FACTOID # 13: New York has America's lowest percentage of residents who are veterans.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Elder (religious)

A religious elder (in Greek, πρεσβυτερος [presbyteros]) is valued for his or her wisdom, in part for their age, on the grounds that the older one is then the more one is likely to know. The concept of an elder was common in parts of the world where what is now called civilization had taken over. Elders are typical of societies where oral history plays a large part; in societies with patrilineal descent, elders are frequently male, whereas in societies with matrilineal descent, elders are often female. However, both men and women may be elders of a particular society. The sections below look at the concept of eldership both from the Bible and as held in various religious denominations. Personification of wisdom (Greek Σοφια) in Celsus Library in Ephesos, Turkey Detail from the Allegory of Wisdom and Strength by Paulo Veronese (c. ... Cities are a major hallmark of human civilization. ... Patrilineality is a system in which one belongs to ones fathers lineage; it generally involves the inheritance of property, names or titles through the male line as well. ... Matrilineality is a system in which one belongs to ones mothers lineage; it may also involve the inheritance of property or titles through the female line. ... A religious denomination, (also simply denomination) is a subgroup within a religion that operates under a common name, tradition, and identity. ...


Iconium is Paul's and God's favorite city!!!

Contents

Elder in the Bible

Terms

There are three different words used synonymously in the New Testament to refer to the office of elder. In I Timothy and Titus, Paul drafts nearly identical lists of qualifications for elder and overseer, while Peter draws all three concepts together in one passage: "Therefore, I exhort the elders among you... shepherd the flock of God among you, exercising oversight..." (I Peter 5:1-2). Luke uses the terms elder, overseer and shepherd interchangeably in Acts 20.


presbuteros

Greek word #4245 in Strong's Strongs Concordance is a concordance of the King James Bible (KJV) that was constructed under the direction of Dr. James Strong (1822-1894). ...


This is the most commonly used word in the New Testament with regard to church leaders. It refers 28 times in the Gospels and Acts to the members of the Jewish Sanhedrin and 12 times in Revelation to the representatives of the redeemed people of God. The remaining 19 times the word is employed in Acts and the Epistles, it identifies a unique group of leaders in the church. The term simply means advanced in age, but in the first century context indicates a rank or office among Jews as members of the ruling council, among Greeks as those who those who managed public affairs and administered justice, and among Christians as those who presided over the local assemblies. While no specific age is given, this term emphasizes the character of the elder and implies maturity, dignity, experience, and honor[1].


episkopos

Greek word #1985 in Strong's Strongs Concordance is a concordance of the King James Bible (KJV) that was constructed under the direction of Dr. James Strong (1822-1894). ...


This is a common word for in the Greek culture for any official who acted as a superintendent, manager, controller, curator, guardian or ruler. It occurs only 5 times in the New Testament, once referring to Christ (1 Peter 2:25) and the other 4 times to church leaders. The term emphasizes the function of an elder as exercising authority and supervision "by divine placement, initiative and design"[2].


poimen

Greek word #4166 in Strong's Strongs Concordance is a concordance of the King James Bible (KJV) that was constructed under the direction of Dr. James Strong (1822-1894). ...


This word simply means shepherd. It is applied only once in the noun form and 3 times in the verb form in the New Testament in the context of church leaders. The term emphasizes the heart attitude of an elder as one who tends, feeds, guides, protects and cares for his flock[3].


Teaching vs ruling elders

Some churches, particulary under Presbyterian polity, make a distinction between teaching and ruling elders. This distinction rests upon 1 Timothy 5:17, James 3:1 and other passages. The distinction is made that some elders are called to teach and govern while others are called to govern only. Presbyterian governance of a church is typified by the rule of assemblies of presbyters, or elders. ...


Within this distinction, there are two-office and three-office views. The two office view see the church offices as elder and deacon. The three office view sees the church offices as minister, elder, and deacon. Under the two-office view, teaching is a gift that only some elders possess but all elders receive their ordination from the same source. Under the three-office view, teachers or ministers in the church possess not only a separate gifting but also a separate office. Under the three-office view in presbyterianism, ministers (or teaching elders) are ordained by the presbytery while ruling elders and deacons are ordained by the minister in the local congregation. In presbyterianism, all elders (both teaching and ruling) are eligible for participation in church courts (congregational session, presbytery, synod, general assembly). Those holding to the three office view are more likely to hold to a distinct demarcation between clergy and laity. Presbyterian polity is a method of church governance typified by the rule of Assemblies of presbyters, or elders. ... A synod (also known as a council) is a council of a church, usually a Christian church, convened to decide an issue of doctrine, administration or application. ... Clergy is the generic term used to describe the formal religious leadership within a given religion. ... In religious organizations, the laity comprises all lay persons collectively. ...


Mandate

Together, the New Testament writers mention elders, overseers and shepherds in reference to church leadership more than twenty-five times in the Gospels and the Epistles. The basis, selection, office, character, functions, attitude and qualifications of elders are laid out and the pattern established early and often. Strauch writes, "In fact, the New Testament offers more instruction regarding elders than on any other important church subjects such as the Lord's Supper, the Lord's Day, baptism or spiritual gifts" [4].


For example, Acts 11:30; 15:2, 4, 6, 22-23; 16:4; and 21:18 demonstrate that elders had a significant role in the Jerusalem church and the Jerusalem council. In reference to churches in Antioch, Pisidia, Iconium, Lystra and Derbe, Acts 14:23 demonstrates Paul's pattern of appointing elders as a key step in organizing a new church. Paul spoke directly to the elders in Acts 20:17 and warned them in 20:28 to "(b)e on guard for (them)selves and for all the flock, among which the Holy Spirit has made (them) overseers, to shepherd the church of God which He purchased with His own blood." Antioch is a city in the Turkish Lake District, which is at the crossroads of the Mediterranean, Aegean and Central Anatolian regions. ... Konya (also Koniah, Konieh, Konia, and Qunia; historically known as Iconium) is a city in Turkey, on the central plateau of Anatolia. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Derbe is an ancient city in todays Turkey. ...


Each of these passages points to an early understanding that God's intent for church leadership was by a plurality of elders. Instruction about elders is given to the churches in I Thessalonians 5:12-13; I Timothy 3:1-7, 10 and 5:17-22, 24-25; Titus 1:5-9; Hebrews 13:17; James 5:14; and I Peter 5:5. Instruction is given to elders about churches in I Thessalonians 5:13; James 5:14; and I Peter 5:1-5. In the majority of the references the word for elders is plural and word for church is singular, indicating a very clear directive that the church should be governed by a plurality of elders.


Qualifications

(This list was developed by the leadership of Grace Community Church and can be found in the The Biblical Case for Elder Rule) Grace Community Church is a non-denominational, evangelical, megachurch located in Sun Valley, California. ...

  • Blameless as a steward of God; above reproach (1 Timothy 3:2; Titus 1:6-7)
  • Husband of one wife; a one-woman man (1 Timothy 3:2, Titus 1:6)
  • Temperate, sober, vigilant (1 Timothy 3:2)
  • Sober-minded, prudent (1 Timothy 3:2, Titus 1:8)
  • Of good behavior; orderly, respectable (1 Timothy 3:2)
  • Given to hospitality (1 Timothy 3:2; Titus 1:8)
  • Apt to teach; able to teach; he can exhort believers and refute false teaching (1 Timothy 3:2; Titus 1:9)
  • Not given to wine (1 Timothy 3:3, Titus 1:7)
  • Not violent, not pugnacious (1 Timothy 3:3, Titus 1:7)
  • Patient, moderate, forbearing, gentle (1 Timothy 3:3)
  • Not a brawler; uncontentious; not soon angry or quick tempered (1 Timothy 3:3, Titus 1:7)
  • Not covetous; not a lover of money; not greedy of base gain (1 Timothy 3:3, Titus 1:7)
  • Rules well his own house; his children are faithful, not accused of rebellion to God (1 Timothy 3:4, Titus 1:7)
  • Not a novice; not a new convert (1 Timothy 3:6)
  • Has a good report or reputation with outsiders (1 Timothy 3:7)
  • Not self-willed (Titus 1:7)
  • A lover of what is good (Titus 1:7)
  • Just, fair (Titus 1:8)
  • Holy, devout (Titus 1:8)
  • Self-Controlled (Titus 1:8)

Duties

(This list was developed by the leadership of Bethel Baptist Church) Bethel Baptist Church is an evangelical church in North Wilmington, Delaware. ...

  • Shepherd the flock, setting an example for all (1 Peter 5:1-3)
  • Feed and care for the church (Acts 20:28; 1 Thessalonians 5:12)
  • Teach and preach sound doctrine (1 Timothy 5:17; Titus 1:9)
  • Rule and lead (I Timothy 5:17; Hebrews 13:17; cf. 1 Thessalonians 5:12; 1 Timothy 3:2,4)
  • Train and ordain others (Acts 14:23; 1 Timothy 4:14; 5:22; Titus 1:5)
  • Refute and rebuke the insubordinate (Titus 1:9, 13)
  • Keep watch over and give account to God for the spiritual well-being of the church (Hebrews 13:17)
  • Serve clothed in Christ-like humility (1 Peter 5:3-5)

Elder in church denominations

Methodism

Main article: Elder (Methodism)

An Elder -- sometimes called a "Presbyter" -- is someone who has been ordained by a bishop to the ministry of Word, Sacrament, Order, and Service. Their responsibilities are to preach and teach, preside at the celebration of the sacraments, administer the church through pastoral guidance, and lead the congregations under their care in service ministry to the world. The office of Elder, then, is what most people tend to think of as the pastoral, priestly, clergy office within the church. In most of the denominations within Methodism, ordination to the office of Elder is open to both women and men. An Elder in Methodism -- sometimes called a Presbyter -- is someone who has been ordained by a Bishop to the ministry of Word, Sacrament, Order, and Service. ... This article is about the sacrament. ... A mitre is used as a symbol of the bishops ministry. ... A sacrament is a Christian rite that mediates divine grace—a holy [[Mystery The root meaning of the Latin word sacramentum is making sacred. One example of its use was as the term for the oath of dedication taken by Roman soldiers; but the ecclesiastical use of the word is... Main article: Minister of religion A pastor is the head minister or priest of a Christian church. ... Roman Catholic priests in traditional clerical clothing. ... Clergy is the generic term used to describe the formal religious leadership within a given religion. ... Methodism or the Methodist movement is a group of historically related denominations of Protestant Christianity. ... Ordination is the process in which clergy become authorized by their religious denomination and/or seminary to perform religious rituals and ceremonies. ...


Mormonism

Main article: Elder (Mormonism)

Elder is a title given to adult male members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints or Mormon who have the Melchizedek Priesthood and have been ordained to the office of elder. Male missionaries of the Church, who typically serve for two years beginning at age 19, are considered elders despite their youth because they have been ordained to the office of elder. In Mormonism, an Elder is a priesthood and leadership position in many denominations of the Latter Day Saint movement. ... This is the current Mormon collaboration of the month! Please help improve it to meet the Featured Article standard. ... The term Mormon is a colloquial name, most-often used to refer to members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church). ... The Melchizedek Priesthood, to members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, is the authority and power to act in the name of God including the authority to perform ordinances and to preside over and direct the affairs of his Church and Kingdom. ... A missionary is a propagator of religion, often an evangelist or other representative of a religious community who works among those outside of that community. ...


Congregationalism

See also: Congregational polity

In some Protestant churches, an elder is a senior member of an individual church who is a lay and non-salaried minister. This is a defining characteristic of a Presbyterian church, which draws its name from the Greek language for 'elder'. The elders provide either an advisory or a ruling role in the decision process of local issues; though most modern churches now emphasize the participation of all confirmed members. Congregationalist polity, often known as congregationalism, is a system of church governance in which every local congregation is independent. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... Presbyterianism is part of the Reformed churches family of denominations of Christian Protestantism based on the teachings of John Calvin which traces its institutional roots to the Scottish Reformation, especially as led by John Knox. ... Confirmation is a rite used in many Christian Churches. ...


Most Baptist churches do not recognize elder as a separate office; it is commonly considered synonymous with that of deacon or pastor. This is not universal in Baptist circles, however, and there are many Baptist churches which are elder-led. A Baptist is a member of a Baptist church or any follower of Jesus Christ who believes that baptism is administered by the full immersion of a confessing Christian. ...


Jehovah's Witnesses

Among Jehovah's Witnesses, an elder is a spiritually mature man appointed to teach the congregation, according to Witness interpretation of Bible requirements. Jehovahs Witnesses are organized into a hierarchy. ... The word Bible refers to the canonical collections of sacred writings of Judaism and Christianity. ...


An elder works within a group known as a "body of elders", each assigned to specific congregational tasks entailing oversight of the congregation. Each congregation has a chairman, or presiding overseer, typically the most experienced elder.


Elders are not clergy in the common sense of the term; they are not paid and elder is not a title. Clergy is the generic term used to describe the formal religious leadership within a given religion. ...


Traveling overseers and men serving in the boards of the offices of Jehovah's Witnesses are all considered elders.


Elders in a congregation receive no monetary compensation for their work. Travelling overseers, and members of the 'Bethel families' seek the kingdom first instead of material benefit. They are not forbidden from doing secular work but do receive a modest stipend.


Presbyterian Church (USA)

See also: Presbyterian polity

In the Presbyterian Church (USA), elders are "ordained lay" people (Ministers of Word and Sacrament are also elders, though they have a different function). They form the session, which is a ruling council for their congregation. Presbyterian governance of a church is typified by the rule of assemblies of presbyters, or elders. ... Image File history File links Gnome-globe. ... Emblem of the PC(USA) The Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) or PC(USA) is a mainline Protestant Christian denomination in the United States. ... Presbyterian governance of a church is typified by the rule of assemblies of presbyters, or elders. ...


Governmental responsibilities

Elders are chosen by the people. Together with ministers of the Word and Sacrament, they exercise leadership, government, and discipline and have responsibilities for the life of a particular church as well as the church at large, including ecumenical relationships. They shall serve faithfully as members of the session. (G-10.0102) When elected commissioners to higher governing bodies, elders participate and vote with the same authority as ministers of the Word and Sacrament, and they are eligible for any office.


Gifts and requirements

Elders should be persons of faith, dedication, and good judgment. Their manner of life should be a demonstration of the Christian gospel, both within the church and in the world. (G-6.0106)


Specific responsibilities

It is the duty of elders, individually and jointly, to strengthen and nurture the faith and life of the congregation committed to their charge. Together with the pastor, they should encourage the people in the worship and service of God, equip and renew them for their tasks within the church and for their mission in the world, visit and comfort and care for the people, with special attention to the poor, the sick, the lonely, and those who are oppressed. They should inform the pastor and session of those persons and structures which may need special attention. They should assist in worship. (See W-1.4003, W-2.3011-.3012, W-3.1003, W-3.3616, and W-4.4003.) They should cultivate their ability to teach the Bible and may be authorized to supply places which are without the regular ministry of the Word and Sacrament. In specific circumstances and with proper instruction, specific elders may be authorized by the presbytery to administer the Lord's Supper in accord with G-11.0103z. Those duties which all Christians are bound to perform by the law of love are especially incumbent upon elders because of their calling to office and are to be fulfilled by them as official responsibilities.


Restoration Movement

In churches growing out of the American Restoration Movement (or Campbell-Stone Movement), namely the Church of Christ, Independent Christian Church, and Disciples of Christ, elders are laity who form the major government of the church. In the Church of Christ, all elders are still male. In this group, the elders are generally the entire governing unit of the congregation; they hire and fire ministers, determine Sunday school curriculum, and are generally the trustees of the physical building and other real estate of the congregation as well. This arrangement is generally followed to some extent in the Independent Christian Church as well; in more recent years the function of the eldership in the Disciples of Christ has been more of an advisory and ceremonial role (serving the Lord's Supper, for example) and a separate board has been constituted to serve in conjunction with the minister in the church's governance. For information related to Dispensational Christian views regarding Jewish people in the End times see Restorationism The Stone-Campbell Restoration Movement (or simply, Restoration Movement) is a religious reform movement born in the early 1800s in the United States. ... Alternate meanings: see Church of Christ (disambiguation). ... The Independent Christian Churches/Churches of Christ are a part of the Restoration Movement and are in the theological middle ground between the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) and the Church of Christ (non-instrumental). ... The insignia of the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ). ... In most Protestant churches, a minister is a member of the ordained clergy who leads a congregation or participates in a role in a parachurch ministry; such a person may also be called a Pastor, Preacher, Bishop, Chaplain or Elder. ... Sunday school, Indians and whites. ... The word trustee is a legal term that refers to a holder of property on behalf of some other beneficiary. ... Real estate is a legal term that encompasses land along with anything permanently affixed to the land, such as buildings. ... The Lords Supper is a variation of the name and the service of The Last Supper or Eucharist. ...


Shakerism

Among the Shakers, Elders and Eldresses were leaders in specific areas. Two Elders and Eldresses headed the central Shaker ministry at Mount Lebanon, New York and dealt with both spiritual and temporal matters. Other pairs of elders and eldresses headed groups of Shaker communities, while others were spiritual leaders of smaller groups within the communities. The Shakers, an offshoot of the Religious Society of Friends (or Quakers), originated in Manchester, England in the late eighteenth century (1772). ...


Brethren

In early 19th century Great Britain groups of believers began to gather in what they referred to as Biblical simplicity. Under the leadership of such men as J. N. Darby and George Mueller these groups began to meet with no clergy to share the Lord's Supper. John Nelson Darby John Nelson Darby, (November 18, 1800 - April 29, 1882) was an Anglo-Irish evangelist, an influential figure among the original Plymouth Brethren, and considered the father of modern Dispensationalism. ... George Mueller may refer to the following people: George Mueller, the former NASA deputy administrator George Müller, the Christian evangelist and coordinator of orphanages in England This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... The Lords Supper is a variation of the name and the service of The Last Supper or Eucharist. ...


The most defining element of these churches is the total rejection of the concept of clergy. Rather, in keeping with the doctrine of the Priesthood of the Believer, they view all Christians as being ordained by God to serve and are therefore ministers. Leadership is by example and by the recognition of their abilities by those they lead. The priesthood of all believers is a Protestant doctrine founded on the First Epistle of Peter, 2:9: But ye are a chosen generation, a royal priesthood, an holy nation, a peculiar people; that ye should shew forth the praises of him who hath called you out of darkness into...


Regardless of great efforts to prevent it, splits happened, with the two largest divisions being commonly referred to as Open Brethren and Exclusive Brethren. Among other differences their view of elders vary. The Open Brethren, sometimes called Christian Brethren or Plymouth Brethren, are a group of Protestant Evangelical Christian churches that arose in the late 1820s. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


Open Brethren

So called because they serve the Lord's Supper to any Christian who wishes to fellowship with them, their churches are led by elders—men meeting the Biblical qualifications found in 1 Timothy 3:1-7 and Titus 1:6-9. These men are the spiritual leadership of the church. (Redirected from 1 Timothy) This article or section should be merged with Second Epistle to Timothy The First Epistle to Timothy is a book of the canonic New Testament, one of the three so-called pastoral epistles (1 Timothy, 2 Timothy, and the Epistle to Titus). ... For other uses, see Titus (disambiguation). ...


Exclusive Brethren

As the name implies the Exclusives are so named for their practice of serving the Lord's Supper exclusively to those who are part of their own particular group, agreeing with them on various doctrinal positions.


Most exclusive groups believe the church to have been in ruins between the death of the apostles and their own time. Since no truly apostolic authority exists to appoint elders the church has none. Instead they recognize leading brothers who demonstrate maturity and leadership ability.


References

  1. ^ Strauch, A. (1995). Biblical Eldership. Lewis and Roth Publishers, p. 125
  2. ^ Strauch, A. (1995). Biblical Eldership. Lewis and Roth Publishers, p. 148
  3. ^ Strauch, A. (1995). Biblical Eldership. Lewis and Roth Publishers, p. 149
  4. ^ Strauch, A. (1995). Biblical Eldership. Lewis and Roth Publishers, p. 103

See also

In general religious use, ordination is the process by which one is consecrated (set apart for the undivided administration of various religious rites). ... A religious or political elder is valued for his (it is usually a man, though there are exceptions) wisdom, by the logic that the older you are the more you know. ... A Church of Scotland congregation is led by its minister and elders. ... For other types of minister, see Minister In Christian churches, a minister is a man or woman who serves a congregation or participates in a role in a parachurch ministry; such persons can minister as a Pastor, Preacher, Bishop, Chaplain, Deacon or Elder. ... Main article: Minister of religion A pastor is the head minister or priest of a Christian church. ... Presbyterian governance of a church is typified by the rule of assemblies of presbyters, or elders. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
United States v. Elder (2814 words)
Elder regards Casa Romero as a sanctuary in the biblical sense.
Elder bears the initial burden to demonstrate that religious beliefs motivated his conduct.
Elder's do-it-yourself immigration policy, while charitable, gives away what is not his to give away the Government's legitimate right to examine every person who enters the country so that the Government can make informed decisions on who will be admitted.
Elder (religious) at AllExperts (1278 words)
A religious elder (in Greek, πρεσβυτερος [presbyteros]) is valued for his or her wisdom, in part for their age, on the grounds that the older one is then the more one is likely to know.
Elders are typical of societies where oral history plays a large part; in societies with patrilineal descent, elders are frequently male, whereas in societies with matrilineal descent, elders are often female.
Elder is a title given to adult male members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints or Mormon who have the Melchizedek Priesthood and have been ordained to the office of elder.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m