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Encyclopedia > Elections in Canada
Canada

This article is part of the series:
Politics and government of
Canada
Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Canada is a constitutional monarchy and a Commonwealth Realm (see Monarchy in Canada) with a federal system of parliamentary government, and strong democratic traditions. ...


Federal
Executive (The Crown)
Sovereign (Queen Elizabeth II)
Governor General (Michaëlle Jean)

Queen's Privy Council for Canada
This article refers to the Commonwealths concept of the monarchys legal authority. ... Canada is a constitutional monarchy and a Commonwealth Realm with Queen Elizabeth II as its reigning monarch and head of state. ... Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of sixteen sovereign states, holding each crown and title equally. ... The Governor General of Canada (French (feminine): Gouverneure générale du Canada or (masculine) Gouverneur général du Canada) is the vice-regal representative in Canada of the Canadian monarch, who is the head of state; Canada is one of sixteen Commonwealth realms, all of which share the... Michaëlle Jean, CC, CMM, COM, CD, DUniv (honoris causa), D.Litt (honoris causa) , (born September 6, 1957, in Port-au-Prince, Haïti) is the current Governor General of Canada. ... The Privy Council Office as it appeared in the 1880s The Queens Privy Council for Canada (French: Conseil privé de la Reine pour le Canada) is the council of advisers to the Queen of Canada, whose members are appointed by the Governor General of Canada for life on the...

Prime Minister (Stephen Harper)
Cabinet (Twenty-Eighth Ministry)

Government of Canada
Regions Political culture Foreign relations Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      The Prime Minister of Canada (French: Premier ministre du Canada), is the Minister of the Crown who is head of the Government of Canada. ... Stephen Joseph Harper (born April 30, 1959) is the 22nd and current Prime Minister of Canada and leader of the Conservative Party of Canada. ... Regions Political culture Foreign relations Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      The Cabinet of Canada (French: Cabinet du Canada or Conseil des ministres) plays an important role in the Government of Canada in accordance with the Westminster System. ... Prime Minister Stephen Harper and Governor General Michaëlle Jean with Twenty-Eighth Ministry after the swearing-in ceremony (February 6, 2006) The Twenty-Eighth Canadian Ministry is the federal Cabinet of Prime Minister Stephen Harper, which has governed Canada since the begining of the 39th Parliament of Canada. ... Queen Elizabeth the second was the first person who created the law and the taxes and judging to count the votes from the voters from all around Canada. ...

Ministries
Legislative (Parliament)
Current Parliament (39th)

Senate
The following list outlines the Structure of the Canadian federal government. ... A legislatureis a type of representative deliberative assembly with the power to ratify laws. ... Regions Political culture Foreign relations Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      The Senate Chamber of Parliament Hill in Ottawa. ... The initial seat distribution of the 39th Canadian Parliament The 39th Canadian Parliament is the current Parliament of Canada, and has been in session since April 3, 2006. ... The Senate of Canada (French: Le Sénat du Canada) is a component of the Parliament of Canada, along with the Sovereign (represented by the Governor General) and the House of Commons. ...

Speaker of the Senate
Government Leader in the Senate
Opposition Leader in the Senate
Canadian Senate divisions

House of Commons
The Speaker of the Canadian Senate (French: Président du Sénat) is the presiding officer of the Canadian Senate. ... The Leader of the Government in the Senate is a Canadian cabinet minister who leads the government side in the Canadian Senate and is chiefly responsible for promoting and defending the governments program in the Upper House. ... In Canada, the Leader of the Official Opposition in the Senate is the leader of the largest party in the Senate that is not in government. ... Representation in the Canadian Senate is divided into seats on a provincial basis. ... The House of Commons (French: Chambre des communes) is a component of the Parliament of Canada, along with the Sovereign (represented by the Governor General) and the Senate. ...

Speaker of the House
Government House Leader
Her Majesty's Loyal Opposition
Leader of the Opposition
Opposition House Leader
Shadow Cabinet
Elections
Parliamentary constituencies

Electoral system
Last election
Current house speaker Peter Milliken In Canada the Speaker of the House of Commons (French: Président de la Chambre des communes) is the presiding officer of the lower house and is elected by fellow MPs. ... The Leader of the Government in the House of Commons (French: Leader du gouvernement à la Chambre des communes), more commonly known as the Government House Leader, is the Cabinet minister responsible for planning and managing the governments legislative program in the Canadian House of Commons. ... Her Majestys Loyal Opposition (French: LOpposition Loyale de Sa Majesté) in Canada is usually the largest parliamentary opposition party in the Canadian House of Commons that is not in government either on its own or as part of a governing coalition. ... The Leader of the Opposition (French: Chef de lOpposition) in Canada is the Member of Parliament in the Canadian House of Commons who leads Her Majestys Loyal Opposition (the body in Parliament recognized as the Official Opposition). ... In Canada each political party with representation in the House of Commons has a House Leader who is a front bench MP and an expert in parliamentary procedure. ... The outgoing Official Opposition Shadow Cabinet is listed below. ... This is a list of Canadas 308 electoral districts (also known as ridings in Canadian English) as defined by the 2003 Representation Order, which came into effect on May 23, 2004. ... Rendition of party representation in the 39th Canadian parliament decided by this election. ...

Judicial
Supreme Court
Chief Justice (Beverley McLachlin)

Lower Courts of Appeal
Constitution
British North America Acts
Peace, Order and Good Government
Charter of Rights and Freedoms
The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      In the law, the judiciary or judicial system is the system of courts which administer justice in the name of the sovereign or state, a mechanism for the resolution of disputes. ... The Supreme Court of Canada (French: Cour suprême du Canada) is the highest court of Canada and is the final court of appeal in the Canadian justice system. ... The Right Hon. ... The Rt. ... List of final courts of appeal in Canada. ... The British North America Acts 1867–1975 are a series of Acts of the Parliament of the United Kingdom dealing with the government of Canada, which was known as British North America until 1867. ... In Canada, the phrase peace, order and good government (in French, paix, ordre et bon gouvernement), called POGG for short, is often used to describe the principles upon which that countrys Confederation took place. ... The Charter, signed by Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau in 1981. ...

Provincial and territorial
Politics of the Canadian provinces
General
Regions

Political culture
Foreign relations Regions Political culture Foreign relations Other countriesAtlas  Politics Portal      Canada is a federation which consists of ten provinces that, with three territories, make up the worlds second largest country in total area. ... // Canadian provinces and territories are normally grouped into the following regions (generally from west to east): Northern Canada (The North) Yukon Northwest Territories Nunavut Western Canada British Columbia Prairies Alberta Saskatchewan Manitoba Eastern Canada Central Canada Ontario Quebec Atlantic Canada Maritimes New Brunswick Prince Edward Island Nova Scotia Newfoundland and... Canadian political culture is in some ways part of a greater North American and European political culture, which emphasizes constitutional law, freedom of religion, personal liberty, and regional autonomy; these ideas stemming in various degrees from the British common law and French civil law traditions, North American aboriginal government, and... Regions Political culture Foreign relations Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      // The British North American colonies which today constitute modern Canada had little control over their foreign affairs until the achievement of responsible government in the late 1840s. ...


Other countries · Atlas
 Politics Portal
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See also: Canadian electoral system and Canadian federal election results since 1867

The Parliament of Canada (French: Parlement du Canada) has two chambers. The House of Commons (French: Chambre des Communes) has 308 members, elected for a maximum five-year term in single-seat constituencies. The Senate (French: Sénat) has 105 appointed members. However, the present Conservative government recently proposed a bill fixing federal election dates every four years, although minority governments can fall over motions of non-confidence. Information on politics by country is available for every country, including both de jure and de facto independent states, inhabited dependent territories, as well as areas of special sovereignty. ... Regions Political culture Foreign relations Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      The Canadian electoral system is based on a parliamentary system of government, modelled on that of the United Kingdom. ... A Conservative election poster from 1891. ... Regions Political culture Foreign relations Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      The Senate Chamber of Parliament Hill in Ottawa. ... Image:WashingtonDC Capitol USA2. ... The House of Commons (French: Chambre des communes) is a component of the Parliament of Canada, along with the Sovereign (represented by the Governor General) and the Senate. ... A constituency is any cohesive corporate unit or body bound by shared structures, goals or loyalty. ... The Senate of Canada (French: Le Sénat du Canada) is a component of the Parliament of Canada, along with the Sovereign (represented by the Governor General) and the House of Commons. ...


Although four parties are currently represented in Parliament, Canada has two dominant political parties, the Conservatives and Liberals, that have governed the country since its formation in 1867. Political parties Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A two-party system is a form of party system where two major political parties dominate the voting in nearly all elections. ... The Conservative Party of Canada (French: Parti conservateur du Canada), colloquially known as the Tories, is a conservative political party in Canada, formed by the merger of the Canadian Alliance and the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada in December 2003. ... The Liberal Party of Canada (French: ), colloquially known as the Grits (originally Clear Grits), is a Canadian federal political party. ...


The Prime Minister may ask the Governor General to call an election at virtually any time, although one must be called no later than five years after the return of the writs the last election under section 4 of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. The same provision applies in all provinces and territories, although some provinces have local laws that require elections to be even earlier. Regions Political culture Foreign relations Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      The Prime Minister of Canada (French: Premier ministre du Canada), is the Minister of the Crown who is head of the Government of Canada. ... The Governor General of Canada (French (feminine): Gouverneure générale du Canada or (masculine) Gouverneur général du Canada) is the vice-regal representative in Canada of the Canadian monarch, who is the head of state; Canada is one of sixteen Commonwealth realms, all of which share the... Section Four of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms is one of three democratic rights sections in the Charter. ... The Charter, signed by Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau in 1981. ... Regions Political culture Foreign relations Other countriesAtlas  Politics Portal      Canada is a federation which consists of ten provinces that, with three territories, make up the worlds second largest country in total area. ...


The time limitation is strictly applied to the life of the Parliament or Assembly in question - this body is not deemed to have been "formed" until the return of the writs and ceases to exist the moment it is dissolved. It is therefore possible to run slightly longer than five years between election days, as was the case between 1930 and 1935. In parliamentary systems, a dissolution of parliament is the dispersal of a legislature at the call of an election. ... More than one country has a day called Election Day. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1930 election The Canadian federal election of 1930 was held on July 28, 1930 to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons to the 17th Parliament. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1935 election The Canadian federal election of 1935 was held to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ...


It is also possible for a general election to be delayed should Canada be embroiled in a war or insurrection. This provision was enacted to allow Prime Minister Robert Borden to delay a federal election for about a year during World War I. Since then, the provision has only been used twice, both times by provincial governments - Ontario delayed an election for a few weeks in the year following the Armistice in 1918. Saskatchewan was the only jurisdiction to delay a general election by more than five years due to World War II, but held an election in 1944 (six years after the previous vote). For other uses, see War (disambiguation). ... Insurrection could refer to: * in a general sense, it means Rebellion * it is also a title of a Star Trek film, see Star Trek: Insurrection ... Sir Robert Laird Borden, PC, GCMG, KC, DCL, LL.D (June 26, 1854 – June 10, 1937) was the eighth Prime Minister of Canada from October 10, 1911, to July 10, 1920, and the third Nova Scotian to hold this office. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... The Ontario general election, 1919 was the fifteenth general election held in the Province of Ontario, Canada. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The Saskatchewan general election of 1944 was the tenth provincial election in the Canadian province of Saskatchewan. ...


Traditionally, governments have waited four years between elections, but under Jean Chrétien's Liberal government in the 1990s, elections were held on average every three and half years. Parties generally only wait the maximum of five years between elections if they expect to lose, and hope (usually in vain) that a postponement will allow more time for things to change in their favour. Joseph Jacques Jean Chrétien, usually known as Jean Chrétien, PC, QC, BA, BCL, LLD (h. ...


Elections are generally held in either the fall or spring. This avoids the problems of a winter campaign, where outdoor events are harder to hold. It also avoids the problems of the summer, when many Canadians are on holiday.


Using the plurality voting system, Canadians vote for their local Member of Parliament (MP), who sits in the House of Commons. Canadians do not vote directly for the Prime Minister, nor do they vote for senators. An example of a plurality ballot. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ...


By-elections can be held between general elections when seats become vacant. It is at the discretion of the Prime Minister to call by-elections, but they must be called between the 11th and 180th day after the chief electoral officer receives notice of the vacancy.[1] The federal government can also hold nation-wide referendums on major issues. The last referendum was held in 1992 on proposed constitutional changes in the Charlottetown Accord. On occasion, one particular issue will dominate an election, and the election will in a sense be a virtual referendum. The most recent instance of this was the 1988 election, which was considered by most parties to be a referendum on free trade with the United States. A by-election or bye-election is a special election held to fill a political office when the incumbent has died or resigned. ... Elections Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A referendum (plural: referendums or referenda) or plebiscite (from Latin plebiscita, originally a decree of the Concilium Plebis) is a direct vote in which an entire electorate is asked to either accept or reject a particular proposal. ... Headline on October 27, 1992 Globe and Mail. ... Map of the Popular Vote with bar graphs showing seat totals in the provinces and territories The Canadian Parliament after the 1988 election The Canadian federal election of 1988 was held November 21, 1988, to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... Free trade is an economic concept referring to the selling of products between countries without tariffs or other trade barriers. ...


Every person who is Canadian citizen 18 years of age or older is allowed to vote except for the Chief Electoral Officer and the Deputy Chief Electoral Officer. In the Canada Elections Act, inmates serving a sentence of at least two years are also prohibited from voting, but on October 31, 2002, the Supreme Court of Canada ruled in Sauvé v. Canada that such a law violated the section 3 of the Charter, and was rendered of no force or effect. The Chief Electoral Officer was created in 1920 by the Dominion Elections Act (Canada). ... The Supreme Court of Canada (French: Cour suprême du Canada) is the highest court of Canada and is the final court of appeal in the Canadian justice system. ... Court membership Chief Justice: Beverley McLachlin Puisne Justices: Claire LHeureux-Dubé, Charles Gonthier, Frank Iacobucci, John C. Major, Michel Bastarache, Ian Binnie, Louise Arbour, Louis LeBel Reasons given Majority by: McLachlin Joined by: Iacobucci, Binnie, Arbour, and LeBel Dissent by: Gonthier Joined by: L’Heureux‑Dubé, Major and Bastarache... 3. ...


Election turn-out has been steadily falling for many decades, although turnout rose by four percent in the last election. Currently, about sixty percent of registered voters vote in federal elections, but this amounts to less than 50% of the eligible, adult population.


The most recent election was held on January 23, 2006. Rendition of party representation in the 39th Canadian parliament decided by this election. ... is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Contents

Length of election campaigns

The length of election campaigns can vary, but under the Canada Elections Act the minimum length of a campaign is 36 days. There is no explicit maximum length for a campaign, although section 5 of the Charter requires that the Parliament sit at least once every twelve months, and thus a campaign would have to conclude in time for returns to be completed and parliament to be called into session within twelve months of the previous sitting. The federal election date must be set on a Monday (or Tuesday if the Monday is a statutory holiday). Canada Elections Act is an Act of the Parliament of Canada respecting the election of members of parliament to the Canadian House of Commons, repealing other Acts relating to elections and making consequential amendments to other Acts. ... Section Five of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms is a part of the Constitution of Canada, and the last of three democratic rights in the Charter. ...


The longest election campaign was the 1926 election following the King-Byng Affair which lasted 74 days. Prior to the adoption of the minimum of 36 days in law, there were six elections that lasted shorter periods of time. The last of these was the 1904 election which occurred many decades before the time limit was imposed. The Canadian parliament after the 1926 election The Canadian federal election of 1926 was held to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... Mackenzie King requested a dissolution of Parliament. ... In the Canadian federal election of 1904, SIr Wilfrid Laurier led the Liberal Party of Canada to a second term in government, with an increased majority in the canadian House of Commons, and over half of the popular vote. ...


In practice, the Prime Minister will generally keep a campaign as brief as is legal and/or feasible, because spending by parties is strictly limited by the Elections Act, a law which contains no provisions that would allow for increased spending in a lengthy campaign. The 1997, 2000 and 2004 elections were all of the minimum 36 days in length which has led to a common misconception that elections must be 36 days long. However, prior to 1997, elections averaged much longer: aside from the 47 day campaign in 1993, the shortest election period after World War II was 57 days and many were over 60 days in length. 36th Parliament The Canadian federal election of 1997 was held on June 2, 1997, to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The 2000 Canadian federal election was held on November 27, 2000, to elect 301 Members of Parliament to the House of Commons of Canada. ... The Canadian federal election, 2004 (more formally, the 38th general election), was held on June 28, 2004 to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... Popular vote map with bar graphs showing seat totals in the provinces and territories. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


Much speculation had surrounded how long the campaign for the 39th federal election would be in 2006, especially as it became certain the election would be called in the weeks preceding Christmas 2005. The government of Joe Clark, which fell on December 12, 1979, recommended a campaign of 66 days for the resulting election, and nothing legal barred a similarly lengthened campaign. In the end, the 2006 election was called on November 29, 2005, for January 23, 2006 — making a 55-day long campaign. Rendition of party representation in the 39th Canadian parliament decided by this election. ... Charles Joseph Joe Clark, PC, CC, AOE, MA, LLD (born June 5, 1939) was the sixteenth prime minister of Canada, from June 4, 1979, to March 3, 1980. ... is the 346th day of the year (347th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Provincial elections

The following table lists the results of the most recent provincial and territorial elections. A link to complete lists for each province and territory is below. The winning party is indicated in bold and by the coloured bar at the left of the table. The table does not show the current state of the parties within the legislative bodies; refer to the articles on the individual houses for the current state. Regions Political culture Foreign relations Other countriesAtlas  Politics Portal      Canada is a federation which consists of ten provinces that, with three territories, make up the worlds second largest country in total area. ... This is a list of the Legislative Assemblies of Canadas provinces and territories. ...


In some cases the provincial parties are not associated with their federal equivalents. Most notably, in British Columbia and Quebec the provincial Liberals are wholly emancipated from the federal Liberals, and in many policy aspects differ from their federal counterparts. Both the Saskatchewan and Yukon parties are closely tied to the Conservative party. Thus, names of provincial parties are sometimes misleading when associating a provincial party with a national party.

Province Date of most
recent election
        Total Seats
Progressive Conservative Liberal New Democrat Other
Saskatchewan 2007-11-07       22 36 (Saskatchewan Party) 58
Ontario 2007-10-10   26 711 10   107
Newfoundland & Labrador 2007-10-09   44 3 1   48
Prince Edward Island 2007-05-28   4 23     27
Manitoba 2007-05-22   19 2 36   57
Quebec 2007-03-27     481   41 (A.D.Q.)
36 (Parti Québécois)
125
Yukon 2006-10-10     5 3 10 (Yukon Party) 18
New Brunswick 2006-09-18   26 29     55
Nova Scotia 2006-06-13   23 9 20   52
British Columbia 2005-05-17     461 33   79
Alberta 2004-11-22   62 161 4 1 (Alberta Alliance) 83
Total 204 252 129 124 709

Nunavut does not have political parties; political parties in the Northwest Territories were disbanded in 1905. For lists of general elections in each province and territory, see the infobox at the bottom of the article. There are a number of conservative parties in Canada, a country which has traditionally been dominated by two political parties, one liberal and one conservative. ... Liberalism has been a strong force in Canadian politics since the late 18th Century. ... This article is about the Canadian political party. ... The Legislative Assembly of Saskatchewan is located in Regina. ... The 26th Saskatchewan general election will be the twenty-sixth provincial election held in the Canadian province of Saskatchewan. ... The Saskatchewan Party is a centre-right political party in the Canadian province of Saskatchewan. ... The Provincial Parliament of Ontario, is the legislature of the Canadian province of Ontario. ... The Ontario general election of 2007 was held on October 10, 2007 to elect members (MPPs) of the 39th Legislative Assembly of the Province of Ontario, Canada. ... Colonial Building, the House of Assembly of the Dominion of Newfoundland Chamber of the House of Assembly in the Confederation Building. ... The Newfoundland and Labrador general election, 2007 is scheduled to be held on October 9, 2007 to elect members of the Legislative Assembly of the Province of Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada. ... The Legislative Assembly of Prince Edward Island is one of two parts of the General Assembly, the other being the Lieutenant-Governor. ... Map of PEIs ridings coloured in based on how they voted Prince Edward Island general election was held on May 28, 2007. ... The Legislative Assembly of Manitoba is located in central Winnipeg, at the meeting point of the Wolseley and Fort Rouge ridings. ... On April 20, 2007, Premier of Manitoba Gary Doer announced that a general election will be held on May 22, 2007. ... The Quebec Parliament Building at night The National Assembly of Quebec (French: Assemblée nationale du Québec) is the name for the legislative body of the province of Quebec, Canada which was defined in the Canadian constitution as the Legislative Assembly of Quebec (lassemblée législative de... The new composition of the legislature Map of Quebecs ridings coloured in to indicate ridings won by each party and their popular vote. ... The Action démocratique du Québec (ADQ) is a fiscally conservative, nationalist and populist provincial political party in Quebec, Canada. ... The Parti Québécois (PQ) is a political party that advocates national sovereignty for the Canadian province of Quebec and secession from Canada, as well as social democratic policies and has traditionally had support from the labour movement. ... The Yukon Legislative Assembly is the legislative assembly for Yukon Territory, Canada. ... The next Yukon general election will be held on October 10, 2006, in the Yukon Territory in [{Canada]] to elect members of the Yukon Legislative Assembly. ... The Yukon Party is a conservative political party in the Yukon Territory of Canada. ... The Legislative Assembly of New Brunswick is located in Fredericton. ... Map of New Brunswicks ridings coloured in based on the winning parties and their popular vote The 2006 general election (more formally the 56th general election) was held on September 18, 2006, in the province of New Brunswick, Canada to elect members of the Legislative Assembly of New Brunswick. ... The Nova Scotia House of Assembly is the legislative branch of the provincial government of Nova Scotia, located in Halifax. ... Riding map of Nova Scotia showing winning parties. ... Legislature Building in Victoria, BC The Legislative Assembly of British Columbia is located in Victoria. ... Popular vote map by riding. ... The Legislative Assembly of Alberta meets in the provincial capital, Edmonton. ... Alberta riding map showing the winning parties and their vote percentage in each won riding. ... The Alberta Alliance is a right wing political party in Alberta. ... Motto: Nunavut Sannginivut (Inuktitut: Nunavut our strength or Our land our strength) Capital Iqaluit Largest city Iqaluit Official languages Inuktitut, Inuinnaqtun, English, French Government - Commissioner Ann Meekitjuk Hanson - Premier Paul Okalik (Consensus government) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 1 (Nancy Karetak-Lindell) - Senate seats 1 (Willie Adams) Confederation... For the former United States territory, see Northwest Territory. ...


1Note: Provincial Liberal Parties that are not affiliated with the federal Liberal Party of Canada


Municipal

Municipal elections in Canada according to the Canadian Constitution are the jurisdiction of the various provinces and territories. ... Every three years, in the Canadian province of Ontario there are municipal elections held across the province, in most municipalities. ... The 2006 Municipal Elections in Ontario will elect mayors, councillors, school board trustees and all other elected officials in all of Ontarios municipalities. ... The following is a list of articles on municipal elections in the City of Toronto, Ontario, Canada: City of Toronto - pre-amalgamation Toronto municipal election, 1978 Toronto municipal election, 1981 Toronto municipal election, 1991 Toronto municipal election, 1994 Toronto municipal election, 1997 City of Toronto - post-amalgamation Toronto municipal election... This is a list of elections held in Ottawa, Canada. ... Election results for the position of mayor, in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. ...

Senate nominee (Alberta)

Alberta is the only Canadian province to elect nominees for appointment to the Senate of Canada in a process known as an Alberta Senate nominee election. ... The 1st Alberta Senate nominee election was held on October 16, 1989 which resulted in the first, and only, Canadian Senator appointed following a popular election. ... The 2nd Alberta Senate nominee election was held on October 19, 1998 in conjunction with the Alberta Municipal Elections. ... The 3rd Alberta Senate nominee election was held on November 22, 2004 in conjuction with the Alberta general election, 2004. ...

See also

// The Province of Canada was the union of Canada West (formerly Upper Canada and later Ontario) and Canada East (formerly Lower Canada and later Quebec). ... A Conservative election poster from 1891. ... It is a common misconception that there is no electronic voting in Canada. ... This electoral calendar lists the national/federal direct elections in the countries listed in the list of countries. ... This is list of elections in Canada this year. ... This is a list of Canadas 308 electoral districts (also known as ridings in Canadian English) as defined by the 2003 Representation Order, which came into effect on May 23, 2004. ... This is a list of past arrangements of Canadas electoral districts. ... National referenda are seldom used in Canada, and have tended to be disasters. ... This is a list of by-elections in Canada since 1980. ...

External links

Publications

The Hill Times: Canada's national newsweekly of politics and government


The Tyee's Election Blog: Canada's Daily Election Blog based in British Columbia


The Tyee: Daily Election stories from this daily independent BC-based online news source


A Conservative election poster from 1891. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1867 election The 1867 federal election, which proved how much canada sucks ended on September 20th, was the first election for the new . ... Politics of Canada Categories: Stub | Canadian federal elections ... The Canadian federal election of 1874 was held on January 22, 1874. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1878 election The Canadian federal election of 1878 was held to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1882 election The Canadian federal election of 1882 was held on June 20, 1882 to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1887 election The Canadian federal election of 1887 was held on February 22, 1887 to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The 1891 Canadian federal election was won by the Conservative Party of Sir John A. Macdonald. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1896 election The Canadian federal election of 1896 was held on June 23, 1896 to elect members of the 8th Parliament of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1900 election The Canadian federal election of 1900 was held to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... In the Canadian federal election of 1904, SIr Wilfrid Laurier led the Liberal Party of Canada to a second term in government, with an increased majority in the canadian House of Commons, and over half of the popular vote. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1908 election The Canadian federal election of 1908 was held to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1911 election The Canadian federal election of 1911 was held to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1917 election The 1917 Canadian federal election (sometimes referred to as the khaki election) was held on December 17, 1917, to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1921 election The Canadian federal election of 1921 was held on December 6, 1921 to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1925 election The Canadian federal election of 1925 was held to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1926 election The Canadian federal election of 1926 was held to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1930 election The Canadian federal election of 1930 was held on July 28, 1930 to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons to the 17th Parliament. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1935 election The Canadian federal election of 1935 was held to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1940 election The Canadian federal election of 1940 was the 19th general election in Canadian history. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1945 election The Canadian federal election of 1945 was the 20th general election in Canadian history. ... The Canadian federal election of 1949 was the first election in Canada in almost thirty years in which the Liberals were not led by William Lyon Mackenzie King. ... National results Notes: (1) The Liberal-Labour MP sat with the Liberal caucus. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1957 election The Canadian federal election of 1957 was held June 10, 1957, to elect members of the 23rd Parliament of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The 24th general election was held just nine months after the 23rd and transformed Prime Minister John Diefenbakers minority into the largest ever majority government in Canadian history. ... The Canadian parliament after the 1962 election The Canadian federal election of 1962 was held on June 18, 1962 to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... Map of Canadas provinces and territories and which party won the most votes in each province and territory and their popular vote. ... In the Canadian federal election of 1965, the Liberal Party of Prime Minister Lester B. Pearson was re-elected with a larger number of seats in the Canadian House of Commons. ... In the Canadian federal election of June 25, 1968, the Liberal Party won a majority government under its new leader, Pierre Trudeau. ... The House of Commons after the 1972 election The Canadian federal election of 1972 was held on October 30, 1972 to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The House of Commons after the 1974 election The Canadian federal election of 1974 was held on July 8, 1974 to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The House of Commons after the 1979 election The Canadian federal election of 1979 was held on May 22, 1979 to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The House of Commons after the 1980 election The 1980 Canadian federal election was called when the minority Progressive Conservative government led by Israel from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem. ... The Canadian federal election of 1984 was called on July 4, 1984, and held on September 4 of that year. ... Map of the Popular Vote with bar graphs showing seat totals in the provinces and territories The Canadian Parliament after the 1988 election The Canadian federal election of 1988 was held November 21, 1988, to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... Popular vote map with bar graphs showing seat totals in the provinces and territories. ... 36th Parliament The Canadian federal election of 1997 was held on June 2, 1997, to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The 2000 Canadian federal election was held on November 27, 2000, to elect 301 Members of Parliament to the House of Commons of Canada. ... The Canadian federal election, 2004 (more formally, the 38th general election), was held on June 28, 2004 to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... Rendition of party representation in the 39th Canadian parliament decided by this election. ... Barring war or insurrection, the 40th Canadian federal election will be held October 19, 2009, in accordance with the provisions of Bill C-16, which was passed by the 39th Parliament. ...

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Canadian Parliaments are the legislative bodies of the Government of Canada. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The initial seat distribution of the 1st Canadian parliament The 1st Canadian parliament was in session from November 6, 1867 until July 8, 1872. ... The initial seat distribution of the 2nd Canadian Parliament Sir John A. Macdonald was Prime Minister during most of the 2nd Canadian Parliament. ... Contents // Categories: Canada government stubs | Canadian parliaments ... The initial seat distribution of the 4th Canadian parliament The 4th Canadian parliament was in session from 1878 until 1882. ... The initial seat distribution of the 5th Canadian parliament The 5th Canadian parliament was in session from 1882 until 1887. ... The initial seat distribution of the 6th Canadian parliament The 6th Canadian parliament was in session from 1887 until 1891. ... The initial seat distribution of the 7th Canadian Parliament Several people served as Prime Minister during the 7th Canadian Parliament. ... The initial seat distribution of the 8th Canadian parliament The 8th Canadian parliament was in session from 1896 until 1900. ... The initial seat distribution of the 9th Canadian parliament The 9th Canadian parliament was in session from 1900 until 1904. ... The initial seat distribution of the 10th Canadian parliament The 10th Canadian parliament was in session from 1904 until 1908. ... The initial seat distribution of the 11th Canadian parliament The 11th Canadian parliament was in session from 1908 until 1911. ... The initial seat distribution of the 12th Canadian parliament The 12th Canadian parliament was in session from 1911 until 1917. ... The initial seat distribution of the 13th Canadian parliament The 13th Canadian parliament was in session from 1917 until 1921. ... The initial seat distribution of the 14th Canadian parliament The 14th Canadian parliament was in session from 1921 until 1925. ... The initial seat distribution of the 15th Canadian parliament The 15th Canadian parliament was in session from 1925 until 1926. ... The initial seat distribution of the 16th Canadian parliament The 16th Canadian parliament was in session from 1926 until 1930. ... The initial seat distribution of the 17th Canadian parliament The 17th Canadian parliament was in session from 1930 until 1935. ... The initial seat distribution of the 18th Canadian parliament The 18th Canadian parliament was in session from 1935 until 1940. ... The initial seat distribution of the 19th Canadian parliament The 19th Canadian parliament was in session from 1940 until 1945. ... The 20th Canadian parliament was in session from 1945 until 1949. ... The 21st Canadian parliament was in session from 1949 until 1953. ... The 22nd Canadian parliament was in session from 1953 until 1957. ... The 23rd Canadian parliament was in session from 1957 until 1958. ... The 24th Canadian parliament was in session from 1958 until 1962. ... The 25th Canadian parliament was in session from 1962 until 1963. ... The 26th Canadian parliament was in session from 1963 until 1965. ... The 27th Canadian parliament was in session from 1965 until 1968. ... The initial seat distribution of the 28th Canadian parliament The 28th Canadian parliament was in session from 1968 until 1972. ... The initial seat distribution of the 29th Canadian parliament The 29th Canadian parliament was in session from 1972 until 1974. ... The initial seat distribution of the 30th Canadian parliament The 30th Canadian parliament was in session from 1974 until 1979. ... The initial seat distribution of the 31st Canadian Parliament Joe Clark was Prime Minister during the 31st Canadian Parliament. ... The initial seat distribution of the 32nd Canadian parliament The 32nd Canadian parliament was in session from March 1980 until June 1984. ... The initial seat distribution of the 33rd Canadian parliament The 33rd Canadian parliament was in session from 1984 until 1988. ... The initial seat distribution of the 34th Canadian Parliament Brian Mulroney was Prime Minister during most of the 34th Canadian Parliament. ... The 35th Canadian parliament was in session from 1993 until 1997. ... The initial seat distribution of the 36th Canadian Parliament Jean Chrétien was Prime Minister during the 36th Canadian Parliament( and is also a pedafile). ... 37th Parliament * - formerly a member of the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada ** - formerly a member of the Canadian Alliance Party Categories: Canadian parliaments ... The initial seat distribution of the 38th Canadian Parliament Paul Martin was Prime Minister during the 38th Canadian Parliament. ... The initial seat distribution of the 39th Canadian Parliament Stephen Harper is the Prime Minister of the 39th Parliament. ...

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  Results from FactBites:
 
Canadian Election Law & Policies (2146 words)
Elections Canada also provides a number of plain English overviews of the laws and policies governing the conduct of federal elections.
This law was challenged during the 2000 election, by Stephen Harper when he headed up the National Citizens Coalition, on the grounds that the law is an unconstitutional limit on the freedom of expression and of the voters' rights to be fully informed of all points of view.
However, the Supreme Court of Canada lifted the injunction on November 10, and the limits were in force during the rest of the campaign.
Elections Canada - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (318 words)
Elections Canada is an independent, non-partisan agency reporting directly to the Parliament of Canada.
Prior to the 1991 Northwest Territories election, Elections Canada was also responsible for administering the territorial elections.
During an election, staff at Elections Canada headquarters increases to 600 and to approximately 190,000 across Canada.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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