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Encyclopedia > Edward VI of England
Edward VI
King of England and Ireland (more...)
Edward as Prince of Wales, Flemish School
Edward as Prince of Wales, Flemish School[1]
Reign 28 January 15476 July 1553
Coronation 20 February 1547
Predecessor Henry VIII
Regent Lord Northumberland (1549–1553)
Lord Somerset (1547–1549)
and Council
Successor Jane
Titles and styles
HM The King
The Prince of Wales
The Duke of Cornwall
Royal house House of Tudor
Father Henry VIII
Mother Jane Seymour
Born 12 October 1537(1537-10-12)
Hampton Court Palace, Richmond upon Thames
Died 6 July 1553 (aged 15)
Palace of Placentia, Greenwich
Burial 9 August 1553
Henry VII Lady Chapel, Westminster Abbey

Edward VI (12 October 15376 July 1553) became King of England, and Edward I of Ireland on 28 January 1547, and was crowned on 20 February, at nine years of age. He also carried the English claim to the French throne, but he did not rule France. Edward, the son of Henry VIII and Jane Seymour, was the third monarch of the Tudor dynasty and England's first Protestant ruler. Edward's entire rule was mediated through a council of regency as he never reached maturity. The council was first led by his uncle, Edward Seymour, 1st Duke of Somerset (1547–1549), and then by John Dudley, 1st Duke of Northumberland (1549–1553). This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Lambert Simnel (c. ... The precise style of British Sovereigns has varied over the years. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 444 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 1383 pixel, file size: 344 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Faithful reproductions of two-dimensional original works cannot attract copyright in the U.S. according to the rule in Bridgeman Art Library v. ... is the 28th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1547 was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events June 26 - Christs Hospital in London gets a Royal Charter July 6 - Edward VI of England dies July 10 - Lady Jane Grey is proclaimed Queen of England - for the next nine days July 18 - Lord Mayor of London proclaims Queen Mary as the rightful Queen - Lady Jane Grey... is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1547 was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... Henry VIII redirects here. ... John Dudley John Dudley (1501 – August 22/23, 1553) was a Tudor nobleman and politician, executed for high treason by Queen Mary I of England. ... Edward Seymour Edward Seymour, 1st Duke of Somerset (c. ... Lady Jane Grey, formally Jane of England (1537 — 12 February 1554), a grand-niece of Henry VIII of England, reigned as uncrowned Queen regnant of the Kingdom of England for nine days[1] in July 1553. ... A Royal House or Dynasty is a sort of family name used by royalty. ... The Tudor dynasty or House of Tudor (Welsh Twdwr) is a series of five monarchs of Welsh origin who ruled England from 1485 until 1603. ... Henry VIII redirects here. ... For the actress, see Jane Seymour (actress). ... is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 6 - Alessandro de Medici assassinated August 25 - The Honourable Artillery Company, the oldest surviving regiment in the British Army, and the second most senior, was formed. ... Hampton Court redirects here. ... The London Borough of Richmond upon Thames is a London borough in South West London and part of Outer London. ... is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events June 26 - Christs Hospital in London gets a Royal Charter July 6 - Edward VI of England dies July 10 - Lady Jane Grey is proclaimed Queen of England - for the next nine days July 18 - Lord Mayor of London proclaims Queen Mary as the rightful Queen - Lady Jane Grey... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Greenwich Palace. ... This page is about Greenwich in England. ... is the 221st day of the year (222nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events June 26 - Christs Hospital in London gets a Royal Charter July 6 - Edward VI of England dies July 10 - Lady Jane Grey is proclaimed Queen of England - for the next nine days July 18 - Lord Mayor of London proclaims Queen Mary as the rightful Queen - Lady Jane Grey... The Henry VII Lady Chapel is a large chapel at the far eastern end of Westminster Abbey. ... The Collegiate Church of St Peter, Westminster, which is almost always referred to by its original name of Westminster Abbey, is a mainly Gothic church, on the scale of a cathedral (and indeed often mistaken for one), in Westminster, London, just to the west of the Palace of Westminster. ... is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 6 - Alessandro de Medici assassinated August 25 - The Honourable Artillery Company, the oldest surviving regiment in the British Army, and the second most senior, was formed. ... is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events June 26 - Christs Hospital in London gets a Royal Charter July 6 - Edward VI of England dies July 10 - Lady Jane Grey is proclaimed Queen of England - for the next nine days July 18 - Lord Mayor of London proclaims Queen Mary as the rightful Queen - Lady Jane Grey... For the various rulers of the kingdoms within England prior to its formal unification, during the Heptarchy, see Bretwalda. ... The designation King of Ireland has been used during three periods of Irish history. ... is the 28th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1547 was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... Henry VIII redirects here. ... For the actress, see Jane Seymour (actress). ... For other uses, see Tudor (disambiguation). ... Protestantism encompasses the forms of Christian faith and practice that originated with the doctrines of the Reformation. ... Regent, from the Latin, a person selected to administer a state because the ruler is a minor or is not present or debilitated. ... Edward Seymour Edward Seymour, 1st Duke of Somerset (c. ... John Dudley John Dudley (1501 – August 22/23, 1553) was a Tudor nobleman and politician, executed for high treason by Queen Mary I of England. ...


Although Henry VIII had severed the link between the English church and Rome, it was during Edward's reign that Protestantism was established for the first time in England, with Thomas Cranmer, the Archbishop of Canterbury, implementing the Book of Common Prayer. Edward's reign was marked by increasingly harsh Protestant reforms, the loss of control of Scotland, and an economic downturn. A period of social unrest begun earlier intensified during his rule, and conflicts with the French increased. Thomas Cranmer (July 2, 1489 – March 21, 1556) was the Archbishop of Canterbury during the reigns of the English kings Henry VIII and Edward VI. He is credited with writing and compiling the first two Books of Common Prayer which established the basic structure of Anglican liturgy for centuries and... The Archbishop of Canterbury is the spiritual leader and senior clergyman of the Church of England, recognized by convention as the head of the worldwide Anglican Communion. ... For the novel, see A Book of Common Prayer. ... This article is about the country. ...


When it became clear that Edward's life was to be a short one, the Device to Alter the Succession was drafted. This made Lady Jane Grey, Edward's solidly Protestant cousin, the first in line of succession to the throne by excluding his two half sisters, the devout Catholic Mary and moderate Protestant Elizabeth. Following Edward's death at the age of fifteen, a disputed succession reopened the religious conflicts. Lady Jane was Queen for only nine days, during that time reigning in name only, before she was replaced by Mary. Queen Mary then sought to undo many of Edward's Protestant reforms with the Marian Repeal Acts in her first two Parliaments. Lady Jane Grey, formally Jane of England (1537 — 12 February 1554), a grand-niece of Henry VIII of England, reigned as uncrowned Queen regnant of the Kingdom of England for nine days[1] in July 1553. ... Succession to the British Throne is governed both by common law and statute. ... Mary I (18 February 1516 – 17 November 1558), also known as Mary Tudor, was Queen of England and Queen of Ireland from 6 July 1553 (de facto) or 19 July 1553 (de jure) until her death on 17 November 1558. ... Elizabeth I redirects here. ...

Contents

Early life

Prince Edward in 1538Painting by Hans Holbein
Prince Edward in 1538
Painting by Hans Holbein

Edward was born at Hampton Court Palace to the west of London.[2] He was the son of King Henry VIII by his third wife, Jane Seymour, who died twelve days afterwards from puerperal fever. It is sometimes asserted that Jane sacrificed her life by the performance of a Caesarean section, but such assertions are disputed as Caesarean sections in the sixteenth century were almost invariably immediately fatal for the mother. Henry was deeply upset at Jane's death. He described Jane as his only ‘True Wife’ as she was the only one that provided him with the son he so desperately wanted. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2024x2634, 515 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Edward VI of England ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2024x2634, 515 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Edward VI of England ... Hampton Court redirects here. ... Henry VIII redirects here. ... For the actress, see Jane Seymour (actress). ... Puerperal fever (from the latin puer, child), also called childbed fever or puerperal sepsis, is a serious form of septicaemia contracted by a woman during or shortly after childbirth or abortion. ... A caesarean section (AE cesarean section), or c-section, is a form of childbirth in which a surgical incision is made through a mothers abdomen (laparotomy) and uterus (hysterotomy) to deliver one or more babies. ...


Edward automatically became Duke of Cornwall upon his birth; a few days later he was created Prince of Wales. His early care was guided by his father, who specified nurses for him, foremost among them was the "Lady Mistress," Lady Bryan. The Dukedom of Cornwall was the first dukedom created in the peerage of England. ... This article is about the title Prince of Wales. ...


Henry VIII was extremely pleased by the birth of a male heir. He had disposed of his two previous wives, Catherine of Aragon (mother of Mary) and Anne Boleyn (mother of Elizabeth), partially because of their failure to produce male heirs. Both marriages were annulled: Anne Boleyn was executed, and Mary and Elizabeth were declared illegitimate. Henry later had them reinserted into the line of succession after Edward VI by the Third Succession Act (1543). Katherine of Aragon (Alcalá de Henares, 16 December 1485 – 7 January 1536), Castilian Infanta Catalina de Aragón y Castilla, also known popularly after her time as Catherine of Aragon, was the first wife and Queen Consort of Henry VIII of England. ... Mary I (18 February 1516 – 17 November 1558), also known as Mary Tudor, was Queen of England and Queen of Ireland from 6 July 1553 (de facto) or 19 July 1553 (de jure) until her death on 17 November 1558. ... Anne Boleyn, Queen Consort of England, 1st Marchioness of Pembroke[1] (ca. ... Elizabeth I redirects here. ... Annulment is a legal procedure for declaring a marriage null and void. ... Illegitimacy is the status that was once commonly ascribed to individuals born to parents who were not married. ... An order of succession is a formula or algorithm that determines who inherits an office upon the death, resignation, or removal of its current occupant. ... The Third Succession Act of Henry VIIIs reign was passed by the Parliament of England in mid-1543, and returned both Mary and Elizabeth to the line of the succession behind Prince Edward. ...

English Royalty
House of Tudor

Royal Coat of Arms
Henry VIII
   Henry, Duke of Cornwall
   Mary I
   Elizabeth I
   Edward VI
Edward VI
Edward at the age of six.
Painting by Hans Holbein

Until recently it was widely accepted that Edward VI was an extremely sickly child, but now evidence is coming to light showing him as much more robust. Theories have speculated that he suffered from congenital syphilis[3] or from tuberculosis. His first illness, experienced at the age of 4, was a "quartan fever"[4] which lasted for months. His supposed frailty may have led Henry VIII to seek to remarry quickly; the King's last three marriages (to Anne of Cleves, Catherine Howard, and Catherine Parr), however, did not produce any children. Other than this, Edward appears to have recovered quickly from other diseases. Edward's own journals mention no illness at all apart from a bout of measles in 1552. The policies of the Duke of Northumberland also indicate that he was making a foundation on which Edward was expected to build when he reached his majority at sixteen, rather than expecting Edward to die young. This article is about the monarchy of the United Kingdom, one of sixteen that share a common monarch; for information about this constitutional relationship, see Commonwealth realm; for information on the reigning monarch, see Elizabeth II. For information about other Commonwealth realm monarchies, as well as other relevant articles, see... For other uses, see Tudor (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links England_Arms_1405. ... The Royal Arms as used in England, Wales and Northern Ireland The Royal Coat of Arms of the United Kingdom is the official coat of arms of the British monarch, currently Queen Elizabeth II. These arms are used by the Queen in her official capacity as monarch, and are officially... Henry VIII redirects here. ... Henry, Duke of Cornwall was the name of two sons of King Henry VIII of England and his first wife, Catherine of Aragon. ... Mary I (18 February 1516 – 17 November 1558), also known as Mary Tudor, was Queen of England and Queen of Ireland from 6 July 1553 (de facto) or 19 July 1553 (de jure) until her death on 17 November 1558. ... Elizabeth I redirects here. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2024x2026, 317 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Edward VI of England ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2024x2026, 317 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Edward VI of England ... Tuberculosis (abbreviated as TB for tubercle bacillus or Tuberculosis) is a common and deadly infectious disease caused by mycobacteria, mainly Mycobacterium tuberculosis. ... Anne of Cleves (22 September 1515 – 16 July 1557) was the fourth wife of Henry VIII of England from 6 January 1540 to 9 July 1540. ... Cathrine Howard (between 1520 and 1525 – 13 February 1542), also called Katherine Howard[1] was the fifth wife of Henry VIII of England (1540-1542), and sometimes known by his reference to her as the rose without a thorn. Her birth date and place of birth is unknown, (occasionally cited... Catherine Parr or Jane Grey Catherine Parr (c. ... John Dudley John Dudley (1501 – August 22/23, 1553) was a Tudor nobleman and politician, executed for high treason by Queen Mary I of England. ...


Edward's supposed physical difficulties did not impede his education; on the contrary, the young prince was a very bright child, already able to read and speak Greek and Latin at the age of seven. His principal tutors were Bishop Richard Cox, Sir John Cheke and Jean Belmain. These were able teachers and great minds at the time and imparted in Edward his knowledge of the Classics, seemingly based on the course of instruction described by Erasmus and Vives. Importantly, Henry VIII chose his tutors because they were humanists: he may also have considered their moderated Protestantism when making his choice,[5] as Edward was not brought up in the Catholic religion. Edward's education was coloured by the Reformation that had swept through the Netherlands and Germany.[2] He later learned to speak French and Greek, and, by the age of thirteen, he was writing essays in the latter language. He was quite fond of his stepmother Catherine Parr, and wrote three letters to her, one each in French, English and Latin. The rest of the letters he wrote were in Latin to his older sisters, Mary and Elizabeth, whom he addressed as his "Sweet Sister Temperance". (Waller, p. 47) Edward also had strong feelings for Mary, although these were tempered by their disagreements over religion. His love of learning and writing led him to found many grammar schools that were named after him.[3] He also gave the Royal Charter to Sherborne School, which has a claim to be the oldest educational establishment in England, teaching having occurred in the Abbey, which forms part of the school, from the eighth century. For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ... Richard Cox (c. ... Sir John Cheke (16 June 1514 - 13 September 1557) was an English classical scholar and statesman, notable as the first Regius Professor of Greek at Cambridge. ... Jean Belmain was a zealous Calvinist who taught French to the young King Edward VI and Queen Elizabeth I. Large and austere, he was well rewarded for his services, and may well have had a major role in forming Edwards Protestant views. ... Desiderius Erasmus in 1523 Desiderius Erasmus Roterodamus (also Desiderius Erasmus of Rotterdam) (October 27, probably 1466 – July 12, 1536) was a Dutch humanist and theologian. ... Statue of Juan Luís Vives, outside of the Biblioteca Nacional de España, in Madrid. ... Humanism is a system of thought that defines a socio-political doctrine (-ism) whose bounds exceed those of locally developed cultures, to include all of humanity and all issues common to human beings. ... Sherborne School is an English public school for boys in the town of Sherborne in north-west Dorset, England. ...


Christ's Hospital was the result of the vision of King Edward VI, assisted by Nicholas Ridley, Bishop of London, and Sir Richard Dobbs, Lord Mayor of London. Its genesis was the earlier dissolution of the monasteries and the resultant overflow onto the streets of the poor and destitute. Encouraged by a sermon from Ridley, exhorting mercy to the poor, the King wrote to the Lord Mayor encouraging him to action. This he did via a committee of 30 merchants. Henry VIII had already granted the use of Greyfriars to the City for the relief of the poor and Edward granted The Palace of Bridewell, his lands of the Savoy and rents and other chattels to create three Royal Hospitals — Bridewell Hospital (now the King Edward's School, Witley, Surrey), St Thomas Hospital and Christ's Hospital, which was for the education of poor children. Bluecoat School directs here. ... Nicholas Ridley (died October 16, 1555) was an English clergyman. ... For other uses of the term dissolution see Dissolution. ... , The Pass Room at Bridewell from Ackermanns Microcosm of London (1808–1811), drawn by Thomas Rowlandson and Augustus Pugin. ... Saint Thomas’ Hospital. ... Bluecoat School directs here. ...


The first boys and girls entered the school in Newgate in 1552. The royal charter was granted and signed by its founder, Edward VI, the following year, just a few days before his death.


Somerset's Protectorate

Council of Regency

Edward VI's uncle, Edward Seymour, 2nd Duke of Somerset, ruled England in the name of his nephew as Lord Protector from 1547 to 1549.
Edward VI's uncle, Edward Seymour, 2nd Duke of Somerset, ruled England in the name of his nephew as Lord Protector from 1547 to 1549.

Henry VIII died on 28 January 1547, when Edward was only nine. His will named sixteen executors, who were to act as a Council of Regency until Edward VI achieved majority at the age of eighteen (although it was agreed by the Council in 1552 that Edward would reach his majority at 16). These executors were to be supplemented by twelve assistants, who would participate only when the others deemed it fit. The executors were all inclined towards religious reformation, whose most prominent opponents, Thomas Howard, 3rd Duke of Norfolk, Stephen Gardiner (the Bishop of Winchester) and Thomas Thirlby (the sole Bishop of Westminster), were excluded. The Council immediately appointed the king's maternal uncle Edward Seymour, 1st Earl of Hertford to serve as Lord Protector of the Realm and Governor of the King's Person during Edward's minority.[6] A few days after Henry VIII's death, Lord Hertford was created Duke of Somerset and appointed to the influential positions of Lord High Treasurer and Earl Marshal. Edward VI was crowned at Westminster Abbey on 20 February 1547.[2] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... is the 28th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1547 was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... In the common law, a will or testament is a document by which a person (the testator) regulates the rights of others over his property or family after death. ... An executor is a person named by a maker of a will to carry out the directions of the will. ... Regent, from the Latin, a person selected to administer a state because the ruler is a minor or is not present or debilitated. ... Thomas Howard, 3rd Duke of Norfolk by Hans Holbein. ... Stephen Gardiner (c. ... Arms of the Bishop of Winchester The diocese of Winchester is one of the oldest and most important in England. ... Thomas Thirlby (c. ... Edward Seymour Edward Seymour, 1st Duke of Somerset (c. ... Lord Protector is a particular English title for Heads of State, with two meanings (and full styles) at different periods of history. ... The Duke of Somerset is a title in the peerage of England that has been created several times. ... The Lord High Treasurer bears a white staff as his symbol of office. ... Earl Marshal (alternatively Marschal or Marischal) is an ancient chivalric title used separately in England, Ireland and the United Kingdom. ... The Collegiate Church of St Peter, Westminster, which is almost always referred to by its original name of Westminster Abbey, is a mainly Gothic church, on the scale of a cathedral (and indeed often mistaken for one), in Westminster, London, just to the west of the Palace of Westminster. ... is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1547 was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ...


To allay all doubts regarding the validity of Henry VIII's will, all the executors sought reappointment from Edward. On 13 March 1547, Edward VI created a new Council of twenty-six members. The Council consisted of all the executors and assistants, except for Thomas Wriothesley, 1st Earl of Southampton (who, whilst serving as Lord Chancellor, had illegally delegated some of his powers to other officials) and Edward Seymour, 1st Duke of Somerset. Somerset, as Lord Protector, was supposed to act only on the advice of the other executors but was able to gain near complete control of government after obtaining the power to change the composition of the Council at his pleasure. The Lord Protector, then, became the real ruler of England, with Edward VI acting in a largely ceremonial role. Somerset's administration of the country would prove to be more merciful than tactical and more idealistic than practical; Henry VIII's treason and heresy acts were repealed or changed, resulting in social and political unrest.[7] is the 72nd day of the year (73rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1547 was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... Thomas Wriothesley (1505 - July 30, 1550) was a politician of the Tudor period, and was created Earl of Southampton in 1547. ... The Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain, or Lord Chancellor and prior to the Union the Chancellor of England and the Lord Chancellor of Scotland, is a senior and important functionary in the government of the United Kingdom, and its predecessor states. ...


Ineffective rule

One of the Duke of Somerset's primary aims was to achieve a union between England and Scotland. In late 1547, an English army marched into Scotland and took control of the Lowlands in the Battle of Pinkie Cleugh. This action was the closing chapter in the War of the Rough Wooing and in the Anglo-Scottish Wars that had been simmering throughout the 16th century. In 1548, however, Mary, the young Scottish Queen, was betrothed to the Dauphin Francis, the heir-apparent to the French throne, thereby strengthening the traditional alliance between France and Scotland. For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article is about the country. ... Lowland-Highland divide The Scottish Lowlands (a Ghalldachd, meaning roughly the non-Gaelic region, in Gaelic), although not officially a geographical area of the country, in normal usage is generally meant to include those parts of Scotland not referred to as the Highlands (or Gàidhealtachd), that is, everywhere due... Combatants Scots English Commanders Earl of Arran Duke of Somerset Strength Between 23,000 and 36,000 17,000 30 warships Casualties 5,000 killed 1500 prisoners 500 killed The Battle of Pinkie Cleugh, along the banks of the River Esk near Musselburgh, Scotland on 10 September 1547, was part... The War of the Rough Wooing was a war between Scotland and England during the 16th century. ... The Anglo-Scottish Wars were a series of wars fought between England and Scotland during the sixteenth century. ... Mary, Queen of Scots redirects here. ... Coat of Arms of the Dauphins of France. ... Francis II (French: François II) (January 19, 1544 – December 5, 1560) was a King of France (1559 – 1560). ...


The Duke of Somerset was hardly in a position to oppose both France and Scotland, as his own position was insecure. His brother, and the widower of Catherine Parr, Thomas Seymour, 1st Baron Seymour of Sudeley, the Lord High Admiral, took advantage of this weakness by hatching a plot to depose Somerset. Lord Seymour's conspiracy, however, was exposed in 1549. A bill of attainder was introduced in Parliament and passed almost unanimously. Somerset was hesitant to sign his brother's death warrant, so Edward very reluctantly gave his consent to the Council; Lord Seymour was executed by beheading on 20 March 1549.[8] Thomas Seymour was Edward's favourite uncle and his death would embitter the young king toward Protector Somerset.[2] Thomas Seymour, 1st Baron Seymour of Sudeley Thomas Seymour redirects here. ... A bill of attainder (also known as an act or writ of attainder) is an act of legislature declaring a person or group of persons guilty of some crime, and punishing them, without benefit of a trial. ... is the 79th day of the year (80th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events July - Ketts Rebellion Francis Xavier arrives in Japan. ...

Archbishop of Canterbury, Thomas Cranmer, was a very important influence on Edward's Protestant views
Archbishop of Canterbury, Thomas Cranmer, was a very important influence on Edward's Protestant views

Another powerful influence on Edward VI was Thomas Cranmer, the Archbishop of Canterbury. Both Cranmer and the Duke of Somerset were committed to creating a Protestant England. Various Catholic rites were replaced with Protestant ones. One of the most notable was Cranmer's Book of Common Prayer, which was published solely in English in 1549 to replace the four old liturgical books in Latin. The political aim of the work was to unite moderate religious factions into a single Protestant fold by obscuring the role of the Mass and downplaying the status of saints. Its use was enforced by an Act of Uniformity 1549 but it served only to antagonise both Protestants and Catholics.[7] Zealous reformers such as John Knox were appointed as court chaplains. The Duke of Somerset, however, did not encourage persecution; rather, he refrained from it, as he feared the wrath of Europe's powerful Catholic monarchs, especially Holy Roman Emperor Charles V. Thomas Cranmer, archbisop of canterbury. ... Thomas Cranmer (July 2, 1489 – March 21, 1556) was the Archbishop of Canterbury during the reigns of the English kings Henry VIII and Edward VI. He is credited with writing and compiling the first two Books of Common Prayer which established the basic structure of Anglican liturgy for centuries and... The Archbishop of Canterbury is the spiritual leader and senior clergyman of the Church of England, recognized by convention as the head of the worldwide Anglican Communion. ... This box:      King Henry VIII of England. ... For the novel, see A Book of Common Prayer. ... The Act of Uniformity 1549 (citation 2 & 3 Edward VI, c. ... For other persons named John Knox, see John Knox (disambiguation). ... The Holy Roman Emperor was, with some variation, the ruler of the Holy Roman Empire, the predecessor of modern Germany, during its existence from the 10th century until its collapse in 1806. ... For the Carlist claimant King Carlos V, see Infante Carlos, Count of Molina. ...


The Western or Prayer-Book Rebellion

The Western Rebellion was a movement opposing the Act of Uniformity. The ‘Book of Common Prayer’ was disapproved of by many in England, but it was especially opposed in Cornwall where the common tongue was not English but the native Cornish language. However, although protesters explained that they spoke no English, Somerset refused to alter the Act: English was to be the language of the true English Church. For other uses, see Cornwall (disambiguation). ... For the Cornish-English dialect, see West Country dialects. ...


Led by prominent Catholic landowners, the protesters responded by forming an army of up to 3,000 men and proceeding to the city of Exeter, which they had assumed would support them. At Exeter, however, the mayor refused to open the city gates and a five-week siege began, during which time London had time to formulate a plan of action. The city of Exeter is the county town of Devon, in the southwest of England, also known as the West Country. ... A siege is a military blockade of a city or fortress with the intent of conquering by force or attrition, often accompanied by an assault. ...


Somerset sent Sir Peter Carew and his brother to keep the Cornish army occupied until John Russell, 1st Earl of Bedford could gather an army to counter the rebellion. Eventually, and reinforced with troops from Italy and Germany, Russell was in a position to attack and most of the Cornish lost their lives when they were cut off and slaughtered by Gawen Carew. But the affair did little to aid Somerset’s popularity. Sir Peter Carew (1514–1575) was a Devonshire adventurer, who served during the reign of Queen Elizabeth of England and became a controversial figure in the Tudor re-conquest of Ireland. ... John Russell, 1st Earl of Bedford (c. ...

Edward VI, by William Scrots, c. 1550
Edward VI, by William Scrots, c. 1550

Somerset's fall

The 1549 rebellion caused the Duke of Somerset to lose a good deal of support, even among his own Council. Inflation and the cost of war combined to double prices from 1547 to 1549 and although the wool industry boomed during this period - through the ongoing fencing in or enclosure of the landscape to raise sheep for individual proprietors - the displacement of common land caused great social unrest known as the enclosure riots. On August 8, 1549, taking advantage of internal strife, the French, under Henry II, formally declared war on England. Somerset’s response to the now substantial opposition to his Protectorate was to take possession of the King's person and flee to Windsor. However, he was soon deposed and sent under arrest to the Tower of London by John Dudley, Earl of Warwick and although Somerset briefly regained his place on the Council in 1550, he was executed in 1551. For other uses, see Wool (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Enclosure (disambiguation). ... Species See text. ... Commons redirects here. ... is the 220th day of the year (221st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events July - Ketts Rebellion Francis Xavier arrives in Japan. ... Henry II (French: Henri II) (March 31, 1519 – July 10, 1559), a member of the Valois Dynasty, was King of France from March 31, 1547, until his death. ... For other uses, see Tower of London (disambiguation) Her Majestys Royal Palace and Fortress The Tower of London, more commonly known as the Tower of London (and historically simply as The Tower), is an historic monument in central London, England on the north bank of the River Thames. ... John Dudley (1501-1553) was a Tudor nobleman and politician, executed for high treason by Queen Mary I of England. ...


Under John Dudley, Earl of Warwick, Duke of Northumberland

Somerset was deposed, but John Dudley, Earl of Warwick made himself Lord President instead of Lord Protector, and even encouraged Edward VI into declaring his majority as soon as he was sixteen. In 1550, Lord Northumberland conciliated the peasant rebels and made peace with France, giving up all of England's possessions in Scotland and Boulogne without compensation.[7] Unlike Somerset, Warwick was a man of action who was full of ambition to officially install and enforce an inflexible form of Protestantism and enrich himself with land and power. John Dudley John Dudley (1501 – August 22/23, 1553) was a Tudor nobleman and politician, executed for high treason by Queen Mary I of England. ...

John Dudley, 1st Duke of Northumberland, led the Council of Regency after the downfall of Somerset
John Dudley, 1st Duke of Northumberland, led the Council of Regency after the downfall of Somerset

The rise of the Earl of Warwick (later Duke of Northumberland) was accompanied by the fall of Catholicism in England. Use of the Book of Common Prayer in all Church services was more strictly enforced and all official editions of the Bible were accompanied by anti-Catholic annotations. Catholic symbols in churches were desecrated by mobs and the Ordinal of 1550 replaced the divine ordination of priests with a government-run appointment system.[7] Religious dissenters, moreover, were often persecuted and burnt at the stake. In 1550 and 1551, the most powerful Roman Catholic Bishops, Edmund Bonner (the Bishop of London), Stephen Gardiner (the Bishop of Winchester) and Nicholas Heath (the Bishop of Worcester) included, were deposed and their places taken by Protestant reformers such as Nicholas Ridley. The Council under Warwick also systematically confiscated church territories and Warwick himself had the ambition to be the largest landowner in England.[9] Image File history File links John_Dudley. ... Image File history File links John_Dudley. ... For the novel, see A Book of Common Prayer. ... This Gutenberg Bible is displayed by the United States Library. ... The term dissenter (from the Latin dissentire, to disagree), labels one who dissents or disagrees in matters of opinion, belief, etc. ... Jan Hus burned at the stake Execution by burning has a long history as a method of punishment for crimes such as treason, heresy and witchcraft (burning, however, was actually less common than hanging, pressing, or drowning as a punishment for witchcraft). ... Edmund Bonner (c. ... Arms of the Bishop of London The Bishop of London is the Ordinary of the Church of England Diocese of London in the Province of Canterbury. ... Stephen Gardiner (c. ... Arms of the Bishop of Winchester The diocese of Winchester is one of the oldest and most important in England. ... Nicholas Heath (c. ... The Bishop of Worcester is the ordinary in the see of Worcester and has his seat in Worcester Cathedral. ... Nicholas Ridley (died October 16, 1555) was an English clergyman. ...


Meanwhile, the Duke of Somerset, who agreed to submit to Lord Warwick, was released from prison and readmitted to the Privy Council. Within a few months, he found himself powerful enough to demand the release of other political and religious prisoners. He opposed the Council's attempt to curtail the religious liberty of Edward's sister, Mary. The Duke of Somerset's opposition to the more radical form of religious Reformation irked Lord Warwick. Her Majestys Most Honourable Privy Council is a body of advisors to the British Sovereign. ...


Warwick attempted to increase his own prestige; on his advice, Edward created him Duke of Northumberland and bestowed honours on his numerous supporters. The Duke of Northumberland began a campaign to discredit the Duke of Somerset. The people of London were informed that the Duke of Somerset would destroy their city; Edward was told that the Duke would depose and imprison him and seize his Crown. It was also suggested that the Duke of Somerset had plotted to murder the Duke of Northumberland. In December of 1551, the Duke of Somerset was tried for treason on the grounds that he had attempted to imprison a member of the King's Council. The treason charge, however, could not be proven; instead, Somerset was found guilty of participating in unlawful assemblies, but was still sentenced to death. The Duke of Somerset was subsequently executed in January 1552. The title Duke of Northumberland was created in 1551 for John Dudley. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see Treason (disambiguation) or Traitor (disambiguation). ...


On the day after the Duke of Somerset's execution, a new session of Parliament began. It passed the Act of Uniformity 1552, under which a second Book of Common Prayer was required for church services. Unauthorised worship was punishable by up to life imprisonment. The Act of Uniformity 1552 was enacted in 1552 by Edward VI of England. ...


The Devices and the plot to alter the succession

During his father's reign Edward had effectively been pampered and kept in seclusion. Edward desperately wanted his own freedom, and indulged in the early years of his reign with other children of his age. He became extremely fond of sports such as tennis. During the winter of 1552–53, Edward VI, strained by physical activities in the bitter weather, became ill. Although he may have contracted a cold or other respiratory infection, smallpox was epidemic in the region at the time. Doctors administered various medicines, but their efforts were in vain, leaving Edward in perpetual agony. The first symptoms of tuberculosis were manifest in January 1553 and by May it was obvious that his condition was fatal.[10] Edward was enough the master of his own destiny to have concerns about the succession addressed. Having been brought up a Protestant, he had no desire to be succeeded by his older half-sister and devout Catholic, Mary. Tuberculosis (abbreviated as TB for tubercle bacillus or Tuberculosis) is a common and deadly infectious disease caused by mycobacteria, mainly Mycobacterium tuberculosis. ... Mary I (18 February 1516 – 17 November 1558), also known as Mary Tudor, was Queen of England and Queen of Ireland from 6 July 1553 (de facto) or 19 July 1553 (de jure) until her death on 17 November 1558. ...


Traditional View

At the same time, the Duke of Northumberland was eager to retain his own power and contrived to alter the succession. He did not find the next two individuals in the line of succession, Mary and Elizabeth, conducive to his aims. The third individual in the line of succession under Henry VIII's will was Lady Frances Brandon (the daughter of Henry's younger sister Mary by Charles Brandon, 1st Duke of Suffolk); she, too, was not to Northumberland's liking. Northumberland feared that Frances' husband, Henry Grey, 1st Duke of Suffolk, would claim the Crown as his own. The Duke of Northumberland then foolishly attempted to rule through the Duchess of Suffolk's daughter, the Lady Jane Grey. Jane was married off to the Duke of Northumberland's younger son, Guilford Dudley. The marriage between Lady Jane Grey and Guilford Dudley had been arranged for several months previous to Edward's sickness, and the Act to make Jane Grey heir to the throne and disclaim Mary and Elizabeth was written in Edward's own hand, showing that Edward at least consented to it. However, at the time that Guildford Dudley married Lady Jane Grey, it was not certain that she would be the mother of the next king, and she had not been named as heir to the throne. There is also debate over whether or not Edward was even thought to be dying at the time that the marriage was arranged. Elizabeth I redirects here. ... Portrait by Hans Eworth. ... A sketch of Mary during her brief period as Queen of France Mary Tudor (March 18, 1496 – June 25, 1533) was the younger sister of Henry VIII of England and queen consort of France due to her marriage to Louis XII. Mary was the fifth child of Henry VII of... Charles Brandon, 1st Duke of Suffolk (c. ... Henry Grey, 1st duke of Suffolk, 3rd marquess of Dorset and baron Ferrers of Groby, Harrington, Bonville and Astley (c. ... Lady Jane Grey, formally Jane of England (1537 — 12 February 1554), a grand-niece of Henry VIII of England, reigned as uncrowned Queen regnant of the Kingdom of England for nine days[1] in July 1553. ... Lord Guilford Dudley (sometimes spelled Guildford) (1536 - 12 February 1554) was a son of John Dudley, 1st Duke of Northumberland, and Jane Guilford; and the younger brother of Robert Dudley, the future Earl of Leicester. ...

The Devices altered the succession to put Lady Jane Grey next in line to succeed Edward
The Devices altered the succession to put Lady Jane Grey next in line to succeed Edward

On 11 June 1553, the first draft of the will was written in Edward's own hand and the councilors of the privy council were forced to sign. Image File history File links Painting sometimes called Lady Jane Grey by a 16th-century artist File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Painting sometimes called Lady Jane Grey by a 16th-century artist File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... is the 162nd day of the year (163rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events June 26 - Christs Hospital in London gets a Royal Charter July 6 - Edward VI of England dies July 10 - Lady Jane Grey is proclaimed Queen of England - for the next nine days July 18 - Lord Mayor of London proclaims Queen Mary as the rightful Queen - Lady Jane Grey...


The first draft of the will excluded Mary, Elizabeth, the Duchess of Suffolk and the Lady Jane from the line of succession. The Crown was to be left to the Lady Jane's heirs-male, as it was not apparent that Edward would die so soon. Once it was discovered that Edward was indeed dying, the Device had to be altered. Because Lady Jane had no male heirs at this time, having been married only a month or so before, the draft was changed to leave the Crown to Jane and her heirs-male. Mary and Elizabeth were excluded because they were officially illegitimate; the Duchess of Suffolk agreed to renounce her own claims. As Edward VI lay dying, the Duke of Northumberland (according to legend) symbolically stole the crown from him and gave it to his daughter-in-law, the Lady Jane.


Revisionist perspectives

In recent years revisionist historians have speculated that there is in fact substantial evidence that Northumberland alone did not engineer the plot to subvert the succession and put Lady Jane Grey on the throne. Dale Hoak[11] suggests that "some others" shared Northumberland's responsibility for the scheme. Indeed, in his confession he did suggest that there were others involved but he would not name them. It is thought to have been Sir John Gates who "convinced Edward VI of the utlity of the plan", rather than Northumberland. David Starkey[12] has also suggested that "there is a distinct possibility that the audacious scheme to divert the succession from Mary to the staunchly reformist Jane Grey was Edward's rather than Northumberland's." Matthew Christmas[13] has written that "it originated with Edward to ensure a Protestant successor", and Edward had the power to persuade even the Councillors and judges who signed the formal will because "whilst [Edward] lived, his word was law". He argues that at the time of Guildford Dudley's marriage to Jane Grey there was no way of realising that it would "give his son a crown, however briefly" and that he was just making another good "dynastic marriage", typical of the time. David Robert Starkey (born January 3, 1945) is one of Englands best-known historians, and a specialist in the Tudor period. ...


Edward's death and aftermath

Edward VI died at the age of 15 at Greenwich Palace on 6 July 1553, either of tuberculosis, arsenic poisoning, syphilis or rheumatoid arthritis. His last words were said to have been: "Oh my Lord God, defend this realm from papistry and maintain Thy true religion." He was buried in Henry VII Lady Chapel at Westminster Abbey by Thomas Cranmer with Protestant rites on 9 August 1553, while Mary had Mass said for his soul in the Tower. On a site lying to the south of the river Thames, can be found an ancient royal palace acquired by King Henry V in 1414 when he confiscated the endowments of the alien priories. ... is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events June 26 - Christs Hospital in London gets a Royal Charter July 6 - Edward VI of England dies July 10 - Lady Jane Grey is proclaimed Queen of England - for the next nine days July 18 - Lord Mayor of London proclaims Queen Mary as the rightful Queen - Lady Jane Grey... Tuberculosis (abbreviated as TB for tubercle bacillus or Tuberculosis) is a common and deadly infectious disease caused by mycobacteria, mainly Mycobacterium tuberculosis. ... Arsenic poisoning kills by allosteric inhibition of essential metabolic enzymes, leading to death from multi-system organ failure. ... Syphilis is a curable sexually transmitted disease caused by the Treponema pallidum spirochete. ... Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is traditionally considered a chronic, inflammatory autoimmune disorder that causes the immune system to attack the joints. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... The Henry VII Lady Chapel is a large chapel at the far eastern end of Westminster Abbey. ... The Collegiate Church of St Peter, Westminster, which is almost always referred to by its original name of Westminster Abbey, is a mainly Gothic church, on the scale of a cathedral (and indeed often mistaken for one), in Westminster, London, just to the west of the Palace of Westminster. ... Thomas Cranmer (July 2, 1489 – March 21, 1556) was the Archbishop of Canterbury during the reigns of the English kings Henry VIII and Edward VI. He is credited with writing and compiling the first two Books of Common Prayer which established the basic structure of Anglican liturgy for centuries and... is the 221st day of the year (222nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events June 26 - Christs Hospital in London gets a Royal Charter July 6 - Edward VI of England dies July 10 - Lady Jane Grey is proclaimed Queen of England - for the next nine days July 18 - Lord Mayor of London proclaims Queen Mary as the rightful Queen - Lady Jane Grey...

Edward's half sister, Mary, daughter of Catherine of Aragon.

Edward VI's death was kept secret for several days so that preparations could be made for Jane's accession. High civic authorities privately swore their allegiance to the new Queen, who was not publicly proclaimed until 10 July 1553. However, the people were much more supportive of Mary, the rightful heir under the Act of Succession. On 19 July, Mary rode triumphantly into London, and Jane was forced to give up the Crown. Jane's proclamation was revoked as an act done under coercion; her succession was deemed unlawful. Thus, Edward VI's de jure successor was Mary I (1553–58), but his de facto successor was Jane. Download high resolution version (800x1036, 202 KB)Mary I of England, at the time the Princess Mary, by Master John in 1544. ... Download high resolution version (800x1036, 202 KB)Mary I of England, at the time the Princess Mary, by Master John in 1544. ... Cleopatra is one of the most well-known queens regnant A queen regnant (plural queens regnant) is a woman monarch possessing and exercising all of the monarchal powers of a king, in contrast with a queen consort, who is the wife of a reigning king, and in and of her... is the 191st day of the year (192nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events June 26 - Christs Hospital in London gets a Royal Charter July 6 - Edward VI of England dies July 10 - Lady Jane Grey is proclaimed Queen of England - for the next nine days July 18 - Lord Mayor of London proclaims Queen Mary as the rightful Queen - Lady Jane Grey... The Third Succession Act of Henry VIIIs reign was passed by the Parliament of England in mid-1543, and returned both Mary and Elizabeth to the line of the succession behind Prince Edward. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Look up De jure in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Mary I (18 February 1516 – 17 November 1558), also known as Mary Tudor, was Queen of England and Queen of Ireland from 6 July 1553 (de facto) or 19 July 1553 (de jure) until her death on 17 November 1558. ... De facto is a Latin expression that means in fact or in practice. It is commonly used as opposed to de jure (meaning by law) when referring to matters of law or governance or technique (such as standards), that are found in the common experience as created or developed without...


The Duke of Northumberland was executed, but the Lady Jane and her father were originally spared. In 1554, when Mary faced Wyatt's Rebellion, the Duke of Suffolk once again attempted to put his daughter on the throne. For this crime, Jane, her husband and the Duke of Suffolk were executed. Wyatts Rebellion (1554) is a popular rising named for Thomas Wyatt the younger (son of Sir Thomas Wyatt). ...


After Edward VI's death, rumours of his survival persisted. To take advantage of the people's delusions, several impostors were put forward as rightful kings. These impersonations continued throughout Mary I's reign, and even far into Elizabeth I's reign (1558–1603).[citation needed] Mistaken identities also feature in the American author Mark Twain's novel, The Prince and the Pauper, in which the young Edward VI and a pauper boy of identical appearance accidentally replace each other. Samuel Langhorne Clemens (November 30, 1835 – April 21, 1910),[1] better known by the pen name Mark Twain, was an American humanist,[2] humorist, satirist, lecturer and writer. ... The Prince and the Pauper was first published in 1881 in Canada before its 1882 publication in the united states. ...


Ancestors

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
16. Owen Tudor
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
8. Edmund Tudor, 1st Earl of Richmond
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
17. Catherine of Valois
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
4. Henry VII of England
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
18. John Beaufort, 1st Duke of Somerset
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
9. Margaret Beaufort
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
19. Margaret Beauchamp of Bletso
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
2. Henry VIII of England
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
20. Richard Plantagenet, 3rd Duke of York
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
10. Edward IV of England
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
21. Cecily Neville
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
5. Elizabeth of York
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
22. Richard Woodville, 1st Earl Rivers
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
11. Elizabeth Woodville
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
23. Jacquetta of Luxembourg
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
1. Edward VI of England
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
24. John Seymour
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
12. John Seymour
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
25. Elizabeth Coker
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
6. John Seymour
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
26. George Darell
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
13. Elizabeth Darrell
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
27. Margaret Stourton
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
3. Jane Seymour
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
28. Philip Wentworth
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
14. Henry Wentworth
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
29. Mary Clifford
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
7. Margaret Wentworth
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
30. John Say
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
15. Ann Say
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
31. Elizabeth Cheney
 
 
 
 
 
 

This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Edmund Tudor, 1st Earl of Richmond (~1430-November 1, 1456) was the father of King Henry VII of England. ... Catherine of Valois (27 October 1401 – 3 January 1437) was the Queen consort of England from 1420 until 1422. ... The Tudor Rose: a combination of the Red Rose of Lancaster and the White Rose of York Henry VII (January 28, 1457 – April 21, 1509), King of England, Lord of Ireland (August 22, 1485 – April 21, 1509), born Henry Tudor, was the first monarch of the Tudor dynasty. ... John Beaufort, 1st Duke of Somerset (baptised March 25, 1404 – May 27, 1444), was an English noble and military commander. ... Margaret Beaufort, Mother of Henry VII, at prayer, by an anonymous artist, about 1500 Margaret Beaufort (May 31, 1443 – June 29, 1509) was the daughter of John Beaufort, 1st Duke of Somerset, granddaughter of John Beaufort, 1st Earl of Somerset and great-granddaughter of John of Gaunt and his mistress... Margaret Beauchamp of Bletso (d. ... Henry VIII redirects here. ... Richard, Duke of York (21 September 1411 – 30 December 1460) was a member of the English royal family, who served in senior positions in France at the end of the Hundred Years War, and in England during Henry VIs madness. ... Edward IV (April 28, 1442 – April 9, 1483) was King of England from March 4, 1461 to April 9, 1483, with a break of a few months in the period 1470–1471. ... Cecily Neville (3 May 1415 – 31 May 1495), Duchess of York, was called the Rose of Raby (because she was born at Raby Castle in Durham, England) and Proud Cis (because of her pride and a temper that went with it). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Richard Woodville (or Wydeville), 1st Earl Rivers (1405 - August 12, 1469), was an English nobleman, best remembered as the father of Elizabeth Woodville, wife of Edward IV. Born at Maidstone, Kent, he was the son of another Sir Richard Wydevill, chamberlain to the Duke of Bedford. ... Elizabeth Woodville or Wydville (c. ... Jacquetta de Luxembourg (1415/1416 - May 30, 1472) was daughter of Pierre de Luxembourg, Comte de Saint Pol, Conversano et Brienne and his wife Margaret de Baux (Margherita del Balzo of Andria). ... Sir John Seymour (c. ... For the actress, see Jane Seymour (actress). ...

Style and arms

Like his father, Edward VI was referred to with the styles "Majesty", "Highness" and "Grace". His official style was of the same form as his father: "Edward the Sixth, by the Grace of God, King of England, France and Ireland, Defender of the Faith and of the Church of England and also of Ireland in Earth Supreme Head". This article discusses the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ... The Kingdom of England was first unified as a state by Athelstan of Wessex. ... This article or section should be merged with English claims to the French throne From 1339 to 1801, with only brief intervals in 1360-1369 and 1420-1422, the Kings of England also bore the title of King of France. ... // Fidei defensor is the Latin original of the English and French titles. ... The Church of England logo since 1996. ... This article is about Earth as a planet. ...


Edward VI's arms were the same as those used by his predecessors since Henry IV: Quarterly, Azure three fleurs-de-lys Or (for France) and Gules three lions passant guardant in pale Or (for England). Heraldry in its most general sense encompasses all matters relating to the duties and responsibilities of officers of arms. ... Henry IV (3 April 1367 – 20 March 1413) was the King of England and France and Lord of Ireland from 1399 to 1413. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ...


His Royal Motto was idem per diversa, the same whatever the circumstances (similar to that of Elizabeth I - semper eadem, Always the same).


Coinage reform

One of the most significant legacies of Edward VI was the reform of England's coinage, and more specifically silver coinage which had suffered from debasement in previous eras. Silver coins such as the threepence, sixpence, shilling, half-crown and crown were first minted during the reign of Edward VI, and these denominations continued until modern times. The half-crown and crown in particular reflected the trend towards larger silver coins which had begun in Europe towards the end of the 15th century.


See also

  • Cultural depictions of Edward VI of England

Notes

  1. ^ This portrait was formerly attributed to Hans Eworth. More recently, it has been suggested that the artist is William Scrots, but this is not generally accepted. See Hearn, Karen, ed. Dynasties: Painting in Tudor and Jacobean England 1530-1630. New York: Rizzoli, 1995. ISBN 0-8478-1940-X
  2. ^ a b c d Williamson, p 66
  3. ^ a b Williamson, p 67
  4. ^ A fever recurring about every four days, today usually associated with malaria.
  5. ^ Jordan, Edward VI: The Young King, Vol 1, p 68
  6. ^ Columbia Encyclopedia (2005), "Edward VI"
  7. ^ a b c d Encyclopaedia Britannica (2005), "United Kingdom: Edward VI (1547–53)"
  8. ^ TudorPalace.com
  9. ^ Britannia.com
  10. ^ Encyclopaedia Britannica (2005), "Edward VI"
  11. ^ Dale Hoak, Rehabilitating the Duke of Northumberland, from The Mid-Tudor Polity, C. 1540-1560, edited by Jennifer Loach and Robert Tittler
  12. ^ David Starkey, Juvenile Court
  13. ^ Matthew Christmas, Edward VI, The Changing Picture, History Review, March 1997

Categories: Stub | Flemish painters ... Malaria is a vector-borne infectious disease caused by protozoan parasites. ...

References

  • "Edward VI (1547–1553 AD)", Britannia.com, Accessed 28 May 2006
  • "King Edward VI", Royalty.nu, The Royal Tudor Dynasty, Accessed 28 May 2006
  • David Williamson, Kings and Queens of England (1998), Barnes and Noble Books, pages 66–68
  • "Edward VI", Encyclopædia Britannica (1911) 11th ed. London: Cambridge University Press.
  • "Edward VI", Encyclopædia Britannica (2005)
  • "Edward VI", Columbia Encyclopedia (2005)
  • Karen Hearn, ed. Dynasties: Painting in Tudor and Jacobean England 1530-1630. New York: Rizzoli, 1995. ISBN 0-8478-1940-X.
  • W.K. Jordan, "Edward VI: The Young King, Vol 1. The Protectorship of the Duke of Somerset", (1968), Great Britain: George Allen and Unwin Ltd.
  • Chris Skidmore, "Edward VI: The Lost King of England" (2007), Weidenfeld & Nicolson, ISBN 0297846493. Reviewed
  • Jennifer Loach, Edward VI Yale University Press; New Ed edition (April 1, 2002), ISBN 0300094094.
  • Waller, Maureen, "Sovereign Ladies: Sex, Sacrifice, and Power. The Six Reigning Queens of England." St. Martin's Press, New York, 2006. ISBN 0-312-33801-5

is the 148th day of the year (149th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 148th day of the year (149th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Edward VI of England
Edward VI of England
Born: 12 October 1537 Died: 6 July 1553
Regnal titles
Preceded by
Henry VIII
King of England
King of Ireland

28 January 1547 – 6 July 1553
Succeeded by
Jane
English royalty
Preceded by
Lady Elizabeth Tudor
Heir to the English Throne
as heir apparent
12 October 1537 – 28 January 1547
Succeeded by
Lady Mary Tudor
New title
New Kingdom
Heir to the Irish Throne
as heir apparent
1541 – 28 January 1547
Peerage of England
Preceded by
Henry
later became King Henry VIII
Prince of Wales
1537 – 1547
Vacant
Title next held by
Henry Frederick

See also

  • Template:British Monarchs
  • Template:Scottish Monarchs

</noinclude>

Persondata
NAME Edward VI of England
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Edward I of Ireland
SHORT DESCRIPTION Tudor king
DATE OF BIRTH 12 October 1537
PLACE OF BIRTH Hampton Court Palace, Richmond upon Thames
DATE OF DEATH 6 July 1553
PLACE OF DEATH Palace of Placentia, Greenwich, London
Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Duke_of_Cornwall. ... is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 6 - Alessandro de Medici assassinated August 25 - The Honourable Artillery Company, the oldest surviving regiment in the British Army, and the second most senior, was formed. ... Hampton Court redirects here. ... Richmond is a suburb in southwest London, in the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames. ... is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events June 26 - Christs Hospital in London gets a Royal Charter July 6 - Edward VI of England dies July 10 - Lady Jane Grey is proclaimed Queen of England - for the next nine days July 18 - Lord Mayor of London proclaims Queen Mary as the rightful Queen - Lady Jane Grey... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Greenwich Palace. ... This page is about Greenwich in England. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Edward VI of England - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3688 words)
Edward, the son of Henry VIII and Jane Seymour, was the third monarch of the Tudor dynasty and England's first ruler who was Protestant at the time of his ascension to the throne.
Edward was born at Hampton Court Palace in London Borough of Richmond upon Thames.
Edward VI was crowned as king at Westminister Abbey on 20 February 1547.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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