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Encyclopedia > Elbert Hubbard
Elbert Green Hubbard, American philosopher and writer
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Elbert Green Hubbard, American philosopher and writer
Elbert Hubbard illustrated in the frontispiece of The Mintage
Enlarge
Elbert Hubbard illustrated in the frontispiece of The Mintage

Elbert Green Hubbard (June 19, 1856May 7, 1915) was an American writer and publisher. He is perhaps most famous for his essay A Message to Garcia. Download high resolution version (1128x1400, 136 KB)Elbert Hubbard - Project Gutenberg eText 12933 - http://www. ... Download high resolution version (1128x1400, 136 KB)Elbert Hubbard - Project Gutenberg eText 12933 - http://www. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (414x674, 22 KB) Elbert Hubbard - Project Gutenberg etext 17504 Frontispiece of The Project Gutenberg EBook of The Mintage, by Elbert Hubbard From http://www. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (414x674, 22 KB) Elbert Hubbard - Project Gutenberg etext 17504 Frontispiece of The Project Gutenberg EBook of The Mintage, by Elbert Hubbard From http://www. ... June 19 is the 170th day of the year (171st in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 195 days remaining. ... 1856 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... May 7 is the 127th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (128th in leap years). ... 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... A Message to Garcia is an inspirational essay written by Elbert Hubbard that has been made into two motion pictures. ...


He was born in Bloomington, Illinois and founded Roycroft, an Arts and Crafts movement community in East Aurora, New York in 1895. This grew from his private press, the Roycroft Press, which was inspired by William Morris’s Kelmscott Press. (Although called the "Roycroft Press" by latter-day collectors and print historians, the organization called itself "The Roycrofters" and "The Roycroft Shops.") Bloomington is a city located in McLean County, Illinois. ... Roycroft was a reformist community of craft workers and artists which formed part of the Arts and Crafts movement in the USA. Elbert Hubbard founded the community in 1895 in the village of East Aurora, Erie County, New York, near Buffalo. ... Artichoke wallpaper, by John Henry Dearle for William Morris & Co. ... East Aurora is a village located in Erie County, New York. ... Private Press is a term used in the field of book collecting to describe a printing press operated as a personal enthusiasm, rather than as a purely commercial venture. ... Roycroft was a reformist community of craft workers and artists which formed part of the Arts and Crafts movement in the USA. Elbert Hubbard founded the community in 1895 in the village of East Aurora, Erie County, New York, near Buffalo. ... William Morris, socialist and innovator in the Arts and Crafts movement William Morris, publisher Davids Charge to Solomon (1882), a stained-glass window by Edward Burne-Jones and William Morris in Trinity Church, Boston, Massachusetts. ... This page is about William Morris the writer, designer and socialist. ...


Hubbard edited and published two magazines, The Philistine and The Fra. The Philistine was bound in brown butcher paper and full of satire and whimsy. (Hubbard himself quipped that the cover was butcher paper because "There is meat inside.") The Roycrofters produced handsome, if sometimes eccentric, books printed on handmade paper, and operated a fine bindery, a furniture shop, and shops producing modeled leather and hammered copper goods. They were a leading producer of Mission Style products. Elbert Green Hubbard, American philosopher and writer Elbert Hubbard illustrated in the frontispiece of The Mintage Elbert Green Hubbard (June 19, 1856 – May 7, 1915) was an American writer and publisher. ... Postcard of the reconstructed Mission Santa Bárbara The California missions are a series of settlements established by Spanish Catholic Franciscans, to Christianize the local Native Americans, but with the added benefit of giving Spain a toehold in the frontier land. ...


Hubbard's second wife, Alice Moore Hubbard, was a graduate of the New Thought-oriented Emerson College of Oratory in Boston and a noted suffragist, and the Roycroft Shops became a site for meetings and conventions of radicals, freethinkers, reformers and suffragists. Hubbard became a popular lecturer, and his homespun philosophy evolved from a loose William Morris-inspired socialism to an ardent defense of free enterprise and American know-how. Hubbard was much mocked in the press for "selling out." Alice Moore Hubbard (June 7, 1861- May 7, 1915) was a noted American femininst, and, with her husband, Elbert Hubbard was a leading figure in the Roycroft movement- a branch of the Arts and Crafts Movement in England with which it was contemporary. ... New Thought describes a set of religious ideas that developed in the United States during the late 19th century, originating with Phineas Parkhurst Quimby. ... Emerson College was founded in 1880 by Charles Wesley Emerson as a school of oratory, in Boston, Massachusetts. ... Suffragette with banner, Washington DC, 1918 The title of suffragette was given to members of the womens suffrage movement in the United Kingdom and United States, particularly in the years prior to World War I. The name was the Womens Social and Political Union (founded in 1903). ... Look up Radical in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The word freethinker has different meanings: A freethinker is a proponent of the philosophical practice known as Freethinking, thus being a practitioner of Freethought. ... Socialism refers to a broad array of doctrines or political movements that envisage a socio-economic system in which property and the distribution of wealth are subject to social control. ...


In 1912, the famed passenger liner the Titanic was sunk after hitting an iceberg. Hubbard subsequently wrote[citation needed] of the disaster, singling out the story of the wife of Isador Straus, who as a woman was supposed to be placed on a lifeboat in precedence to the men. She refused to board the boat: "Not I—I will not leave my husband. All these years we've traveled together, and shall we part now? No, our fate is one." 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday in the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... RMS Titanic was an Olympic class passenger liner that collided with an iceberg and sank in 1912. ... An iceberg (a partial loan translation, probably from Dutch ijsberg (literally: mountain of ice),[1] cognate to German Eisberg) is a large piece of ice that has broken off from a snow-formed glacier or ice shelf and is floating in open water. ... Isidor Straus (February 6, 1845–April 15, 1912) was owner of the Macys department store and served as a Congressional Representative. ...


Hubbard then added his own stirring commentary: "Mr. and Mrs. Straus, I envy you that legacy of love and loyalty left to your children and grandchildren. The calm courage that was yours all your long and useful career was your possession in death. You knew how to do three great things—you knew how to live, how to love and how to die.


"One thing is sure, there are just two respectable ways to die. One is of old age, and the other is by accident. All disease is indecent. Suicide is atrocious. But to pass out as did Mr. and Mrs. Isador Straus is glorious. Few have such a privilege. Happy lovers, both. In life they were never separated and in death they are not divided."

Contents

Lusitania

Hubbard and his wife, though he knew it not then, were to have just such a privilege. Little more than three years after the sinking of the Titanic, the Hubbards boarded Lusitania in New York City on May 1, 1915. On May 7, 1915, while at sea, it was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine Unterseeboot 20. In red is the province of Lusitania within the Roman Empire, 120 AD Lusitania was an ancient Roman province approximately including current Portugal, except for the area between the rivers Douro and Minho (part of Hispania Tarraconensis), and part of modern day western Spain, the present autonomous communities of Extremadura... The RMS Lusitania was a British ocean liner owned by the Cunard Steamship Line Shipping Company, built by John Brown and Company of Clydebank, Scotland, and launched on June 6, 1906. ... Nickname: Big Apple; City that never Sleeps; Gotham Location in the state of New York Coordinates: Country United States State New York Boroughs The Bronx Manhattan Queens Brooklyn Staten Island Settled 1613 Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Area    - City 1,214. ... May 1 is the 121st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (122nd in leap years). ... 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... May 7 is the 127th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (128th in leap years). ... 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... U-boat is also a nickname for some diesel locomotives built by GE; see List of GE locomotives October 1939. ... Unterseeboot 20 (U-20) has been the designation of two submarines of the German Navy. ...


In a letter to Elbert Hubbard II dated March 12, 1916, Ernest C. Cowper, a survivor of this devastating act of warfare against civilians, wrote: March 12 is the 71st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (72nd in leap years). ... 1916 (MCMXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ...


"I can not say specifically where your father and Mrs. Hubbard were when the torpedoes hit, but I can tell you just what happened after that. They emerged from their room, which was on the port side of the vessel, and came on to the boat-deck.


"Neither appeared perturbed in the least. Your father and Mrs. Hubbard linked arms—the fashion in which they always walked the deck—and stood apparently wondering what to do. I passed him with a baby which I was taking to a lifeboat when he said, 'Well, Jack, they have got us. They are a damn sight worse than I ever thought they were.'


"They did not move very far away from where they originally stood. As I moved to the other side of the ship, in preparation for a jump when the right moment came, I called to him, 'What are you going to do?' and he just shook his head, while Mrs. Hubbard smiled and said, 'There does not seem to be anything to do.'


"The expression seemed to produce action on the part of your father, for then he did one of the most dramatic things I ever saw done. He simply turned with Mrs. Hubbard and entered a room on the top deck, the door of which was open, and closed it behind him.


"It was apparent that his idea was that they should die together, and not risk being parted on going into the water."


Posthumous renown

Owing to his prolific publications, Hubbard was a renowned figure in his day. Contributors to a 360-page book published by Roycrofters and entitled In Memoriam: Elbert and Alice Hubbard included such luminaries as meat-packing magnate J. Ogden Armour, business theorist and Babson College founder Roger Babson, botanist and horticulturalist Luther Burbank, seed-company founder W. Atlee Burpee, ketchup magnate Henry J. Heinz, National Park Service founder Franklin Knight Lane, success writer Orison Swett Marden, inventor of the modern comic strip Richard F. Outcault, poet James Whitcomb Riley, Nobel Peace Prize recipient Elihu Root, evangelist Billy Sunday, African-American political leader Booker T. Washington, and poet Ella Wheeler Wilcox. J. Ogden Armour was a Chicago meat-packing magnate in the early 20th century. ... Babson College, located in Wellesley, Massachusetts (Zoned as Babson Park ZIP code 02457)[1], is a private business school which grants undergraduates a BS degree. ... Roger Ward Babson (July 6, 1875 - March 5, 1967), was a fucking asshole. ... Luther Burbank - c1902 Luther Burbank - The Wizard of Horticulture Luther Burbank (March 7, 1849–April 11, 1926)[1] was an American botanist, horticulturist, and pioneer of agricultural science. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Henry J. Heinz Henry John Heinz (October 11, 1844–May 14, 1919) was a United States businessman. ... Franklin Knight Lane (1864–1921) was a Canadian-American Democratic politician who served as United States Secretary of the Interior under Woodrow Wilson from 1913 to 1920. ... Richard Felton Outcault (January 14, 1863-September 25, 1928) was an American comic strip scriptwriter, sketcher and painter. ... Honorary statue of James Whitcomb Riley on courthouse lawn in Greenfield, Indiana James Whitcomb Riley (Greenfield, Indiana October 7, 1849 – July 22, 1916), American writer and poet called the Hoosier poet and Americas Childrens Poet made a start writing newspaper verse in Hoosier dialect for the Indianapolis Journal... Elihu Root Elihu Root (February 15, 1845 – February 7, 1937) was an American lawyer and statesman, the son of Oren Root and Nancy Whitney Buttrick. ... Billy Sunday William Ashley Billy Sunday (November 19, 1863 – November 6, 1935) was noted first as a professional baseball player, and then more famously as an evangelist. ... Booker T. Washington Booker Taliaferro Washington (April 5, 1856 – November 14, 1915) was an American political leader, educator and author. ... Ella Wheeler Wilcox (November 5, 1850–October 30, 1919) was an American author and poet. ...


Trivia

The Roycroft Shops, run by Hubbard's son, Elbert Hubbard II, operated until 1938.


He is an ancestor of singer Brodie Foster Hubbard. An ancestor is a parent or (recursively) the parent of an ancestor (i. ... Brodie Foster Hubbard (born November 1, 1978) is an American country music and rock music singer, guitarist and songwriter from Phoenix, Arizona. ...


Quotations

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Elbert Hubbard
  • "The Supernatural is the natural not yet understood."
  • "An ounce of loyalty is worth a pound of cleverness."
  • "Genius may have its limitations, but stupidity is not thus handicapped."
  • "A failure is a man who has blundered but is not able to cash in on the experience."
  • "Life is just one damned thing after another."
  • "Never explain—your friends do not need it and your enemies will not believe you anyway."
  • "To avoid criticism do nothing, say nothing, be nothing."
  • "Do not take life too seriously. You will never get out of it alive."
  • "The greatest mistake you can make in life is to be continually fearing you will make one."
  • “Health Must be Earned. Get it—you Lobster!”[1]
  • "One machine can do the work of fifty ordinary men. No machine can do the work of one extraordinary man."[2]

Image File history File links Wikiquote-logo-en. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...

Further reading

John H. Martin (commonly credited as John Martin) is an an American actor who plays the recurring character of Frederick Hodges on soap opera The Young and the Restless. ... Upton Sinclair I never met a Socialist, or a Socialist cause, that I didnt like. ...

External links

  • Elbert Hubbard of East Aurora
  • A Visit to the Elbert Hubbard Museum in East Aurora, New York by Donovan A. Shilling
  • A message to Garcia
  • A message to Garcia
  • Elbert Hubbard Quotes
  • Text of the Ernest Cowper letter on the Hubbards' last hour
  • Ad for In Memoriam: Elbert and Alice Hubbard
  • Works by Elbert Hubbard at Project Gutenberg
  • The Elbert Hubbard papers at the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center at The University of Texas at Austin

  Results from FactBites:
 
Elbert Hubbard - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1090 words)
Elbert Hubbard illustrated in the frontispiece of The Mintage
Hubbard became a popular lecturer, and his homespun philosophy evolved from a loose William Morris-inspired socialism to an ardent defense of free enterprise and American know-how.
Hubbard and entered a room on the top deck, the door of which was open, and closed it behind him.
Elbert Hubbard: The Lusitania Resource (1521 words)
Elbert Hubbard, 55, was born in Bloomington, Illinois, United States on 19 June 1859.
Elbert complained that Bertha was boring and that "Great men often marry commonplace women." Bertha retained custody of two of their children.
Hubbard had barely finished speaking when they felt a muffled impact, and "the good ship trembled for a moment under the force of the blow." They turned to see where the sound was coming from and saw a "smoke and cinders flying up in the air on the starboard side." A second explosion soon followed.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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