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Encyclopedia > Edward the Elder
Edward the Elder
King of the English
Reign 26 October 899 - 17 July 924
Coronation 8 June 900, Kingston upon Thames
Predecessor Alfred the Great and
Ealhswith
Successor Ælfweard of Wessex and
Athelstan of England
Spouse Ecgwynn, Ælfflæd, and Edgiva
Father Alfred the Great
Mother Ealhswith
Born c.870
Wessex, England
Died 17 July 924
Farndon-on-Dee, Cheshire England
Burial New Minster, Winchester, later translated to Hyde Abbey

Edward the Elder (Old English: Ēadweard se Ieldra) (c. 87017 July 924) was King of England (899924). He was the son of Alfred the Great (Ælfrēd se Grēata) and Alfred's wife, Ealhswith, and became King upon his father's death in 899. is the 299th day of the year (300th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Edward the Elder becomes King of England. ... is the 198th day of the year (199th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events King Athelstan of England succeeds to the throne. ... is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Gyeonhwon formally establishes the kingdom of Hubaekje in southwestern Korea. ... Kingston upon Thames, part of the Royal Borough of Kingston upon Thames, is an ancient market town where Saxon kings were crowned, and is now a lively suburb of London. ... For the 10th century Bishop of Sherborne, see Alfred (bishop). ... Ealhswith (or Ealswitha) of the Gaini was born c. ... Ælfweard (died 2 August 924) was the second known son of Edward the Elder. ... Athelstan redirects here. ... Edgiva of Kent, or also Eadgifu (d. ... For the 10th century Bishop of Sherborne, see Alfred (bishop). ... Ealhswith (or Ealswitha) of the Gaini was born c. ... Events February 28 - End of the Fourth Council of Constantinople. ... Wessex was one of the seven major Anglo-Saxon kingdoms (the Heptarchy) that preceded the kingdom of England. ... is the 198th day of the year (199th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events King Athelstan of England succeeds to the throne. ... Farndon is a village in the county of Cheshire, England, on the banks of the River Dee, south of Chester, and close to the border with Wales. ... For other uses, see Cheshire (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... The New Minster, Winchester was a royal Benedictine abbey founded in 901 in Winchester in the English county of Hampshire. ... Hyde Abbey was a Benedictine monastery just outside the walls of Winchester, Hampshire, dissolved and demolished in 1538. ... Old English redirects here. ... Events February 28 - End of the Fourth Council of Constantinople. ... is the 198th day of the year (199th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events King Athelstan of England succeeds to the throne. ... Motto Dieu et mon droit(French) God and my right Territory of the Kingdom of England Capital Winchester; London from 11th century Language(s) Old English (de facto, until 1066) Anglo-Norman language (de jure, 1066 - 15th century) English (de facto, gradually replaced French from late 13th century) Government Monarchy... Events Edward the Elder becomes King of England. ... Events King Athelstan of England succeeds to the throne. ... For the 10th century Bishop of Sherborne, see Alfred (bishop). ... Ealhswith (or Ealswitha) of the Gaini was born c. ... Events Edward the Elder becomes King of England. ...


He was king at a time when the Kingdom of Wessex was becoming transformed into the Kingdom of England. The title he normally used was "King of the Anglo-Saxons"; most authorities do regard him as a king of England, although the territory he ruled over was significantly smaller than the present borders of England. For the helicopter, see Westland Wessex. ... Motto Dieu et mon droit(French) God and my right Territory of the Kingdom of England Capital Winchester; London from 11th century Language(s) Old English (de facto, until 1066) Anglo-Norman language (de jure, 1066 - 15th century) English (de facto, gradually replaced French from late 13th century) Government Monarchy...

Contents

Succession and early reign

Edward's succession to his father was not assured. When Alfred died, Edward's cousin Aethelwold, the son of King Ethelred of Wessex, rose up to claim the throne and began Æthelwold's Revolt. He seized Wimborne, in Dorset, where his father was buried, and Christchurch (then in Hampshire, now in Dorset). Edward marched to Badbury and offered battle, but Aethelwold refused to leave Wimborne. Just when it looked as if Edward was going to attack Wimborne, Aethelwold left in the night, and joined the Danes in Northumbria, where he was announced as King. In the meantime, Edward is alleged to have been crowned at Kingston upon Thames on 8 June 900 [1] Aethelwald was the eldest son of Ethelred of Wessex, Alfred the Greats predecessor and older brother. ... Life King Ethelred I (Old English: Æþelræd) (c. ... Famous ex-residents Pope Joan Tim Berners Lee External links Census data Wimborne Minster Wimborne. ... Dorset (pronounced DOR-sit or [dÉ”.sÉ™t], and sometimes in the past called Dorsetshire) is a county in the south-west of England, on the English Channel coast. ... Christchurch is a borough and town in Dorset on the English Channel coast, adjoining Bournemouth in the west, with the New Forest to the east. ... For other uses, see Hampshire (disambiguation). ... Badbury Hundred was a hundred in the county of Dorset, England, containing the following parishes: Chalbury Gussage St Michael Hinton Martell Hinton Parva Horton More Crichel Shapwick Tarrant Crawford Wimborne Minster See also: List of hundreds in Dorset Categories: | ... Section from Shepherds map of the British Isles about 802 AD showing the kingdom of Northumbria Northumbria is primarily the name of a petty kingdom of Angles which was formed in Great Britain at the beginning of the 7th century, from two smaller kingdoms of Bernicia and Diera, and... Kingston upon Thames, part of the Royal Borough of Kingston upon Thames, is an ancient market town where Saxon kings were crowned, and is now a lively suburb of London. ... is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Gyeonhwon formally establishes the kingdom of Hubaekje in southwestern Korea. ...


In 901, Aethelwold came with a fleet to Essex, and encouraged the Danes in East Anglia to rise up. In the following year, he attacked Cricklade and Braydon. Edward arrived with an army, and after several marches, the two sides met at the Battle of Holme. Aethelwold and King Eohric of the East Anglian Danes were killed in the battle. Events Mesoamerican ballgame court dedicated at Uxmal Kingdom of Taebong established in Korean peninsula Fuzhou city was expanded with construction of a new city wall (Luo City). Births Deaths February 18 - Thabit ibn Qurra, Arab astronomer and mathematician Categories: 901 ... For other meanings of Essex, see Essex (disambiguation). ... Norfolk and Suffolk, the core area of East Anglia. ... , Cricklade is a small town in north Wiltshire in England, on the River Thames, situated midway between Swindon and Cirencester. ...


Relations with the North proved problematic for Edward for several more years. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle mentions that he made peace with the East Anglian and Northumbrian Danes "of necessity". There is also a mention of the regaining of Chester in 907, which may be an indication that the city was taken in battle.[2] The initial page of the Peterborough Chronicle. ... For the larger local government district, see Chester (district). ... Events Oleg leads Kievan Rus in a campaign against Constantinople Yelü Abaoji establishes Liao (Khitan) dynasty Births Deaths Categories: 907 ...


In 909, Edward sent an army to harass Northumbria. In the following year, the Northumbrians retaliated by attacking Mercia, but they were met by the combined Mercian and West Saxon army at the Battle of Tettenhall, where the Northumbrian Danes were destroyed. From that point, they never raided south of the River Humber. This article is for the year 909. ... Section from Shepherds map of the British Isles about 802 AD showing the kingdom of Northumbria Northumbria is primarily the name of a petty kingdom of Angles which was formed in Great Britain at the beginning of the 7th century, from two smaller kingdoms of Bernicia and Diera, and... The Battle of Tettenhall was a major battle of 5th August 910, near the end of the Anglo-Saxon period of English history. ... River Hull tidal barrier. ...


Edward then began the construction of a number of fortresses (burhs), at Hertford, Witham and Bridgnorth. He is also said to have built a fortress at Scergeat, but that location has not been identified. This series of fortresses kept the Danes at bay. Other forts were built at Tamworth, Stafford, Eddisbury and Warwick. Hertford (standard pronunciations /hɑtֽfəd/ and /hɑֽfəd/; local pronunciation /[h]ɑːʔֽfəd/) is the county town of Hertfordshire, England, and is in the East Hertfordshire district of that county. ... , Witham (pronounced Wittam; IPA, /ˈwɪtæm/) is a town in the county of Essex, in the south east of England. ... , Bridgnorth is a town in Shropshire, England, along the Severn Valley. ... For other places named Tamworth, see Tamworth (disambiguation). ... , Stafford is the county town of Staffordshire in England. ... Eddisbury is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Warwick (pronounced or War-ick (silent w in middle)) is the historic county town of Warwickshire in England and has a population of 25,434 (2001 census). ...


Achievements

Edward extended the control of Wessex over the whole of Mercia, East Anglia and Essex, conquering lands occupied by the Danes and bringing the residual autonomy of Mercia to an end in 918, after the death of his sister, Ethelfleda (Æðelflǣd). Ethelfleda's daughter, Aelfwinn, was named as her successor, but Edward deposed her, bringing Mercia under his direct control. He had already annexed the cities of London and Oxford and the surrounding lands of Oxfordshire and Middlesex in 911. By 918, all of the Danes south of the Humber had submitted to him. By the end of his reign, the Norse, the Scots and the Welsh had acknowledged him as "father and lord".[3] This recognition of Edward's overlordship in Scotland led to his successors' claims of suzerainty over that Kingdom. The Kingdom of Mercia at its greatest extent (7th to 9th centuries) is shown in green, with the original core area (6th century) given a darker tint. ... Norfolk and Suffolk, the core area of East Anglia. ... For other meanings of Essex, see Essex (disambiguation). ... Events Taebong has been overthrown and Goryeo established in Korean peninsula. ... Ethelfleda (alternative spelling Aethelfled, Æthelfleda or Æthelflæd) (872/879?-918) was the eldest daughter of King Alfred the Great of Wessex and his wife Ealhswith. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the city of Oxford in England. ... Oxfordshire (abbreviated Oxon, from the Latinised form Oxonia) is a county in the South East of England, bordering on Northamptonshire, Buckinghamshire, Berkshire, Wiltshire, Gloucestershire, and Warwickshire. ... The Middlesex Guildhall at Westminster Middlesex is one of the 39 historic counties of England and was the second smallest (after Rutland). ... This article is about the year 911 A.D.. For the emergency telephone number, see 9-1-1. ... This article is about the country. ...


Edward reorganized the Church in Wessex, creating new bishoprics at Ramsbury and Sonning, Wells and Crediton. Despite this, there is little indication that Edward was particularly religious. In fact, the Pope delivered a reprimand to him to pay more attention to his religious responsibilities.[4] Catholic Church redirects here. ... This page refers to holders of the Saxon bishopric. ... The Diocese of Bath and Wells is a diocese in the Church of England Province of Canterbury in England. ... The Diocese of Exeter is a Church of England diocese based in Exeter, covering Devon. ...


He died leading an army against a Welsh-Mercian rebellion, on 17 July 924 at Farndon-Upon-Dee and was buried in the New Minster in Winchester, Hampshire, which he himself had established in 901. After the Norman Conquest, the minster was replaced by Hyde Abbey to the north of the city and Edward's body was transferred there. His last resting place is currently marked by a cross-inscribed stone slab within the outline of the old abbey marked out in a public park. is the 198th day of the year (199th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events King Athelstan of England succeeds to the throne. ... Farndon is a village in the county of Cheshire, England, on the banks of the River Dee, south of Chester, and close to the border with Wales. ... The New Minster, Winchester was a royal Benedictine abbey founded in 901 in Winchester in the English county of Hampshire. ... Winchester Cathedral as seen from the Cathedral Close Arms of Winchester City Council Winchester is a city in southern England, and the administrative capital of the county of Hampshire, with a population of around 35,000. ... For other uses, see Hampshire (disambiguation). ... Events Mesoamerican ballgame court dedicated at Uxmal Kingdom of Taebong established in Korean peninsula Fuzhou city was expanded with construction of a new city wall (Luo City). Births Deaths February 18 - Thabit ibn Qurra, Arab astronomer and mathematician Categories: 901 ... The Bayeux Tapestry depicts the Battle of Hastings and the events leading to it. ... Hyde Abbey was a Benedictine monastery just outside the walls of Winchester, Hampshire, dissolved and demolished in 1538. ...


The portrait included here is imaginary and was drawn together with portraits of other Anglo-Saxon monarchs by an unknown artist in the 18th century. Edward's eponym the Elder was first used in the 10th century, in Wulfstan's Life of St Æthelwold, to distinguish him from the later King Edward the Martyr. Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... As a means of recording the passage of time, the 10th century was that century which lasted from 901 to 1000. ... The most well known people called Wulfstan in history are: St. ... Not to be confused with Edmund the Martyr. ...


Family

Edward had four siblings, including Ethelfleda, Queen of the Mercians and Ælfthryth, Countess of Flanders. Ethelfleda (alternative spelling Aethelfled, Æthelfleda or Æthelflæd) (872/879?-918) was the eldest daughter of King Alfred the Great of Wessex and his wife Ealhswith. ...


King Edward had about fourteen children from three marriages, and may have had illegitimate children too.


Edward married (although the exact status of the union is uncertain) a young woman of low birth called Ecgwynn around 893, and they became the parents of the future King Athelstan and a daughter who married Sihtric, King of Dublin and York in 926. Nothing is known about Ecgwynn other than her name, which was not even recorded until after the Conquest. [5][6] Events Simeon I succeeds Vladimir as king of Bulgaria. ... Athelstan redirects here. ... Sigtrygg Caech (or Sihtric) (died 927) was a Viking leader from Dublin who reigned as king of York. ...


When he became king in 899, Edward set Ecgwynn aside and married Ælfflæd, a daughter of Æthelhelm, the ealdorman of Wiltshire. [7] Their son was the future king, Ælfweard, and their daughter Eadgyth married Otto I, Holy Roman Emperor. The couples other children included five more daughters: Edgiva aka Edgifu, whose first marriage was to Charles the Simple; Eadhild, who married Hugh the Great, Duke of Paris; Ælfgifu who married Conrad of Burgundy; and two nuns Eadflæd and Eadhild. According to the entry on Boleslaus II of Bohemia, the daughter Adiva (referred to in the entry for Eadgyth) was his wife. A son, Edwin Ætheling who drowned in 933[8] was possibly Ælfflæd's child, but that is not clear. Events Edward the Elder becomes King of England. ... An Ealdorman, or Alderman, was the prior magistrate of a British shire in A. D. 900 to A. D. 1100. ... Not to be confused with Wilshire. ... Ælfweard (died 2 August 924) was the second known son of Edward the Elder. ... Eadgyth or Edith (910 - 26 January 946)was the daughter of Edward the Elder, King of England and Elfleda. ... For others with the same name, see Otto I (disambiguation). ... Eadgifu (b. ... Charles III the Simple (September 17, 879 - October 7, 929) was a member of the Carolingian dynasty. ... Hugh the Great (d. ... Conrad (died 19 October 993) was king of Burgundy from 937 until his death. ... Boleslaus II the Pious Boleslaus II the Pious (Czech: ; ca. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Eadgyth or Edith (910 - 26 January 946)was the daughter of Edward the Elder, King of England and Elfleda. ...


Edward married for a third time, about 919, to Edgiva, aka Eadgifu,[7] the daughter of Sigehelm, the ealdorman of Kent. They had two sons who survived infancy, Edmund and Edred, and two daughters, one of whom was Saint Edburga of Winchester the other daughter, Eadgifu, married Louis l'Aveugle. Events King Edward I of England conquers Bedford. ... Edgiva of Kent, or also Eadgifu (d. ... For other uses, see Kent (disambiguation). ... Edmund I (or Eadmund, 921 – May 26, 946), called the Elder, the Deed-Doer, or the Just, was King of England from 939 until his death. ... “Eadred” redirects here. ... Saint Eadburh or Edburga (died June 15, 960) was the daughter of King Edward the Elder by his third marriage. ... Louis the Blind (c. ...


Eadgifu outlived her husband and her sons, and was alive during the reign of her grandson, King Edgar. William of Malmsbury's history De antiquitate Glastonie ecclesiae claims that Edward's second wife, Aelffaed, was also alive after Edward's death, but this is the only known source for that claim. King Edgar or Eadgar I ( 942 – July 8, 975) was the younger son of King Edmund I of England. ... William of Malmesbury (c. ...


Genealogy

For a more complete genealogy including ancestors and descendants, see House of Wessex family tree. This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

Diagram based on the information found on Wikipedia
Diagram based on the information found on Wikipedia

Image File history File links Genealogy_england_bis_1000. ... Image File history File links Genealogy_england_bis_1000. ...

References

  1. ^ England: Anglo-Saxon Consecrations: 871-1066.
  2. ^ Edward the Elder: Reconquest of the Southern Danelaw.
  3. ^ Edward the Elder: "Father and Lord" of the North.
  4. ^ English Monarchs: Edward the Elder.
  5. ^ Edward the Elder, king of the Anglo-Saxons.
  6. ^ Lappenberg, Johann; Benjamin Thorpe, translator (1845). A History of England Under the Anglo-Saxon Kings. J. Murray, pp. 98,99. 
  7. ^ a b Lappenberg, Johann; Benjamin Thorpe, translator (1845). A History of England Under the Anglo-Saxon Kings. J. Murray, p. 99. 
  8. ^ Chart of Kings & Queens Of Great Britain (see References)

Johann Martin Lappenberg (July 30, 1794 - November 28, 1865), was a German historian. ... Johann Martin Lappenberg (July 30, 1794 - November 28, 1865), was a German historian. ...

Sources

Johann Martin Lappenberg (July 30, 1794 - November 28, 1865), was a German historian. ...

External links

Preceded by
Alfred the Great
King of England
899924
Succeeded by
Ælfweard in Wessex
Athelstan in Mercia
Persondata
NAME Edward the Elder
ALTERNATIVE NAMES
SHORT DESCRIPTION English monarch
DATE OF BIRTH 871
PLACE OF BIRTH Wessex, England
DATE OF DEATH 17 July 924
PLACE OF DEATH Farndon-on-Dee, Cheshire England
For the 10th century Bishop of Sherborne, see Alfred (bishop). ... For the various rulers of the kingdoms within England prior to its formal unification, during the Heptarchy, see Bretwalda. ... Events Edward the Elder becomes King of England. ... Events King Athelstan of England succeeds to the throne. ... Ælfweard (died 2 August 924) was the second known son of Edward the Elder. ... For the helicopter, see Westland Wessex. ... Athelstan redirects here. ... The Kingdom of Mercia at its greatest extent (7th to 9th centuries) is shown in green, with the original core area (6th century) given a darker tint. ... For the various rulers of the kingdoms within England prior to its formal unification, during the Heptarchy, see Bretwalda. ... Bretwalda is an Anglo-Saxon term, the first record of which comes from the late ninth-century Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Northumberland. ... Ælle was king of the South Saxons from 477 to perhaps as late as 514, and was named Bretwalda by Bede, who adds that he was overlord of the English south of the Humber river. ... Ceawlin of Wessex (also spelled Ceaulin or Caelin) is recorded in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle as being king of the West Saxons, or Wessex from 560 to 591, and named by Bede in his Historia Ecclesiastica Gentis Anglorum as the second king to hold imperium over other Anglo-Saxon kingdoms. ... Ethelbert (or Æthelbert, or Aethelberht) (means roughly Magnificent Noble) (c. ... Rædwald, son of Tytila, was King of the East Angles from c 600 AD until his death in c 624 AD. From c 616 he became the most powerful of the English rulers south of the River Humber, and by military action installed a Northumbrian ruler acquiescent to his... Saint Edwin (alternately Eadwine or Æduini) (c. ... Oswald (c. ... Oswiu (612–February 15, 670), also written as Oswio, Oswy, and Osuiu was an Anglo-Saxon Bretwalda. ... Wulfhere (d. ... For the later earl, see Earl Aethelred of Mercia. ... Ethelbald (or Æthelbald) (died 757) was the King of Mercia in England from 716 until his death. ... This article is about Offa of Mercia. ... Coenwulf (or Cenwulf) (died 821) was King of Mercia from 796 to 821. ... Egbert (also Ecgbehrt or Ecgbert, means roughly The shining edge of a blade) (c. ... Motto Dieu et mon droit(French) God and my right Territory of the Kingdom of England Capital Winchester; London from 11th century Language(s) Old English (de facto, until 1066) Anglo-Norman language (de jure, 1066 - 15th century) English (de facto, gradually replaced French from late 13th century) Government Monarchy... Image File history File links Wyvern. ... For the 10th century Bishop of Sherborne, see Alfred (bishop). ... Ælfweard (died 2 August 924) was the second known son of Edward the Elder. ... Athelstan redirects here. ... Edmund I (or Eadmund, 921 – May 26, 946), called the Elder, the Deed-Doer, or the Just, was King of England from 939 until his death. ... “Eadred” redirects here. ... Edwy All-Fair or Eadwig (941? – October 1, 959) was the King of England from 955 until his death. ... King Edgar or Eadgar I ( 942 – July 8, 975) was the younger son of King Edmund I of England. ... Not to be confused with Edmund the Martyr. ... Ethelred II (c. ... Sweyn I Forkbeard (actually Svein Otto Haraldsson; in Danish, Svend Tveskæg, originally Svend Tjugeskæg or Tyvskæg) (circa 960 - February 3, 1014). ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Canute the Great, or Canute I, also known as Cnut in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicles (Old Norse: Knútr inn ríki, Norwegian: Knut den mektige, Swedish: Knut den Store, Danish: Knud den Store) (died November 12, 1035) was a Viking king of England and Denmark, and Norway, and of... Harold I Harefoot (c. ... Harthacanute (sometimes Hardicanute, Hardecanute; Danish Hardeknud, Canute the Hardy) (1018/1019–June 8, 1042) was a King of Denmark (1035–1042) and England (1035–1037, 1040–1042). ... St Edward the Confessor or Eadweard III (c. ... Harold Godwinson (Haraldur Guðinason), or Harold II (c. ... Edgar Ætheling[1], also known as Edgar the Outlaw, (c. ... Motto Dieu et mon droit(French) God and my right Territory of the Kingdom of England Capital Winchester; London from 11th century Language(s) Old English (de facto, until 1066) Anglo-Norman language (de jure, 1066 - 15th century) English (de facto, gradually replaced French from late 13th century) Government Monarchy... Image File history File links Flag_of_England. ... William I of England (c. ... William II (c. ... Henry I (c. ... Stephen (c. ... Empress Matilda (February 1102 – September 10, 1167; sometimes Maud or Maude), also called Matilda, Countess of Anjou or Matilda, Lady of the English, was the daughter and dispossessed heir of King Henry I of England. ... Henry II of England (called Curtmantle; 25 March 1133 – 6 July 1189) ruled as King of England (1154–1189), Count of Anjou, Duke of Normandy, Duke of Aquitaine, Duke of Gascony, Count of Nantes, Lord of Ireland and, at various times, controlled parts of Wales, Scotland and western France. ... Richard I (8 September 1157 – 6 April 1199) was King of England and ruler of the Angevin Empire from 6 July 1189 until his death. ... This article is about the King of England. ... Henry III (1 October 1207 – 16 November 1272) was the son and successor of John Lackland as King of England, reigning for fifty-six years from 1216 to his death. ... Edward I (17 June 1239 – 7 July 1307), popularly known as Longshanks[1], also as Edward the Lawgiver or the English Justinian because of his legal reforms, and as Hammer of the Scots,[2] achieved fame as the monarch who conquered Wales and tried to do the same to Scotland. ... Edward II, (25 April 1284 – 21 September 1327), of Caernarfon, was King of England from 1307 until deposed in January, 1327. ... This article is about the King of England. ... Richard II (January 6, 1367 – February 14, 1400) was King of England from 1377 until he was deposed in 1399. ... Henry IV (3 April 1367 – 20 March 1413) was the King of England and France and Lord of Ireland from 1399 to 1413. ... Henry V of England (16 September 1387 – 31 August 1422) was one of the great English warrior kings of the Middle Ages. ... Henry VI (December 6, 1421 – May 21, 1471) was King of England from 1422 to 1461 (though with a Regent until 1437) and then from 1470 to 1471, and King of France from 1422 to 1453. ... Edward IV (April 28, 1442 – April 9, 1483) was King of England from March 4, 1461 to April 9, 1483, with a break of a few months in the period 1470–1471. ... Edward V (4 November 1470 – 1483?) was the King of England from 9 April 1483 until his deposition two months later. ... This article is about King Richard III of England. ... The Tudor Rose: a combination of the Red Rose of Lancaster and the White Rose of York Henry VII (January 28, 1457 – April 21, 1509), King of England, Lord of Ireland (August 22, 1485 – April 21, 1509), born Henry Tudor, was the first monarch of the Tudor dynasty. ... Henry VIII redirects here. ... Edward Tudor redirects here. ... Lady Jane Grey, formally Jane of England (1537 — 12 February 1554), a grand-niece of Henry VIII of England, reigned as uncrowned Queen regnant of the Kingdom of England for nine days[1] in July 1553. ... Mary I (18 February 1516 – 17 November 1558), also known as Mary Tudor, was Queen of England and Queen of Ireland from 6 July 1553 (de facto) or 19 July 1553 (de jure) until her death on 17 November 1558. ... Elizabeth I redirects here. ... James VI and I (19 June 1566 – 27 March 1625) was King of Scots as James VI, and King of England and King of Ireland as James I. He ruled in Scotland as James VI from 24 July 1567, when he was only one year old, succeeding his mother Mary... Charles I (19 November 1600 – 30 January 1649) was King of England, Scotland and Ireland from March 27, 1625 until his execution. ... The English Interregnum was the period of parliamentary and military rule in the land occupied by modern-day England and Wales after the English Civil War. ... Charles II (29 May 1630 – 6 February 1685) was the King of England, Scotland, and Ireland. ... James II and VII (14 October 1633 – 16 September 1701)[2] was King of England, King of Scotland,[1] and King of Ireland from 6 February 1685 to 11 December 1688. ... William III (14 November 1650 – 8 March 1702) was the Prince of Orange from his birth, Stadtholder of the main provinces of the Dutch Republic from 28 June 1672, King of England and King of Ireland from 13 February 1689, and King of Scots (under the name William II) from... Mary II (30 April 1662–28 December 1694) reigned as Queen of England and Ireland from 13 February 1689, and as Queen of Scots (as Mary II of Scotland) from 11 April 1689 until her death. ... William III (14 November 1650 – 8 March 1702) was the Prince of Orange from his birth, Stadtholder of the main provinces of the Dutch Republic from 28 June 1672, King of England and King of Ireland from 13 February 1689, and King of Scots (under the name William II) from... Anne (6 February 1665 – 1 August 1714) became Queen of England, Scotland and Ireland on 8 March 1702, succeeding William III of England and II of Scotland. ... For an explanation of terms such as Great Britain, British, United Kingdom, England, Scotland and Wales, see British Isles (terminology). ... This article is about the Irish kingdom existing from 1541 to 1800. ... Motto Latin: Nemo me impune lacessit (English: No one provokes me with impunity) (Scots: Wha daur meddle wi me) Capital Edinburgh¹ Language(s) Gaelic, Scots Government Monarchy King/Queen  - 843-860 Kenneth I  - 1587–1625 James VI  - 1702-1714 Anne Legislature Parliament of Scotland History  - United 843  - Union of the... This article is about the Irish kingdom existing from 1541 to 1800. ... Wessex was one of the seven major Anglo-Saxon kingdoms (the Heptarchy) that preceded the kingdom of England. ... is the 198th day of the year (199th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events King Athelstan of England succeeds to the throne. ... Farndon is a village in the county of Cheshire, England, on the banks of the River Dee, south of Chester, and close to the border with Wales. ... For other uses, see Cheshire (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ...

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Anglo-Saxons.net : Edward the Elder (4155 words)
Edward the Elder, king of the Anglo-Saxons (899-924), was probably born in the 870s (he was the second child of a marriage of 868, and led troops in battle in 893).
Edward the Elder is best known for his reconquest of all of England south of the Humber after the Viking invasions of the previous century.
Edward, having just conquered the Danes south of the Humber, is unlikely to have worried about the unrest of the English Mercians, and it is plausible that the rearrangement of the Mercian shires closely followed Edward's assertion of direct control over Mercia in 918.
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