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Encyclopedia > El Salvador
Republica de El Salvador
Flag of El Salvador
Flag Coat of arms
Motto"Dios, Unión, Libertad"  (Spanish)
"God, Union, Liberty"
AnthemHimno Nacional de El Salvador
Capital
(and largest city)
San Salvador
13°40′N, 89°10′W
Official languages Spanish
Demonym Salvadorean
Government Presidential republic
 -  President Antonio Saca
Independence
 -  from Spain September 15, 1821 
 -  from the UPCA 1842 
Area
 -  Total 21,040 km² 
8,124 sq mi 
 -  Water (%) 1.4
Population
 -   estimate 6,600,000 (97th)
 -  2007 census 6,600,000 
 -  Density 318.7/km² (23rd)
823.6/sq mi
GDP (PPP) 2006 estimate
 -  Total $38.617 billion (89th)
 -  Per capita $5,600 (103rd)
Gini (2002) 52.4 (high
HDI (2007) 0.735 (medium) (103th)
Currency United States dollar ($) (2001–present)2 (USD "$")
Time zone (UTC-6)
Internet TLD .sv
Calling code +5031
1 Telephone companies (market share): Tigo (45%), Claro (25%), Movistar (24%), Digicel (5.5%), Red (0.5%).
2 The United States dollar is the currency in use. Financial information can be expressed in US Dollars and in Salvadoran colón, but it is out of circulation. http://www.bcr.gob.sv/ingles/integracion/ley.html

El Salvador (República de El Salvador) is a country in Central America. The area was originally called by the Pipil "Cuzhcatl", in Spanish “Cuzcatlan”, which in Nahuatl means “The Land Of Precious Things”. Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... World map showing the Americas CIA political map of the Americas in an equal-area projection The Americas are the lands of the Western hemisphere or New World, consisting of the continents of North America and South America with their associated islands and regions. ... El Salvador is a country in Central America. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_El_Salvador. ... Image File history File links El_Salvador_COA.svg‎ Coat of arms of El Salvador Extraced from Image:Flag_of_El_Salvador. ... State flag and naval ensign. ... Coat of arms of El Salvador The coat of arms of El Salvador has been in use in its current form since 15 September 1912. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... A national anthem is a generally patriotic musical composition that evokes and eulogizes the history, traditions and struggles of its people, recognized either by a countrys government as the official national song, or by convention through use by the people. ... The title of the anthem of El Salvador is simply Himno Nacional de El Salvador (National Anthem of El Salvador). ... Image File history File links LocationElSalvador. ... Not to be confused with capitol. ... Population growth 1961-2003. ... For other uses, see San Salvador (disambiguation). ... An official language is a language that is given a special legal status in the countries, states, and other territories. ... A demonym or gentilic is a word that denotes the members of a people or the inhabitants of a place. ... A presidential system, also called a congressional system, is a system of government where an executive branch exists and presides (hence the term) separately from the legislature, to which it is not accountable and which cannot in normal circumstances dismiss it. ... This page contains a list of presidents of El Salvador. ... Elías Antonio (Tony) Saca González (born in Usulutan, 9 March 1965) is a Salvadoran politician and the current President of El Salvador. ... is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1821 (MDCCCXXI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The United Provinces of Central America (UPCA) was a country that existed in Central America from July 1823 to approximately 1840. ... 1842 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... To help compare different orders of magnitude and geographical regions, we list here areas between 100 km² and 1000 km². See also areas of other orders of magnitude. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Impact from a water drop causes an upward rebound jet surrounded by circular capillary waves. ... A percentage is a way of expressing a proportion, a ratio or a fraction as a whole number, by using 100 as the denominator. ... Map of countries by population for the year 2007 This is a list of countries ordered according to population. ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... Population density by country, 2006 List of countries and dependencies by population density in inhabitants/km². The list includes sovereign states and self-governing dependent territories that are recognized by the United Nations. ... PPP of GDP for the countries of the world (2003). ... There are three lists of countries of the world sorted by their gross domestic product (GDP) (the value of all final goods and services produced within a nation in a given year). ... Per capita is a Latin phrase meaning for each head. ... This article includes two lists of countries of the world[1] sorted by their gross domestic product (GDP) at purchasing power parity (PPP) per capita, the value of all final goods and services produced within a nation in a given year divided by the average population for the same year. ... Graphical representation of the Gini coefficient The Gini coefficient is a measure of inequality of income distribution or inequality of wealth distribution. ... This page talks about Human Development Index, for other HDIs see HDI (disambiguation) World map indicating Human Development Index (2007). ... This talks about the countries in the Human Development Index, for information on the Human Development Index, please Click Here World map indicating Human Development Index (2007) (Colour-blind compliant map) For red-green color vision problems. ... USD redirects here. ... ISO 4217 is the international standard describing three letter codes (also known as the currency code) to define the names of currencies established by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... UTC redirects here. ... A country code top-level domain (ccTLD) is a top-level domain used and reserved for a country or a dependent territory. ... .sv is the Internet country code top-level domain ( ccTLD) for El Salvador. ... This is a list of country calling codes defined by ITU-T recommendation E.164. ... USD redirects here. ... The colón was the currency of El Salvador between 1919 and 2001. ... The Pipil are an indigenous people who live in western El Salvador. ... For the Spanish language as spoken in Mexico, see Mexican Spanish. ...


After the Spanish conquest the land was baptized by Spanish conquistadors as “Provincia De Nuestro Señor Jesucristo El Salvador Del Mundo”, (“Province Of Our Lord Jesus Christ, The Savior Of The World”), now abbreviated as “Republica de El Salvador”.

Contents

History

Main article: History of El Salvador

In the early sixteenth century, the Spanish ventured into ports to extend their dominion to the area. They were firmly resisted by the Spanish and their remaining Mayan-speaking neighbors. Pedro de Alvarado, a lieutenant of Hernan Cortés, led the first effort by Spanish forces. Two subsequent expeditions took place --the first in 1525, followed by a smaller group in 1528-- to bring the Pipil under Spanish rule.[citation needed] Before the Spanish conquest, the area that now is El Salvador was composed of three great indigenous states and several principalities. ... “Maya language” redirects here. ...


Towards the end of 1810, a combination of internal and external factors allowed Central American élites to attempt to gain independence from the Spanish crown. The internal factors were mainly the interest the élites had in controlling the territories they owned without involvement from Spanish authorities. The external factors were the success of the French and American revolutions in the eighteenth century and the weakening of the military power of the Spanish crown because of its wars against Napoleonic France. The independence movement was consolidated on November 5, 1811, when the Salvadoran priest, Jose Matias Delgado, sounded the bells of the Iglesia La Merced in San Salvador, making a call for the insurrection. After many years of internal fights, the Acta de Independencia (Act of Independence) of Central America was signed in Guatemala on September 15, 1821.When these provinces were joined with Mexico in early 1822, El Salvador resisted, insisting on autonomy for the Central American countries. 1810 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the US Federal Agent designation, see Special agent. ... Padre José Matías Delgado José Matías Delgado y León (February 24, 1767, San Salvador—November 12, 1832, San Salvador) was a Salvadoran priest and doctor known as El Padre de la Patria Salvadoreña (The Father of the Salvadoran Fatherland). ... is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1821 (MDCCCXXI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


In 1823, the United Provinces of Central America was formed by the five Central American states under General Manuel José Arce. When this federation was dissolved in 1838, El Salvador became an independent republic. El Salvador's early history as an independent state was marked by frequent revolutions. Capital Guatemala City; in 1834 moved to San Salvador Created 1823 Dissolved 1840 Demonym Centroamerican The United Provinces of Central America (UPCA) was a country that existed in Central America from July 1823 to approximately 1840. ... For other uses, see Central America (disambiguation). ... Manuel Jose Arce (1786-1847) was the President of Central America from 1825 to 1829. ... Look up republic in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


From 1872 to 1898, El Salvador was a prime mover in attempts to reestablish an isthmian federation. The governments of El Salvador, Honduras, and Nicaragua formed the Greater Republic of Central America via the Pact of Amapala in 1895. Although Guatemala and Costa Rica considered joining the Greater Republic (which was rechristened the United States of Central America when its constitution went into effect in 1898), neither country joined. This union, which had planned to establish its capital city at Amapala on the Golfo de Fonseca, did not survive a seizure of power in El Salvador in 1898. This article is about federal states. ... The Republic of Central America (officially the Greater Republic of Central America) was an attempt to unite the Central American countries of Honduras, Nicaragua, and El Salvador into a single state, lasting from 1896 to 1898. ... Amapala is a municipality in the Honduran department of Valle. ... The United Provinces of Central America (UPCA) was a country that existed in Central America from July 1823 to approximately 1840. ... Amapala is a municipality in the Honduran department of Valle. ... Gulf of Fonseca from space, July 1997 The Gulf of Fonseca (Spanish: Golfo de Fonseca) is a gulf in Central America, bordering El Salvador, Honduras and Nicaragua. ...


The enormous profits that coffee yielded as a monoculture export served as an impetus for the process whereby land became concentrated in the hands of an oligarchy of few families. A succession of presidents from the ranks of the Salvadoran oligarchy, nominally both conservative and liberal, throughout the last half of the nineteenth century generally agreed on the promotion of coffee as the predominant cash crop, on the development of infrastructure (railroads and port facilities) primarily in support of the coffee trade, on the elimination of communal landholdings to facilitate further coffee production, on the passage of anti-vagrancy laws to ensure that displaced campesinos and other rural residents provided sufficient labour for the coffee fincas (plantations), and on the suppression of rural discontent. In 1912, the national guard was created as a rural police force. For other uses, see Coffee (disambiguation). ... Forms of government Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Oligarchy (Greek , Oligarkhía) is a form of government where political power effectively rests with a small elite segment of society (whether distinguished by wealth, family or military powers). ... For other uses, see President (disambiguation). ... Conservatism is a term used to describe political philosophies that favor tradition and gradual change, where tradition refers to religious, cultural, or nationally defined beliefs and customs. ... Liberalism is an ideology, philosophical view, and political tradition which holds that liberty is the primary political value. ... In agriculture, a cash crop is a crop which is grown for money. ... This is the top-level page of WikiProject trains Rail tracks Rail transport refers to the land transport of passengers and goods along railways or railroads. ... Categories: Stub | Commercial item transport and distribution | Transportation ... A vagrant is a person, almost always poor, without a home or regular work. ... Campesino may refer to A simple farmer is referred to as a campesino in Spanish. ... In classical economics and all micro-economics labour is a measure of the work done by human beings and is one of three factors of production, the others being land and capital. ... This article is about crop plantations. ...


The coffee industry grew inexorably in El Salvador. As a result the élite provided the bulk of the government's financial support through import duties on goods imported with the foreign currencies that coffee sales earned. This support, coupled with the humbler and more mundane mechanisms of corruption, ensured the coffee growers of overwhelming influence within the government. Duty is a term loosely appliedDuty to any action (or course of action) whichDutyDuty is regarded as morally incumbent, apart from personal likes and dislikes or any external compulsion. ...


El Salvador's early history as an independent state was marked by frequent revolutions; not until the period 1900-30 was relative stability achieved. The economic élite, based on agriculture and some mining, ruled the country in conjunction with the military.


The economy, based on coffee-growing after the mid-19th century, as the world market for indigo withered away, prospered or suffered as the world coffee price fluctuated. From 1931--the year of the coup in which Gen. Maximiliano Hernández Martínez came to power until he was deposed in 1944 there was brutal suppression of rural resistance. The most notable event was the 1932 Salvadoran peasant uprising, commonly referred to as La Matanza (the massacre), headed by Farabundo Martí and the retaliation led by Martínez's government, in which approximately 30,000 indigenous people and political opponents were murdered, imprisoned or exiled. Until 1980, all but one Salvadoran temporary president was an army officer. Periodic presidential elections were seldom free or fair and an oligarchy in alliance with military forces ruled the nation. As in many Latin American countries, this inequality led to peasant opposition to the oligarchy. The result was the Salvadoran Civil War (1979-1991), largely a peasant revolution. Atrocities of the Alianza Republicana Nacionalista (ARENA, or Nationalist Republican Alliance) government, such as the El Mozote massacre, and the murder of Catholic missionaries and other religious aid workers, such as Jean Donovan, by death squads linked to the government caused international outrage. In 1984 international observers saw centrist Napoleon Duarte elected president in popular elections which were violently boycotted by members of the opposition. Despite the peace-making efforts of the democratic government, the peasant revolution continued until the peace accords were signed in January 1991. The different factions of the guerrillas formed the Frente Farabundo Martí para la Liberación Nacional party (FMLN) in order to seek office through democratic elections. Since then, the FMLN has gradually gained representation, particularly in the Legislative Assembly and local governments. Meanwhile, the conservative Alianza Republicana Nacionalista (ARENA) party has won every presidential election and remained the most favored political force.[citation needed] Maximiliano Hernández Martínez (1882–1966) was the President of El Salvador from 1931 to 1944. ... The Salvadoran Peasant Uprising of 1932, also known as La matanza, was a brief peasant-led uprising in January of 1932. ... Agustín Farabundo Martí was a Salvadoran revolutionary. ... Combatants Salvadoran Government: Salvadoran Armed Forces, National Police, Treasury Police, Death Squads Revolutionary Forces: FMLN FDR ERP RN PRTC Commanders Roberto DAubuisson Álvaro Magaña José Guillermo García José Napoleón Duarte Alfredo Cristiani Cayetano Carpio† Leonel González Schafik Handal Joaquin Villalobos Nidia Díaz Strength About... The Nationalist Republican Alliance (Spanish: Alianza Republicana Nacionalista or ARENA) is a conservative political party in El Salvador. ... The memorial at El Mozote The El Mozote Massacre took place in the village of El Mozote, in Morazán department, El Salvador, on December 11, 1981, when Salvadoran armed forces killed an estimated 900 civilians in an anti-guerrilla campaign. ... Jean Donovan (April 10, 1953 – December 2, 1980) was a Roman Catholic lay missionary to Peru and El Salvador. ...


In 1998, El Salvador became one of three Latin-American countries where abortion is illegal with no exceptions, along with Chile and Nicaragua.


Politics

The political framework of El Salvador is a presidential representative democratic republic with a multiform multi-party system. The President of El Salvador, currently Antonio Saca, is both head of state and head of government. Executive power is exercised by the government. Legislative power is vested in both the government and the Legislative Assembly. The Judiciary branch is independent of the executive and the legislative branches. Politics of El Salvador takes place in a framework of a presidential representative democratic republic, whereby the President of El Salvador is both head of state and head of government, and of a pluriform multi-party system. ... A presidential system, also called a congressional system, is a system of government where an executive branch exists and presides (hence the term) separately from the legislature, to which it is not accountable and which cannot in normal circumstances dismiss it. ... Representative democracy is a form of government founded on the principles of popular sovereignty by the peoples representatives. ... Look up republic in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This page contains a list of presidents of El Salvador. ... Elías Antonio (Tony) Saca González (born in Usulutan, 9 March 1965) is a Salvadoran politician and the current President of El Salvador. ... For the comedy film of the same name, see Head of State (film). ... The head of government is the chief officer of the executive branch of a government, often presiding over a cabinet. ... Under the doctrine of the separation of powers, the executive is the branch of a government charged with implementing, or executing, the law. ... A legislature is a governmental deliberative body with the power to adopt laws. ... The Legislative Assembly is the legislative branch of the government of El Salvador. ... In the law, the judiciary or judicial system is the system of courts which administer justice in the name of the sovereign or state, a mechanism for the resolution of disputes. ...


Departments and municipalities

See also: List of cities in El Salvador.
Departments of El Salvador
Departments of El Salvador

El Salvador is divided into 14 departments (departamentos), which, in turn, are subdivided into 267 municipalities (municipios). Map of El Salvador This is a list of cities and towns in El Salvador. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... A list of the departments of El Salvador in alphabetical order. ... Municipalities of El Salvador The departments of El Salvador are divided into 267 municipalities or municipios. ...


Department names and abbreviations for the 14 Salvadoran Departments:

Location Statistics Created (given current status) 1869 Capital Ahuachapán Area    â€¢% 1,240 km²   Ranked 8th Population    â€¢(2006) 377,141   Ranked 7th ISO 3166-2 SV-AH Ahuachapán is a department of El Salvador in the west of the country. ... Cabañas is a department of El Salvador in the north central part of the country. ... Chalatenango is a department of El Salvador in the northwest of the country. ... Capital Cojutepeque Area Ranked 14th 756. ... La Libertad is one of the departments of El Salvador and is located in the southwest of the country. ... La Paz is a department of El Salvador in the south central area of the country. ... La Unión is a department of El Salvador in eastern part of the country. ... Morazán is a department of El Salvador. ... San Miguel is a department of El Salvador in the eastern part of the country. ... San Salvador is a department of El Salvador in the west central part of the country. ... Categories: Central America geography stubs | Departments of El Salvador ... Categories: Central America geography stubs | Departments of El Salvador ... Sonsonate is a department of El Salvador in the western part of the country. ... Usulután from the Lenca language Uxulvotan is a department of El Salvador in the southeast of the country ( Maya Lenca region). ...

Geography

Shaded relief map of El Salvador
Shaded relief map of El Salvador
The scenic Jiboa Valley and San Vicente volcano.
The scenic Jiboa Valley and San Vicente volcano.

El Salvador is located in Central America. It has a total area of 8,123 square miles (21,040 km²), making it almost the same size as the U.S. state of New Jersey. It is the smallest country in continental America, and is affectionately called the "Tom Thumb of the Americas" ("Pulgarcito de America"). It has 123.6 square miles (320 km²) of water within its borders. Several small rivers flow through El Salvador into the Pacific Ocean, including the Goascorán, Jiboa, Torola, Paz and the Río Grande de San Miguel. Only the largest river, the Lempa River, flowing from Honduras across El Salvador to the ocean, is navigable for commercial traffic. Volcanic craters enclose lakes, the most important of which are Lake Ilopango (70 km² / 27 sq mi) and Lake Coatepeque (26 km² / 10 sq mi). Lake Güija is El Salvador's largest natural lake (44 km² / 17 sq mi). Several artificial lakes were created by the damming of the Lempa, the largest of which is Embalse Cerrón Grande (350 km² / 135 sq mi). Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1300x1078, 251 KB) El Salvador http://www. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1300x1078, 251 KB) El Salvador http://www. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Sanvicentevolcanojiboavalley. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Sanvicentevolcanojiboavalley. ... Map of El Salvador Shaded relief map of El Salvador Satellite image of El Salvador in April 2002 Economic activity of El Salvador, 1980 Vegetation and land use, 1980 The geography of El Salvador is unique among the nations of Central America. ... For other uses, see Central America (disambiguation). ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Tom Thumb hitches a ride on a butterfly Tom Thumb is the name of a traditional hero in English folklore who was no bigger than his fathers thumb. ... The Goascorán River or Río Goascorán is a river in Honduras and El Salvador that divides the two countries. ... Río Grande de San Miguel is a river in southern El Salvador. ... Lempa River (Spanish: ) is a river in southern El Salvador. ... // Coatepeque Caldera is a volcanic caldera in El Salvador and Honduras in Central America. ...


El Salvador shares borders with Guatemala (126 mi / 203 km) and Honduras (212.5 mi / 342 km). It is the only Central American country that does not have a Caribbean coastline. The highest point in the country is Cerro El Pital at 8,957 feet (2,730 meters), which shares a border with Honduras “Miles” redirects here. ... A kilometer (Commonwealth spelling: kilometre), symbol: km is a unit of length in the metric system equal to 1,000 metres (from the Greek words χίλια (khilia) = thousand and μέτρο (metro) = count/measure). ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... The metre, or meter (symbol: m) is the SI base unit of length. ...


Climate

San Vicente Volcano
San Vicente Volcano
San Vicente Volcano
Survey marker at the summit of Cerro El Pital.
Survey marker at the summit of Cerro El Pital.

El Salvador has a tropical climate with pronounced wet and dry seasons. Temperatures vary primarily with elevation and show little seasonal change. The Pacific lowlands are uniformly hot; the central plateau and mountain areas are more moderate. The rainy season extends from May to October. Almost all the annual rainfall occurs during this time, and yearly totals, particularly on southern-facing mountain slopes, can be as high as 217 centimeters. Protected areas and the central plateau receive lesser, although still significant, amounts. Rainfall during this season generally comes from low pressure over the Pacific and usually falls in heavy afternoon thunderstorms. Hurricanes occasionally form in the Pacific with the notable exception of Hurricane Mitch in 1998. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 297 × 200 pixelsFull resolution (297 × 200 pixel, file size: 12 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Source: Personal camera About: Volcan de San Vicente, El Salvador I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 297 × 200 pixelsFull resolution (297 × 200 pixel, file size: 12 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Source: Personal camera About: Volcan de San Vicente, El Salvador I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1024x768, 185 KB) Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1024x768, 185 KB) Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... Lowest pressure 905 mbar (hPa; 26. ...


From November through April, the northeast trade winds control weather patterns. During these months, air flowing from the Caribbean has had most of the precipitation wrung out of it while passing over the mountains in Honduras. By the time this air reaches El Salvador, it is dry, hot, and hazy.


Temperatures vary little with season; elevation is the primary determinant. The Pacific lowlands are the hottest and most humid region, with annual averages ranging from 25°C to 29°C. San Salvador is representative of the central plateau, with an annual average temperature of 23°C and absolute high and low readings of 38°C and 2°C, respectively. Mountain areas are the coolest, with annual averages from 12°C to 23°C and minimum temperatures sometimes approaching freezing. For other uses, see Celsius (disambiguation). ...


Natural disasters

El Salvador lies along the Pacific ring of fire, and is thus subject to significant tectonic activity, including frequent earthquakes and volcanic activity. Recent examples include the earthquake on January 13, 2001 that measured 7.7 on the Richter scale and caused a landslide that killed more than eight hundred people;[1] and another earthquake only a month after the first one February 13, 2001, killing 255 people and damaging about 20% of the nation's housing. Luckily, many families were able to find safety from the landslides caused by the earthquake. El Salvador's most recent destructive volcanic eruption took place on October 1, 2005, when the Ilamatepec volcano spewed up a cloud of ash and rocks, which fell on nearby villages and caused two deaths (Óscar Armando Guerrero Ventura and José Rafael Guevara). [2] [3] Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1474x1992, 931 KB) Landslide during the 2001 El Salvador quake (January 13) Source: http://landslides. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1474x1992, 931 KB) Landslide during the 2001 El Salvador quake (January 13) Source: http://landslides. ... This article is about geological phenomenon. ... The 2001 El Salvador earthquakes were two earthquakes which hit El Salvador on January 13 and February 13, 2001, within exactly one month of each other. ... “The Ring of Fire” redirects here. ... The tectonic plates of the world were mapped in the second half of the 20th century. ... This article is about the natural seismic phenomenon. ... Cleveland Volcano in the Aleutian Islands of Alaska photographed from the International Space Station For other uses, see Volcano (disambiguation). ... is the 13th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... The Richter magnitude scale, or more correctly local magnitude ML scale, assigns a single number to quantify the amount of seismic energy released by an earthquake. ... This article is about geological phenomenon. ... is the 44th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...


El Salvador's position on the Pacific Ocean also makes it subject to severe weather conditions, including heavy rainstorms and severe droughts, both of which may be made more extreme by the El Niño and La Niña effects. In the summer of 2001, a severe drought destroyed 80% of the country's crops, causing famine in the countryside.[4][5] On October 4, 2005, severe rains resulted in dangerous flooding and landslides, which caused a minimum of fifty deaths.[6] El Salvador's location in Central America also makes it vulnerable to hurricanes coming off of the Caribbean, however this risk is much less than for other Central American countries. Fields outside Benambra, Victoria, Australia suffering from drought conditions A drought is an extended period of months or years when a region notes a deficiency in its water supply. ... Chart of ocean surface temperature anomaly [°C] during the last strong El Niño in December 1997 El Niño and La Niña (also written in English as El Nino and La Nina) are major temperature fluctuations in surface waters of the tropical Eastern Pacific Ocean. ... La Niña is a coupled ocean-atmosphere phenomenon similar to El Niño. ... <nowiki>Insert non-formatted text hereBold text</nowiki>A famine is a social and economic crisis that is commonly accompanied by widespread malnutrition, starvation, epidemic and increased mortality. ... is the 277th day of the year (278th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about geological phenomenon. ... For other uses, see Central America (disambiguation). ... This article is about weather phenomena. ... West Indies redirects here. ...


The Santa Ana volcano in El Salvador is currently dormant, but while it was still erupting it was very dangerous. Lago de Coatepeque (One of El Salvador's lakes.) was caused by a massive eruption.


Economy

According to the IMF and CIA World Factbook, El Salvador has the third largest economy in the region (behind Costa Rica and Guatemala) when looking at nominal Gross Domestic Product and purchasing power GDP.[7] El Salvador's GDP per capita stands at US$4,900, however, this "developing country" still faces many social issues and is among the 10 poorest countries in Latin America.[8] Approximately 2.4 million (35.2%) people live below the poverty line, its GDP real growth rate is low compared to its neighbors, and 6% of the population is unemployed with much underemployment. This article does not cite its references or sources. ... The flag of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) The International Monetary Fund (IMF) is the international organization entrusted with overseeing the global financial system by monitoring foreign exchange rates and balance of payments, as well as offering technical and financial assistance when asked. ... World Factbook 2004 cover The World Factbook is an annual publication by the Central Intelligence Agency of the United States with basic almanac-style information about the various countries of the world. ... USD redirects here. ...  Newly industrialized countries  Other emerging markets  Other developing economies  High income  Upper-middle income  Lower-middle income  Low income A developing country is that country which has a relatively low standard of living, an undeveloped industrial base, and a moderate to low Human Development Index (HDI) score and per capita... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A boy from Jakarta, Indonesia shows his find. ... Unemployment rates in the United States. ... In economics, the term underemployment has at least three different distinct meanings and applications. ...


Most of El Salvador's economy has been hampered by natural disasters such as earthquakes and hurricanes, but El Salvador currently has a steadily growing economy.


GDP in purchasing power parity (PPP) in 2006 was estimated at $33.68 billion USD. The service sector is the largest component of GDP at 60.7%, followed by the industrial sector at 29.6% (2006 est.). Agriculture represents only 7.6% of GDP (2006 est.). PPP of GDP for the countries of the world (2003). ...


The Salvadoran economy has experienced mixed results from the recent government's commitment to free market initiatives and conservative fiscal management that include the privatization of the banking system, telecommunications, public pensions, electrical distribution, and some electrical generation, reduction of import duties, elimination of price controls, and an improved enforcement of intellectual property rights. The GDP has been growing since 1996 at an annual rate that averages 2.8% real growth. In 2006 the GDP's real growth rate was 4.2%. [9] A problem that the Salvadoran economy faces is the inequality in the distribution of income. In 1999, the richest fifth of the population received 45% of the country's income, while the poorest fifth received only 5.6%. A free market is an idealized market, where all economic decisions and actions by individuals regarding transfer of money, goods, and services are voluntary, and are therefore devoid of coercion and theft (some definitions of coercion are inclusive of theft). Colloquially and loosely, a free market economy is an economy... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... For other uses, see Bank (disambiguation). ... Copy of the original phone of Alexander Graham Bell at the Musée des Arts et Métiers in Paris Telecommunication is the assisted transmission of signals over a distance for the purpose of communication. ... Itaipu Dam is a hydroelectric generating station Electricity generation is the first process in the delivery of electricity to consumers. ... Duty is a term loosely appliedDuty to any action (or course of action) whichDutyDuty is regarded as morally incumbent, apart from personal likes and dislikes or any external compulsion. ... In economics, incomes policies are wage and price controls used to fight inflation. ... In law, particularly in common law jurisdictions, intellectual property is a form of legal entitlement which allows its holder to control the use of certain intangible ideas and expressions. ... GDP redirects here. ...


In December 1999, net international reserves equaled US$1.8 billion or roughly five months of imports. Having this hard currency buffer to work with, the Salvadoran government undertook a monetary integration plan beginning January 1, 2001 by which the U.S. dollar became legal tender alongside the Salvadoran colón and all formal accounting was done in U.S. dollars. This way, the government has formally limited its possibility of implementing open market monetary policies to influence short term variables in the economy. As of September 2007, net international reserves stood at $2.42 billion.[10] is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... The colón was the currency of El Salvador between 1919 and 2001. ... International reserve system is a system where every year, countries around the world set aside reserve as insurance against various contingencies such as:- Collapse of export price Change of investors sentiment. ...


Since 2004, the colón stopped circulating and is now never used in the country for any type of transaction.[11] In general, there was discontent with the shift to the U.S. dollar, primarily because of wage stagnation vis-a-vis basic commodity pricing in the marketplace. Additionally there are contentions that, according to Colin's Law, a reversion to the colón would be disastrous to the economy. The change to the dollar also precipitated a trend toward lower interest rates in El Salvador, helping many to secure much needed credit for house or car purchases. A challenge in El Salvador has been developing new growth sectors for a more diversified economy. As many other former colonies, for many years El Salvador was considered a mono-export economy (an economy that depended heavily on one type of export). During colonial times, the Spanish decided that El Salvador would produce and export indigo, but after the invention of synthetic dyes in the 19th century, Salvadoran authorities and the newly created modern state turned to coffee as the main export. Since the cultivation of coffee required the highest lands in the country, many of these lands were expropriated from indigenous reserves and given or sold cheaply to those that could cultivate coffee. The government provided little or no compensation to the indigenous peoples. On occasion, this compensation implied merely the right to work for seasons in the newly created coffee farms and to be allowed to grow their own food. Such actions provided the basis of conflicts that would shape the political landscape of El Salvador for years to come. Colón may refer to: Colón (currency) Costa Rican colón currency of Costa Rica (ISO 4217: CRC) El Salvador colón currency of El Salvador (ISO 4217: SVC). ... Indigo is the color on the spectrum between about 450 and 420 nm in wavelength, placing it between blue and violet. ... For other uses, see Coffee (disambiguation). ...


For many decades, coffee was one of the only sources of foreign currency in the Salvadoran economy. The Salvadoran Civil War in the 1980s and the fall of international coffee prices in the 1990s pressured the Salvadoran government to diversify the economy. The government has followed policies that intend to develop other export industries, such as textiles and sea products. Tourism is another industry Salvadoran authorities see as a possibility. But rampant crime rates, lack of infrastructure, and inadequate social capital have prevented this resource from being properly exploited and is still underdeveloped. For other uses, see Coffee (disambiguation). ... Combatants Salvadoran Government: Salvadoran Armed Forces, National Police, Treasury Police, Death Squads Revolutionary Forces: FMLN FDR ERP RN PRTC Commanders Roberto DAubuisson Álvaro Magaña José Guillermo García José Napoleón Duarte Alfredo Cristiani Cayetano Carpio† Leonel González Schafik Handal Joaquin Villalobos Nidia Díaz Strength About... This graph shows the rate of non-fatal firearm-related crime in the United States from 1993 to 2003. ... Social capital, referring to connections within and between social networks, is a core concept in business, economics, organisational behaviour, political science, public health, and sociology. ...


There are 15 free trade zones in El Salvador. The largest beneficiary has been the maquila industry, which provides 88,700 jobs directly, and consists primarily of supplying labor for the cutting and assembling of clothes for export to the United States.[citation needed] A free trade zone (FTZ) or Export processing zone (EPZ) is one or more areas of a country where tariffs and quotas are eliminated and bureaucratic requirements are lowered in hopes of attracting new business and foreign investments. ... A maquiladora (or maquila) is a factory, the majority of which are located in Mexican border towns, that imports materials and equipment on a duty- and tariff-free basis for assembly or manufacturing. ...


El Salvador signed the Central American Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA) — negotiated by the five countries of Central America and the Dominican Republic — with the United States in 2004. CAFTA requires that the Salvadoran government adopt policies that foster free trade. El Salvador has signed free trade agreements with Mexico, Chile, the Dominican Republic, and Panama, and increased its trade with those countries. El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, and Nicaragua also are negotiating a free trade agreement with Canada. In October 2007, these four countries and Costa Rica began free trade agreement negotiations with the European Union. Negotiations started in 2006 for a free trade agreement with Colombia. The Central American Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA) is a free trade agreement between the United States and the Central American countries of Guatemala, Honduras, and Canada, and Mexico. ... For other uses, see Central America (disambiguation). ... Free trade is an economic concept referring to the selling of products between countries without tariffs or other trade barriers. ... This article is about economic exchange. ...


Fiscal policy has been the biggest challenge for the Salvadoran government. The 1992 peace accords committed the government to heavy expenditures for transition programs and social services. The Stability Adjustment Programs (PAE, for the initials in Spanish) initiated by President Cristiani's administration committed the government to the privatization of banks, the pension system, and the electric and telephone companies. The total privatization of the pension system has implied a serious burden for the public finance system, because the newly created private Pension Association Funds did not absorb coverage of retired pensioners covered under the old system. The government lost the revenues from contributors and absorbed completely the costs of coverage of retired pensioners. This has been the main source of fiscal imbalance. ARENA governments have financed this deficit with the emission of bonds, something the leftist FMLN has opposed. Debates surrounding the emission of bonds have stalled the approval of the national budget for many months on several occasions. The emission of bonds and the approval of government loans need a qualified majority (3/4 of the votes) in the National Legislature. If the deficit is not financed through a loan it is enough with a simple majority to approve the budget (50% of the votes plus 1). Fiscal policy is the economic term that defines the set of principles and decisions of a government in setting the level of public expenditure and how that expenditure is funded. ... Social Workers are concerned with social problems, their causes, their solutions and their human impacts. ... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Despite such challenges to keep public finances in balance, El Salvador still has one of the lowest tax burdens in the American continent (around 11% of GDP). Many specialists claim that it is impossible to advance significant development programs with such little public sector aid. (The tax burden in the United States is around 25% of the GDP and in developed countries of the EU it can reach around 50%.) The government has focused on improving the collection of its current revenues with a focus on indirect taxes. Leftist politicians criticize such a structure since indirect taxes (like the value-added tax) affect everyone alike, whereas direct taxes can be weighed according to levels of income. However, basic foods and medicines are not subject to the value-added-tax.[citation needed] A 10% value-added tax (VAT), implemented in September 1992, was raised to 13% in July 1995. The VAT is the biggest source of revenue, accounting for about 52.3% of total tax revenues in 2004. For the tax agency in Ireland of the same name, see Revenue Commissioners. ... Value added tax (VAT) is a sales tax levied on the sale of goods and services. ... Tax revenue is the income that is gained by governments because of taxation of the people. ...


Inflation has been steady and among the lowest in the region. Since 1997 inflation has averaged 3%, with recent years increasing to nearly 5%. From 2000 to 2006 total exports have grown 19% from $2.94 billion to $3.51 billion. During this same period total imports have risen 54% from $4.95 billion to $7.63 billion. This has resulted in a 102% increase in the trade deficit from $2.01 billion to $4.12 billion.[12]


Remittances from Salvadorans living and working in the United States, sent to family in El Salvador, are a major source of foreign income and offset the substantial trade deficit of $4.12 billion. Remittances have increased steadily in the last decade and reached an all-time high of $3.32 billion in 2006 (an increase of 17% over the previous year).[13] approximately 16.2% of gross domestic product(GDP). Income, generally defined, is the money that is received as a result of the normal business activities of an individual or a business. ... Balance of trade figures are the sum of the money gained by a given economy by selling exports, minus the cost of buying imports. ... GDP redirects here. ...


Remittances have had positive and negative effects on El Salvador. In 2005 the number of people living in extreme poverty in El Salvador was 16%,[14] according to a United Nations Development Program report, without remittances the number of Salvadorans living in extreme poverty would rise to 37%. While Salvadoran education levels have gone up, wage expectations have risen faster than either skills or productivity. For example, some Salvadorans are no longer willing to take jobs that pay them less than what they receive monthly from family members abroad. This has led to an influx of Hondurans and Nicaraguans who are willing to work for the prevailing wage. Also, the local propensity for consumption over investment has increased. Money from remittances have also increased prices for certain commodities such as real estate. Many Salvadorans abroad earning much higher wages can afford higher prices for houses in El Salvador than local Salvadorans and thus push up the prices that all Salvadorans must pay.[15] Extreme poverty is the most severe state of poverty, where people cannot meet basic needs for survival, such as food, water, clothing, shelter, sanitation, education and health care. ... Income, generally defined, is the money that is received as a result of the normal business activities of an individual or a business. ...


Tourism

El Salvador's ministry of tourism logo

The only airport serving international flights in the country is Comalapa International Airport (airport code: SAL). This airport is located in Comalapa, about 30 minutes southeast of the capital.[16] The airport is commonly known as Comalapa International or El Salvador International. Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Comalapa International Airport (IATA airport code: SAL), also known as El Salvador International Airport, is located about 30 miles from San Salvador, El Salvador. ...


El Salvador's tourism industry has grown dynamically over recent years as the Salvadoran government focuses on developing this sector. Last year tourism accounted for 4.6% of GDP; only 10 years ago, it accounted for 0.4%. In this same year, tourism grew 4.5% worldwide. Comparatively, El Salvador saw an increase of 8.97%, from 1.15 million to 1.27 million tourists. This has led to revenue from tourism growing 35.9% from $634 million to $862 million. As a reference point, in 1996 tourism revenue was $44.2 million. Also, there has been an even greater increase in the number of excursionists (visits that do not include an overnight stay). 222,000 excursionists visited El Salvador in 2006, a 24% increase over the previous year.[17]


Most North American and European tourists are seeking out El Salvador's beaches and nightlife. Besides these two choices, El Salvador's tourism landscape is slightly different than those of other Central American countries. Because of its geographical size and urbanization, there aren't many nature-themed tourist destination such as ecotours or archaeological monuments. Surfing, however, is a natural tourist sector that is gaining popularity as more surfers visit El Zonte, Sunzal, and La Libertad, surfing spots that are not yet overcrowded. Also, the use of the United States dollar as Salvadoran currency and direct flights of 4–6 hours from most cities in the United States are important things to note for first-time travelers from the United States. Urbanization and Americanization of Salvadoran culture has also led to something else that first time tourists might be surprised to see: the abundance of American-style malls, stores, and restaurants in the three main urban areas, especially greater San Salvador. Currently, tourists to El Salvador can be classified into four groups: Central Americans; North Americans; Salvadorans living abroad, primarily in the United States; and Europeans and South Americans. The first three represent the vast majority of tourists. Recently, El Salvador is attempting to broaden its tourist base and looking to the last group. Early indicators show that the government's efforts are working. When comparing January–March 2007 to the same period in 2006 (most recent data available), overall tourism has grown 10%, while from North America 38%, Europe 31%, and South America 36%.[18] In the fall, Livingston Airlines will initiate the only direct flight between Europe (departing from Milan) and El Salvador. The Decameron Salinitas, a recently inaugurated resort, has contributed to the growth of tourists from South America (because of name recognition of the resort chain) and is looking to do the same with Europeans. It is interesting to note that Decameron Salinitas is responsible for half the initial bookings on the Milan-San Salvador flights.[citation needed] This demonstrates a synergy between two of the few businesses that cater to European tourists and is evident of what is necessary in this nascent sector. Additionally, more and more tourists continue to be drawn by El Salvador's turbulent past. [1] Some of the latest tourist attractions in the former war-torn El Salvador are gun fragments, pictures, combat plans, and mountain hideouts. Since 1992, residents in economically depressed areas are trying to profit from these remains. The mountain town of Perquin was considered the "guerrilla capital." Today it is home to the "Museum of the Revolution," featuring cannons, uniforms, pieces of Soviet weaponry, and other weapons of war once used by the FMLN's (Farabundo Marti National Liberation Front) headquarters. El Salvador continues to grow as an attraction. 40% of El Salvador visitors want to enjoy the sun and the country's beautiful beaches; 38% of El Salvador visitors enjoy the colonial structures and the country's history; and 22% enjoy the nature and El Salvador mountains and volcanoes. According to El Salvador newspaper El Diario De Hoy the top 10 attractions are the beaches in La Libertad, Ruta Las Flores, Suchitoto, Playa Las Flores in San Miguel, La Palma, Santa Ana where you find the country's tallest volcano, Nahuizalco, Apaneca, Juayua, San Ignacio. [2] For other uses, see Milan (disambiguation). ... Soviet redirects here. ... Shafik Handal Revolution or Death, We will win! El Salvador in struggle. ... La Libertad is a department in Peru. ... Suchitoto is a municipality in the Cuscatlán department of El Salvador. ... San Miguel is: San Miguel is a town in San Luis Obispo County in California San Miguel is the name of a county in New Mexico San Miguel is the name of a town in the Philippine province of Leyte A city in Tabasco is called San Miguel The biggest... This article is about one of the Canary Islands. ... The Santa Ana Volcano or Ilamatepec (Spanish: volcán de Santa Ana) is a volcano located in the Santa Ana department of El Salvador. ... Nahuizalco is a municipality in the Sonsonate department of El Salvador. ... Apaneca is a municipality in the Ahuachapán department of El Salvador. ... San Ignacio is a municipality in the Mexican state of Sinaloa. ...


Culture

The Roman Catholic Church plays an important role in the Salvadoran culture. Important foreign personalities in El Salvador were the Jesuit priests and professors Ignacio Ellacuria, Ignacio Martín-Baró, and Segundo Montes, who were murdered in 1989 by the Salvadoran Army during the heat of the civil war. Painting, ceramics and textile goods are the main manual artistic expressions. Writers Francisco Gavidia (1863–1955), Salarrué (Salvador Salazar Arrué) (1899-1975), Claudia Lars, Alfredo Espino, Pedro Geoffroy Rivas, Manlio Argueta, José Roberto Cea, and poet Roque Dalton are among the most important writers to stem from El Salvador. Notable 20th century personages include the late filmmaker Baltasar Polio, artist Fernando Llort, and caricaturist Toño Salazar. Amongst the more renowned representatives of the graphic arts are the painters Noe Canjura, Carlos Cañas, Julia Díaz, Camilo Minero, Ricardo Carbonell, Roberto Huezo, Miguel Angel Cerna (the painter and writer better known as MACLo), Esael Araujo, and many others. The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... The Society of Jesus (Latin: Societas Iesu), commonly known as the Jesuits, is a Roman Catholic religious order. ... Ignacio Ellacuria Ignacio Ellacuría (Portugalete, Biscay, Spain, November 9, 1930-November 16, 1989) was a Roman catholic priest, philosopher and theologian who did important work as a teacher and administration worker in the Jesuit university of El Salvador (Universidad Centroamericana Jose Simeon Cañas, UCA, founded in 1965). ... Ignacio Martín-Baró Ignacio Martín-Baró, S.J. (Valladolid, Castilla y Leon, Spain, November 7, 1942 – San Salvador, El Salvador, November 16, 1989) was a scholar, social psychologist, philosopher and Roman Catholic Jesuit priest. ... Segundo Montes Segundo Montes, S.J. (Valladolid, Spain, May 15, 1933 - San Salvador, El Salvador, November 16, 1989) was a scholar, philosopher, educator, sociologist and Jesuit priest. ... The Mona Lisa Although today the word art usually refers to the visual arts, the concept of what art is has continuously changed over centuries. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Salarrué, Salvador Efraín Salazar Arrué (born October 22, 1899 in Sonsonate, El Salvador. ... Her true name was Carmen Brannon Vega. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Manlio Argueta is a Salvadoran writer, critic, and novelist born in 1935. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Roque Dalton Roque Dalton García (San Salvador, El Salvador, 14 May 1935 – Quezaltepeque, El Salvador, 10 May 1975) was a leftist Salvadoran poet and journalist. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... A caricaturist is an artist who specializes in drawing caricatures. ... Antonio Toño Salazar (June, 1897 - December, 1986) was a Salvadoran caricaturist, illustrator and diplomat. ... Noe Canjura Noe Canjura (Apopa, El Salvador, August 14, 1922 - Morienval, France, September 29, 1970) was a Salvadorian painter. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


The wife of Antoine de Saint-Exupéry (author of the children's book, The Little Prince) was a Salvadoran aristocrat, Consuelo de Saint-Exupéry. Antoine de Saint-Exupéry[1] (pronounced ) (June 29, 1900 – presumably July 31, 1944) was a French writer and aviator. ... The Little Prince (French: Le Petit Prince), published in 1943, is French aviator Antoine de Saint Exupérys most famous novella, which he wrote in the United States while renting The Bevin House in Asharoken, New York, on Long Island. ... Consuelo de Saint-Exupéry (née Consuelo Suncin Sandoval Zeceña of Gómez; born:April 10, 1911-1979) was the wife of famous writer and aviator Antoine de Saint Exupéry, author of the The Little Prince, although she was an accomplished writer and artist in her own...


The local Spanish vernacular is called Caliche. Look up Vernacular in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Caliche or Salvadoreño is a collection of slang words unique to Salvadoran Spanish. ...

Holidays
Date English name Local name
January 16 Peace Accords Day Día de los Acuerdos de Paz Celebrates the peace accords signing between the government and the guerrilla in 1992 that finished the 12-year civil war. Mostly political events.
March/April Holy Week/Easter Semana Santa Celebrated with Carnival-like events in different cities by the large Catholic population.
May 1 Labor Day Día del trabajo International Labour Day
May 10 Mother's Day Día de las Madres
August 1–7 August Festivals Fiestas de agosto Week-long festival in celebration of El Salvador del Mundo, patron saint of El Salvador.
September 15 Independence Day Día de la Independencia Celebrates independence from Spain, achieved in 1821.
November 2 Day of Death Día de los Santos Difuntos A day on which most people visit the tombs of deceased loved ones. (November 1 may be commemorated as well.)
November 21 Queen of the Peace Day Dia de la Reyna de la Paz Day of the Queen of Peace, the patron saint. Also celebrated, the San Miguel Carnival, (carnaval de San Miguel) a known feast in El Salvador, celebrated in in San Miguel City, similar to Mardi Gras of New Orleans,where you can enjoy about 45 music bands on the street.
October 12 Day of the Indians Día de los indios Celebration in dedication to the Indians (Amerindians).
December 24 Christmas Day Navidad In many communities, December 24 (Christmas Eve) is the major day of celebration, often to the point that it is considered the actual day of Navidad — with December 25 serving as a day of rest.

is the 16th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the 1958 novel of the same name by Louis Aragon, see La Semaine Sainte. ... This article is about the Christian festival. ... Holy Week (Sp. ... For other uses, see Carnival (disambiguation). ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 130th day of the year (131st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 358th day of the year (359th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Joseph and Mary with baby Jesus, at the first Christmas Christmas (literally, the Mass of Christ) is a holiday in the Christian calendar, usually observed on December 25, which celebrates the birth of Jesus. ... Nativity of the Lord redirects here. ...

Education

El Salvador has several universities:

  • Universidad de El Salvador, UES
  • Universidad Centroamericana “José Simeón Cañas”, UCA
  • Universidad Francisco Gavidia, UFG
  • Universidad Tecnologica, UTec
  • Universidad Don Bosco, UDB
  • Universidad Evangelica
  • Universidad de Nueva San Salvador, UNSS
  • Universidad Albert Einstein
  • Universidad Alberto Masferrer
  • Universidad Modular Abierta, UMA
  • Universidad Polytecnica
  • Universidad Catolica de Occidente, UNICO

The Universidad Centroamericana Jose Simeon Cañas (better known as UCA) was founded in September of 1965, by the request of a group of catholic families. ...

Cuisine

Salvadoran woman at a food stall.
Salvadoran woman at a food stall.

El Salvador's most notable dish is the pupusa. Pupusas are a thick hand-made corn tortilla (made using masa de maíz or masa de arroz, a maize or rice flour dough used in Latin American cuisine) stuffed with one or more of the following: cheese (usually a soft Salvadoran cheese, a popular example is Quesillo con loroco), chicharrón (a ground pork product, often mixed with tomato paste), and refried beans. Loroco is a vine flower bud native to Central America. There are also vegetarian options, often with ayote (a type of squash). Some adventurous restaurants even offer pupusas stuffed with shrimp. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 524 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,024 × 671 pixels, file size: 442 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 524 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,024 × 671 pixels, file size: 442 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... For other uses, see Pupusa (disambiguation). ... Fernaldia pandurata This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ...


Pupusas come from the pipil-nahuatl word, pupushahua. The pupusa's exact origins are debated, although its presence in El Salvador is known to predate the arrival of Spaniards.[19]


Two other typical Salvadoran dishes are yuca frita and pan con pavo. Yuca frita, which is fried cassava root, is deep fried and served with curtido (a pickled cabbage, onion and carrot topping) and pork rinds or pepesquitas (fried baby sardines). The Yuca is sometimes served boiled instead of fried. Pan con pavo, translated to turkey with bread, is a warm turkey submarine sandwich similar to a hoagie. The turkey is marinated and then roasted with Pipil spices and handpulled. This sandwich is traditionally served with turkey, tomato, and watercress. Yuca redirects here. ... The hoagie is the term for a lunch sandwich in a region including Pennsylvania, southern New Jersey, Delaware, and parts of New York. ...


Music

Main article: Music of El Salvador

El Salvador is a Central American country whose culture is a mixture of Pipil and Spanish. Its music includes religious songs (mostly Roman Catholic) used to celebrate Christmas and other holidays, especially feast days of the saints. Satirical and rural lyrical themes are common. Due to the Americanization of El Salvador, popular English music is played on most national radio stations. In 2007, census showed that 67% of the music played on the most popular radio station, consisted of English music.[citation needed] El Salvador is a Central American country whose culture is a mixture of Mayan, Pipil/Aztec, Spanish and West African influences. ...


Demographics

El Salvador's population numbers around 6.7 million people [20]. More than 90% of Salvadorans are mestizo (mixed Native American and Spanish origin). 9% are White; this population is mostly of Spanish descent. There are also some of French, German, Swiss, and Italian descent. El Salvador is 1% indigenous, mostly Pipil and Lenca. Very few Native Americans have retained their native customs, traditions, or languages, especially in the wake of the deliberate 1932 massacres in which the Salvadoran military murdered up to 40,000 peasants. Population growth 1961-2003. ... Mestizo is a Spanish term that was formerly used in the Spanish Empire to designate people of mixed European (Spaniard) and Amerindian ancestry living in the region of Latin America. ... For other uses, see Native Americans (disambiguation). ... Spaniard redirects here. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Languages Italian, Sicilian, Neapolitan, Corsican, Sardinian, Emiliano-Romagnolo, Ligurian, Lombard, Piedmontese, Venetian, Ladin, Friulian Religions predominantly Roman Catholic      The Italians are a Southern European ethnic group found primarily in Italy and in a wide-ranging diaspora throughout Western Europe, the Americas and Australia. ... The Pipil are an indigenous people who live in western El Salvador. ... The Lenca people are an indigenous peoples of Central America, situated in the western highland regions of Honduras and eastern El Salvador. ... For other uses, see Native Americans (disambiguation). ... La Matanza refers to a horrific massacre of mostly indegenous people of El Salvador in 1932, committed in the name of progress. ... Military branches: Army, Navy, Air Force Military manpower - military age: 18 years of age Military manpower - availability: males age 15-49: 1,428,974 (2000 est. ...


El Salvador is the only Central American country that has no visible African population because of its lack of an Atlantic coast and access to the slave trade that occurred along the east coast of the continent. In addition, General Maximiliano Hernandez Martinez instituted race laws in 1930 that prohibited blacks from entering the country; this changed during the 1980s and the law was removed.[21].[22] World map showing location of Africa A satellite composite image of Africa Africa is the worlds second_largest continent in both area and population, after Asia. ... Maximiliano Hernández Martínez (1882–1966) was the President of El Salvador from 1931 to 1944. ... Look up black in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Among the few immigrant groups that reached El Salvador, Palestinian Christians stand out.[citation needed] Though few in number, their descendants have attained great economic and political power in the country, as evidenced by President Antonio Saca — whose opponent in the 2004 election, Schafik Handal, was likewise of Palestinian descent — and the flourishing commercial, industrial, and construction firms owned by them. Palestinian Christians make up 6% of the worlds Palestinian population, according to Bernard Sabella. ... Elías Antonio (Tony) Saca González (born in Usulutan, 9 March 1965) is a Salvadoran politician and the current President of El Salvador. ... Schafik Handal Schafik Jorge Handal (October 14, 1930 – January 24, 2006) was a Salvadoran politician. ...


Spanish is the official language and therefore spoken by virtually all inhabitants (some of the indigenous still speak their native tongues). English is also spoken by some throughout the republic since many have studied or lived in English speaking countries (mainly the U.S., but also Canada and Australia). These include many young Salvadorans deported from the United States, many of whom had grown up speaking only English. The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ...


Although the majority of the residents are Roman Catholic, Protestantism is growing rapidly and is already representing more than 20% of the population.[23] Anglican, Presbyterian, Methodist, Seventh-Day Adventist churches are all growing rapidly, as are Pentecostals and Mormons. The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Protestantism encompasses the forms of Christian faith and practice that originated with the doctrines of the Reformation. ...


The capital city of San Salvador has about 2.1 million people; an estimated 42% of El Salvador's population live in rural areas. Urbanization expanded at a phenomenal rate in El Salvador since the 1960s, driving millions to the cities and creating growth problems for cities around the country. For other uses, see San Salvador (disambiguation). ...


According to the most recent United Nations survey, life expectancy for men was 68 years and 74 years for women. Education in El Salvador is free through ninth grade. The national literacy rate is 84.1%. UN redirects here. ... Education in El Salvador follows a 1-9-3-4 system: one year of preschool, nine years of primary education, threee years of high school, and four years of university or other tertiary education. ... Children reading. ...


As of 2004, there were approximately 3.2 million Salvadorans living outside El Salvador, some of whom are undocumented immigrants in the United States. Many other Salvadoran Americans are legal immigrants, many becoming citizens or residents through the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986.[citation needed] The USA has traditionally been the destination of choice for Salvadorans looking for greater economic opportunity. Salvadorans also live in nearby Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua.[24] The majority of expatriates emigrated during the civil war of the 1980s for political reasons and later because of adverse economic and social conditions. Other countries with notable Salvadoran communities include Canada, Mexico, the Cayman Islands, Sweden, Italy and Australia. The neutrality and factual accuracy of this article are disputed. ... Languages Spanish, English Religions Roman Catholic, Protestantism Salvadoran Americans are residents of the United States of Salvadoran descent. ...


References

  1. ^ El Salvador
  2. ^ ERUPCIÓN EN SANTA ANA | La Prensa Gráfica
  3. ^ El Salvador
  4. ^ Wide Angle . 18 with a Bullet . Photo Essay: El Salvador, the Makings of a Gangland | PBS
  5. ^ http://www.fiu.edu/~oberbaue/el_salvador.pdf
  6. ^ El Salvador
  7. ^ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_GDP_%28nominal%29
  8. ^ Rank Order - GDP - per capita (PPP). U.S. Central Intelligence Agency World Factbook. Retrieved on 2007-11-17.
  9. ^ Gross Domestic Product, annual rates, main economic sectors. Banco Central de Reserva de El Salvador. Retrieved on 2007-11-17.
  10. ^ Saldos a fin de año o mes (Spanish). Banco Central de Reserva de El Salvador. Retrieved on 2007-11-17.
  11. ^ http://travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_tw/cis/cis_1109.html Country Specific Information,U.S. State Department,2007.
  12. ^ Trade Balance, Annual and Monthly Accumulated. Banco Central de Reserva de El Salvador. Retrieved on 2007-11-17.
  13. ^ Family Remittances. Banco Central de Reserva de El Salvador. Retrieved on 2007-11-17.
  14. ^ "Objetivos de Desarrollo del Milenio". Retrieved on 2007-05-23. (Spanish) 
  15. ^ Money Earned in U.S. Pushes Up Prices in El Salvador
  16. ^ ::- CEPA- Aeropuerto Internacional de El Salvador ::
  17. ^ http://www.elsalvadorturismo.gob.sv/boletin2006.pdf/
  18. ^ http://www.elsalvadorturismo.gob.sv/MARZO2007.pdf/
  19. ^ http://www.elsalvador.com/noticias/2003/10/31/nacional/nacio7.html.
  20. ^ El Salvador (01/08)
  21. ^ Elena Salamanca. NO a “los otros” (Spanish). La Prensa Gráfica. Retrieved on 2007-12-29.
  22. ^ Montgomery, Tommie Sue (1995). Revolution in El Salvador: from civil strife to civil peace. Boulder, Colo: Westview Press. ISBN 0-8133-0071-1. 
  23. ^ International Religious Freedom Report 2005
  24. ^ "Comunidad Salvadorena: Republica de Nicaragua", Minsterio de Relaciones Exteriores de El Salvador. Retrieved on 2008-01-06. 

Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 363rd day of the year (364th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see January (disambiguation). ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... March 6 is the 65th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (66th in Leap years). ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... March 6 is the 65th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (66th in Leap years). ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... October 3 is the 276th day of the year (277th in Leap years). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... March 6 is the 65th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (66th in Leap years). ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ...

Bibliography

  • Bonner, Raymond. Weakness and Deceit: U.S. Policy and El Salvador. New York: Times Books, 1984.
  • Danner, Mark. The Massacre at El Mozote: A Parable of the Cold War. New York: Vintage Books, 1994.
  • Vilas, Carlos. Between Earthquakes and Volcanoes: Market, State, and the Revolution America. New York: Monthly Review Press. 1995.

See also

Latin American culture is the formal or informal expression of the peoples of Latin America, and includes both high culture (literature, high art) and popular culture (music, folk art and dance) as well as religion and other customary practices. ... Military branches: Army, Navy, Air Force Military manpower - military age: 18 years of age Military manpower - availability: males age 15-49: 1,428,974 (2000 est. ... Salvador is a 1986 film which tells the story of an American journalist in El Salvador covering the story of the assassination of Archbishop Óscar Romero. ... Salvadorean Embassy in Ottawa El Salvador is a small Central American country with a modest number of diplomatic missions abroad. ... The Scout and Guide movement in El Salvador is served by Asociación de Muchachas Guías de El Salvador, member of the World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts; Asociación de Scouts de El Salvador, member of the World Organization of the Scout Movement. ... Combatants Salvadoran Government: Salvadoran Armed Forces, National Police, Treasury Police, Death Squads Revolutionary Forces: FMLN FDR ERP RN PRTC Commanders Roberto DAubuisson Álvaro Magaña José Guillermo García José Napoleón Duarte Alfredo Cristiani Cayetano Carpio† Leonel González Schafik Handal Joaquin Villalobos Nidia Díaz Strength About... This article does not cite its references or sources. ...

External links

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World map of dependent territories. ... Anthem For Sweden - The Land of The Incredible Biffs Capital (and largest city) Gustavia Official languages Swedish Government  -  Prime Minister of Sweden Nick XII Bonaparte  -  Prefect Per af Biffsläkt  -  President of the Territorial Council none yet; however Henning is the mayor of Saint-Barthelemy Overseas Collectivity of Sweden   -  Swedish... Anthem: La Marseillaise Capital (and largest city) Marigot Official languages French Government  -  President of France Jacques Chirac  -  Prefect Dominique Lacroix  -  President of the Territorial Council none yet; however Albert Fleming is the mayor of Saint-Martin Overseas Collectivity of France   -  Island divided between France and the Netherlands 23 March 1648... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Clipperton Island (locally known as Île Clipperton and sometimes Île de la Passion) is an uninhabited seven-square-kilometer coral atoll in the North Pacific Ocean, 1,300 km southwest of France administered from French Polynesia by a high commissioner of the Republic; its defense is the responsibility of France. ... The Turks and Caicos Islands (TCI) (IPA: ) are a British Overseas Territory consisting of two groups of tropical islands in the West Indies at . ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
El Salvador - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3927 words)
El Salvador is the most densely populated nation on the American mainland (especially in its capital, San Salvador), and also the most industrialized country in Central America.
From 1872 to 1898 El Salvador was a prime mover in attempts to reestablish an isthmian federation.
El Salvador shares borders with Guatemala—126 miles (203 km) and Honduras—212.5 miles (342 km), and is the only Central American country that does not have a Caribbean coastline.
El Salvador - Facts, Information, and Encyclopedia Reference article (1972 words)
El Salvador is a democratic republic governed by a president and an 84-member unicameral Legislative Assembly.
El Salvador is the smallest Central American country (roughly the size of the U.S. state of Massachusetts) and the only one without a coastline on the Caribbean Sea.
El Salvador is located between the North Pacific Ocean to the south and southwest, with Guatemala in the north-northwest and Honduras to the north-northeast.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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