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Encyclopedia > Eleanor Roosevelt
Eleanor Roosevelt
Eleanor Roosevelt

White House portrait Image File history File links Anna_Eleanor_Roosevelt. ...


In office
31 December 1946 – 31 December 1952
President Harry S. Truman

In office
1946 – 1952
Preceded by New Position
Succeeded by Charles Malik

In office
1961 – 1962
President John F. Kennedy
Preceded by New Office
Succeeded by Commission work taken over by Esther Peterson after Commissioner Roosevelt's death

In office
March 4, 1933 – April 12, 1945
Preceded by Lou Henry Hoover
Succeeded by Elizabeth "Bess" Wallace Truman

Born October 11, 1884(1884-10-11)
New York, New York
Died November 7, 1962 (aged 78)
New York, New York
Political party Democratic
Spouse Franklin D. Roosevelt
Children Anna Eleanor, James, Elliott, Franklin, John
Residence Geneva
Occupation First Lady, diplomat, activist
Religion Episcopal

Anna Eleanor Roosevelt (IPA: /ˈɛlɪnɔr ˈroʊzəvɛlt/; October 11, 1884November 7, 1962) was First Lady of the United States from 1933 to 1945. She supported the New Deal policies of her husband, President Franklin D. Roosevelt, and assumed a role as an advocate for civil rights. After her husband's death in 1945, she continued to be an internationally prominent author and speaker for the New Deal coalition. She worked to enhance the status of working women, although she opposed the Equal Rights Amendment because she believed it would adversely affect women. Spanish president in the General Assembly in New York Org type: Principal Organ Acronyms: GA, UNGA Head: President of the UN General Assembly As of 18 September 2007 Srgjan Kerim former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia Status: Active Established: 1945 Website: www. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1952 (MCMLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other persons named Harry Truman, see Harry Truman (disambiguation). ... United Nations Commission on Human Rights - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Charles Malik Charles Habib Malik (1906 - 1987) was a Lebanese Christian philosopher and diplomat. ... The Presidential Commission on the Status of Women (PCSW) was established to advise the President of the United States on issues concerning the status of women. ... John Kennedy and JFK redirect here. ... Esther Peterson (December 9, 1906 - December 20, 1997) was a lifelong consumer and womens advocate. ... First Lady Laura Bush and former first ladies (from left to right) Rosalynn Carter, Sen. ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... Lou Henry Hoover (1874-1944) Lou Henry Hoover (March 29, 1874 – January 7, 1944) was the wife of President Herbert Hoover and First Lady of the United States. ... Elizabeth Virginia Wallace Truman (February 13, 1885 – October 18, 1982), often known as Bess Truman, was the wife of Harry S Truman and First Lady of the United States from 1945 to 1953. ... is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1884 (MDCCCLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... This article is about the state. ... is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... This article is about the state. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... FDR redirects here. ... Anna Eleanor Roosevelt Halsted (May 3, 1906 – December 1, 1975), also Anna Dall and Anna Boettiger in earlier marriages, was the first child of Anna Eleanor Roosevelt and Franklin Delano Roosevelt. ... Franklin Delano Roosevelt (1882-1945) and his son James Roosevelt (1907-1991) in 1934. ... Elliott Roosevelt in his Air Force uniform Elliott Roosevelt (September 23, 1910 – October 27, 1990), was a World War II hero and an author. ... Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Jr. ... Photo of Roosevelt family and children (John Aspinwall Roosevelt) John Aspinwall Roosevelt (March 13, 1916 – April 27, 1981) was the 6th and last child of the 32nd President of the United States, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, and his wife, Eleanor Roosevelt. ... For other uses, see Geneva (disambiguation). ... First Lady Laura Bush and former first ladies (from left to right) Rosalynn Carter, Sen. ... This article is about negotiations. ... Activism, in a general sense, can be described as intentional action or inaction to bring about social or political change. ... This article is about the Episcopal Church in the United States. ... is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1884 (MDCCCLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... First Lady Laura Bush and former first ladies (from left to right) Rosalynn Carter, Sen. ... This article is about the policy program of US President Franklin D Roosevelt. ... FDR redirects here. ... See also: American Civil Rights Movement (1955-1968) The civil rights movement in the United States has been a long, primarily nonviolent struggle to bring full civil rights and equality under the law to all Americans. ... The New Deal coalition was the alignment of interest groups and voting blocs that supported the New Deal and voted for Democratic presidential candidates from 1932 until approximately 1966, which made the Democratic Party the majority party during that period, although they had only one Presidential majority after 1944. ... The Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) was a proposed amendment to the United States Constitution intended to guarantee equal rights under the law for Americans regardless of sex. ...


In the 1940s, she was one of the co-founders of Freedom House and supported the formation of the United Nations. Eleanor Roosevelt founded the UN Association of the United States in 1943 to advance support for the formation of the UN. She was a delegate to the UN General Assembly from 1945 and 1952, a job for which she was appointed by President Harry S. Truman and confirmed by the United States Senate. During her time at the United Nations she chaired the committee that drafted and approved the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. President Truman called her the "First Lady of the World" in tribute to her human rights achievements. Freedom House is a United States-based international non-governmental organization that conducts research and advocacy on democracy, political freedom and human rights. ... UN redirects here. ... The United Nations Association of the United States of America or UNA-USA was founded in 1943 by Eleanor Roosevelt as the American Association for the United Nations (AAUN) which was merged with the in 1964. ... Spanish president in the General Assembly in New York Org type: Principal Organ Acronyms: GA, UNGA Head: President of the UN General Assembly As of 18 September 2007 Srgjan Kerim former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia Status: Active Established: 1945 Website: www. ... For other persons named Harry Truman, see Harry Truman (disambiguation). ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... The Universal Declaration of Human Rights (also UDHR) is a declaration adopted by the United Nations General Assembly (A/RES/217, December 10, 1948), outlining basic human rights. ... Human rights are rights which some hold to be inalienable and belonging to all humans. ...


Active in politics for the rest of her life, she chaired the John F. Kennedy administration's ground-breaking committee which help start second-wave feminism, the Presidential Commission on the Status of Women. She was one of the most admired persons of the 20th century, according to Gallup's List of Widely Admired People. John Kennedy and JFK redirect here. ... Second-wave feminism refers to a period of feminist activity which began during the early 1960s and lasted through the late 1980s. ... The Presidential Commission on the Status of Women (PCSW) was established to advise the President of the United States on issues concerning the status of women. ... Gallups List of Widely Admired People, a poll of United States citizens to volunteer the names of the individuals whom they most admire, is a list compiled annually by The Gallup Organization. ...

Contents

Personal life

Early life

Anna Eleanor Roosevelt was born on October 11, 1884, at 56 West 37th Street in New York City, New York. Her parents were Elliott Roosevelt and Anna Hall Roosevelt. She was named Anna for her mother and for her aunt, Anna Cowles and Eleanor for her father, who was nicknamed "Ellie". From the beginning, she preferred to be called by her middle name, Eleanor. Two brothers, Elliott, Jr. (1889–1893) and Hall Roosevelt (1891–1941) were born later. Eleanor also had a half brother, Elliott Roosevelt Mann, the result of an extramarital relation between Elliot and Katy Mann, a young servant girl employed by Anna.[1] She was born into a world of immense wealth and privilege, as her family was part of New York high society called the "swells".[2] is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1884 (MDCCCLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... This article is about the state. ... Elliott Bulloch Roosevelt (February 28, 1860- August 14, 1894) was the father of Anna E. Roosevelt and the brother of Theodore Roosevelt. ... Anna Eleanor Rebecca Livingston Ludlow Hall Roosevelt (March 17, 1863 - December 7, 1892) was the mother of former First Lady of the United States, Anna E. Roosevelt. ... Anna Bamie Roosevelt Cowles in 1882 Anna Roosevelt Cowles (January 18, 1855 – August 25, 1931) was the older sister of United States President Theodore Roosevelt. ... Gracie Hall Roosevelt (June 2, 1891 - September 25, 1941) was the youngest brother of former First Lady of the United States, Eleanor Roosevelt and the nephew of Theodore Roosevelt. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

When Eleanor was eight, her mother died of diphtheria and she and her brothers were sent to live with her maternal grandmother, Mary Ludlow Hall (1843–1919) at Tivoli, New York and at a brownstone in New York City. Just before Eleanor turned ten, she was orphaned when her father died of complications of alcoholism. In his Pulitzer Prize-winning biography of Eleanor Roosevelt, author Joseph Lash describes her during this period of childhood as insecure and starved for affection, considering herself "ugly". In the fall of 1899, with the encouragement of her paternal aunt Bamie Cowles, it was decided to send Eleanor to Allenswood Academy, an English finishing school. The headmistress, Marie Souvestre, was a noted feminist educator who sought to develop independent minds in young women. Eleanor learned to speak French fluently and gained self-confidence. Her first-cousin Corinne Robinson, whose first term at Allenswood overlapped with Eleanor's last, said that when she arrived at the school, Eleanor was "everything". Image File history File links Eleanor_Roosevelt_&_father_Elliot_in_1889. ... Tivoli is a village in Dutchess County, New York, United States. ... This article is about the state. ... Alcoholism is the consumption of, or preoccupation with, alcoholic beverages to the extent that this behavior interferes with the drinkers normal personal, family, social, or work life, and may lead to physical or mental harm. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... Anna Bamie Roosevelt Cowles in 1882 Anna Roosevelt Cowles (January 18, 1855 – August 25, 1931) was the older sister of United States President Theodore Roosevelt. ... A finishing school is a type of private school for girls that emphasizes cultural studies and prepares students especially for social activities. ... Marie Souvestre (1830-1905) was a feminist educator who sought to develop independent minds in young women. ... Corinne Douglas Robinson Alsop Cole (July 2, 1886 in Orange, New Jersey - June 23, 1971 in Avon, Connecticut) was the daughter of Corinne Roosevelt and her husband Douglas Robinson and a niece of Theodore Roosevelt. ...


Marriage and family life

In 1902 at age 17, Eleanor Roosevelt returned to the United States, ending her formal education, and was later given a debutante party. Soon afterward, she became reacquainted with her father's (Elliott Roosevelt's) fifth cousin Franklin D. Roosevelt ("FDR"), then a 20-year-old junior at Harvard University. Following a White House reception and dinner with her uncle, President Theodore Roosevelt, on New Year's Day, 1903, Franklin's courtship of Eleanor began. In November, 1903, they became engaged, although the engagement was not announced for more than a year, until December 1, 1904, at the insistence of FDR's mother, Sara Delano Roosevelt. Franklin Delano Roosevelt and Anna Eleanor Roosevelt were married on St. Patrick's Day (March 17, 1905) at Eleanor's great-aunt's home in New York City. The marriage produced six children, five of whom survived infancy: Anna Eleanor, James, Franklin Delano, Jr. (who was born and died in 1909), Elliott, Franklin Delano, and John Aspinwall. Following a honeymoon in Europe, the newlyweds settled in New York City, in a house provided by Sara, as well as at the family's estate overlooking the Hudson River in Hyde Park, New York. Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... A debutante (or deb) (from the French débutante, female beginner) is a young lady from an aristocratic or upper class family who has reached the age of maturity, and as a new adult, is introduced to society at a formal presentation known as her debut or coming out. Originally... Elliott Bulloch Roosevelt (February 28, 1860- August 14, 1894) was the father of Anna E. Roosevelt and the brother of Theodore Roosevelt. ... FDR redirects here. ... Harvard redirects here. ... For other uses, see White House (disambiguation). ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... For other persons named Theodore Roosevelt, see Theodore Roosevelt (disambiguation). ... This article is about the date January 1 in the Gregorian calendar. ... “Engaged” redirects here. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1904 (MCMIV) was a leap year starting on a Friday (see link for calendar). ... ... St. ... is the 76th day of the year (77th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1905 (disambiguation). ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... is the death of infants in the first year of life. ... Anna Eleanor Roosevelt Halsted (May 3, 1906 – December 1, 1975), also Anna Dall and Anna Boettiger in earlier marriages, was the first child of Anna Eleanor Roosevelt and Franklin Delano Roosevelt. ... Franklin Delano Roosevelt (1882-1945) and his son James Roosevelt (1907-1991) in 1934. ... Elliott Roosevelt in his Air Force uniform Elliott Roosevelt (September 23, 1910 – October 27, 1990), was a World War II hero and an author. ... Franklin D. Roosevelt, Jr. ... Photo of Roosevelt family and children (John Aspinwall Roosevelt) John Aspinwall Roosevelt (March 13, 1916 – April 27, 1981) was the 6th and last child of the 32nd President of the United States, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, and his wife, Eleanor Roosevelt. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... , The Hudson River, called Muh-he-kun-ne-tuk in Mahican, the Great Mohegan by the Iroquois,[1][2][3] or as the Lenape Native Americans called it in Unami, Muhheakantuck, Θkahnéhtati[4] in Tuscarora), is a river that runs through the eastern portion of New York State and... Hyde Park is a town located in the northwest part of Dutchess County, New York, United States, just north of the city of Poughkeepsie. ... This article is about the state. ...


The family began spending summers at Campobello Island, New Brunswick, on the MaineCanada border, where Franklin was stricken with high fever in August, 1921, which resulted in permanent paralysis of his legs. Although the disease was widely believed during his lifetime to be poliomyelitis, some retrospective analysts now favor the diagnosis of Guillain-Barré syndrome (see also Franklin D. Roosevelt's paralytic illness). FDR's attending physician, Dr. William Keen, believed it was polio and commended Eleanor's devotion to the stricken Franklin during that time of travail, "You have been a rare wife and have borne your heavy burden most bravely", proclaiming her "one of my heroines".[2] A play and movie depicting that time, Sunrise at Campobello, were produced almost 40 years later. Campobello Island is a Canadian island located in the Bay of Fundy near the entrances to Passamaquoddy Bay and Cobscook Bay. ... Official language(s) None (English and French de facto) Capital Augusta Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 39th  - Total 33,414 sq mi (86,542 km²)  - Width 210 miles (338 km)  - Length 320 miles (515 km)  - % water 13. ... This article is about the disease. ... Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) (IPA pronunciation: is an acute, autoimmune, polyradiculoneuropathy affecting the peripheral nervous system, usually triggered by an acute infectious process. ... One of only a few known photographs of Roosevelt in a wheelchair Franklin D. Roosevelts paralysis has become a major part of his image today, even though during his life it was kept from public view and rarely discussed in public. ... This article is about the film . ...


Relationship with mother-in-law

Eleanor had a somewhat contentious relationship with her domineering mother-in-law, Sara Delano Roosevelt.[3] Long before Eleanor fell in love with her future husband and distant cousin, Franklin, she already had a relationship with Sara as a distant but highly engaging cousin with whom she corresponded. Although they had a somewhat contentious relationship, Sara sincerely wanted to be a mother to Eleanor and did her best before and during the marriage to fill this role. Sara had her own reasons for attempting to prevent their marriage and historians continue to discuss them. Historians also have had widely diverging opinions on the pluses and minuses of this relationship.[4] ...

Eleanor and her future mother-in-law Sara Delano Roosevelt in 1904
Eleanor and her future mother-in-law Sara Delano Roosevelt in 1904

From Sara's perspective, Eleanor was relatively young, inexperienced and lacked the support from her late mother, Anna Hall Roosevelt. Despite her forceful and domineering personality, Sara had much to teach her new daughter-in-law on what a young wife should know. Eleanor, while sometimes resenting Sara's domineering nature, nevertheless highly valued her opinion in the early years of her marriage until she developed the experience and confidence a wife gains from the school of marital "hard knocks". Historians continue to study the reasons Eleanor allowed Sara to dominate their lives, especially in the first years of the marriage. Eleanor's income was more than half of that of her husband's when they married in 1905 and could have lived still relatively luxuriously without Sara's financial support.[5] Image File history File links Eleanor_roosevelt_&_sara_delano_roosevelt_1908. ... Image File history File links Eleanor_roosevelt_&_sara_delano_roosevelt_1908. ... Sara Ann Delano Roosevelt (September 21, 1854 – September 7, 1941) was the wife of James Roosevelt, Sr. ... Anna Eleanor Rebecca Livingston Ludlow Hall Roosevelt (March 17, 1863 - December 7, 1892) was the mother of former First Lady of the United States, Anna E. Roosevelt. ...


From Sara's perspective, she was bound and determined to ensure her son's success in all areas of life including his marriage. Sara had doted on her son to the point of spoiling him, and now intended to help him make a success of his marriage with a woman that she evidently viewed as being totally unprepared for her new role as chatelaine of a great family. Sara would continue to give huge presents to her new grandchildren, but sometimes Eleanor had problems with the influence that came with "mother's largesse."[2]


Tensions with some "Oyster Bay Roosevelts"

Although Eleanor was always in the good graces of her Uncle Theodore, the paterfamilias of the Oyster Bay Roosevelts, as the Republican branch of the family was known, she often found herself at odds with his eldest daughter, Alice Roosevelt. Uncle Theodore felt Eleanor's conduct to be far more responsible, socially acceptable and cooperative: in short, more "Rooseveltian" than that of the beautiful, highly photogenic but rebellious and self-absorbed Alice, to whom he would ask, "Why can't you be more like 'cousin Eleanor'?" These early experiences laid the foundation for life-long strain between the two high-profile cousins. Eleanor's relationship with her cousin and other Oyster Bay Roosevelts would be aggravated by the widening political gulf between the Hyde Park and Oyster Bay families as Franklin D. Roosevelt's political career began to take off. Characteristically caustic comments by "Cousin Alice", such as her later description of Franklin as "two-thirds mush and one-third Eleanor" certainly did not help. When Franklin was inaugurated president in 1933, Alice was invited to attend along with her brothers, Kermit and Archie. Alice Roosevelt, taken around her debut in 1902. ... FDR redirects here. ... An inauguration is a ceremony of formal investiture whereby an individual assumes an office or position of authority. ... Alice Roosevelt, taken around her debut in 1902. ... Kermit Roosevelt, explorer, author and soldier, accompanied his father, Theodore Roosevelt on several expeditions to Africa and the Amazon Kermit Roosevelt I (October 10, 1889 – June 4, 1943) was a son of U.S. President Theodore Roosevelt (also known as TR). ... Archibald Roosevelt was the fourth child of president Theodore Roosevelts marriage to his second wife Edith Carow. ...


Franklin's affair and Eleanor's relationships

Despite its happy start, the Roosevelts' marriage almost disintegrated over Franklin's affair with Eleanor's social secretary Lucy Mercer (later Lucy Mercer Rutherfurd). When Eleanor learned of the affair from Mercer's letters to FDR (found in FDR's suitcases), which she discovered in September 1918, she was brought to despair and self-reproach. She told Franklin she would insist on a divorce if he did not immediately end the affair.[2] Lucy Page Mercer Rutherfurd, born Lucy Mercer, is best known as the mistress of Franklin Roosevelt. ...

Eleanor and Fala, the Roosevelts' dog during the White House years
Eleanor and Fala, the Roosevelts' dog during the White House years

So implacable was Sara's opposition to divorce that she warned her son she would disinherit him. Aunt Corinne, Uncle Ted, and Louis Howe, FDR's political advisor, were also influential in persuading Eleanor and Franklin to save the marriage for the sake of the five children and FDR's political career. The idea has been put forth that because of Lucy being a Catholic she would never have married a divorced Protestant. However this is probably not true. Her relatives maintain that she was perfectly willing to marry Franklin. Her father's family was Episcopal and her mother, Minnie, had been divorced.[6] Franklin agreed not to see Mercer, but the affair continued right up to Franklin's death in 1945 at Warm Springs, Georgia, where Mercer was with FDR when he died. Image File history File links Eleanor Roosevelt with Fala. ... Image File history File links Eleanor Roosevelt with Fala. ... FDR with Fala at Warm Springs, Georgia. ... For other uses, see White House (disambiguation). ... For other persons named Theodore Roosevelt, see Theodore Roosevelt (disambiguation). ... Louis McHenry Howe (1871-1936) was an intimate friend and political advisor to President Franklin D. Roosevelt. ... Warm Springs is a city in Meriwether County, Georgia, United States. ...


Although the marriage survived, Eleanor Roosevelt emerged a different woman, coming to the realization that she could achieve fulfillment only through her own influence and life, not someone else's.[2]


In 1933 Eleanor Roosevelt had a very close relationship with Lorena Hickok, which spanned over her early years in the White House.[7] On the day of Roosevelt's inauguration, she was wearing a sapphire ring that Lorena had given her.[7] Later, when their correspondence was made public, it became clear that Eleanor would write such endearments as, 'I want to put my arms around you & kiss you at the corner of your mouth.'[8] It is however unknown if FDR was aware of that relationship, which Lillian Faderman has deemed to be lesbian.[7] Hickok's relationship with Roosevelt has been the subject of much speculation but it has not been determined by historians whether or not the two were romantically connected.[9] de Lorena Alice Hickok de (7 mars, 1893 &ndash ; 1er mai, 1968) étaient American un journaliste et un confident de Eleanor Roosevelt. ... For other uses, see White House (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Sapphire (disambiguation). ... Lillian Faderman is a scholar whose books on lesbian relationships in history have earned critical praise and awards. ...


Eleanor also had a close relationship with New York State Police sergeant Earl Miller. Franklin had assigned Miller as her bodyguard. Prior to that Miller had been Al Smith's personal bodyguard and was acquainted with Franklin from World War I. Miller was an athlete and had been the Navy's middleweight boxing champion as well as a member of the U.S. Olympic squad at the Antwerp games in 1920.[10] An editor has expressed a concern that the subject of the article does not satisfy one of the guidelines for inclusion on Wikipedia on one of the following topics: If you are familiar with the subject matter, please expand the article to establish its notability, citing reliable sources. ... Alfred Emanuel Al Smith (December 30, 1873 – October 4, 1944) was Governor of New York, and Democratic U.S. presidential candidate in 1928. ...


Eleanor was 44 when they met, in 1929, and Miller was 32. According to Franklin's biographer Jean Edward Smith, Miller became her unofficial escort, companion, and manager. He taught her different sport activities, like diving and riding, and coached her tennis game. Whether they were more than good friends is open to conjecture. For example, according to Blanche Wiesen Cook, Earl Miller was Eleanor's "first romantic involvement" in her middle years but she does not speculate further. James Roosevelt wrote that "From my observations, I personally believe they were more than friends." Eleanor's friendship with Miller coincided with Franklin's relationship with Missy LeHand, and Smith writes that "Remarkably, both ER and Franklin recognized, accepted, and encouraged the arrangement... Eleanor and Franklin were strong-willed people who cared greatly for each other's happiness but realized their own inability to provide for it."[11] Their relationship went on until Eleanor's death in 1962, but there is not much evidence of it. There are some photographs and a few home movies. They are thought to have corresponded daily, but all letters are lost. According to rumors the letters were anonymously purchased and destroyed or locked away when Eleanor died.[12] Jean Edward Smith is an accomplished educator and biographer having authored such works as Grant, John Marshall: Definer of a Nation, and Presently he is the John Marshall Professor of Political Science at Marshall University. ... Blanche Wiesen Cook is the author of one of Mrs. ... Franklin Delano Roosevelt (1882-1945) and his son James Roosevelt (1907-1991) in 1934. ... Marguerite Missy LeHand was the private secretary to Franklin Delano Roosevelt for many years. ...


Public life in the years before the White House

Following FDR's paralytic illness attack in 1921, Eleanor began serving as a stand-in for her incapacitated husband, making public appearances on his behalf. She also started working with the Women's Trade Union League (WCTU), raising funds in support of the union's goals: a 48-hour work week, minimum wage, and the abolition of child labor.[2] Throughout the 1920s, she was increasingly influential as a leader in the New York State Democratic Party. In 1924, she actively campaigned for Alfred E. Smith in his successful re-election bid as governor of the Empire State. By 1928, she was actively promoting Smith's candidacy for president and Franklin Roosevelt's nomination as the Democratic Party's candidate for governor of New York, succeeding Smith. Although Smith lost, Roosevelt won handily and the Roosevelts moved into the governor's mansion in Albany, New York. The Womens Trade Union League was an organization of both working class and more well-off women formed in 1903 to support the efforts of women to organize labor unions and to eliminate sweatshop conditions. ... The minimum wage is the minimum rate a worker can legally be paid (usually per hour) as opposed to wages that are determined by the forces of supply and demand in a free market. ... A twelve year old American uneducated child laborer, Furman Owens, who stated Yes I want to learn but cant when I work all the time. ... Alfred Emanuel Al Smith (December 30, 1873 – October 4, 1944) was Governor of New York, and Democratic U.S. presidential candidate in 1928. ... For other uses, see Albany. ... This article is about the state. ...


She also taught literature and American history at the Todhunter School for Girls in New York City in the 1920s.


First Lady of the United States (1933–1945)

Eleanor Roosevelt met President Ramon Magsaysay, the 7th President of the Philippines, and his wife at the Malacañang Palace.
Eleanor Roosevelt and Madame Chiang Kai-shek
Eleanor Roosevelt and Madame Chiang Kai-shek

Having seen her aunt Edith Roosevelt's strictly circumscribed role and traditional protocol during the presidency of Theodore Roosevelt (1901–1909), Eleanor set out on a different course. Despite criticism, she continued with the active business and speaking agenda she had begun before becoming First Lady, in an era when few women had careers outside the home. She was the first First Lady to hold weekly press conferences and started writing a syndicated newspaper column, "My Day". Eleanor Roosevelt maintained a heavy travel schedule over her twelve years in the White House, frequently making personal appearances at labor meetings to assure Depression-era workers that the White House was mindful of their plight. In one widely-circulated cartoon of the time lampooning the peripatetic First Lady, she was pictured appearing inside a coal mine wearing a miner's hat, to the astonishment of a startled miner who exclaims, "My gosh! There's Mrs. Roosevelt".[13] Eleanor Roosevelt saw the job of the First Lady as a buffer between depression victims and the government bureaucracy, a guardian of human values within the administration, not just as a social, ceremonial position.[citation needed] Image File history File linksMetadata Magsaysay_Roosevelt. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Magsaysay_Roosevelt. ... For the municipality, see Ramon Magsaysay, Zamboanga del Sur. ... Malacañan Palace, colloquially, the Malacañang Palace [1], is the official residence of the President of the Philippines. ... Image File history File links Eleanor_Roosevelt_with_Soong_Mei-ling. ... Image File history File links Eleanor_Roosevelt_with_Soong_Mei-ling. ... Generalissimo and Madame Chiang Kai-shek with General Stilwell in Burma (1942). ... White House portrait Edith Kermit Carow Roosevelt (August 6, 1861 – September 30, 1948), second wife of Theodore Roosevelt, was First Lady of the United States from 1901 to 1909. ... First Lady Laura Bush and former first ladies (from left to right) Rosalynn Carter, Sen. ...


Eleanor also became an important connection for FDR's administration to the African-American population during the segregation era. During Franklin Roosevelt's terms as President, Eleanor was vocal in her support of the African-American civil rights movement. She was outspoken in her support of Marian Anderson in 1939 when the black singer was denied the use of Washington's Constitution Hall and was instrumental in the subsequent concert held on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial. The first lady also played a role in racial affairs when she appointed Mary McLeod Bethune as head of the Division of Negro Affairs.[13] Historically, the civil rights movement was a concentrated period of time around the world of approximately twenty years (1960-1980) in which there was much worldwide civil unrest and popular rebellion. ... Marian Anderson (February 27, 1897 – April 8, 1993),[1] was an American contralto, perhaps best remembered for her performance on Easter Sunday, 1939 on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C. // Anderson was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ... DAR Constitution Hall DAR Constitution Hall is a concert hall located in Washington, D.C. It was built in 1929 by the Daughters of the American Revolution, which still owns the theater. ... The Lincoln Memorial, in Washington, D.C., is a United States Presidential memorial built to honor 16th President Abraham Lincoln. ...


World War II

In 1941, Eleanor Roosevelt, Wendell Willkie, and other Americans concerned about threats to democracy established Freedom House. Once the United States entered World War II, she was active on the homefront, co-chairing a national committee on civil defense with New York Mayor Fiorello LaGuardia and frequently visiting civilian and military centers to boost war morale. Wendell L. Willkie Wendell Lewis Willkie (February 18, 1892 – October 8, 1944) was a lawyer in the United States and the Republican nominee for the 1940 presidential election. ... Freedom House is a United States-based international non-governmental organization that conducts research and advocacy on democracy, political freedom and human rights. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The United States home front during World War II covers the developments within the United States, 1940-1945, to support its efforts during the Second World War. ... Fiorello Henry LaGuardia (December 11, 1882–September 20, 1947) was the Mayor of New York from 1934 to 1945. ...

Roosevelt flying with Tuskegee Airman Charles "Chief" Anderson
Roosevelt flying with Tuskegee Airman Charles "Chief" Anderson

She especially supported more opportunities for women and African-Americans, notably the Tuskegee Airmen in their successful effort to become the first black combat pilots. At a time when there was still racial segregation in the armed forces and considerable opposition to allowing blacks to train as pilots, First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt was openly supportive of the Tuskegee Airmen. She visited the Tuskegee Air Corps Advanced Flying School in Alabama and, at her request, flew with a black student pilot for more than an hour, which had great symbolic value and brought visibility to Tuskegee's pilot training program.[14] She also arranged a White House meeting in July 1941 for representatives of the Tuskegee flight school to plead their cause for more support from the military establishment in Washington. Afterwards, the president of the Tuskegee Institute, F.D. Patterson, wrote to her at the White House that he was "greatly heartened to know of your sympathetic interest".[14] As the war raged in Europe and the Tuskegee Airmen were distinguishing themselves in combat over the skies of Europe in 1943, Tuskegee President Patterson sent a telegram to Eleanor Roosevelt expressing his gratitude: "[I] feel your presence and endorsement ... was a major factor in favorable action. [I] am happy men in air now at front are justifying in full measure the great confidence you and others expressed in them".[14] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 425 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (474 × 668 pixel, file size: 20 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) A picture of First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt flying with Tuskegee Airman pilot C. Alfred “Chief” Anderson. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 425 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (474 × 668 pixel, file size: 20 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) A picture of First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt flying with Tuskegee Airman pilot C. Alfred “Chief” Anderson. ... Pilots of the 332nd Fighter Group, Tuskegee Airmen, the elite, all-African American 332nd Fighter Group at Ramitelli, Italy. ... Pilots of the 332nd Fighter Group, Tuskegee Airmen, the elite, all-African American 332nd Fighter Group at Ramitelli, Italy. ...


She was a strong proponent of the Morgenthau Plan to de-industrialize Germany in the postwar period,[15][16][17] and was in 1946 one of the few prominent individuals to remain a member of the campaign group lobbying for a harsh peace for Germany.[18] The Morgenthau Plan showing the planned partitioning of Germany into a North State, a South State, and an International zone. ...


The years after the White House

United Nations

Roosevelt speaking at the United Nations in July 1947

In 1946, U.S. President Harry S. Truman appointed Eleanor Roosevelt as a delegate to the United Nations General Assembly. She played an instrumental role, along with René Cassin, John Peters Humphrey and others, in drafting the UN Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Roosevelt served as the first chairperson of the UN Human Rights Commission.[19] On the night of September 28, 1948, Roosevelt spoke on behalf of the Declaration calling it "the international Magna Carta of all mankind" (James 1948). The Declaration was adopted by the UN General Assembly on December 10, 1948.[20] The vote of the General Assembly was unanimous except for eight abstentions. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... UN redirects here. ... For other persons named Harry Truman, see Harry Truman (disambiguation). ... United Nations General Assembly The United Nations General Assembly is one of the six principal organs of the United Nations. ... Memorial for Cassin in Forbach/France René Samuel Cassin (5 October 1887 – 20 February 1976) was a French jurist and judge. ... John Peters Humphrey (April 30, 1905 – May 14, 1995) was a Canadian legal scholar, jurist, and human rights advocate. ... The Universal Declaration of Human Rights (also UDHR) is a declaration adopted by the United Nations General Assembly (A/RES/217, December 10, 1948), outlining basic human rights. ... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the English charter issued in 1215. ... United Nations General Assembly The United Nations General Assembly is one of the six principal organs of the United Nations. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Roosevelt resigned from her UN post in 1953 when Dwight D. Eisenhower became president. Dwight David Eisenhower, born David Dwight Eisenhower (October 14, 1890 – March 28, 1969), nicknamed Ike, was a five-star General in the United States Army and U.S. politician, who served as the thirty-fourth President of the United States (1953–1961). ...


Relations with Catholic hierarchy

In July 1949, she had a public disagreement with Francis Cardinal Spellman, the Catholic Archbishop of New York, which was characterized as "a battle still remembered for its vehemence and hostility".[21][22] In her columns, Eleanor had attacked proposals for federal funding of certain nonreligious activities at parochial schools, such as bus transportation for students. Spellman cited the Supreme Court's decision which upheld such provisions, accusing her of anti-Catholicism. Most Democrats rallied behind Roosevelt, and Cardinal Spellman eventually met with Eleanor Roosevelt at her Hyde Park home to quell the dispute. However, Eleanor maintained her belief that Catholic schools should not receive federal aid, evidently heeding the writings of secularists such as Paul Blanshard.[23] Francis Joseph Cardinal Spellman, (4 May 1889–2 December 1967) was an American prelate, the ninth bishop and sixth archbishop of the Roman Catholic diocese of New York. ... Paul Beecher Blanshard (often misspelled Blanchard) (1892-1980) was an American journalist of the mid-20th century, specializing in political topics. ...


During the Spanish Civil War, she favored the republican Loyalists against General Francisco Franco's Nationalists; after 1945, she opposed normalizing relations with Spain.[24] She told Spellman bluntly that "I cannot however say that in European countries the control by the Roman Catholic Church of great areas of land has always led to happiness for the people of those countries."[25] Her son Elliott Roosevelt suggested that her "reservations about Catholicism" were rooted in her husband's sexual affairs with Lucy Mercer and Missy LeHand, who were both Catholics.[26] Not to be confused with the Spanish Civil War of 1820-1823. ... Francisco Paulino Hermenegildo Teódulo Franco y Bahamonde (December 4, 1892 - November 20, 1975), commonly known as Francisco Franco (pronounced ) or Francisco Franco y Bahamonde was leader of Spain from October 1936, as regent of Kingdom of Spain from 1947 until his death in 1975. ... Elliott Roosevelt in his Air Force uniform Elliott Roosevelt (September 23, 1910 – October 27, 1990), was a World War II hero and an author. ... Lucy Page Mercer Rutherfurd, born Lucy Mercer, is best known as the mistress of Franklin Roosevelt. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


Her defenders deny that Eleanor Roosevelt was anti-Catholic, citing her public support of Al Smith, a Catholic, in the 1928 presidential campaign and her statement to a New York Times reporter that year quoting her uncle, President Theodore Roosevelt, in expressing "the hope to see the day when a Catholic or a Jew would become president" (New York Times, January 25, 1928).[2] is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Postwar politics

In the late 1940s, Roosevelt was courted for political office by Democrats in New York and throughout the country.

At first I was surprised that anyone should think that I would want to run for office, or that I was fitted to hold office. Then I realized that some people felt that I must have learned something from my husband in all the years that he was in public life! They also knew that I had stressed the fact that women should accept responsibility as citizens. I heard that I was being offered the nomination for governor or for the United States Senate in my own state, and even for Vice President. And some particularly humorous souls wrote in and suggested that I run as the first woman President of the United States! The simple truth is that I have had my fill of public life of the more or less stereotyped kind.[27]

With Frank Sinatra in 1960
With Frank Sinatra in 1960

In the 1948 campaign, she was touted by some as the ideal running mate for President Truman. The North Dakota State Democratic Central Committee passed a resolution in 1947 calling for a Truman-Roosevelt ticket, and when Truman was asked if he would consider, he replied, "Why, of course, of course... What do you expect me to say to that?" Nevertheless, Eleanor rejected the appeals and insisted she had no interest in elective politics. Her son James Roosevelt would later say she refused to be considered for the vice presidency "because she was afraid of it."[27] Image File history File links Eleanor_Roosevelt_Frank_Sinatra. ... Image File history File links Eleanor_Roosevelt_Frank_Sinatra. ... Sinatra redirects here. ... Franklin Delano Roosevelt (1882-1945) and his son James Roosevelt (1907-1991) in 1934. ...


In 1954, Tammany Hall boss Carmine DeSapio campaigned against Eleanor's son, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Jr., during the New York Attorney General elections, which Franklin (Jr.) lost. Roosevelt held DeSapio responsible for her son's defeat and grew increasingly disgusted with his political conduct through the rest of the 1950s. Eventually, she would join with her old friends Herbert Lehman and Thomas Finletter to form the New York Committee for Democratic Voters, a group dedicated to enhancing the democratic process by opposing DeSapio's reincarnated Tammany. Their efforts were eventually successful, and DeSapio was removed from power in 1961.[28] Tammany Hall was the Democratic Party political machine that played a major role in controlling New York City politics from the 1790s to the 1960s. ... Carmine Gerard DeSapio (10 December 1908– 27 July 2004) was an American politician from New York City. ... Franklin D. Roosevelt, Jr. ... Herbert Henry Lehman (March 28, 1878 - December 5, 1963) was a Governor and Senator from New York. ...


Eleanor was a close friend of Adlai Stevenson and supported his candidacies in the 1952 and 1956 presidential elections. When President Truman backed New York Governor W. Averell Harriman, who was a close associate of Carmine DeSapio, for the Democratic presidential nomination, Roosevelt was disappointed but continued to support Stevenson who ultimately won the nomination. She backed Stevenson once again in 1960 primarily to block John F. Kennedy, who nevertheless received the presidential nomination.[29] However, she nevertheless worked hard to promote the Kennedy-Johnson ticket in 1960 and was appointed to policy-making positions by the young president, including the National Advisory Committee of the Peace Corps.[30] This is about the mid-20th-century politician and diplomat; for other American politicians so named, see Adlai Stevenson (disambiguation). ... William Averell Harriman (November 15, 1891 – July 26, 1986) was an American Democratic Party politician, businessman and diplomat. ... John Kennedy and JFK redirect here. ... current logo The Peace Corps is an independent United States federal agency. ...

 
Newly-elected U.S. President John F. Kennedy calls on Eleanor Roosevelt at Val-Kill (1961)
Newly-elected U.S. President John F. Kennedy calls on Eleanor Roosevelt at Val-Kill (1961)

By the 1950s Roosevelt's international role as spokesperson for women led her to stop publicly attacking the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA). But she never supported it and never thought it was wise. In 1961, President Kennedy’s undersecretary of labor, Esther Peterson proposed a new "President’s Commission on the Status of Women". Kennedy appointed Roosevelt to chair the commission, with Peterson as director. Roosevelt died just before the commission issued its final report. It concluded that female equality was best achieved by recognition of gender differences and needs, and not by an Equal Rights Amendment.[31] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Esther Peterson (December 9, 1906 - December 20, 1997) was a lifelong consumer and womens advocate. ...


Roosevelt was responsible for the eventual establishment, in 1964, of the 2,800 acre (11 km²) ([1]) Roosevelt Campobello International Park on Campobello Island, New Brunswick, Canada. This followed a gift of the Roosevelt summer estate to the Canadian and American governments. This article is about the unit of measurement. ... Campobello Island is a Canadian island located in the Bay of Fundy near the entrances to Passamaquoddy Bay and Cobscook Bay. ... This article is about the Canadian province. ...


Honors and awards

Roosevelt at Hyde Park with Ralph Bellamy and Greer Garson, filming Sunrise at Campobello (1960)
Roosevelt at Hyde Park with Ralph Bellamy and Greer Garson, filming Sunrise at Campobello (1960)

Eleanor Roosevelt received 35 honorary degrees during her life, compared to 31 awarded to her husband. Her first, a Doctor of Humane Letters or D.H.L. on June 13, 1929, was also the first honorary degree awarded by Russell Sage College in Troy, New York. Her last was a Doctor of Laws, LL.D. degree granted by what is now Clark Atlanta University in June 1962. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Ralph Rexford Bellamy (June 17, 1904 – November 29, 1991) was a Tony Award-winning American actor with a career spanning sixty-two years. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about the film . ... An honorary degree (Latin: honoris causa ad gradum, not to be confused with an honors degree) is an academic degree awarded to an individual as a decoration, rather than as the result of matriculating and studying for several years. ... A Doctor of Humane Letters (Latin: Litterarum humanae doctor; D.H.L.; or L.H.D.) is an honorary degree often conferred to those who have contributed to issues of peace and social justice. ... is the 164th day of the year (165th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Russell Sage College (often Russell Sage or RSC) is a womens college located in Troy, New York, approximately 150 miles north of New York City in the Capital District. ... Looking west down Broadway at downtown Troy. ... This article is about the state. ... Doctor of Laws (Latin: Legum Doctor, LL.D) is a doctorate-level academic degree in law. ... Clark Atlanta University (CAU) is a private institution of higher education in Atlanta, Georgia. ...


In 1968, she was awarded one of the United Nations Human Rights Prizes. There was an unsuccessful campaign to award her a posthumous Nobel Peace Prize; however, a posthumous nomination has never been considered for the award.[32] The United Nations Prizes in the Field of Human Rights were instituted by a United Nations General Assembly resolution in 1966. ... Lester B. Pearson after accepting the 1957 Nobel Peace Prize The Nobel Peace Prize (Swedish and Norwegian: Nobels fredspris) is the name of one of five Nobel Prizes bequeathed by the Swedish industrialist and inventor Alfred Nobel. ...


In 1960, Greer Garson played Eleanor Roosevelt in the movie Sunrise at Campobello, which portrayed Eleanor's instrumental role during Franklin Roosevelt's paralytic illness and his protracted struggle to reenter politics in its aftermath. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about the film . ...


Later life

Following FDR's death in 1945, Eleanor Roosevelt moved from the White House to Val-Kill Cottage in Hyde Park, NY, where she lived the rest of her life. Stone Cottage Eleanor Roosevelt National Historic Site (Val-Kill) consists of 180-acres approximately two miles east of Springwood, the Hyde Park Roosevelt family home. ... Hyde Park is a town located in the northwest part of Dutchess County, New York, United States, just north of the city of Poughkeepsie. ...

Statue of Eleanor Roosevelt at Washington D.C. memorial
Statue of Eleanor Roosevelt at Washington D.C. memorial

Eleanor Roosevelt was a member of the Brandeis University Board of Trustees, delivering the University's first commencement speech, and joined the Brandeis faculty as a visiting lecturer in international relations in 1959 at the age of 75. On November 15, 1960, she met for the last time with former US President, Harry S. Truman and his wife, Bess, at the Truman Library and Museum in Independence, Missouri. Roosevelt had raised considerable funds for the erection and dedication of the building. The Trumans would later attend Roosevelt's memorial service in Hyde Park, NY in November, 1962. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1200x1600, 994 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Eleanor Roosevelt User:Chensiyuan Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1200x1600, 994 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Eleanor Roosevelt User:Chensiyuan Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner... Brandeis University is a private university located in Waltham, Massachusetts, United States. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... For other persons named Harry Truman, see Harry Truman (disambiguation). ... Elizabeth Virginia Wallace Truman (February 13, 1885 – October 18, 1982), often known as Bess Truman, was the wife of Harry S Truman and First Lady of the United States from 1945 to 1953. ... Entrance to the Museum and Library, April 2007 (Robert E. Nylund) Kofi Annan speaking at the Museum and Library. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Hyde Park is a town located in the northwest part of Dutchess County, New York, United States, just north of the city of Poughkeepsie. ...


In 1961, all volumes of Eleanor Roosevelt's autobiography, which she had begun writing in 1937, were compiled into The Autobiography of Eleanor Roosevelt, which is still in print (Da Capo Press, ISBN 0-306-80476-X). Cover of the first English edition of 1793 of Benjamin Franklins autobiography. ... Da Capo Press is a publishing company with offices in New York City and Cambridge, Massachusetts. ...


Roosevelt was injured in April 1960 when she was struck by a car in New York City. Though only 76, her health began a rapid decline. Subsequently diagnosed with aplastic anemia, she developed bone marrow tuberculosis. Roosevelt died at her Manhattan apartment on November 7, 1962 at 6:15 p.m., at the age of 78.[33] New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Aplastic anemia is a condition where bone marrow does not produce sufficient new cells to replenish blood cells. ... For the Dir en grey album, see The Marrow of a Bone. ... Tuberculosis (abbreviated as TB for tubercle bacillus or Tuberculosis) is a common and deadly infectious disease caused by mycobacteria, mainly Mycobacterium tuberculosis. ... This article is about the borough of New York City. ... is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


At her memorial service, Adlai Stevenson asked, "What other single human being has touched and transformed the existence of so many?" Stevenson also said that Roosevelt was someone "who would rather light a candle than curse the darkness." She was laid to rest next to Franklin at the family compound in Hyde Park, New York on November 10, 1962. A laconic cartoon published at the time showed two angels looking down towards an opening in the clouds with the caption "She's here".[citation needed] This is about the mid-20th-century politician and diplomat; for other American politicians so named, see Adlai Stevenson (disambiguation). ... Hyde Park is a town located in the northwest part of Dutchess County, New York, United States, just north of the city of Poughkeepsie. ... is the 314th day of the year (315th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Eleanor Roosevelt, who considered herself plain and craved affection as a child, had in the end transcended whatever shortcomings she felt were hers to bring comfort and hope to many, becoming one of the most admired figures of the 20th century.


See also

Eleanor and Franklin Roosevelt gravesite in the Rose Garden at their Hyde Park, New York, home
Eleanor and Franklin Roosevelt gravesite in the Rose Garden at their Hyde Park, New York, home

Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2304 × 1728 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2304 × 1728 pixel, file size: 1. ... Franklin Delano Roosevelt (January 30, 1882–April 12, 1945), 32nd President of the United States, the longest-serving holder of the office and the only man to be elected President more than twice, was one of the central figures of 20th century history. ... This table shows the descent of President Theodore Roosevelt and President Franklin D. Roosevelt from their common ancestor Claes van Roosevelt. ... Elliott Bulloch Roosevelt (February 28, 1860- August 14, 1894) was the father of Anna E. Roosevelt and the brother of Theodore Roosevelt. ... Anna Eleanor Rebecca Livingston Ludlow Hall Roosevelt (March 17, 1863 - December 7, 1892) was the mother of former First Lady of the United States, Anna E. Roosevelt. ... Gracie Hall Roosevelt (June 2, 1891 - September 25, 1941) was the youngest brother of former First Lady of the United States, Eleanor Roosevelt and the nephew of Theodore Roosevelt. ... For other persons named Theodore Roosevelt, see Theodore Roosevelt (disambiguation). ... Lucy Page Mercer Rutherfurd,(April 26, 1891-July 31, 1948) born in Washington,D.C..She was rumored to be the mistress of Franklin Roosevelt. ... Eleanor is a town in Putnam County, West Virginia, U.S., along the Kanawha River. ... Official language(s) none (de facto English) Demonym West Virginian Capital Charleston Largest city Charleston Largest metro area Charleston metro area Area  Ranked 41st in the US  - Total 24,230 sq mi (62,755 km²)  - Width 130 miles (210 km)  - Length 240 miles (385 km)  - % water 0. ... Arthurdale is an unincorporated community located in Preston County, West Virginia, USA. Arthurdale was named for Richard Arthur, former owner of the land on which it was built, who had sold the land to the federal government under a tax default. ... Eleanor Roosevelt College (or ERC) is one of the six colleges located on the campus at the University of California, San Diego. ... The University of California, San Diego (popularly known as UCSD, or sometimes UC San Diego) is a highly selective, research-oriented[1] public university located in La Jolla, a seaside resort community of San Diego, California. ... Eleanor is a biography of Eleanor Roosevelts childhood. ... Barbara Cooney (1917–2000) was an American childrens author and illustrator of more than 200 books and double Caldecott Medalist. ... Eleanor Roosevelt High School (ERHS) is a high school located in Greenbelt, Maryland and is part of the Prince Georges County School sytem in the USA. It contains roughly 3000 students in grades 9 through 12. ... // This is a list of prominent individuals who have been romantically or maritally coupled with a cousin, niece, nephew, aunt or uncle. ... This article is about the film . ... Campobello Island is a Canadian island located in the Bay of Fundy near the entrances to Passamaquoddy Bay and Cobscook Bay. ...

Footnotes

Memorial in Riverside Park, Manhattan
Memorial in Riverside Park, Manhattan
  1. ^ Jean Edward Smith, FDR (2007), New York: Random House, 2007, p. 42.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g Lash, Joseph P. (1971). Eleanor and Franklin. W.W. Norton & Company. ISBN 1-56852-075-1. , pages 48, 56, 74, 81, 89-91, 108-110, 111-113, 145, 152-155, 160, 162-163, 174-175, 179, 193-196, 198, 220-221, 225-227, 244-245, 259, 273-274, 275, 276, 297, 293-294, 302-303
  3. ^ Roosevelt, Eleanor (1992). The Autobiography of Eleanor Roosevelt. Da Capo Press. ISBN 0-306-80476-X. , pages 56, 60, 65, 95–96, 116, 117–118, 135–136, 235
  4. ^ Cook, Blanche Wiesen (1992). Eleanor Roosevelt: Volume One, 1884-1933. Viking Press. ISBN 0-670-80486-X. , pages 132-133, 142-143, 150-151, 155, 157, 159-160, 167-169, 174-177, 180-181, 183, 202, 226-228, 229, 233, 250-252, 256-57, 283, 310-312, 330-331, 333-335, 419
  5. ^ Cook, Blanche Wiesen (1999). Eleanor Roosevelt: Volume Two, 1933-1938. Viking Press. ISBN 0-14-017894-5. , pages 34, 94-96,191-192, 255-256, 290, 398
  6. ^ "FDR's Secret Love: How Roosevelt's lifelong affair might have changed the course of a century", US News & World Report, April 18, 2008.
  7. ^ a b c Lillian Faderman, Odd Girls and Twilight Lovers: A History of Lesbian Life in Twentieth-Century America, Penguin Books Ltd, 1991, page 99
  8. ^ Doris Faber, The Life of Lorena Hickok: E.R.'s Friend, New York: William Morrow, 1980, page 111
  9. ^ Eleanor Roosevelt biography.
  10. ^ Smith, Jean Edward FDR, p. 246-247, Random House, 2007 ISBN 978-1-4000-6121-1.
  11. ^ Smith, p. 347-348, cites Cook, 1 Eleanor Roosevelt 429, 442 and James Roosevelt with Bill Libby, My Parents: A Differing View 110-111, Chicago:Playboy Press, 1976.
  12. ^ Smith, p. 348.
  13. ^ a b American Experience: Eleanor Roosevelt, enhanced transcript, page 1, 1999: "Eleanor's visit to a mine was satirized in a famous cartoon. 'It was indicated to me,' she responded, 'that there was certainly something the matter with a woman who wanted to see so much and know so much.
  14. ^ a b c The Tuskegee Airmen. The Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum. Retrieved on 2007-10-18.
  15. ^ The Papers of Eleanor Roosevelt, 1945–1962
  16. ^ My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt, November 28, 1947
  17. ^ Correspondence: 1946
  18. ^ Steven Casey ,"The campaign to sell a harsh peace for Germany to the American public, 1944–1948". History, 90 (297). pp. 62–92. (2005) ISSN 1468-229X
  19. ^ Glendon 2000
  20. ^ Kenton 1948
  21. ^ Lash, Eleanor: The Years Alone pp 156–65
  22. ^ Beasley, Eleanor Roosevelt Encyclopedia pp 498–502
  23. ^ Lash, Eleanor: The Years Alone p. 157. Privately, Eleanor Roosevelt said that if the Catholic church got school aid, "Once that is done they control the schools, or at least a great part of them." (p. 164).
  24. ^ Beasley, Eleanor Roosevelt Encyclopedia p 492
  25. ^ Lash, Eleanor: The Years Alone pp 159.
  26. ^ Elliot Roosevelt and James Brough (1973) An Untold Story, New York: Dell, p.282.
  27. ^ a b Correspondence: 1948
  28. ^ Beasley, Eleanor Roosevelt Encyclopedia 276-76
  29. ^ Lash, Eleanor: The Years Alone pp 282 ff.
  30. ^ Eleanor Roosevelt National Historic Site, National Park Service, 1999.
  31. ^ Lois Scharf in Beasley, ed. Eleanor Roosevelt Encyclopedia pp 164-5
  32. ^ Eleanor: The Years Alone
  33. ^ Elisabeth Kubler-Ross claimed in her book "Questions on Death and Dying" that Eleanor Roosevelt actually died of bone cancer, and was kept alive against her will for many months.

... Da Capo Press is a publishing company with offices in New York City and Cambridge, Massachusetts. ... Viking Press was founded on March 1, 1925, in New York City, by Harold K. Guinzburg and George S. Oppenheim. ... Viking Press was founded on March 1, 1925, in New York City, by Harold K. Guinzburg and George S. Oppenheim. ... Lillian Faderman is a scholar whose books on lesbian relationships in history have earned critical praise and awards. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The National Park Service (NPS) is the United States federal agency that manages all National Parks, many National Monuments, and other conservation and historical properties with various title designations. ...

References

  • Beasley, Maurine H., et al, eds. The Eleanor Roosevelt Encyclopedia (2001) online version
  • Cook, Blanche Wiesen. Eleanor Roosevelt, Vol. 1: 1884–1933 (1992).
  • Cook, Blanche Wiesen. Eleanor Roosevelt: Volume 2, The Defining Years, 1933–1938 (2000).
  • Faber, Harold. "An Upstate Focus for Eleanor Roosevelt Centennial." New York Times, November 6, 1983, Metropolitan Desk: 54. Academic. LEXIS-NEXIS. Indiana University, Bloomington.
  • Glendon, M.A. "John P. Humphrey and the Drafting of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights." Journal of the History of International Law 2000: 250–260. Academic Search Premier. EBSCO. Indiana University, Bloomington.
  • Goodwin, Doris Kearns. No Ordinary Time: Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt: The Home Front in World War II, 768 pages, ISBN 0-684-80448-4
  • James, Michael. "Soviet Rights Hit by Mrs. Roosevelt." New York Times, September 29, 1948: A4. ABI/Inform Global. ProQuest. Indiana University, Bloomington.
  • Kenton, John. "Human Rights Declaration Adopted by U.N. Assembly." New York Times, December 11, 1948: A1. ABI/Inform Global. ProQuest. Indiana University, Bloomington.
  • Lachman, Seymour P. "The Cardinal, the Congressmen, and the First Lady." Journal of Church and State (Winter, 1965): 35–66.
  • Lash, Joseph. Eleanor and Franklin. New York: W.W. Norton (1971).
  • Lash, Joseph. Eleanor: The Years Alone (1972)
  • Manly, Chesly. "U.N. Adopts 1st Declaration on Human Rights." Chicago Daily Tribune December 11, 1948: 4. ProQuest. EBSCO. Indiana University, Bloomington.
  • "The Draft Declaration of Human Rights." New York Times June 19, 1948. ProQuest. EBSCO. Indiana University, Bloomington.
  • Pfeffer, Paula F. "Eleanor Roosevelt and the National and World Women's Parties." Historian, Fall, 1996: 39–58. Academic Search Premier. EBSCO. Indiana University, Bloomington.
  • Pottker, Jan. Sara and Eleanor: The Story of Sara Delano Roosevelt and Her Daughter-In-Law, Eleanor Roosevelt, St. Martin's Press, 416 pages, ISBN 0-312-30340-8
  • Roosevelt, David B. Grandmère: A Personal History of Eleanor Roosevelt, Warner Books, 2002, 256 pages, ISBN 0-446-52734-3
  • Roosevelt, Eleanor, The Autobiography of Eleanor Roosevelt, Da Capo Press ed., 1992, paperback, 439 pages, ISBN 0-306-80476-X, dacapopress.com
  • Streitmatter, Roger. Empty Without You: The Intimate Letters of Eleanor Roosevelt and Lorena Hickok, Free Press, 1998, 336 pages, ISBN 0-684-84928-3

For Young Readers is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Jimi Hendrix song, see 1983. ... is the 272nd day of the year (273rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 345th day of the year (346th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 345th day of the year (346th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 170th day of the year (171st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

  • Cooney, Barbara. Eleanor. Viking, 1996, 40 pages, ISBN 978-0-670-86159-0.
  • Fleming, Candace. Our Eleanor: a Scrapbook Look at Eleanor Roosevelt's Remarkable Life. Atheneum/Anne Schwartz, 2005, 192 pages, ISBN 978-0-689-86544-2
  • Weidt, Maryann N. Stateswoman to the World: a Story about Eleanor Roosevelt. illus. by Lydia M. Anderson. Lerner Publications, 1991. ISBN 0-87614-663-9

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Eleanor Roosevelt
  • White House Biography of Eleanor Roosevelt
  • Eleanor Roosevelt National Historic Site (Val-Kill Cottage)
  • The Eleanor Roosevelt Center at Val-Kill
  • Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum
  • National First Ladies' Library
  • The Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt Institute
  • The Roosevelt Institution, a student think tank inspired in part by Eleanor Roosevelt
  • TeddyRoosevelt.com: Information about Eleanor and her favorite uncle, President Theodore Roosevelt.
  • Some of My Best Friends Are Negro: Mrs. Roosevelt and her views on race.
  • Online Biographical Sketch at George Washington University's Eleanor Roosevelt archival papers site
  • Text and Audio of Eleanor Roosevelt's Address to the United Nations General Assembly
  • Audio, photographs and transcript documenting Eleanor Roosevelt's speech to a convocation in Assembly Hall at Ball State Teachers College (now Ball State University) in Muncie, Indiana
  • George Washington University's biography of Eleanor Roosevelt and her archival papers
  • American Experience: Eleanor web site for documentary program, including 28 My Day columns and excerpts from her FBI file
  • "Mrs. Roosevelt dies at 78", New York Times obituary, November 8, 1962.
  • The Truman Library's collection of correspondence between Eleanor Roosevelt and President Harry S. Truman.
  • This Is My Story by Eleanor Roosevelt. (Her 1937 autobiography)
  • Roosevelt Campobello International Park website
Honorary titles
Preceded by
Lou Henry Hoover
First Lady of the United States
1933–1945
Succeeded by
Bess Truman
Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... Ball State University is a state-run research university located in Muncie, Indiana, USA. Located on the northwest side of the city, Ball States campus spans more than 1,000 acres (4 km²). The student body consists of more than 20,000 students, of which over 18,000 are... Muncie (IPA: ) is a city in Delaware County in east central Indiana, best known as the home of Ball State University and the birthplace of the Ball Corporation. ... For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ... is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other persons named Harry Truman, see Harry Truman (disambiguation). ... Lou Henry Hoover (1874-1944) Lou Henry Hoover (March 29, 1874 – January 7, 1944) was the wife of President Herbert Hoover and First Lady of the United States. ... Laura Bush Current First Lady (2001- ) First Lady of the United States is the unofficial title of the hostess of the White House. ... Elizabeth Virginia Wallace Truman (February 13, 1885 – October 18, 1982), often known as Bess Truman, was the wife of Harry S Truman and First Lady of the United States from 1945 to 1953. ... First Lady Laura Bush and former first ladies (from left to right) Rosalynn Carter, Sen. ... This article is about the first First Lady of the United States. ... Abigail Adams (née Smith) (November 11, 1744 – October 28, 1818) was the wife of John Adams the second President of the United States and mother of John Quincy Adams, the sixth, and is regarded as the first Second Lady of the United States and the second First Lady of... Martha Wayles Skelton Jefferson (October 19, 1748 (O.S.) - September 6, 1782) was the wife of the third President of the United States, Thomas Jefferson. ... This article is about a U.S. First Lady (the wife of James Madison). ... Elizabeth Kortright Monroe (1768 - September 23, 1830) was the wife of US President James Monroe. ... Louisa Catherine Johnson Adams (February 12, 1775 – May 15, 1852), wife of John Quincy Adams, was First Lady of the United States from 1825 to 1829. ... Emily Tennessee Donelson (June 1, 1807 - December 19, 1836) was the niece of US President Andrew Jackson. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Angelica Van Buren Angelica Singleton Van Buren, born Angelica Singleton (February 13, 1818 – December 29, 1877) was the daughter-in-law of the 8th United States President Martin Van Buren. ... Anna Tuthill Symmes Harrison (1775 - 1864), wife of President William Henry Harrison and the grandmother of President Benjamin Harrison, was nominally First Lady of the United States during her husbands one-month term in 1841, but she never entered the White House. ... Jane Irwin Harrison, who married William Henry Harrison Jr, was the daughter-in-law of William Henry Harrison, ninth President of the United States; she acted as his official hostess during his brief tenure in office, a month in 1841. ... Letitia Christian Tyler (November 12, 1790 - September 10, 1842), first wife of John Tyler, was First Lady of the United States from 1841 until her death. ... Elizabeth Priscilla Cooper Tyler (June 14, 1816 - December 29, 1889) was the daughter in law of John Tyler, the tenth President of the United States. ... White House portrait Julia Gardiner Tyler (July 23, 1820 – July 10, 1889), second wife of John Tyler, was First Lady of the United States from June 26, 1844 to March 4, 1845. ... Sarah Childress Polk (September 4, 1803 – August 14, 1891), wife of James K. Polk, was First Lady of the United States from March 4, 1845 to March 3, 1849. ... Margaret Mackall Smith Taylor (September 21, 1788 – August 14, 1852), wife of Zachary Taylor, was First Lady of the United States from 1849 to 1850. ... Abigail Powers Fillmore (March 13, 1798 - March 30, 1853), wife of Millard Fillmore, was First Lady of the United States from 1850 to 1853. ... Jane Means Appleton Pierce Jane Means Appleton Pierce (March 12, 1806 – December 2, 1863), wife of Franklin Pierce, was First Lady of the United States from 1853 to 1857. ... Harriet Rebecca Lane (May 9, 1830 - July 3, 1903), niece of perpetual bachelor James Buchanan, acted as First Lady of the United States from 1857 to 1861. ... Mary Ann Todd Lincoln (December 13, 1818 – July 16, 1882) was the First Lady of the United States when her husband, Abraham Lincoln, served as the sixteenth President, from 1861 until 1865. ... Elizabeth McCardle Johnson, wife of President Andrew Johnson. ... Julia Grant Julia Boggs Dent Grant (January 26, 1826 – December 14, 1902), wife of Ulysses S. Grant, was First Lady of the United States from 1869 to 1877. ... Lucy Ware Webb Hayes (August 28, 1831 - June 25, 1889) was the wife of President Rutherford B. Hayes of the United States of America and one of the most popular First Ladies of the nineteenth century. ... White House portrait Lucretia Rudolph Garfield (1832 - 1918), wife of James A. Garfield, was First Lady of the United States in 1881. ... Mary Arthur McElroy (July 5, 1841 – January 8, 1917) was the sister of 21st President of the United States, Chester A. Arthur, and served as a hostess for his administration (1881-1885). ... Rose Cleveland was the First Lady during the first of U.S. President Grover Clevelands two administrations. ... Frances Folsom Cleveland Frances Clara Folsom Cleveland Preston (July 21, 1864 – October 29, 1947), wife of Grover Cleveland, was First Lady of the United States from 1886 to 1889 and 1893 to 1897. ... White House portrait Caroline Lavinia Scott Harrison (October 1, 1832 _ October 25, 1892), wife of Benjamin Harrison, was First Lady of the United States from 1889 until her death. ... Mary Scott Harrison McKee (April 3, 1858 – October 28, 1930) was the first lady to her father President Benjamin Harrison,when her mother Caroline Harrison was seriously ill and then died. ... Frances Folsom Cleveland Frances Clara Folsom Cleveland Preston (July 21, 1864 – October 29, 1947), wife of Grover Cleveland, was First Lady of the United States from 1886 to 1889 and 1893 to 1897. ... Ida Saxton McKinley (June 8, 1847 – May 26, 1907), wife of William McKinley, was First Lady of the United States from 1897 to 1901. ... White House portrait Edith Kermit Carow Roosevelt (August 6, 1861 – September 30, 1948), second wife of Theodore Roosevelt, was First Lady of the United States from 1901 to 1909. ... Helen Herron Taft Helen Louise Herron Taft (June 2, 1861 – May 22, 1943), usually known as Nellie Taft or Helen Taft, was the wife of William Howard Taft, was First Lady of the United States from 1909 to 1913. ... Ellen Louise Axson Wilson (May 15, 1860 – August 6, 1914),[1] first wife of Woodrow Wilson, was First Lady of the United States from 1913 until her death. ... White House portrait Edith Bolling Galt Wilson (October 15, 1872–December 28, 1961), second wife of Woodrow Wilson, was First Lady of the United States from 1915 to 1921. ... White House portrait Florence (Flossie) Mabel Kling deWolfe Harding (August 15, 1860 – November 21, 1924), wife of Warren G. Harding, was First Lady of the United States from 1921 to 1923. ... Grace Anna Goodhue Coolidge (January 3, 1879 – July 8, 1957) was wife of Calvin Coolidge and First Lady of the United States from 1923 to 1929. ... Lou Henry Hoover (1874-1944) Lou Henry Hoover (March 29, 1874 – January 7, 1944) was the wife of President Herbert Hoover and First Lady of the United States. ... Elizabeth Virginia Wallace Truman (February 13, 1885 – October 18, 1982), often known as Bess Truman, was the wife of Harry S Truman and First Lady of the United States from 1945 to 1953. ... Mamie Geneva Doud Eisenhower (November 14, 1896 – November 1, 1979) was the wife of General and President Dwight D. Eisenhower, and First Lady of the United States from 1953 to 1961. ... First official White House portrait. ... Claudia Alta Lady Bird Taylor Johnson (December 22, 1912 – July 11, 2007)[1] was First Lady of the United States from 1963 to 1969, having been the wife of U.S. President Lyndon B. Johnson. ... Thelma Catherine Pat Ryan Nixon (March 16, 1912 – June 22, 1993) was the wife of former President Richard Nixon and the First Lady of the United States of America from 1969 to 1974. ... Betty Fords official White House portrait, painted in 1977 by Felix de Cossio Elizabeth Anne Bloomer Warren Ford (born April 8, 1918) is the widow of former United States President Gerald R. Ford and was the First Lady from 1974 to 1977. ... Eleanor Rosalynn Smith Carter (born August 18, 1927) is the wife of former President Jimmy Carter and was First Lady of the United States from 1977 to 1981. ... Nancy Davis Reagan (born Anne Frances Robbins on July 6, 1921) is the widow of the former United States President Ronald Reagan and was First Lady of the United States from 1981 to 1989. ... For the daughter of President George W. Bush, see Barbara Pierce Bush. ... Hillary Diane Rodham Clinton (born October 26, 1947) is the junior United States Senator from New York, and is a candidate for the Democratic nomination in the 2008 presidential election. ... Laura Lane Welch Bush (born November 4, 1946) is the wife of the forty-third and current President of the United States George W. Bush and is thereby the First Lady of the United States. ... Image File history File links Seal_Of_The_President_Of_The_Unites_States_Of_America. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Eleanor Roosevelt - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3961 words)
Roosevelt was responsible for the establishment, in 1964, of the 2,800 acre (11 km
Eleanor Roosevelt was outspoken on numerous causes and continued to galvanize the world with her comments and opinions well into her 70s.
Roosevelt's tales of her hunting excursions were well received, though they did not serve to further the cause of women's liberation: in keeping with the chauvinistic standards of the time, Roosevelt's stories were published under the masculine pseudonym "Chuck Painton" to avoid offending the magazine's overwhelmingly male readership.
Eleanor Roosevelt - MSN Encarta (2053 words)
Eleanor Roosevelt had an active public career before and during her marriage and continued to maintain a high profile after her husband’s death.
Eleanor Roosevelt was born on October 11, 1884, in New York City, the first child of Anna Hall and Elliott Roosevelt.
Eleanor’s mother, Anna, was one of the most beautiful women in New York high society, and this made young Eleanor feel insecure about her plainer appearance.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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