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Encyclopedia > Elections in the United States
United States of America

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The Great Seal of the United States, obverse side. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Politics Portal      Politics of the United States takes place in a framework of a presidential republic, whereby the President...


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The United States has a federal government, with elected officials at federal (national), state and local level. On a national level, the head of state, the President, is elected indirectly by the people, through electors of an electoral college. In modern times, the electors virtually always vote with the popular vote of their state. All members of the federal legislature, Congress, are directly elected. There are many elected offices at state level, each state having at least an elective governor and legislature. There are also elected offices at local level, in counties and cities. It is estimated that across the whole country, over one million elected offices are filled in every electoral cycle. Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      United States presidential elections determine who serves as president and vice president of the United... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      Midterm elections are elections in the United States in which members of Congress, state legislatures, and... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Politics Portal      This list of political parties in the United States contains past and present political parties in the... The Democratic Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... A state government is the government of a subnational entity in nation-states with federal forms of government, which shares political power with the federal government or national government. ... Local governments are administrative offices that are smaller than a state or province. ... Current party control of Governors offices (2006). ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      In the United States of America, a state legislature is a generic term referring to the... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      All United States states are required to possess a legislative branch. ... In the U.S., a state court has jurisdiction over disputes which occur in a state. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      Local government in the United States (sometimes referred to as municipal government) is generally structured... Information on politics by country is available for every country, including both de jure and de facto independent states, inhabited dependent territories, as well as areas of special sovereignty. ... Political federalism is a political philosophy in which a group of members are bound together (Latin: foedus, covenant) with a governing representative head. ... Queen Elizabeth II, is the Head of State of 16 countries including: the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, Jamaica, New Zealand and the Bahamas, as well as crown colonies and overseas territories of the United Kingdom. ... The presidential seal was first used in 1880 by President Rutherford B. Hayes and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles. ... Congress in Joint Session. ...


The regulation of elections is specified by both federal and state law. The United States Constitution defines (to a basic extent) how federal elections are held, in Article One and Article Two and various amendments. State law regulates most aspects of electoral law, including primaries, the eligibility of voters (beyond the basic constitutional definition), the running of each state's electoral college, and the running of state and local elections. The financing of elections has always been controversial, due to the fact that private sources of finance make up substantial amounts of campaign contributions, especially in federal elections. Voluntary public funding for candidates willing to accept spending limits was introduced in 1974 for presidential primaries and elections. The Federal Elections Commission, created in 1975 by the 1974 amendment of the Federal Election Campaign Act (1971) has the responsibility to disclose campaign finance information, to enforce the provisions of the law such as the limits and prohibitions on contributions, and to oversee the public funding of U.S. presidential elections. The federal government has also been involved in attempts to increase voter turnout, by measures such as the National Voter Registration Act of 1993. Page one of the original copy of the Constitution. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: Article One of the United States Constitution Article One of the United States Constitution describes the powers of the legislative branch of the United States government, known as Congress, which includes the House of Representatives and the Senate. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: Article Two of the United States Constitution Article Two of the United States Constitution creates the executive branch of the government, comprising the President and other executive officers. ... The first ten amendments to the United States Constitution are known as the Bill of Rights. This is a complete list of all ratified and unratified amendments to the United States Constitution which have received the approval of the Congress. ... A U.S. state is any one of the 50 states which have membership of the federation known as the United States of America (USA or U.S.). The separate state governments and the U.S. federal government share sovereignty. ... The Federal Election Commission (FEC) is an agency created to administer and enforce the Federal Election Campaign Act of 1975 (FECA), the statute that regulates the financing of federal elections in the United States. ... 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday. ... 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... The Federal Election Campaign Act is an American law passed in 1971 to increase disclosure of contributions for federal campaigns and amended in 1974 to place legal limits on the campaign contributions. ... 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday. ... Voters lining up outside a Baghdad polling station during the 2005 Iraqi election. ... The National Voter Registration Act of 1993, commonly known as Motor Voter, was signed into effect by President Clinton on May 20, 1993. ...

Contents

Voting

Eligibility

The eligibility of an individual for voting is set out in the constitution and also regulated at state level. The constitution states that suffrage cannot be denied on grounds of race or color (Fifteenth Amendment), sex (Nineteenth Amendment) or age for citizens eighteen years or older (Twenty-sixth Amendment). Beyond these basic qualifications, it is the responsibility of statutes of state legislatures to regulate voter eligibility. Some states debar convicted criminals, especially felons, from voting for a fixed period of time or indefinitely. The number of American adults who are currently or permanently ineligible to vote due to felony convictions is estimated to be 5.3 million.[1] Some states also have legacy constitutional statements barring the "insane" or "idiots" from voting; such references are generally considered obsolete and are being considered for review or removal where they appear.[2] Amendment XV in the National Archives 1870 celebration of the 15th amendment as a guarantee of African American rights 1867 drawing depicting the first vote by African Americans Amendment XV (the Fifteenth Amendment) of the United States Constitution provides that governments in the United States may not prevent a citizen... Amendment XIX in the National Archives Amendment XIX (the Nineteenth Amendment) allowed women the right to vote under official constitutional protection. ... Amendment XXVI (the Twenty-sixth Amendment) of the United States Constitution was ratified on July 1, 1971. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      In the United States of America, a state legislature is a generic term referring to the...


Voter registration

Registering to vote is the responsibility of individuals in the United States, since voters are not automatically registered to vote once they reach the age of 18. Every state except North Dakota requires that citizens who wish to vote be registered. Some states allow citizens to register to vote on the same day of the election, see below. Traditionally, voters had to register at state offices to vote, but in the mid-1990s efforts were made by the federal government to make registering easier, in an attempt to increase turnout. The National Voter Registration Act of 1993, commonly known as "Motor Voter", forced state governments to make the voter registration process easier by providing uniform registration services through drivers' license registration centers, disability centers, schools, libraries, and mail-in registration. Idaho, Minnesota, New Hampshire, Wisconsin, Wyoming and North Dakota are exempt. This is because in these states (except North Dakota, where no registration is required) same-day registration has been adopted, allowing voters to register to vote on the day of the election. Official language(s) English Capital Bismarck Largest city Fargo Area  Ranked 19th  - Total 70,762 sq mi (183,272 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 340 miles (545 km)  - % water 2. ... The National Voter Registration Act of 1993, commonly known as Motor Voter, was signed into effect by President Clinton on May 20, 1993. ...


Absentee voting

An absentee ballot paper for Milton, New Hampshire. This ballot paper gives the voter the option to write-in a candidate and use straight ticket voting. This ballot also contains a referendum placed on the ballot by the state legislature.
An absentee ballot paper for Milton, New Hampshire. This ballot paper gives the voter the option to write-in a candidate and use straight ticket voting. This ballot also contains a referendum placed on the ballot by the state legislature.

Voters unable or unwilling to vote at polling stations on Election Day, can vote via absentee ballots. An absentee ballot is a ballot that the voter (usually) receives and sends through the mail. In about half of all states and U.S. territories allow "no excuse absentee," where no reason is required to request an absentee ballot. Others require a valid reason, such as infirmity or travel, be given before a voter can participate using an absentee ballot. Typically a voter must request an absentee ballot before the election occurs. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (816x1258, 268 KB)A absentee ballot paper for Milton, New Hampshire. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (816x1258, 268 KB)A absentee ballot paper for Milton, New Hampshire. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Postal voting. ... For the town in France, see Ballots, Mayenne. ... It has been suggested that first class mail be merged into this article or section. ...


A significant source of absentee ballots is the population of Americans living outside the United States. In 1986 Congress enacted the Uniformed and Overseas Citizens Absentee Voting Act (UOCAVA). UOCAVA requires that the states and territories allow members of the United States Uniformed Services and merchant marine, their family members, and United States citizens residing outside the United States to register and vote absentee in elections for Federal offices. Though many states had pre-existing statutes in place UOCAVA made it mandatory and nationally uniform. "Generally, all U.S. citizens 18 years or older who are or will be residing outside the United States during an election period are eligible to vote absentee in any election for Federal office. In addition, all members of the Uniformed Services, their family members and members of the Merchant Marine and their family members, who are U.S. citizens, may vote absentee in Federal, state and local elections."[3] Wikisource has original text related to this article: Uniformed and Overseas Citizens Absentee Voting Act Wikisource has original text related to this article: Executive Order 12642 The Uniformed and Overseas Citizens Absentee Voting Act (UOCAVA) is a United States federal law dealing with elections and voting rights for United States...


Voting equipment

Voters casting their ballots in polling locations record their votes on either paper ballots or on voting machines. Voting machine selection is typically done through a state's local election jurisdiction including counties, cities, and townships. Many of these local jurisdictions have changed their voting equipment since 2000 due to the passage of the Help America Vote Act (HAVA), which required and allocated funds for the replacement of lever machine and punch card voting equipment. A voting machine is a device to record and register votes to be counted as per any voting system, with or without printing a ballot for the voter to verify. ... A voting machine is a device to record and register votes to be counted as per any voting system, with or without printing a ballot for the voter to verify. ... The Help America Vote Act was enacted on October 29, 2002. ... A voting machine is a device to record and register votes to be counted as per any voting system, with or without printing a ballot for the voter to verify. ... A voting machine is a device to record and register votes to be counted as per any voting system, with or without printing a ballot for the voter to verify. ...


Levels of election

Federal elections

The United States has a Presidential system of government, which means that the executive and legislature are elected separately. Article One of the United States Constitution requires that any election for the U.S. President must occur on a single day throughout the country; elections for Congressional offices, however, can be held at different times. See Election Day (United States). Congressional and Presidential election elections take place simultaneously every four years, and the intervening Congressional election, which take place every two years are called Midterm elections. A presidential system, also called a congressional system, is a system of government where the executive branch exists and presides (hence the term) separate from the legislature, to which it is not accountable, and which cannot in normal circumstances dismiss it. ... Election Day in the United States is the day when polls most often open for the election of certain public officials. ... United States presidential elections determine who serves as President and Vice President of the United States for four-year terms, starting on Inauguration Day (January 20th of the year after the election). ... The United States hold elections to federal offices every two years; midterm elections is the name given to elections when the United States House of Representatives and one third of the US Senate are being elected, but not the President. ...


The constitution states that members of the House of Representatives must be at least 25 years old, a citizen of the United States for at least seven years, and be a (legal) inhabitant of the state they represent. Senators must be at least 30 years old, a citizen of the United States for at least nine years, and be a (legal) inhabitant of the state they represent. The President must be at least 35 years old, a natural born citizen of the United States and a resident in the United States for at least fourteen years. It is the responsibility of state legislatures to regulate the qualifications for a candidate appearing on a ballot paper. "Getting on the ballot" is based on candidate's performances in previous elections. The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      House of Representatives is a name used for legislative bodies in many countries. ...


Presidential elections

See also United States presidential election, United States Electoral College (detail on the college, history, and criticism) Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      United States presidential elections determine who serves as president and vice president of the United... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles. ...


The President and the Vice President are elected together in a Presidential election. The election is indirect, the winner being determined by votes cast by electors of the United States Electoral College. In modern times, voters in each state select a slate of electors from a list of several slates designated by different parties or candidates, and the electors typically promise in advance to vote for the candidates of their party (whose names usually appear on the ballot rather than those of the individual electors). The winner of the election is the candidate with at least 270 Electoral College votes. It is possible for a candidate to win the electoral vote, and lose the (nationwide) popular vote (receive fewer votes nationwide than the second ranked candidate). Until the Twelfth Amendment to the United States Constitution of 1804, the runner-up in a Presidential election became the Vice President. It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles. ... The United States Electoral College is the electoral college which chooses the President and Vice President of the United States at the conclusion of each Presidential election. ... This article is about the political process. ... Amendment XII in the National Archives The Twelfth Amendment to the United States Constitution altered Article II pertaining to presidential elections. ... 1804 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ...


Electoral College votes are cast by individual states by a group of electors, each elector casts one electoral college vote. In modern times, with electors usually committed to vote for a party candidate in advance, electors that vote against the popular vote in their state are called faithless electors, and occurrences are rare. State law regulates how states cast their electoral college votes. In all states except Maine and Nebraska, the candidate that wins the most votes in the state receives all its electoral college votes (a "winner takes all" system). From 1969 in Maine, and from 1991 in Nebraska, two electoral votes are awarded based on the winner of the statewide election, and the rest (two in Maine, three in Nebraska) go to the highest vote-winner in each of the state's congressional districts. Incumbent Presidents and challengers usually seek to have a "balanced ticket" (it refers to the fact that the President and the Vice President are elected together). Usually, there is some kind of balance, for example geographical, ideological, or in terms of (especially federal) government experience. The nominated Vice Presidential candidate is called the "running mate". Although incumbent Presidents can be challenged in the primaries, none have lost their parties nomination in recent times. The last incumbent President to not seek a second term was Lyndon B. Johnson, who stepped down after serving the remainder of John F. Kennedy's term and another full term (he was eligible for another term). Faithless electors are members of the U.S. Electoral College who, for whatever reason, do not vote for their partys designated candidate. ... Official language(s) None Capital Augusta Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 39th  - Total 33,414 sq mi (86,542 km²)  - Width 210 miles (338 km)  - Length 320 miles (515 km)  - % water 13. ... Official language(s) English Capital Lincoln Largest city Omaha Largest metro area Omaha Area  Ranked 16th  - Total 77,421 sq mi (200,520 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 430 miles (690 km)  - % water 0. ... For the Stargate SG-1 episode, see 1969 (Stargate SG-1). ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... “LBJ” redirects here. ... John Fitzgerald Kennedy (May 29, 1917 – November 22, 1963), also referred to as John F. Kennedy, JFK, John Kennedy or Jack Kennedy, was the 35th President of the United States. ...


The electoral college has long been criticized, for several reasons. It has been criticized for being undemocratic by definition, since through it the President is elected indirectly rather than a direct system of election. Another criticism is that it creates inequality between voters in different states during the presidential election. Usually, only voters in swing states determine the outcome of the election and as a result, it is claimed that the vast majority of Americans, who live in non-competitive states, are largely ignored by political campaigns. If the electoral college were abolished and if the whole country were treated as one district for Presidential elections, then the result would not depend on crucial swing states. It also creates inequality in that the populations of very small states, which have a minimum of 3 Electoral college votes, are overrepresented compared with voters from larger states. For example, Wyoming has a population of 493,782 and 3 EC votes, 164,594 people per EC vote. California has a population of 33,871,648 and 55 EC votes, 615,848 people per EC vote. Abolishing the college and replacing it with a national direct system would also prevent a candidate from receiving fewer votes nationwide than their opponent, but still winning more electoral votes, which last occurred in the 2000 Presidential election.[4] Also, the electoral college discriminates against candidates who do not have support concentrated in several states. In 1992, Ross Perot won 18.9% of the national vote, but received no electoral college votes. The electoral college would require a constitutional amendment to be abolished, and since three-quarters of state legislatures would be required to ratify an amendment that would effectively redistribute voting power from many small states to numerically fewer large states, it is thought that an amendment would fail. United States presidential elections determine who serves as President and Vice President of the United States for four-year terms, starting on Inauguration Day (January 20th of the year after the election). ... In United States presidential politics, a swing state (also, battleground state) is a state in which no candidate has overwhelming support, meaning that any of the major candidates have a reasonable chance of winning the states electoral college votes. ... An amendment is a change to the constitution of a nation or a state. ...

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See also: House | Senate | Governors

Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      United States presidential elections determine who serves as president and vice president of the United... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state The United States presidential election of 1792 was the second presidential election in the United States, and the first in which each of the original 13 states appointed electors (in addition to newly added states Kentucky and Vermont). ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state The U.S. presidential election of 1804 pitted incumbent (Democratic-)Republican President Thomas Jefferson against Federalist Charles Cotesworth Pinckney. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Summary Incumbent President Ulysses S. Grant was easily elected to a second term in office despite a split within the Republican Party that resulted in a defection of many key Republicans to opponent Horace Greeley. ... Presidential electoral votes by state The U.S. presidential election of 1876 was perhaps the most disputed and intense presidential election in American history. ... The U.S. presidential election of 1880 was largely seen as a referendum on the Republicans relaxation of Reconstruction efforts in the southern states. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes. ... Presidential election results map: Red denotes states won by Bush/Cheney; Blue denotes those won by Gore/Lieberman. ... Presidential election results map. ... Presidential electoral votes by state The United States presidential election of 2008 will be 55th consecutive quadrennial election for President and Vice President of the United States, that are scheduled to be held on November 4, 2008. ...

Latest election
Summary of the 2 November 2004 United States presidential election results
Candidates Party Votes % Electoral vote
  George W. Bush Republican Party 62,040,610 50.73% 286
  John Kerry Democratic Party 59,028,444 48.27% 251
  John Edwards1 1
  Ralph Nader Independent, Reform Party 465,650 0.38% -
  Michael Badnarik Libertarian Party 397,265 0.32% -
  Michael Peroutka Constitution Party 143,630 0.12% -
  David Cobb Green Party 119,859 0.10% -
Other 99,887 0.08% -
Total 122,295,345 100.0% 538
Voter turnout:   59 %
Source: FEC 2004 Election Results

November 2 is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 59 days remaining. ... shelby was here 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The presidential seal was first used in 1880 by President Rutherford B. Hayes and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... Al Gore (born December 11, 1943) is a Vietnam Veteran and the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... Johnny Reid John Edwards [1] (born June 10, 1953), is an American politician who was the Democratic nominee for Vice President in 2004 and a one-term U.S. Senator from North Carolina. ... Presidential election results map. ... Ralph Nader (born February 27, 1934), is an American attorney and political activist Issues he has promoted include consumer rights, feminism, humanitarianism, environmentalism, and democratic government. ... The Reform Party of the United States of America (abbreviated Reform Party USA or RPUSA) is a political party in the United States, founded by Ross Perot in 1995 under the belief that Americans were disillusioned with the state of politics--as being corrupt and unable to deal with vital... Badnarik campaigning in July 2004. ... The Libertarian Party is a United States political party created in 1971. ... Michael Peroutka Michael Anthony Peroutka (born 1952) is a Maryland lawyer, the founder of the Institute on the Constitution and once held a position in the United States Department of Health and Human Services. ... The Constitution Party is a conservative third party in the United States, founded as the U.S. Taxpayers Party in 1992. ... David Cobb appealing for votes at the annual Fighting Bob Fest in Baraboo, Wisconsin, September 2004 David Keith Cobb (born December 24, 1962 in San Leon, Texas) is an American ex-lawyer and activist, and was the 2004 presidential candidate of the Green Party of the United States (GPUS). ... This article specifically discusses the national committee of the Green Party in the United States. ...

Congressional elections

Elections to Congress take place every two years. Congress has two chambers. The House of Representatives has 435 members, elected for a two year term in single-seat constituencies. The Senate has 100 members, elected for a six year term in dual-seat constituencies (two from each state) with one-third being renewed every two years. Until the Seventeenth Amendment to the United States Constitution in 1913, Senators were elected by state legislatures, not the electorate of states. Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives United States Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, D since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups (as of November 7, 2006 elections) Democratic Party Republican... Image:WashingtonDC Capitol USA2. ... The United States House of Representatives (or simply the House) is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress; the other is the Senate. ... A constituency is any cohesive corporate unit or body bound by shared structures, goals or loyalty. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Politics Portal      The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the bicameral United States Congress, the... A constituency is any cohesive corporate unit or body bound by shared structures, goals or loyalty. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Counties/Parishes/Boroughs, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... Amendment XVII in the National Archives Amendment XVII (the Seventeenth Amendment) of the United States Constitution was passed by the Senate on June 12, 1911 and by the House on May 13, 1912. ... Year 1913 (MCMXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ...


Critics point out that the division of the country into congressional districts tends to eliminate voter choice, in many cases creating areas in which races are uncontested or uncompetitive. Redistricting of Congressional districts is done every ten years by commissions, which are often controlled by the majority party in a state legislature. As a result, much redistricting is partisan and reduces the number of competitive districts. According to The Economist, "if democracy means multi-party competition at the grass roots, America is not a full democracy in elections to the House of Representatives... More than nine in ten Americans live in districts that are, in practice, one-party monopolies." Source. Much of the reason for this is partisan gerrymandering which is allowed to occur by state law in virtually every state. A congressional district is an electoral constituency that elects a single member of a congress. ... A multi-party system is a type of party system. ... The Economist is a weekly news and international affairs publication owned by The Economist Newspaper Ltd and edited in London, UK. It has been in continuous publication since September 1843. ... Gerrymandering is a controversial form of redistricting in which electoral district or constituency boundaries are manipulated for an electoral advantage. ...


Senate elections
United States Senate Elections
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1908 | 1910 | 1912 | 1914 | 1916 | 1918 | 1920 | 1922 | 1924 | 1926 | 1928 | 1930 | 1932 | 1934 | 1936 | 1938 | 1940 | 1942 | 1944 | 1946 | 1948 | 1950 | 1952 | 1954 | 1956 | 1958 | 1960 | 1962 | 1964 | 1966 | 1968 | 1970 | 1972 | 1974 | 1976 | 1978 | 1980 | 1982 | 1984 | 1986 | 1988 | 1990 | 1992 | 1994 | 1996 | 1998 | 2000 | 2002 | 2004 | 2006 | 2008 | 2010 | 2012
See also: House | President | Governors

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Some states elected their Senators directly even before passage of the 17th Amendment in 1913. ... Some states elected their Senators directly even before passage of the 17th Amendment in 1913. ... Some states elected their Senators directly even before passage of the 17th Amendment in 1913. ... With the passage of the 17th Amendment in 1913, the U.S. Senate election of 1914 was the first time that all senators were popularly elected instead of chosen by their state legislatures. ... The U.S. Senate election, 1916 was an election that coincided with the re-election of Democratic President Woodrow Wilson. ... The 1918 U.S. Senate election occurred on November 5, coinciding with the midpoint of Woodrow Wilsons second term as President of the United States. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The U.S. Senate election, 1920 was an election for the United States Senate which coincided with the election of Warren G. Harding as President. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups  Farmer-Labor pickup The U.S. Senate election, 1922 was an election for the United States Senate which occurred in the middle of Republican President Warren G. Hardings term. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The U.S. Senate election, 1924 was an election for the United States Senate which coincided with the re-election of Republican President Calvin Coolidge. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The U.S. Senate election, 1926 was an election for the United States Senate which occurred in the middle of Republican President Calvin Coolidges second term. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups  Farmer-Labor hold The U.S. Senate election, 1928 was an election for the United States Senate which coincided with the election of Republican Herbert Hoover as President. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups  Simultaneous Republican hold and Democratic pickup The U.S. Senate election, 1930 was an election for the United States Senate which occurred in the middle of Republican President Herbert Hoovers first term. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The U.S. Senate election, 1932 was an election for the United States Senate which coincided with Democrat Franklin Delano Roosevelts crushing defeat of incumbent Herbert Hoover in the presidential election. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups  Simultaneous hold  Farmer-Labor hold  Progressive hold The United States Senate elections, 1934 were elections for the United States Senate which occurred in the middle of Democratic President Franklin Delano Roosevelts first term. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups  Farmer-Labor hold  Independent hold The United States Senate elections, 1936 coincided with the re-election of Franklin Delano Roosevelt. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The U.S. Senate elections, 1938 were elections for the United States Senate which occurred in the middle of Franklin Delano Roosevelts second term. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups  Progressive hold The United States Senate elections of 1940 were elections for the United States Senate which coincided with the election of Franklin Roosevelt to his third term as President. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups  Simultaneous hold The United States Senate elections of 1942 occurred midway through Franklin Roosevelts third term as President. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The United States Senate elections of 1944 coincided with the re-election of Franklin Roosevelt to his fourth term as President. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The United States Senate elections of 1946 were in the middle of Democratic President Harry Trumans first term. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The U.S. Senate election, 1948 was an election for the United States Senate which coincided with the election of Democratic President Harry Truman for a full term. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The U.S. Senate election, 1950 was an election for the United States Senate which occurred in the middle of Harry Trumans second term as President. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The U.S. Senate election, 1952 was an election for the United States Senate which coincided with the election of Dwight D. Eisenhower to the presidency by a large margin. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The U.S. Senate election, 1954 was an election for the United States Senate which was a midterm election in the first term of Dwight D. Eisenhowers presidency. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The U.S. Senate election, 1956 was an election for the United States Senate which coincided with the re-election of President Dwight D. Eisenhower. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The U.S. Senate election, 1958 was an election for the United States Senate which occurred in the middle of President Dwight D. Eisenhowers second term. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The U.S. Senate election, 1960 was an election for the United States Senate which coincided with the election of John F. Kennedy as president. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups  Simultaneous hold  Republican hold and Democratic pickup The U.S. Senate election, 1962 was an election for the United States Senate which occurred in the middle of John F. Kennedys term. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The U.S. Senate election, 1964 was an election for the United States Senate which coincided with the election of President Lyndon B. Johnson by an overwhelming majority. ... Results -- Republican holds in light red, pickups in dark red, Democratic holds in light blue, pickups in dark blue, simultaneous hold in purple The U.S. Senate election, 1966 was an election for the United States Senate which occurred midway through the term of President Lyndon Baines Johnson. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The U.S. Senate election, 1968 was an election for the United States Senate which coincided with the 1968 presidential election. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups  Independent pickups  Conservative pickups The U.S. Senate election, 1970 was an election for the United States Senate which was a midterm election in the term of President Richard M. Nixon. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The U.S. Senate election, 1972 was an election for the United States Senate coinciding with the landslide re-election of Richard M. Nixon. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The U.S. Senate election, 1974 was an election for the United States Senate held in the wake of the Watergate scandal, Richard M. Nixons resignation from the presidency, and Gerald Fords subsequent pardon of Nixon. ... Results -- Independent holds in light yellow, Republican holds in light red, pickups in dark red, Democratic holds in light blue, pickups in dark blue The U.S. Senate election, 1976 was an election for the United States Senate that coincided with Democratic Jimmy Carters election to the presidency. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The United States Senate election, 1978 was an election for the United States Senate in the middle of Democratic President Jimmy Carters term. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The 1980 U.S. Senate elections coincided with Ronald Reagans election to the Presidency. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The U.S. Senate election, 1982 was an election for the United States Senate following the Republican gains in 1980. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The U.S. Senate election, 1984 was an election for the United States Senate that coincided with Ronald Reagans landslide re-election as president. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The U.S. Senate election, 1986 was an election for the United States Senate in the middle of Ronald Reagans second presidential term. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The U.S. Senate election, 1988 was an election for the United States Senate in which, in spite of the Republican victory by George Herbert Walker Bush in the presidential election, the Republicans had a net loss of one seat in the...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The U.S. Senate election, 1990 was an election for the United States Senate in which the Democratic Party increased its majority with a net gain of one seat from the Republicans. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The U.S. Senate election, 1992 was an election for the United States Senate in which the victory of Bill Clinton in the presidential election was not accompanied by major Democratic gains in the Senate. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The U.S. Senate election, 1994 was an election in which the Republican Party was able to take control of the Senate from the Democrats by mobilizing voters discontented with congressional incumbents and the early presidency of Bill Clinton. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The U.S. Senate election, 1996 was an election for United States Senate which coincided with the re-election of Bill Clinton as president. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The U.S. Senate election, 1998 was a roughly even contest between the Republican and Democratic parties. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The U.S. Senate election, 2000 was an election for United States Senate which coincided with the election of George W. Bush as president. ...  Republican hold  Republican pickup  Democratic holdhttp://en. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The United States Senate election, 2004 was an election for one-third of the seats in the United States Senate which coincided with the re-election of George W. Bush as president and the United States House election, as well as many...  Republican hold  Democratic hold  Democratic pickup  Independent hold  Independent pickup Elections for the United States Senate were held on November 7, 2006, with 33 of the 100 seats in the United States Senate being contested. ... This article or section contains speculation and may try to argue its points. ... This article or section contains speculation and may try to argue its points. ... Elections to the United States Senate will be held on November 8, 2012, with 33 of the 100 seats in the Senate being contested. ...

Latest election
Summary of the November 7, 2006 United States Senate election results
Party Breakdown Total Seats Popular Vote
Up Elected Not Up 2004 2006 +/− Vote %
  Democratic Party 17 22 27 44 49 +5 33,134,651 53.8%
  Republican Party 15 9 40 55 49 −6 26,127,486 42.4%
  Independents 1 2 0 1 2 +1 878,486 1.4%
  Libertarian Party 0 0 0 0 0 0 600,991 1.0%
Green Party 0 0 0 0 0 0 402,800 0.7%
Others 0 0 0 0 0 0 408,335 0.7%
Total 33 33 67 100 100 0 61,552,749 100%
Voter turnout:   29.7 %
Sources: The Associated Press, Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Elections, [2] (unofficial) view, talk, edit

The Democratic Party is considered to hold a majority with 51 seats because the two independents, socialist Bernie Sanders (Vermont) and Independent Democrat Joe Lieberman (Connecticut), caucus with the Democrats. Senate Seats up for election:  Republican incumbent  Retiring Republican  Democratic incumbent  Retiring Democrat  Retiring Independent  States without a seat up for reelection // Elections for the United States Senate will be held on November 7, 2006, with 33 of the 100 seats in the United States Senate being contested. ... November 7 is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 54 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Politics Portal      The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the bicameral United States Congress, the...  Republican hold  Democratic hold  Democratic pickup  Independent hold  Independent pickup Elections for the United States Senate were held on November 7, 2006, with 33 of the 100 seats in the United States Senate being contested. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The United States Senate election, 2004 was an election for one-third of the seats in the United States Senate which coincided with the re-election of George W. Bush as president and the United States House election, as well as many...  Republican hold  Democratic hold  Democratic pickup  Independent hold  Independent pickup Elections for the United States Senate were held on November 7, 2006, with 33 of the 100 seats in the United States Senate being contested. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... The Libertarian Party is an American political party founded on Dec. ... In United States politics, the Green Party has been active as a third party since the 1980s. ... Bernard Bernie Sanders (born September 8, 1941) is the current junior United States Senator from Vermont. ... Official language(s) None Capital Montpelier Largest city Burlington Area  Ranked 45th  - Total 9,620 sq mi (24,923 km²)  - Width 80 miles (130 km)  - Length 160 miles (260 km)  - % water 3. ... Joseph Isadore Lieberman (born February 24, 1942) is an American politician from Connecticut. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles. ... A caucus is most generally defined as being a meeting of supporters or members of a political party or movement. ...


House elections
A chart of party balance in the House

U.S. House elections are general elections to the United States House of Representatives that occur every two years on the first Tuesday after November 1 in even years. House elections are first-past-the-post elections that elect a Representative from each of (currently) 435 House districts which cover the United States. Special House elections can occur between if a member dies or resigns during a term. Download high resolution version (902x612, 18 KB)Chart shows the percentage of the United States House of Representatives held by various parties from 1789 until 2004. ... Download high resolution version (902x612, 18 KB)Chart shows the percentage of the United States House of Representatives held by various parties from 1789 until 2004. ... The United States House of Representatives (or simply the House) is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress; the other is the Senate. ... November 1 is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 60 days remaining. ... The first-past-the-post electoral system is a voting system for single-member districts, variously called first-past-the-post (FPTP or FPP), winner-take-all, plurality voting, or relative majority. ...


House elections are usually, but not always, correlated with presidential elections. Typically, when a House election occurs in the same year as a presidential election, the party of the presidential winner will gain seats. On the other hand, there is a historical pattern that the incumbent president's party loses seats in elections that are held in the middle of a presidential term. This may be because the President's popularity has slipped since election, or because the President's popularity encouraged supporters to come out to vote for him in the presidential election, but these supporters are less likely to vote when the President is not up for election. United States presidential elections determine who serves as President and Vice President of the United States for four-year terms, starting on Inauguration Day (January 20th of the year after the election). ... For the pop band, see Presidents of the United States of America. ...


As the redistricting commissions of states are often partisan, districts are often drawn which benefit incumbents. An increasing trend has been for incumbents to have an overwhelming advantage in House elections, and since the 1994 election, an unusually low number of seats has changed hands in each election. Due to gerrymandering, fewer than 10% of all House seats are contested in each election cycle. The fact that over 90% of House members are guaranteed reelection every two years, due to lack of electoral competition, has been criticized by those who disapprove of the US lecturing the rest of the world on democracy. The legal gerrymandering of the House, combined with the institutionalized gerrymandering of the Senate and the Electoral College, have been criticized as being antithetical to democracy and representative government. The U.S. House election, 1994 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1994 which occurred in the middle of President Bill Clintons first term. ... Gerrymandering is a controversial form of redistricting in which electoral district or constituency boundaries are manipulated for an electoral advantage. ...

United States House of Representatives Elections
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See also: Senate | President | Governors

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The U.S. House election, 1789 was the first election for the United States House of Representatives in 1789 which coincided with the election of President George Washington. ... The U.S. House election, 1790 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1790 which occurred in the middle of President George Washingtons first term. ... The U.S. House election, 1792 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1792 which coincided with the re-election of President George Washington. ... The U.S. House election, 1794 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1794 which occurred in the middle of President George Washingtons second term. ... The U.S. House election, 1796 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1796 which coincided with the election of President John Adams. ... The U.S. House election, 1798 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1798 which occurred in the middle of President John Adams first term. ... The U.S. House election, 1800 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1800 which coincided with the election of President Thomas Jefferson. ... The U.S. House election, 1802 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1802. ... The U.S. House election, 1804 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1804. ... The U.S. House election, 1806 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1806. ... The U.S. House election, 1808 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1808. ... The U.S. House election, 1810 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1810. ... The U.S. House election, 1812 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1812. ... The U.S. House election, 1814 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1814. ... The U.S. House election, 1816 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1816. ... The U.S. House election, 1818 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1818. ... The U.S. House election, 1820 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1820. ... The U.S. House election, 1822 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1822. ... The U.S. House election, 1824 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1824. ... The U.S. House election, 1826 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1826. ... The U.S. House election, 1828 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1828. ... The U.S. House election, 1830 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1830. ... The U.S. House election, 1832 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1832. ... The U.S. House election, 1834 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1834. ... The U.S. House election, 1836 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1836. ... The U.S. House election, 1838 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1838. ... The U.S. House election, 1840 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1840. ... The U.S. House election, 1842 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1842. ... The United States House election, 1844 was an election in 1844 in which all 227 members of the United States House of Representatives were elected and who took their seats in March 1845. ... The U.S. House election, 1846 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1846. ... The U.S. House election, 1848 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1848. ... The U.S. House election, 1850 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1850. ... The U.S. House election, 1852 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1852. ... The U.S. House election, 1854 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1854. ... The U.S. House election, 1856 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1856. ... The U.S. House election, 1858 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1858. ... The U.S. House election, 1860 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1860 which coincided with the election of President Abraham Lincoln. ... The U.S. House election, 1862 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1862 which occurred in the middle of President Abraham Lincolns first term. ... The U.S. House election, 1864 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1864 which coincided with the re-election of President Abraham Lincoln. ... The U.S. House election, 1866 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1866. ... The U.S. House election, 1868 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1868 which coincided with the election of President Ulysses S. Grant. ... The U.S. House election, 1870 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1870 which occurred in the middle of President Ulysses S. Grants first term. ... The U.S. House election, 1872 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1872 which coincided with the re-election of President Ulysses S. Grant. ... The U.S. House election, 1874 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1874, which occurred in the middle of President Ulysses S. Grants second term. ... The U.S. House election, 1876 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1876 which coincided with the (heavily contested) election of President Rutherford B. Hayes. ... The U.S. House election, 1878 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1878 which occurred in the middle of President Rutherford B. Hayes term. ... The U.S. House election, 1880 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1880 which coincided with the election of President James A. Garfield. ... The U.S. House election, 1882 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1882 which occurred during President Chester A. Arthurs term. ... The U.S. House election, 1884 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1884 which coincided with the election of President Grover Cleveland. ... The U.S. House election, 1886 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1886 which occurred in the middle of President Grover Clevelands first term. ... The U.S. House election, 1888 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1888 which coincided with the election of President Benjamin Harrison. ... The U.S. House election, 1890 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1890 which occurred in the middle of President Benjamin Harrisons term. ... The U.S. House election, 1892 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1892 which coincided with the election of Grover Cleveland as President for the second time, defeating incumbent Benjamin Harrison. ... The U.S. House election, 1894 was a realigning election--a major Republican landslide that set the stage for the decisive Election of 1896. ... The U.S. House election, 1896 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1896 which coincided with the election of President William McKinley. ... The U.S. House election, 1898 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1898 which occurred in the middle of President William McKinleys first term. ... The U.S. House election, 1900 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1900 which coincided with the re-election of President William McKinley. ... The 1902 elections for the United States House of Representatives occurred in the middle of President Theodore Roosevelts first term, about a year after the assassination of President William McKinley in September 1901. ... The U.S. House election, 1904 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1904 which coincided with the re-election of President Theodore Roosevelt. ... The U.S. House election, 1906 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1906 which occurred in the middle of President Theodore Roosevelts second term. ... The U.S. House election in 1908 for the U.S. House of Representatives coincided with the 1908 presidential election, which William Howard Taft won. ... The U.S. House election, 1910 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1910 which occurred in the middle of President William Howard Tafts term. ... The U.S. House election, 1912 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1912 which coincided with the election of President Woodrow Wilson. ... The U.S. House election, 1914 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1914 which occurred in the middle of President Woodrow Wilsons first term. ... The U.S. House election, 1916 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1916 which coincided with President Woodrow Wilsons re-election. ... The U.S. House election, 1918 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1918 which occurred in the middle of President Woodrow Wilsons second term. ... The U.S. House election, 1920 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1920 which coincided with the election of President Warren G. Harding. ... The U.S. House election, 1922 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1922 which occurred in the middle of President Warren G. Hardings term. ... The U.S. House election, 1924 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1924 which coincided with the re-election of President Calvin Coolidge. ... The U.S. House election, 1926 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1926 which occurred in the middle of President Calvin Coolidges second term. ... The U.S. House election, 1928 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1928 which coincided with the election of President Herbert Hoover. ... The U.S. House election, 1930 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1930 which occurred in the middle of President Herbert Hoovers term. ... The U.S. House election, 1932 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1932 which coincided with the landslide election of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt. ... The U.S. House elections, 1934 were elections for the United States House of Representatives in 1934 which occurred in the middle of President Franklin Delano Roosevelts first term. ... The U.S. House election, 1936 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1936 which coincided with President Franklin Delano Roosevelts landslide re-election. ... The U.S. House election, 1938 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1938 which occurred in the middle of President Franklin Roosevelts second term. ... The U.S. House election, 1940 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1940 which coincided with President Franklin Delano Roosevelts re-election to an unprecedented third term. ... The U.S. House election, 1942 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1942 which occurred in the middle of President Franklin Delano Roosevelts third term. ... The U.S. House election, 1944 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1944 which coincided with President Franklin Delano Roosevelts re-election to a fourth term. ... The U.S. House election, 1946 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1946 which occurred in the middle of President Harry Trumans first term. ... The U.S. House election, 1948 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1948 which coincided with President Harry Trumans re-election. ... The U.S. House election, 1950 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1950 which occurred in the middle of President Harry Trumans second term. ... The U.S. House election, 1952 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1952 which coincided with the election of President Dwight Eisenhower. ... The U.S. House election, 1954 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1954 which occurred in the middle of President Dwight Eisenhowers first term. ... The U.S. House election, 1956 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1956 which coincided with the re-election of President Dwight Eisenhower. ... The U.S. House election, 1958 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1958 which occurred in the middle of Dwight Eisenhowers second term. ... The U.S. House election, 1960 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1960 which coincided with the election of President John F. Kennedy. ... The U.S. House election, 1962 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1962 which occurred in the middle of President John F. Kennedys term. ... The U.S. House election, 1964 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1964 which coincided with the re-election of President Lyndon Johnson. ... The U.S. House election, 1966 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1966 which occurred in the middle of President Lyndon Johnsons second term. ... The U.S. House elections, 1968 were elections for the United States House of Representatives in 1968 which coincided with Richard M. Nixons election as President. ... The U.S. House election, 1970 was an election for the United States House of Representatives held on November 3, 1970, in the middle of President Richard M. Nixons first term. ... The U.S. House election, 1972 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1972 which coincided with the landslide re-election victory of President Richard M. Nixon. ... The U.S. House election, 1974 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1974 that occurred in the wake of the Watergate scandal, which had forced President Richard M. Nixon to resign in favor of Gerald Ford. ... The U.S. House election, 1976 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1976 which coincided with Jimmy Carters election as President. ... The U.S. House election, 1978 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1978 which occurred in the middle of President Jimmy Carters term. ... The U.S. House election, 1980 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1980 which coincided with the election of Ronald Reagan as President. ... The U.S. House election, 1982 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1982 which occurred in the middle of President Ronald Reagans first term. ... The U.S. House election, 1984 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1984 which coincided with the re-election of President Ronald Reagan in a landslide. ... The U.S. House election, 1986 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1986 which occurred in the middle of President Ronald Reagans second term. ... The U.S. House election, 1988 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1988 which coincided with the election of George H. W. Bush as President. ... The U.S. House election, 1990 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1990 which occurred in the middle of President George H. W. Bushs term. ... The U.S. House election, 1992 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1992 which coincided with the election of Bill Clinton as President. ... The U.S. House election, 1994 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1994 that occurred in the middle of President Bill Clintons first term. ... The U.S. House election, 1996 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1996 which coincided with the re-election of Bill Clinton as President. ... The U.S. House election, 1998 was the midterm Congressional election during President Bill Clintons second term. ... The elections for the United States House of Representatives in 2000 coincided with the disputed election of George W. Bush as President. ... The Elections for the United States House of Representatives on 5 November 2002 was in the middle of President George W. Bushs first term. ... Summary of party change of U.S. house seats in the 2004 House election. ... President Bush meets with Nancy Pelosi and Steny Hoyer (then House Minority Leader and Minority Whip, respectively) at the Oval Office in the White House. ... Elections for the United States House of Representatives will be held on November 4, 2008, with all of the 435 seats in the House being contested. ... This is an incomplete[1] list of special elections to the United States House of Representatives. ...

Latest election
Summary of party changes      3-5 Democratic seat pickup      1-2 Democratic seat pickup
Summary of the November 7, 2006 United States House of Representatives election results
Party Seats Popular Vote
2004 2006 +/− % Vote % +/−
Democratic Party 202 233 +31 53.6% 39,673,226 52.0% +5.4%
Republican Party 232 202 −30 46.4% 34,748,277 45.6% –3.6%
Independents 1 0 −1 0 501,632 0.7% +0.1%
Others 0 0 0 0 1,305,803 1.7% –1.9%
Total 435 435 0 100.0% 76,228,938 100.0% 0
Voter turnout:   36.8 %
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Special case: FL-13 (FL certified the Republican the winner, but this election is being disputed in court and Congress.) Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... November 7 is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 54 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... The United States House of Representatives (or simply the House) is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress; the other is the Senate. ... President Bush meets with Nancy Pelosi and Steny Hoyer (then House Minority Leader and Minority Whip, respectively) at the Oval Office in the White House. ... Summary of party change of U.S. house seats in the 2004 House election. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... Floridas 13th congressional district encompasses all of Sarasota, DeSoto, and Hardee County, and most of Manatee County, except for a small northern coastal portion in District 11. ...


State elections

State law and state constitutions, controlled by state legislatures regulate elections at a state level and local level. Various officials at state level are elected. Since the separation of powers applies to states as well as the federal government, state legislatures and the executive (the governor) are elected separately. Governors and Lieutenant governor are elected in all states, in some states on a joint ticket and in some states separately, some separately in different electoral cycles. The governors of the territories of American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands are also elected. In some states, executive positions such as Attorney General and Secretary of State are also elected offices. All members of state legislatures are elected, state senators and state representatives/assembly members. Nebraska's legislature is unicameral, so only senators are elected. In some states, members of the state supreme court and other members of the state judiciary are elected. Proposals to amend the state constitution are also placed on the ballot in some states. Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      In the United States of America, a state legislature is a generic term referring to the... For other uses, see Governor (disambiguation). ... A Lieutenant Governor is a government official who is the subordinate or deputy of a Governor or Governor-General. ... In most common law jurisdictions, the Attorney General is the main legal adviser to the government, and in some jurisdictions may in addition have executive responsibility for law enforcement or responsibility for public prosecutions. ... In several countries, Secretary of State is a senior government position. ... In the United States, the state supreme court (known by various names in various states) is the highest state court in the state court system. ...

Recent United States gubernatorial elections
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See also: House | Senate | Presidential | List of current United States Governors Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Alabama gubernatorial election, 1998 Alaska gubernatorial election, 1998 Arizona gubernatorial election, 1998 Arkansas gubernatorial election, 1998 California gubernatorial election, 1998 Colorado gubernatorial election, 1998 Connecticut gubernatorial election, 1998 Florida gubernatorial election, 1998 Georgia gubernatorial election, 1998 Hawaii gubernatorial election, 1998 Idaho gubernatorial election, 1998 Illinois gubernatorial election, 1998 Iowa gubernatorial... Republican holds in dark red, Democratic holds in dark blue, Democratic pickups in light blue Three gubernatorial elections were held in the U.S. in 1999. ... Delaware gubernatorial election, 2000 Indiana gubernatorial election, 2000 Missouri gubernatorial election, 2000 Montana gubernatorial election, 2000 New Hampshire gubernatorial election, 2000 North Carolina gubernatorial election, 2000 North Dakota gubernatorial election, 2000 Utah gubernatorial election, 2000 Vermont gubernatorial election, 2000 Washington gubernatorial election, 2000 West Virginia gubernatorial election, 2000 CNN results... Seats up for election. ... Republican holds in dark red, Republican pickups in light red, Democratic holds in dark blue, Democratic pickups in light blue The U.S. gubernatorial elections of 2002 were held on November 4, 2002. ... Seats up for election. ... Election Results Map, Republican win in Red and Democratic win in Blue The U.S. gubernatorial elections of 2004 were held on November 2, 2004. ... Seats up for election. ... Republican holds in dark red, Democratic holds in dark blue, Democratic pickups in light blue The U.S. gubernatorial elections of 2006 were held on November 7, 2006 in 36 states with 22 of the seats held by Republicans and 14 by Democrats. ... Seats up for election. ... Seats up for election. ... Map of 2010 Gubernatorial Elections. ... Current party control of Governors offices (2006). ...

Local elections

At local level, by county or city several positions are usually filled by election. The extent to which offices are elected vary from county to county. Examples of elected local positions include sheriffs and school boards at county level and mayors at city level. United States of America, showing states, divided into counties. ...


Features of the election system

Party systems

The United States has a very strong two-party system, which means that there are two dominant political parties. It is extremely difficult for anyone to achieve electoral success under a "third party". As a general rule, the Republican and Democratic parties are too well established to be seriously challenged in federal and state electoral politics. In the federal government, the sole exceptions are Bernard Sanders, the independent socialist US Representative of Vermont, Senator James Jeffords (elected as a Republican) also from Vermont, an independent from 2001 and Senator Joe Lieberman an independent from Connecticut . A two-party system is a form of party system where two major political parties dominate the voting in nearly all elections. ... A political party is a political organization subscribing to a certain ideology or formed around very special issues. ... Sanders, at the podium, announces National Dairy Equity Act Bernard (Bernie) Sanders (born September 8, 1941) has been a member of the United States House of Representatives since 1991, representing the state of Vermont. ... Official language(s) None Capital Montpelier Largest city Burlington Area  Ranked 45th  - Total 9,620 sq mi (24,923 km²)  - Width 80 miles (130 km)  - Length 160 miles (260 km)  - % water 3. ... James Merrill Jim Jeffords (born May 11, 1934) is currently the junior U.S. Senator from Vermont and the only Independent in the United States Senate. ...


Ballot access

Main article Ballot Access in the United States of America Ballot access rules regulate the conditions under which a candidate or political party is entitled to appear on voters ballots. ...


Ballot access refers to the laws which regulate under what conditions access is granted for a candidate or political party to appear on voters' ballots. Each State has its own ballot access laws to determine who may appear on ballots and who may not. According to Article I, Section 4, of the United States Constitution, the authority to regulate the time, place, and manner of federal elections is up to each State, unless Congress legislates otherwise. Depending on the office and the state, it may be possible for a voter to cast a write-in vote for a candidate whose name does not appear on the ballot; but, it is extremely rare for such a candidate to win office. A write-in candidate is a candidate in an election whose name does not appear on the ballot, but for whom voters may vote nonetheless by writing in the persons name. ...


Campaign finance

The funding of electoral campaigns has always been a controversial issue in American politics. Infringement of free speech (Amendment 1 is an argument against restrictions on campaign contributions, allegations of corruption arising from unlimited contributions is an argument for the other side. Private funds are a major source of finance, from individuals and organizations. The first attempt to regulate campaign finance by legislation was in 1867, but major legislation, with the intention to widely enforce, on campaign finance was not introduced until the 1970s. Campaign finance in the United States is the financing of electoral campaigns at the federal, state, and local levels. ... Freedom of speech is the right to freely say what one pleases, as well as the related right to hear what others have stated. ... The Bill of Rights in the National Archives The First Amendment to the United States Constitution is a part of the United States Bill of Rights. ... Cunt BAg Twat Fuk suck my penis ring 0778851865!!!!!!Year 1867 (MDCCCLXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


Money contributed to campaigns can be classified into "hard money" and "soft money". Hard money is money contributed directed to a campaign, by an individual or organization. Soft money is money from an individual or organization not contributed to a campaign, but spent in candidate specific advertising or other efforts that benefits that candidate by groups supporting the candidate, but legally not coordinated by the official campaign.


The Federal Election Campaign Act 1971 required candidates to disclose sources of campaign contributions and campaign expenditure. It was amended in 1974 to legally limit campaign contributions. It banned direct contributing to campaigns by corporations and trade unions and limited individual donations to $1,000 per campaign. It introduced public funding for Presidential primaries and elections. The Act also placed limits of $5,000 per campaign on PACs (political action committees). The limits on individual contributions and prohibition of direct corporate or labor union campaigns led to a huge increase in the number of PACs. Today many labor unions and corporations have their own PACs, and over 4,000 in total exist. The 1974 amendment also specified a Federal Election Commission, created in 1975 to administer and enforce campaign finance law. Various other provisions were also included, such as a ban on contributions or expenditures by foreign nationals (incorporated from the Foreign Agents Registration Act (FARA) 1966). The Federal Election Campaign Act is an American law passed in 1971 to increase disclosure of contributions for federal campaigns and amended in 1974 to place legal limits on the campaign contributions. ... The Federal Election Commission (FEC) is an independent regulatory agency created in 1975 by Congress to administer and enforce campaign finance legislation in the United States. ... 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1966 calendar). ...


The case of Buckley v. Valeo (1976) challenged the Act. Most provisions were upheld, but the court found that the mandatory spending limit imposed was unconstitutional, as was the limit placed on campaign spending from the candidate's personal fortune and the provision that limited independent expenditures by individuals and organizations supporting but not officially linked to a campaign. The effect of the second decision was to allow candidates such as Ross Perot and Steve Forbes to spend enormous amounts of their own money in their own campaigns. The effect of the second decision was to allow the culture of "soft money" to develop. Holding --- Court membership Case opinions Laws applied --- Buckley v. ... Year 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the 1976 Gregorian calendar. ... Henry Ross Perot (born June 27, 1930) is a billionaire American businessman from Texas, who is best known for seeking the office of President of the United States in 1992 and 1996. ... Malcolm Stevenson Steve Forbes Jr. ...


A 1979 amendment to the Federal Election Campaign Act allowed political parties to spend without limit on get-out-the-vote and voter registration activities conducted primarily for a presidential candidate. Later, they were permitted by FECA to use "soft money", unregulated, unlimited contributions to fund this effort. Increasingly, the money began to be spent on issue advertising, candidate specific advertising that was being funded mostly by soft money.


The Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act of 2002 banned local and national parties from spending soft money" and banned national party committees from accepting or spending soft money. It increased the limit of contributions by individuals from $1,000 to $2,000. It banned corporations or labor unions from funding issue advertising directly, and banned the use of corporate or labor money for advertisements that mention a federal candidate within 60 days of a general election or 30 days of a primary. The constitutionality of the bill was challenged by a group of plaintiffs led by Senate Majority Whip Mitch McConnell. In December 2003, the Supreme Court upheld most provisions of the legislation. See McConnell v. FEC. The Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act of 2002 (BCRA) is U.S. Congressional legislation which regulates the financing of political campaigns. ... In politics, a whip is a member of a political party in a legislature whose task is to ensure that members of the party attend and vote as the party leadership desires. ... Addison Mitchell Mitch McConnell Jr. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      The Supreme Court of the United States (SCOTUS) is the highest judicial body in the... McConnell v. ...


A large number of "527 groups" were active for the first time in the 2004 election. These groups receive donations from individuals and groups and then spend the money on issue advocacy, such as the anti-Kerry ads by Swift Boat Veterans For Truth. This is a new form of soft money, and not surprisingly is controversial. Many 527 groups have close links with the Democratic or Republican Parties, even though legally they cannot coordinate their activities with them. John McCain, one of the Senators behind the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act, and President Bush have both declared a desire to ban 527s. A 527 group, named after a section of the United States tax code, is a tax-exempt organization that is created primarily to influence the nomination, election, appointment or defeat of candidates for public office. ... Swift Vets and POWs for Truth, formerly known as the Swift Boat Veterans for Truth (SBVT), is an organization of American Swift boat veterans and former prisoners of war of the Vietnam War, formed during the 2004 presidential election campaign for the purpose of opposing John Kerrys candidacy for...


Primaries and caucuses

In federal elections, candidates are chosen not by party officials, but by primary elections (abbreviated to "primaries") and caucuses. A primary election is an election in which voters in a jurisdiction select candidates for a subsequent election (nominating primary). ... A caucus is most generally defined as being a meeting of supporters or members of a political party or movement. ...


A primary election is an election in which registered voters in a jurisdiction (nominating primary) select a political party's candidate for a later election. There are various types of primary: either the whole electorate is eligible, and voter choose one party's primary at the polling booth (an "open primary"), or only independent voters can choose a party's primary at the polling booth or only registered members of the party are allowed to vote ("closed primary"). The "blanket primary", when voters could vote for all party's primaries on the same ballot was struck down by the United States Supreme Court as violating the First Amendment guarantee of freedom of assembly in the case California Democratic Party v. Jones. Primaries are also used to select candidates at the state level, for example in gubernatorial elections. Political parties Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A political party is a political organization that seeks to attain political power within a government, usually by participating in electoral campaigns. ... An election is a decision making process where people choose people to hold official offices. ... In United States politics, the blanket primary was a system used for selecting party candidates in a primary election. ... The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C. The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C., (large image) The Supreme Court of the United States, located in Washington, D.C., is the highest court (see supreme court) in the United States; that is, it has ultimate judicial authority within the United States... The first ten Amendments to the U.S. Constitution make up the Bill of Rights. ... Group of women holding placards with political activist slogans: know your courts - study your politicians, Liberty in law, Law makers must not be law breakers, and character in candidates photo 1920 Freedom of assembly is the freedom to associate with, or organize any groups, gatherings, clubs, or organizations that one... Holding --- Court membership Case opinions Laws applied --- California Democratic Party v. ...


Caucuses also nominate candidates by election, but they are very different from primaries. Caucuses are meetings that occur at precincts and involve discussion of each party's platform and issues such as voter turnout in addition to voting. Eleven states: Iowa, New Mexico, North Dakota, Maine, Nevada, Hawaii, Minnesota, Kansas, Alaska, Wyoming, Colorado and the District of Columbia use caucuses. A precinct is a space enclosed by the walls or other boundaries of a particular place or building, or by an arbitrary and imaginary line drawn around it. ... Official language(s) English Capital Des Moines Largest city Des Moines Area  Ranked 26th  - Total 56,272 sq mi (145,743 km²)  - Width 310 miles (500 km)  - Length 199 miles (320 km)  - % water 0. ... Capital Santa Fe Largest city Albuquerque Area  Ranked 5th  - Total 121,665 sq mi (315,194 km²)  - Width 342 miles (550 km)  - Length 370 miles (595 km)  - % water 0. ... Official language(s) English Capital Bismarck Largest city Fargo Area  Ranked 19th  - Total 70,762 sq mi (183,272 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 340 miles (545 km)  - % water 2. ... Official language(s) None Capital Augusta Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 39th  - Total 33,414 sq mi (86,542 km²)  - Width 210 miles (338 km)  - Length 320 miles (515 km)  - % water 13. ... there is a jungle in nevada by the park This article is about the U. S. state of Nevada. ... Official language(s) English, Hawaiian Capital Honolulu Largest city Honolulu Area  Ranked 43rd  - Total 10,931 sq mi (29,311 km²)  - Width n/a miles (n/a km)  - Length 1,522 miles (2,450 km)  - % water 41. ... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Area  Ranked 12th  - Total 87,014 sq mi (225,365 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 400 miles (645 km)  - % water 8. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Official language(s) none Capital Juneau Largest city Anchorage Area  Ranked 1st  - Total 663,267 sq mi (1,717,855 km²)  - Width 808 miles (1,300 km)  - Length 1,479 miles (2,380 km)  - % water 13. ... Official language(s) English Capital Cheyenne Largest city Cheyenne Area  Ranked 10th  - Total 97,818 sq mi (253,348 km²)  - Width 280 miles (450 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 0. ... Official language(s) English Capital Denver Largest city Denver Area  Ranked 8th  - Total 104,185 sq mi (269,837 km²)  - Width 280 miles (451 km)  - Length 380 miles (612 km)  - % water 0. ... ...


The "primary season" (it refers to primaries and caucuses) in Presidential elections lasts from the Iowa caucus in January to the last primary, which was the New Jersey primary and Montana primary on 8 June in 2004. "Front-loading", when too many primaries taken place in the opening weeks of the season can be a problem, reducing the number of realistic candidates, as fund-raisers and donors quickly abandon those they see as untenable. However, it is not the case that the successful candidate is always the candidate that does the best in the early primaries. There is also a period dubbed the "invisible primary" that takes place before the primary season, when candidates attempt to solicit media coverage and funding well before the real primary season begins. Since 1976, the Iowa caucus has been the first indication of which candidate for President of the United States would win the nomination of his or her political party at that partys national convention. ...


For elections of Presidential candidates, political conventions are held in the summer. These conventions ratify the decisions made in the primaries and caucuses for the two major parties, and are used to select the candidate outright for some of the other political parties. In the past, these conventions were used to select the Presidential candidates for the two major parties as well, but that role has gradually receded. Speeches by important party figures are key features of the convention; here, former President Jimmy Carter addresses the 2004 Democratic National Convention. ...


Notes

  1. ^ Felony Disenfranchisement. The Sentencing Project. Retrieved on 2007-01-10. former link replaced 10 Jan 2007: http://www.sentencingproject.org/pdfs/1046.pdf
  2. ^ DeFalco, Beth. "New Jersey to take 'idiots,' 'insane' out of state constitution?", Delaware News-Journal, 9 January 2007. Retrieved on 2007-01-10. 
  3. ^ http://www.fvap.gov/pubs/faq.html
  4. ^ However, according to the New York Times a statewide recount in Florida would have given both the popular vote and the electoral vote and hence the 2000 presidential election to Al Gore by less than 200 votes. See image [1]

2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... January 10 is the 10th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... January 10 is the 10th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also

This electoral calendar lists the national/federal direct elections in the countries listed in the list of countries. ...

External links

  • Campaign Law
  • USA Elections
  • Federal election results 1920-2004, US House Office of the Clerk

  Results from FactBites:
 
Elections in the United States - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3767 words)
State law regulates most aspects of electoral law, including primaries, the eligibility of voters (beyond the basic constitutional definition), the running of each state's electoral college, and the running of state and local elections.
The constitution states that members of the House of Representatives must be at least 25 years old, a citizen of the United States for at least seven years, and be a (legal) inhabitant of the state they represent.
Depending on the office and the state, it may be possible for a voter to cast a write-in vote for a candidate whose name does not appear on the ballot; but, it is extremely rare for such a candidate to win office.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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