk-rock is a musical genre, combining elements of folk music and rock music. ... For the film, see Leadbelly (film). ...


George Harrison of The Beatles and Roger McGuinn of The Byrds brought the electric twelve-string to notability in rock and roll. During the Beatles' first trip to the U.S., in February 1964, Harrison received a new "360/12" model guitar from the Rickenbacker company; this was a 12-string electric made to look onstage like a 6-string. He began using the 360 in the studio on Lennon's "You Can't Do That" and other songs. Roger McGuinn, looking for the sound of a twelve string but on an electric had an epiphany when viewing The Beatles "Hard Days Night" movie, when he realised that George was playing a twelve string electric. He liked the sound so much that it became his signature guitar sound with The Byrds. For other persons named George Harrison, see George Harrison (disambiguation). ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... James Roger McGuinn (known professionally as Roger McGuinn and born James Joseph McGuinn III on July 13, 1942) is a popular rock American singer-songwriter and guitarist of the 1960s and 1970s. ... Not to be confused with The Birds (band). ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... The Rickenbacker 360/12 was among the first electric twelve-string guitars. ... Rickenbacker 330JG Rickenbacker International Corporation, also known as Rickenbacker (pronounced ) [1]), is an electric guitar manufacturer, notable for having invented the first electric guitar during the 1930s. ...


Another notable guitarist to utilise 12 strings is Richie Sambora, the guitarist with rock group Bon Jovi. He has played a double neck guitar with a 12 string neck for years, most notably live for the hit song Wanted Dead or Alive. Richard Stephen Sambora (born on July 11th, 1959), is an American rock guitarist, singer and songwriter who is the lead guitarist of the rock band Bon Jovi. ... Bon Jovi is a hard rock band originating from Sayreville, New Jersey. ... Wanted Dead or Alive is the first album by singer/songwriter Warren Zevon, released in 1969. ...


3rd bridge
Main article: 3rd Bridge

The 3rd bridge guitar is an electric prepared guitar with an additional 3rd bridge. This can be a normal guitar with for instance a screwdriver placed under the strings, but can also be a custom made instrument. Lee Ranaldo of Sonic Youth plays with a 3rd bridge. In 2006 luthier Yuri Landman built the Moodswinger, a 12 string overtone guitar for Aaron Hemphill of the noiseband Liars The 3rd bridge guitar is an electric prepared guitar with an additional 3rd bridge. ... A prepared guitar is a guitar which has had its timbre altered by placing various objects on or between the instruments strings, including other extended techniques. ... A custom made instrument is a musical instrument that is considered to be of ones own design or a modification or extension of a defined guideline of a certain instrument. ... Lee Ranaldo at Ilosaarirock 2003 Lee Ranaldo (b. ... Sonic Youth is an American alternative rock band formed in New York City in 1981. ...


Double neck guitars
Main article: Double neck guitar

Double-neck (or, less commonly, "twin-neck") guitars enable guitarists to play guitar and bass guitar or, more commonly, a six-string and twelve-string. Jimmy Page's use of a custom-made Gibson EDS-1275, to enable him to replicate his use of two different guitars when performing Led Zeppelin's song "Stairway to Heaven" in a concert setting, brought double-necked guitars into the public eye. Don Felder also used the Gibson EDS-1275 during the Hotel California tour. Steve Vai playing a twin-necked Ibanez A double neck guitar is a guitar that has two necks. ... A double neck guitar is a guitar that has two necks. ... The twelve string guitar is an acoustic or electric guitar with twelve strings, which produces a richer, more ringing tone than a standard six string guitar. ... For the Scottish football (soccer) player, see Jimmy Page (footballer). ... This article is about the Led Zeppelin song. ... Donald William[1] Felder (born September 21, 1947 in Gainesville, Florida) is an American rock musician who was a member of the Eagles from 1974-1980 and from 1994-2001. ... This article is about the album. ...


There were also some double necks that had two 6 string necks. These would have two different pickup configurations for two entirely different sounds and tones. The most popular 6 and 6 were made by Ibanez in the early 1980s. These were copies of the Gibson SG style 6 and 12, and were also referred to as the "pre-lawsuit" guitars. Ibanez stopped production when they lost a law suit to Gibson. In some cases the "lawsuit" guitars played just as well as the Gibsons, and sometimes better, at a fraction of the cost. The Gibson 6 and 12 was also popularized by the Eagles hit "Hotel California". The guitar can be heard noticeably in the intro and solo. This article is about the guitar manufacturer. ... The Gibson Guitar Corporation, of Nashville, Tennessee, USA, is a manufacturer of acoustic and electric guitars. ... This article is about the guitar manufacturer. ... The Gibson Guitar Corporation, of Nashville, Tennessee, USA, is a manufacturer of acoustic and electric guitars. ... The Gibson Guitar Corporation, of Nashville, Tennessee, USA, is a manufacturer of acoustic and electric guitars. ... The Gibson Guitar Corporation, of Nashville, Tennessee, USA, is a manufacturer of acoustic and electric guitars. ... Eagles redirects here. ...


English progressive rock bands such as Genesis used custom made instruments produced by the Shergold company. Rick Nielsen, guitarist for Cheap Trick, uses a variety of custom guitars mostly made by Hamer Guitars, many of which have five necks, with the strap attached to the body by a swivel so that the guitar can be rotated to put any neck into playing position. For the Swedish political music movement, see progg. ... Genesis are an English rock band formed in 1967. ... 1976 Shergold Modulator guitar Shergold Guitars, or Shergold Woodcrafts Limited, was established in October 1967 by former Burns employees Jack Golder and Norman Houlder. ... Richard Nielsen (born December 22, 1946 in Rockford, Illinois) is the lead guitarist and primary songwriter of the rock band Cheap Trick. ... Cheap Trick is an American rock band from Rockford, Illinois, that gained popularity in the late 1970s. ... Hamer Guitars is a guitar manufacturing company founded by Jol Dantzig and business partner Paul Hamer in 1973. ...


Guitarist Steve Vai occasionally uses a triple-neck guitar; one neck is twelve string, one is six string and the third is a fretless six string. Today, you can buy up to six necks on a guitar, consisting of various combinations and variations of the six string guitar and four string electric bass guitar. Steven Steve Siro Vai (born June 6, 1960 in Carle Place, New York) is a Grammy Award winning guitarist, composer, vocalist, and record producer. ...


Largest electric guitar

The largest playable electric guitar was completed by 11 students in the Academy of Science and hoper with their physics teacher Scott Rippetoe in 2000. The Gibson '67 Flying V replica guitar measures 13 meters (43 feet, 7 1/2 inches) long, 4.88 meters (16 feet, 5 1/2 inches) wide, and weighs 1018 kilograms (2,244 pounds).[10] AST Logo The Conroe Independent School District Academy of Science and Technology, in Conroe, Texas is a specialized magnet school in science and technology; also a member of NCSSSMST. It was founded at Oak Ridge High School with the first graduates in 1993. ...


Uses

The electric guitar can be played either solo or with other instruments. It has been used in numerous genres of popular music, as well as (less frequently) classical music.


Contemporary classical music

While the classical guitar had historically been the only variety of guitar favored by classical composers, in the 1950s a few contemporary classical composers began to use the electric guitar in their compositions. Examples of such works include Karlheinz Stockhausen's Gruppen (1955-57); Morton Feldman's The Possibility of a New Work for Electric Guitar (1966); George Crumb's Songs, Drones, and Refrains of Death (1968); Hans Werner Henze's Versuch über Schweine (1968); Michael Tippett's The Knot Garden (1965-70); Leonard Bernstein's MASS (1971) and Slava! (1977); Louis Andriessen's De Staat (1972-76); Arvo Pärt's Miserere (1989/92), and countless works composed for the quintet of Ástor Piazzolla. Spanish guitar redirects here. ... Karlheinz Stockhausen (born August 22, 1928) is a German composer, and one of the most important and controversial composers of the 20th century (Barret 1988, 45; Harvey 1975b, 705; Hopkins 1972, 33; Klein 1968, 117; Power 1990, 30). ... Gruppen (Groups) for three orchestras (1955-57) is amongst the best-known works of German composer Karlheinz Stockhausen. ... Morton Feldman (January 12, 1926 – September 3, 1987) was an American composer, born in New York City. ... George Crumb (born October 24, 1929) is an American composer of modern and avant garde music. ... Hans Werner Henze (born July 1, 1926 in Gütersloh, Westphalia, Germany) is a composer well known for his left-wing political beliefs. ... Sir Michael Kemp Tippett, OM (2 January 1905 – 8 January 1998) was one of the foremost English composers of the 20th century. ... The Knot Garden is an opera in three acts by Michael Tippett to an original English libretto by the composer. ... Leonard Bernstein in 1971 Leonard Bernstein (IPA pronunciation: )[1] (August 25, 1918 – October 14, 1990) was an American conductor, composer, and pianist. ... MASS (formally, MASS: A Theatre Piece for Singers, Players, and Dancers) is a musical piece composed by Leonard Bernstein. ... Louis Andriessen (born June 6, 1939) is a Dutch composer, son of the composer Hendrik Andriessen (1892-1981) and brother of composer Jurriaan Andriessen (1925-1996). ... Arvo Pärt (born September 11, 1935 in Paide), (IPA: ˈɑr̺vÉ” ˈpær̺t) is an Estonian composer, often identified with the school of minimalism and more specifically, that of mystic minimalism or sacred minimalism. He is considered a pioneer of this style, along with contemporaries Henryk Górecki... Ástor Pantaleón Piazzolla (March 11, 1921 – July 4, 1992) was an Argentine tango composer and bandoneón player. ...


In the 1980s and 1990s, a growing number of composers (many of them composer-performers who had grown up playing the instrument in rock bands) began writing for the instrument. These include Steven Mackey, Nick Didkovsky, Scott Johnson, Lois V Vierk, Tim Brady, Tristan Murail, John Fitz Rogers, and Randall Woolf. Yngwie Malmsteen released his Concerto Suite for Electric Guitar and Orchestra in 1998, and Steve Vai released a double-live CD entitled Sound Theories, of his work with the Netherlands Metropole Orchestra in June 2007.[11] The American composers Glenn Branca and Rhys Chatham have written "symphonic" works for large ensembles of electric guitars, in some cases numbering up to 100 players, and the instrument is a core member of the Bang on a Can All-Stars (played by Mark Stewart). Still, like many electric and electronic instruments, the electric guitar remains primarily associated with rock and jazz music, rather than with classical compositions and performances. Steven Mackey (b. ... Nick Didkovsky is a composer, guitarist, computer music programmer, and leader of the band Doctor Nerve. ... Scott Johnson (born 1952) is an American composer known for his pioneering use of recorded speech as musical melody. ... Lois V Vierk (born August 4, 1951, Hammond, Indiana) is a post-minimalist or totalist composer who lives in New York City. ... Tim (Timothy Wesley John) Brady (b. ... Tristan Murail (born March 11, 1947 in Le Havre, France) is a French composer associated with the spectral technique of composition (along with Jonathan Harvey and the late Gérard Grisey), which involves the use of the fundamental properties of sound as a basis for harmony, as well as the... Yngwie Johann Malmsteen (IPA pronunciation: //) (born Lars Johann Yngve Lannerbäck on June 30, 1963 in Stockholm, Sweden) is a Swedish guitarist, composer and bandleader. ... Concerto Suite for Electric Guitar and Orchestra is an album released in 1998 by Yngwie J. Malmsteen on Spitfire Records. ... Steven Steve Siro Vai (born June 6, 1960 in Carle Place, New York) is a Grammy Award winning guitarist, composer, vocalist, and record producer. ... Sound Theories vol. ... Glenn Branca (born October 6, 1948 in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania) is an avant-garde composer and guitarist. ... Rhys Chatham (born September 19, 1952, New York City[1]) is an American composer, guitarist, and trumpet player, primarily active in avant-garde and minimalist music. ... Bang on a Can is a musical organization based in New York City which was founded in 1987 by three American composers who remain its artistic directors: Julia Wolfe, David Lang, and Michael Gordon. ... Mark Stewart is a New York City based multi-instrumentalist, composer, singer and instrument designer. ...


R. Prasanna plays Indian Carnatic music on the electric guitar. R. Prasanna is a South Indian Carnatic musician who is one of the very few people who play the south Indian musical art form of Carnatic music on the electric guitar. ... Carnatic music, also known as is one of the two styles of Indian classical music, the other being Hindustani music. ...


See also

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Image File history File links E-Guitare-horiz. ... In 2006 luthier Yuri Landman built the Moodswinger, a 12 string overtone guitar for Aaron Hemphill of the noiseband Liars The 3rd bridge guitar is an electric prepared guitar with an additional 3rd bridge. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... A guitar/synthesizer (also guitar synthesizer, guitar/synth, or guitar synth) is any one of a number of systems originally conceived to allow a guitarist to play synthesizers. ... A sunburst-colored Fender Precision Bass The electric bass guitar (or electric bass[1][2]; pronounced , as in base) is a bass stringed instrument played primarily with the fingers (either by plucking, slapping, popping, or tapping) or using a pick. ... Guitar effects are electronic devices that modify the tone, pitch, or sound of an electric guitar. ... Mesa Boogie Mark IV, A guitar combo amplifier A guitar amplifier is an electronic amplifier designed for use with an electric or electronic musical instrument, such as an electric guitar. ... In the world of guitar music and guitar amplification, distortion is actively sought, evaluated, and appreciatively discussed in its endless flavors. ... A guitar pedalboard is a container for electric guitar effects pedals and their power supplies. ... Similar to Electric guitar,the Pipa is modified with the electric components to change its performance. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...

References

  1. ^ Odjean, Annick (2007-08-04). Le père de tous les rocker (French) 12. Retrieved on 2007-08-07. “La date ? Bien antérieure aux dates officielles des dictionnaires puisque Les Paul dit avoir fait ses expériences à l'âge de 7-8-9 ans, donc entre 1922 et 1925.”
  2. ^ www.rickenbacker.com
  3. ^ Peter Broadbent, Charlie Christian: Solo Flight-The Seminal Electric Guitarist (UK: Ashley Mark Publishing Company, 2003), p. 59
  4. ^ Physics... in action
  5. ^ LightWave System Pickup
  6. ^ The word Tremolo properly describes variation of volume, not pitch (vibrato); however, the misnaming (likely originating with Leo Fender printing "Synchronized Tremolo" on the headstock of his original 1954 Stratocaster) is too well-established to be easily reversed. Thus the correct name for it is "Vibrato bar".
  7. ^ Alan Ratcliffe, Electric Guitar Handbook (UK: New Holland Publishers, 2005), p. 11
  8. ^ Dave Hunter, Chambering the Les Paul: A Marriage of Weight and Tone (Gibson Lifestyle, 2007), Chambering the Les Paul: A Marriage of Weight and Tone.
  9. ^ Les Paul Forum Frequently Asked Questions.
  10. ^ Gibson Article.
  11. ^ [ vai.com - the official steve vai website ]

Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 219th day of the year (220th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Leonidas Fender (August 10, 1909 - March 21, 1991), also known as Leo Fender, was an American luthier who founded Fender Electric Instrument Manufacturing Company, now known as Fender Musical Instruments Corporation, and later founded G&L Musical Products (G&L Guitars). ...

Further reading

  • Ralph Denyer, The Guitar Handbook, (ISBN 0-3303-2750-X), Pan Books; 2Rev Ed edition (27 November 1992)

is the 331st day of the year (332nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Electric guitars

Harrods is a department store on Brompton Road in Knightsbridge, London, England. ... BBC 6 Music is one of the BBCs newest radio stations, launched on March 11, 2002 and originally codenamed Network Y. It is only available via digital media - DAB radio, the Internet and the various forms of digital television. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Electric guitar (886 words)
An electrical pickup is positioned under the strings near the bridge and turns the vibrations of the strings into electrical impulses that are sent to an amplifier.
The electric guitar requires an amplifier to amplify the frequencies of the vibrating strings that are sensed by the pickup.
Guitar effects boxes, such as the fuzz box and the wah-wah have been a staple of the electric guitar's sounds for many years.
Electric guitar - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2796 words)
Guitar virtuoso Steve Vai occasionally uses a triple-neck guitar; one neck is twelve string, one is six string and the third is a fretless six string.
The popularity of the electric guitar began with the big band era because amplified instruments became necessary to compete with the loud volumes of the large brass sections common to jazz orchestras of the thirties and forties.
An acoustic guitar's sound is largely dependent on the vibration of the guitar's body and the air within it; the sound of an electric guitar is largely dependent on a magnetically induced electrical signal, generated by the vibration of metal strings near sensitive pickups.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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