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Encyclopedia > Ekalavya

In the Hindu epic Mahābhārata, Ekalavya (Sanskrit: एकलव्य, ékalavya) is a young prince of the Nishadha tribes, and a member of a low caste, who nevertheless aspires to study archery in the gurukul of Dronacharya. After being rejected by Drona, Ekalavya embarks upon a program of self-study in the presence of a clay image of Drona. He achieves a level of skill equal to that of Arjuna, Drona's favorite and most accomplished pupil. Fearful that Ekalavya will excel him, Arjuna begs Drona to take action. Drona goes to Ekalavya and demands that Ekalavya turn over his right thumb as a teacher's fee. The loyal Ekalavya cripples himself, and thereby ruins his prospects as an archer, by severing his thumb and giving it to Drona. This article discusses the adherents of Hinduism. ... Mahabharat redirects here. ... Sanskrit ( , for short ) is a classical language of India, a liturgical language of Hinduism, Buddhism, Sikhism, and Jainism, and one of the 23 official languages of India. ... The Nishadha peoples are indigenous tribes inhabiting ancient India, according to sources in Hindu mythology. ... A Gurukul (Guru refers to teacher or master; Kul refers to his domain, from the Sanskrit word kula, meaning extended family. ... In the epic Mahabharata, Drona (Sanskrit: द्रोण, droNa) or Dronacharya (द्रोणाचार्य, droNāchārya) is the royal guru to the Kauravas and the Pandavas. ... For other uses, please see Arjun. ...

Contents

Drona's rejection

In the Mahabharatha,[1] Ekalavya is introduced as a young prince of the lowly Nishada tribes. Ekalavya was born to Devashrava (brother of Vasudeva, who was father of Krishna)[2] and was raised by Hiranyadhanus, the leader (King) of the Nishadhas, who was a commander in the army of Jarasandha (the king of Magadha).[3] The Nishadha peoples are indigenous tribes inhabiting ancient India, according to sources in Hindu mythology. ... Jarasandha , the king of Magadha, is a character of the epic Mahabharata. ... The approximate extent of the Magadha state in the 5th century BC The Magadha state circa 600 BC, before it expanded Magadha (मगध) formed one of the sixteen Mahājanapadas (Sanskrit, great countries) or regions in ancient India. ...


Desirous of learning advanced skills of archery, he seeks the tutelage of Drona, the legendary weaponsmaster of and instructor of Arjuna and his brothers. Drona, however, rejects Ekalavya on account of the prince's humble origins. In the epic Mahabharata, Drona (Sanskrit: द्रोण, droNa) or Dronacharya (द्रोणाचार्य, droNāchārya) is the royal guru to the Kauravas and the Pandavas. ... For other uses, please see Arjun. ...


Self-training in the forest

Ekalavya is undeterred and goes off into the forest where he fashions a clay image of Drona. Worshipping the statue as his preceptor, he begins a disciplined program of self-study. As a result, Ekalavya becomes an archer of exceptional prowess, superior even to Drona's best pupil, Arjuna. One day while Ekalavya is practicing, he hears a dog barking. Before the dog can shut up or get out of the way, Ekalavya fires seven arrows in rapid succession to fill the dog's mouth without injuring it. The Pandava princes come upon the "stuffed" dog, and wonder who could have pulled off such a feat of archery. Searching the forest, they find a dark-skinned man dressed all in black, his body besmeared with filth and his hair in matted locks. It is Ekalavya, who introduces himself to them as a pupil of Drona. For other uses, please see Arjun. ...


Dakshina

Arjuna fears that Ekalavya may have eclipsed him in skill with the bow. As a result, Arjuna complains to his teacher Drona, reminding Drona of his promise that he would allow no other pupil to be the equal of Arjuna. Drona acknowledges Arjuna's claim, and goes with the princes to seek out Ekalavya. He finds Ekalavya, as always, diligently practicing archery. Seeing Drona, Ekalavya prostrates himself and clasps the teacher's hands, awaiting his order.


Drona asks Ekalavya for a dakshina or deed of gratitude that a student owes his teacher upon the completion of his training. Ekalavya replies that there is nothing he would not give his teacher. Drona cruelly asks for Ekalavya's right thumb, knowing that its loss will hamper Ekalavya's ability to pursue archery. Ekalavya, however, cheerfully and without hesitation severs his thumb and hands it to Drona. For his part, Arjuna is relieved to find that the crippled Ekalavya can no longer shoot with his former skill and facility. A Dakshina, also known as Gurudakshina is a Sanskrit word describing the Indian tradition of a student repaying his teacher, his guru after the completion of his education. ...


The Mahābhārata is clear that Drona acted in order to protect Arjuna's status as the greatest archer. However, the Mahābhārata does not answer the question whether Drona was ultimately justified. The story thus leaves room for interpretation and moral speculation. As a result, a variety of answers have been proposed to these questions.

  • According to some, Drona wanted to hamper Ekalavya's archery skills because he feared that Ekalavya would use them against Drona's employer, the King of Hastinapur[3] (Ekalavya's father worked for Jarasandh, who was an adversary of the Hastinapur kingdom).
  • Others have alleged that Ekalavya learned all the archery skills by secretly observing the training sessions of Dronacharya. When Dronacharaya found out, he visited Ekalavya to verify his suspicions. Although Drona could have demanded an even greater punishment under the laws in effect at that time, he asked only for Ekalavya's right thumb, thus making useless the archery skills which he had learned secretly.
  • Others still have said that Dronacharya demanded Ekalavya's thumb because the latter was not a Kshatriya, and in those days only Kshatriyas were supposed to get a military education.

, Hastinapur (Hindi: ) (Hastinapura in Sanskrit) is a town and a nagar panchayat in Meerut district in the Indian state of Uttar Pradesh. ... For the Bollywood film of the same name see Kshatriya Kshatriya (Hindi: , from Sanskrit: , ) is one of the four varnas, or castes, in Hinduism. ...

Death

Later, Ekalavya worked as a confidant of King Jarasandh. At the time of Rukmini's Swayamvar, he acted as the messenger between Shishupala and Rukmini's father Bhishmaka, at Jarasandh's behest.[3] Bhishmaka decides that Rukmini should marry Shishupala, but instead Rukmini elopes with Krishna. Ekalavya is later killed by Krishna, who hurls a rock against him, in a conflict against Jarasandh's army[3][4] In Hinduism, Srimati Rukmini was the first wife and queen of Krishna, the 8th avatar of Vishnu. ... Swayamvara, in ancient India, was a practice of choosing a life partner, among a list of suitors by a girl of marriageable age. ... Shishupala or Sisupala was son of Damaghosha, king of Chedi, by Srutadeva, sister of Vasudeva; he was therefore cousin of Krishna, but he was Krishnas implacable foe, because Krishna had carried off Rukmini, his intended wife. ... This article is about the Hindu deity. ...


Relevance in Modern India

In Indian mythology, Eklavya occupies an important place as someone who exemplifies the nature of Guru-shishya tradition of teaching in India, showing extreme reverence for his guru. The Eklavya institute for Educational research and Innovative action,[5] is an institution dedicated to educational research in India, headquartered at Bhopal. A 2007 Hindi movie, Eklavya: The Royal Guard, places the story of Eklavya in a modern context.[citation needed] The guru-shishya tradition (also guru-shishya parampara or lineage, or teacher-disciple relationship) is a spiritual relationship found within traditional Hinduism which is centered around the transmission of teachings from a guru (teacher, ) to a (disciple, ). The term shishya roughly equates to the western term disciple, and in some... For other uses, see Guru (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Bhopal (disambiguation). ...



Ekalavya-ism, which is a bhava (ideal or sentiment) in the Mahabharata, is a philosophy of self learning with a meditative mind without physical presence of a Guru something which is technologically possible today. Ekalavya-ism also believes in learning for learnings sake, self perfectionism and the ability to give up power when demanded by a Guru. This closely ties in with the Indian Guru Daivo Bhava philosophy as a Guru was thought to be essential in ones self development. American higher education operates on philosophy of apprentice-ship but the question remains to asked whether with newer technology like tele presence, semantic web and neural augmentation the Guru is actually needed to guide the student.


References

  1. ^ The Mahābhārata, Book 1: Adi Parva, Sambhava Parva: section CXXXIV
  2. ^ http://www.geocities.com/prasanna_avaroth/mbtns/MBTN_2.pdf
  3. ^ a b c d A. D. Athawale. Vastav Darshan of Mahabharat. Continental Book Service, Pune, 1970
  4. ^ Dowson, John (1820-1881). A classical dictionary of Hindu mythology and religion, geography, history, and literature. London: Trübner, 1879 [Reprint, London: Routledge, 1979]. Also available at Encyclopedia for Epics of Ancient India
  5. ^ www.ias.ac.in/currsci/jan252005/315.pdf, "EKLAVYA"
This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Mahabharat redirects here. ... The Kuru kingdom was ruled by the Kuru clan of kings. ... Shantanu is a king of Hastinapura in the great epic of the Mahabharata. ... In Hinduism, the river Ganga (Sanskrit and Hindi गंगा Gaá¹…gā) or Ganges River (as called by westerners) is considered sacred. ... Bheeshma makes his vow. ... Satyavati is the great-grandmother of the Pandava and Kaurava princes, principal characters of the Mahabharata, one of the principal texts in Hindu mythology. ... Chitrāngada was the elder son of Shantanu and Satyavati. ... In Hindu mythology, Queen Satyavati bore King Santanu two sons, Chitrangada and Vichitravirya. ... Ambika (अम्‍बिका) was the daughter of King of Kashi and wife of Vichitravirya, King of Hastinapur. ... Ambalika was the daughter of King of Kashi and the wife of Vichitravirya, King of Hastinapur. ... Vidura (Sanskrit: विदुर, vidÅ«ra) was a son of a maid-servant who served the Queens of Hastinapura, Queen Ambika and Ambalika. ... In Mahabharata Dhritarashtra was the son bore by Vichitraviryas first wife Ambika from Vyasa. ... GāndhārÄ« is a character in the India epic, the Mahabharata. ... A character in the Mahabharata, Shakuni was the brother of Gandhari. ... Jagannath(far right) with his brother Balarama(far left) and sister Subadra (center) in Radhadesh, Belgium Subhadra is the sister of Krishna. ... In the Mahabharata epic, Pandu is the son of Vichitravirya and his second wife, Ambalika from Vyasa. ... In Hinduism, Princess Kunti is the mother of the Pandavas. ... In the Mahabharata epic, Madri was a princess of the Madra kingdom and the second wife of Pandu. ... In the great Hindu epic Mahabharata, Yudhisthira (Sanskrit: युधिष्ठिर, yudhiṣṭhira) was the eldest son of King Pandu and Queen Kunti, king of Hastinapura and Indraprastha, and World Emperor. ... A motif depicting Bheema in the battle ready posture. ... For other uses, please see Arjun. ... In the Hindu epic Mahabharata, Nakula (Sanskrit: नकुल, naküla) was the son of king Pandu and queen Madri. ... Sahadeva (Sanskrit: सहदेव, sahadéva) is a character in the Mahabharata. ... Duryodhana as depicted in Yakshagana popular drama from Karnataka In the Hindu epic the Mahabharata, Duryodhana (दुर्योधन) is the eldest son of the blind king Dhritarashtra by Queen Gandhari, the eldest of the one hundred Kaurava brothers, and the chief antagonist of the Pandavas. ... Dushasana (Duśśāsana in IAST transliteration, and sometimes written Duhshasana and Dushyasana) was the second son of the blind king Dhritarashtra and Gandhari in the epic Mahabharata, and the younger brother of Duryodhana. ... Yuyutsu (also known as Vikarna), in the Hindu epic Mahabharata, was the son of King Dhritarashtra and one of the palace maidservants. ... In the Mahabharata, Dushala is a Kaurava, the only daughter of Dhritarashtra and Gandhari. ... Draupadi. ... Hidimbi is a Rakshasi, in the Mahabharata. ... In the Mahabharata, Ghatotkacha is the son of Bhima and Hidimbi. ... Ahilawati was at the time of Mahabharat. ... Uttara is the name of two siblings in the Hindu epic Mahabharata, the son and daughter of King Virata, whose court the Pandavas spent a year in concealment during their exile. ... UlÅ«pÄ« or Uloopi, in the Hindu epic Mahabharata, was one of Arjunas wives. ... Chitrāngadā, in the Hindu epic Mahabharata, is one of Arjunas wives. ... Karna (Sanskrit: कर्ण written Karṇa in IAST transliteration) is one of the central figures in Hindu epic Mahabharata. ... In the epic Mahabharata, Drona (Sanskrit: द्रोण, droNa) or Dronacharya (द्रोणाचार्य, droNāchārya) is the royal guru to the Kauravas and the Pandavas. ... Amba was the eldest daughter of King of Kashi. ... Veda Vyasa(Contemporary painting) Vyāsa (DevanāgarÄ«: व्यास) is a central and much revered figure in the majority of Hindu traditions. ... Abhimanyu (Sanskrit: अिभमन्यु, abhimanyu)(litt. ... This article is about the Hindu deity. ... In the Mahabharata epic, Satyaki, also called Yuyudhana, a powerful warrior belong to the Yadava-Vrishni dynasty of Lord Krishna. ... Dhristadyumna was the son of Drupada and brother of Draupadi and Shikhandi in the classic epic Mahabharata. ... For the Javanese dynasty of the same name, see Sanjaya Dynasty. ... Iravan: In Hindu mythology Son of Uloopi, and Arjun Can be considered King of the Nagas Fell on the 7th day of the Mahabharat ... In the Mahabharata, Barbarika (IAST BarbarÄ«ka) was the son of Ghatotkacha and Maurvi, daughter of Muru, a Yadava king. ... Babruvahana is one of the sons of Arjuna, begotten through Chitrangada, the princess of Manipur, during the period of his exile at Manipur. ... Parikshita is in the Mahabharata epic the successor of Yudhisthira to the throne of Hastinapura. ... In Hindu mythology, Virata is the king in whose court the Pandavas spent a year in concealment during their exile. ... Kichaka (Sanskrit: किचक), in the Hindu epic Mahabharata, was the brother of queen Sudeshna of King Virata, the king of Matsya. ... Kripa, also often called Kripacharya, was the chief priest at the court of Hastinapura, in the Mahabharata. ... In the Hindu epic Mahabharata, Ashwatthama (Sanskrit: अश्वत्थामा, AÅ›vatthāmā) or Ashwatthaman (Sanskrit: अश्वत्थामन्, AÅ›vatthāman) was the son of guru Dronacharya. ... This article or section is missing needed references or citation of sources. ... Jarasandha , the king of Magadha, is a character of the epic Mahabharata. ... In Hindu mythology, Maya, or Mayasura was a great ancient king of the Asura, Daitya and Rakshasa races upon earth. ... In Hinduism, Durvasa (दुर्वास) is an ancient sage, who was known for his short temper. ... Janamejaya, was the son of Arjunas (Mahabharata)grandson Parikishit. ... In the epic Mahabharata, Jayadratha (Sanskrit: जयद्रथ) is the king of Sindhu. ... Balarama, next to the river Yamuna. ... Drupada, also known as Yajnasena, is a character in the Mahabharata. ... In the Mahabharata, Hidimba (sometimes called Hidimbasura and Hdimba) was a rakshasa, the brother of Hidimbi and a forest dweller. ... King Shalya was the brother of Madri, the mother of Nakula and Sahadeva. ... According to the Mahabharata, Adhiratha was a charioteer, and was the foster father of Karna. ... Shikandi (born Shikhandini) is a character in the Hindu epic, the Mahabharata. ... In the Hindu epic Mahābhārata, the Pandava (or Pandawa) brothers (Sanskrit: पाण्‍डव ) are the five acknowledged sons of Pandu (Sanskrit: पांडु), by his two wives Kunti and Madri. ... The term Kaurava (Sanskrit:कौरव) is a Sanskrit term, that means a descendant of Kuru, a legendary king who is the ancestor of many of the characters of the Mahabharata. ... In the Hindu epic Mahabharata, Hastinapura is the capital and the kingdom of the Kauravas, the descendants of Kuru, which include the Pandavas. ... The first city of Delhi is believed to be founded by the legendary Pandavas of the Mahabharata around 1400 BC. It was called Indraprastha. ... This article tries to compile and classify all the kingdoms of ancient India mentioned in the Sanskrit/Vedic literature. ... Combatants Pandavas led by Dhristadyumna Kauravas led by Bhishma Commanders Arjuna Bhima Yudhishthira Nakula Sahadeva Bhishma Drona Karna Duryodhana Ashwatthama Strength 7 Akshauhinis 1,530,900 soldiers 11 Akshauhinis 2,405,700 soldiers Casualties Almost Total Only 7 survivors - the five Pandavas, Krishna, and Satyaki Almost Total Only 3 survivors... Bhagavad Gīta भगवद्गीता, composed ca the fifth - second centuries BC, is part of the epic poem Mahabharata, located in the Bhisma-Parva chapters 23–40. ... Hinduism is a religious tradition[1] that originated in the Indian subcontinent. ... Within Hinduism a large number of personalities, or forms, are worshipped as murtis. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Within Hinduism a large number of personalities, or forms, are worshipped as murtis. ... It has been suggested that Shri Vidya be merged into this article or section. ... For the Vedic river, see Saraswati River. ... For other uses, see Lakshmi (disambiguation). ... In the Hindu religion, SatÄ« (Devanagari: सती, the feminine of sat true) or Dākshāyani is the Goddess of marital felicity and longevity; she is worshipped particularly by ladies to seek the long life of their husbands. ... For the Harry Potter character, see Parvati Patil. ... In Hinduism, Durga (Sanskrit: ) is a form of Devi, the supreme goddess. ... Lakshmi is a common aspect of Shakti Shakti meaning force, power or energy is the Hindu concept or personification of Gods female aspect, sometimes referred to as The Divine Mother. Shakti represents the active, dynamic principles of feminine power. ... Kali (Sanskrit ) is a goddess with a long and complex history in Hinduism. ... Lord Rama (center) with wife Sita, brother Lakshmana and devotee Hanuman. ... A Rajastani style painting of Sri Radha Radha (Devanagari: राधा) is the principal paramour of Krishna in the Srimad Bhagavatam, and the Gita Govinda of the Hindu religion. ... Mahavidyas (Great Wisdoms) are aspects of Devi in Hinduism. ... Navadurga, which literally means nine Durgas, constitute, according to Hindu mythology, the manifestation of Durga in nine different forms. ... Matrikas, that is, the mothers, are a band of divinities, which always appear in a group. ... Image File history File links HinduSwastika. ... Within Hinduism a large number of personalities, or forms, are worshipped as murtis. ... For other uses, see Deva (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Hindu god of creation. ... For other meanings, see Vishnu (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Shiva (disambiguation). ... This article is about the incarnation of Vishnu. ... This article is about the Hindu deity. ... For other uses, see Ganesha (disambiguation). ... Murugan (also Murugan) (Tamil: ) is a popular Hindu deity amongst Tamil Hindus. ... This article is about a divine entity in Hinduism. ... For other uses, see Indra (disambiguation). ... For the intercontinental ballistic missile, see Surya (missile). ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Veda redirects here. ... The Upanishads (उपनिषद्, Upanişad) are part of the Hindu Shruti scriptures which primarily discuss meditation and philosophy and are seen as religious instructions by most schools of Hinduism. ... Purana (Sanskrit: ), meaning belonging to ancient or olden times, is the name of an ancient Indian genre (or a group of related genres) of Hindu or Jain literature (as distinct from oral tradition). ... For the television series by Ramanand Sagar, see Ramayan (TV series). ... For the film by Peter Brook, see The Mahabharata (1989 film). ... Bhagavad Gīta भगवद्गीता, composed ca the fifth - second centuries BC, is part of the epic poem Mahabharata, located in the Bhisma-Parva chapters 23–40. ... Hinduism is a religious tradition[1] that originated in the Indian subcontinent. ... Hindu mythology is a term used by modern scholarship for a large body of Indian literature that details the lives and times of legendary personalities, deities and divine incarnations on earth interspersed with often large sections of philosophical and ethical discourse. ... The ancient Sanskrit epics, the Ramayana and Mahabharata, laid the cornerstone for much of Hindu religion. ...

 
 

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