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Encyclopedia > Edward Scissorhands
Edward Scissorhands
Directed by Tim Burton
Produced by Denise Di Novi
Tim Burton
Written by Tim Burton (story)
Caroline Thompson (story and screenplay)
Starring Johnny Depp
Winona Ryder
Dianne Wiest
Alan Arkin
Anthony Michael Hall
Vincent Price
Music by Danny Elfman
Cinematography Stefan Czapsky
Editing by Colleen Halsey
Richard Halsey
Distributed by 20th Century Fox
Release date(s) December 7, 1990 (USA)
March 21, 1991 (AUS)
July 26, 1991 (UK)
Running time 105 minutes
Country Flag of the United States United States
Language English
Budget $20,000,000
Gross revenue $86,024,005 (Worldwide)
Allmovie profile
IMDb profile

Edward Scissorhands is a 1990 American fantasy film, written by Tim Burton and Caroline Thompson, and directed by Burton. The film features Johnny Depp as the titular Edward, Winona Ryder, Dianne Weist and Anthony Michael Hall. The plot revolves around a man named Edward; the creation of an inventor, who has dangerous shears and scissors for hands, and appears frightening, who is adopted into a colorful, but stereotypically suburban, family. Image File history File links Edwardscissorhandsposter. ... Timothy Tim William Burton (born August 25, 1958) is an Academy Award and Golden Globe-nominated American film director, writer and designer notable for the quirky and often dark atmosphere in his high-profile films. ... Denise Di Novi is an American film producer. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... John Christopher Depp II[1] (born June 9, 1963) is an American actor, best known for his frequent portrayals of offbeat and eccentric characters such as Jack Sparrow in the Pirates of the Caribbean trilogy and the titular character of Tim Burtons Edward Scissorhands. ... Winona Laura Horowitz[1] (born October 29, 1971), better known under her professional name Winona Ryder, is a two-time Academy Award-nominated and Golden Globe-winning American actress. ... Dianne Wiest (born March 28, 1948) is a double Academy Award-winning, Golden Globe Award-winning, Emmy Award-winning and BAFTA-nominated American actress. ... Alan Wolf Arkin (born March 26, 1934) is an Academy Award-winning American actor and director. ... Michael Anthony Thomas Charles Hall (born April 14, 1968), known professionally as Anthony Michael Hall, is an American actor, producer and director who achieved stardom in several successful teen-oriented films of the 1980s. ... Vincent Leonard Price Jr. ... Daniel Robert Elfman (born May 29, 1953 in Los Angeles, California) is an American musician who led the rock band Oingo Boingo as singer / songwriter from 1976 until its breakup in 1995, and has composed film scores extensively since 1985s Pee-wees Big Adventure. ... Twentieth (20th) Century Fox Film Corporation (known from 1935 to 1985 as Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation) is one of the six major American film studios. ... is the 341st day of the year (342nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar. ... is the 207th day of the year (208th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... English is a West Germanic language originating in England, and the first language for most people in Australia, Canada, the Commonwealth Caribbean, Ireland, New Zealand, the United Kingdom and the United States of America (also commonly known as the Anglosphere). ... Categories: American cinema | Cinema by country ... Fantasy films are films with fantastic themes, usually involving magic, supernatural events, make-believe creatures, or exotic fantasy worlds. ... Timothy Tim William Burton (born August 25, 1958) is an Academy Award and Golden Globe-nominated American film director, writer and designer notable for the quirky and often dark atmosphere in his high-profile films. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... John Christopher Depp II[1] (born June 9, 1963) is an American actor, best known for his frequent portrayals of offbeat and eccentric characters such as Jack Sparrow in the Pirates of the Caribbean trilogy and the titular character of Tim Burtons Edward Scissorhands. ... Winona Laura Horowitz[1] (born October 29, 1971), better known under her professional name Winona Ryder, is a two-time Academy Award-nominated and Golden Globe-winning American actress. ... Dianne Wiest (born March 28, 1948 in Kansas City, Missouri) is an American actress in stage, television, and film, and has received several awards in her career, including two Oscars. ... Michael Anthony Thomas Charles Hall (born April 14, 1968), known professionally as Anthony Michael Hall, is an American actor, producer and director who achieved stardom in several successful teen-oriented films of the 1980s. ...


The film is a comedy-drama set in an exaggerated and highly stereotypical vision of American suburbia and the typical families that inhabit it. It intentionally combines clichés and styles from both the 1950s, early 1960s and the late 1980s. The concept, and many of the motifs of Edward Scissorhands can be compared to the English Gothic novel Frankenstein by Mary Shelley and the French legend of Beauty and the Beast. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Stereotype (disambiguation). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Strawberry Hill, an English villa in the Gothic revival style, built by seminal Gothic writer Horace Walpole Gothic fiction is an important genre of literature that combines elements of both horror and romance. ... This article is about the 1818 novel. ... Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley (née Godwin) (30 August 1797 – 1 February 1851) was an English romantic/gothic novelist and the author of Frankenstein, or The Modern Prometheus. ... For other uses, see Beauty and the Beast (disambiguation). ...


Edward Scissorhands was a modest box office hit, grossing $56 million worldwide.[1] Critics acclaimed the film as a timeless tale of friendship; it is usually cited as Burton's greatest film.[2] The director cites Edward Scissorhands as epitomizing his most personal work.[3] The term box office can refer to either: A place where tickets are sold to the public for admission to a venue The amount of business a particular production, such as a movie or theatre show, does. ...

Contents

Plot

The film opens with an elderly woman reciting a story of a man named Edward (Johnny Depp), the creation of an inventor (Vincent Price), who unfortunately died before he could give Edward "hands". Local Avon saleswoman Peg Boggs (Wiest) fails to make any profits in her neighborhood. On a whim, she visits a pseudo-medieval mansion on a hill. Here, she finds Edward — a friendless boy with scissors filling in for hands — and decides to take him home and adopt him into her family. Thus, Edward must adjust to his new surroundings. He befriends Peg's children, Kevin (Robert Oliveri) and Kim (Ryder). Edward and Kim eventually form a romantic relationship, although Kim is at first frightened by Edward's appearance. Vincent Leonard Price Jr. ... Avon Products, Inc. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times. ... Robert Oliveri with Keri Russell and one of the Shaliker twins in Honey, I Blew Up the Kid Robert Dane Oliveri (b. ...


Peg's conformist neighbors, while initially thrilled at his skills at hedge clipping and haircutting, grow to distrust Edward. Two of these, a religious fanatic named Esmeralda (O-Lan Jones) and Kim's thuggish boyfriend Jim (Anthony Michael Hall), dislike him from the very beginning. Eventually, Jim attempts to implicate Edward in a theft; Edward is arrested, but is released when a psychological examination reveals that his isolation had allowed him to live without a traditional sense of ethics. At one point thereafter, Peg's husband Bill (Alan Arkin) asks Edward about what to do if he finds a briefcase full of money. Edward, not thinking about whence the money came or realizing it might have an owner, selflessly declares that he would give all the money to his beloved ones. Michael Anthony Thomas Charles Hall (born April 14, 1968), known professionally as Anthony Michael Hall, is an American actor, producer and director who achieved stardom in several successful teen-oriented films of the 1980s. ... Alan Wolf Arkin (born March 26, 1934) is an Academy Award-winning American actor and director. ...


Later, neighbor Joyce (Kathy Baker) suggests that Edward opens a haircutting salon with her; while examining a proposed site, she attempts to seduce him. A confused Edward escapes the room. Edward attempts to bring up the subject of her actions while the family has dinner, but no one reacts to the news. Thus humiliated, Joyce claims that Edward tried to rape her. During Christmas, Edward is ostracized by almost everyone around him except the Boggs, for an unsuccessful robbery was attempted by Jim, who had used Edward to gain entrance. Edward fails to escape home when an alarm is set off, exhibiting him as the suspect, turning the neighborhood against him. This article is about the actress. ...


While the family clearing decks for Christmas decorations, Edward carves an ice sculpture from a block of ice. The ice shavings create an effect of snow under which Kim dances. Edward, unaware of her presence, turns around, and accidentally cuts Kim's hand. Jim assumes that Edward deliberately attacked her, and uses this as an excuse to attack Edward in a jealous rage. Later, the situation turns worse when Kevin is almost run over by Jim's drunk friend who is behind the wheel of the van heading straight for him. Edward saves him, but when checking to see if all is well, he accidentally cuts Kevin's face. The neighbors misunderstood the situation as Edward attacking Kevin and they chase Edward back to the mansion. Officer Allen attempts to deceive the mob under the impression that Edward is dead by firing a few shots in the air when they are too far away to see him.


Kim, refusing to believe this, hastens to enter the mansion. There, she reunites with Edward. Jim follows them and attempts to kill his rival. Though beaten initially, Jim behaves sardonically with Edward and starts beating Kim; in the process, Edward stabs Jim in the chest with the scissored fingers of his right hand. Jim stumbles backwards as Edward withdraws the blade, and Jim and falls out of the loft window to his death. Kim kisses Edward and tells him that she loves him. Kim goes downstairs and tells the townspeople that Edward was killed when the roof fell down, to prevent him from being lynched by them. To "prove" this, she holds up a left-over scissors implement which she has taken from the late inventor's laboratory.


The elderly woman from the beginning appears, telling her granddaughter the story of her relationship with Edward. When the granddaughter asks her how she knows that Edward is still alive in the castle, she answers to this effect; before Edward came, snow never fell on the valley, whereas after he left, it begins to fall. The old lady attributes the snow to Edward and remarks that she still dances in it, revealing that she is a significantly older Kim. Subsequently, we see Edward creating an ice sculpture in the attic of his mansion. He is surrounded by other ice-sculptures that he has created, including one of a girl dancing, as Kim had done. As Edward works, the flurry of ice shavings is thrown, presumably by Edward himself, onto the valley and onto the town below. The granddaughter questions Kim as to why she did not return to visit Edward, and she responds that she wants Edward to remember her as she was, and not see how "ungracefully" she has aged. The film ends with a young Kim joyfully twirling in the snowflakes and snow pouring from the mansion's broken windows.


Cast

  • Johnny Depp stars as Edward Scissorhands, A lonely, naïve and creative being with scissors filling in for hands, and is adopted by Peg and taken into her neighborhood. Tim Burton personally expressed the character as "both simple and complicated. Both beautiful and off-putting, both creative and horrifically clumsy."[3] Twentieth-Century Fox demanded Tom Cruise[4][5] The studio wanted a "bankable" actor and Burton felt it was best "to be open about casting." Burton claims Cruise wasn't his ideal choice but found him remarkably interesting; though claims Cruise wouldn't stop asking questions about the character. It got to the point where Burton found it impossible to work with him.[4] Cruise also wanted the ending to be "happier"[6] and in addition, cited scheduling conflicts with Days of Thunder[5] while blaming Edward's "lack of virility".[3] In due time, Michael Jackson expressed having interest for the role but was ignored. Tom Hanks then turned it down in favor of The Bonfire of the Vanities. William Hurt and Robert Downey, Jr. had both openly expressed interest.[3] Although Burton was unfamiliar with Depp's previous work, Burton was impressed with his "subtlety and ability to act with his eyes," citing that "for a character that doesn't speak a lot; eyes are very important."[4] In 1989, Depp read the script and "wept like a newborn". Meeting Burton and producer Denise Di Novi in Los Angeles, California, he and Burton got on very well, and he was cast a few weeks later.[7] In preparation for the role, Depp watched many Charlie Chaplin films to study creating sympathy without dialogue.[8] Studio executives were so worried about Edward's image that they tried to keep pictures of Depp in full costume under wraps until release of the film.[9] Burton was so impressed with Depp's performance that he would go on to include the actor in five later films.[7]
  • Winona Ryder as Kim Boggs: A fragile, beautiful, bright, compassionate teenage girl, who has a progressive attraction to Edward. Burton claimed he couldn't envision any other actress in the role, feeling that Ryder gave a positive performance in Beetlejuice. At the time, Ryder was coincidentally romantically involved with Depp. Burton felt "she could respond to this dark material" and the idea of her as a cheerleader and wearing a blond wig "was very funny." Burton feels that it was the hardest role for her to take at the time, as she herself was "tortured" and made fun of by cheerleaders at school.[4] Ryder dropped out of The Godfather Part III in favor of this film.[10]
  • Dianne Wiest as Peg Boggs: A typical, sensitive mother, who wants to show Edward the life he deserves by treating him as one of her sons. Peg is having trouble with her job as an Avon lady until she meets Edward. Although Ryder was the first to be attached to the project,[3] Wiest was the first to sign and read the script. Burton claims that it was "her stamp of approval" that had "others soon interested."[11]
  • Anthony Michael Hall as Jim: Kim's uncaring boyfriend, who instantly dislikes Edward's affection for Kim. Hall and Arkin were the last two central characters to be cast.[3]
  • Kathy Baker as Joyce: Peg's seductive neighbor who becomes an admirer of Edward and attempts to seduce him. Baker saw her part as a perfect chance to break into comedy.[3]
  • Robert Oliveri as Kevin Boggs: Kim's obnoxious, curious younger brother who also befriends Edward.
  • Alan Arkin as Bill Boggs: Peg's husband and Kevin and Kim's father. Although he is portrayed as a loving father, he often tries to act as if he's listening to his family when in reality he is not. When Arkin first read the script he was "a bit baffled" saying "nothing really made sense to me until I saw the sets," claiming "Burton's visual imagination is extraordinary."[3]
  • Vincent Price in his final film appearance in the small but pivotal role of The Inventor: Edward's inventor who dies in the very act of trying to give Edward hands. Edward refers to him as his father and he is known to have taught Edward poetry and courtesy. Burton chose to cast Price in the role because he was one of his childhood idols. The two had previously worked together on Vincent. Price said of Burton, "There is a wonderful cartoon madness in his work, a kind of madness that doesn't exist anymore in film." In response, Burton stated, "I can't tell you what Price meant to me growing up. This sounds dramatic but he helped me live. When you're a child and a teenager it's not unusual to go through a melodramatic phase. Some people find release through heavy metal or whatever. But by watching Price's films, there was a catharsis for me. You're not just watching a low-budget Edgar Allan Poe movie, there's something else there that's not on the screen. I channeled my melodrama into that, as opposed to suicide probably."[3]

John Christopher Depp II[1] (born June 9, 1963) is an American actor, best known for his frequent portrayals of offbeat and eccentric characters such as Jack Sparrow in the Pirates of the Caribbean trilogy and the titular character of Tim Burtons Edward Scissorhands. ... Timothy Tim William Burton (born August 25, 1958) is an Academy Award and Golden Globe-nominated American film director, writer and designer notable for the quirky and often dark atmosphere in his high-profile films. ... Related articles FOX Television Network Fox Searchlight Pictures Fox Entertainment Group List of Hollywood movie studios List of movies Variant of current 20th Century Fox logo External links 20th Century Fox Movies official site Twentieth Century Fox is also the punning title of a song by The Doors on their... Tom Cruise (born Thomas Cruise Mapother IV on July 3, 1962) is an Academy Award-nominated, Golden Globe Award-winning American actor and film producer. ... Days of Thunder is an auto racing drama film released in 1990 by producers Don Simpson and Jerry Bruckheimer and director Tony Scott. ... Virility is part of the traditional idealized male gender role. ... For other persons named Michael Jackson, see Michael Jackson (disambiguation). ... Thomas Jeffrey Tom Hanks (born July 9, 1956) is a two-time Academy Award-, two-time Emmy-, four-time Golden Globe- and Screen Actors Guild Award-winning American film actor, director, voice-over artist, writer and film producer. ... Movie In 1990, a film adaptation directed by Brian De Palma was released and starred Tom Hanks as Sherman McCoy, Bruce Willis as Peter Fallow, an uncredited F. Murray Abraham as Abe Weiss, Melanie Griffith as Maria Ruskin, and Kim Cattrall as Judy McCoy, Shermans wife. ... William Hurt (born March 20, 1950) is an Academy Award-winning American actor. ... Robert John Downey, Jr. ... Denise Di Novi is an American film producer. ... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Charles Chaplin redirects here. ... Winona Laura Horowitz[1] (born October 29, 1971), better known under her professional name Winona Ryder, is a two-time Academy Award-nominated and Golden Globe-winning American actress. ... This article is about the film. ... Cheerleading is recreational activity and sometimes competitive sport involving organised routines including elements of dance and gymnastics to encourage crowds to cheer on sports teams. ... The Godfather Part III (1990) is the third and final film in the Godfather trilogy written by Mario Puzo and Francis Ford Coppola, and directed by Coppola. ... Dianne Wiest (born March 28, 1948) is a double Academy Award-winning, Golden Globe Award-winning, Emmy Award-winning and BAFTA-nominated American actress. ... Michael Anthony Thomas Charles Hall (born April 14, 1968), known professionally as Anthony Michael Hall, is an American actor, producer and director who achieved stardom in several successful teen-oriented films of the 1980s. ... This article is about the actress. ... Robert Oliveri with Keri Russell and one of the Shaliker twins in Honey, I Blew Up the Kid Robert Dane Oliveri (b. ... Alan Wolf Arkin (born March 26, 1934) is an Academy Award-winning American actor and director. ... Vincent Leonard Price Jr. ... Vincent is a 1982 stop-motion short film written, designed and directed by Tim Burton and Rick Heinrichs. ... Edgar Allan Poe (January 19, 1809 – October 7, 1849) was an American poet, short story writer, playwright, editor, literary critic, essayist and one of the leaders of the American Romantic Movement. ...

Production

Development

"There's quite an interesting design to a pair of scissors, if you really look at them. How do they work? What do they do? They're both simple and complicated, creative and destructive. It's that feeling of being at odds with yourself."
—Tim Burton on the symbolism of scissors[9]

The genesis of Edward Scissorhands came from a childhood drawing of director Tim Burton, which reflected his feelings of isolation and being unable to communicate to people around him such as family and friends. Burton stated that he was often alone, and had trouble retaining friendships. "I get the feeling people just got this urge to want to leave me alone for some reason, I don’t know exactly why." He also commented "[it was] linked subconsciously and was linked to a character who wants to touch but can't; who was both creative and destructive".[4] Burton stated that "the movie business, success, life in Hollywood or my childhood, three words repeat themselves with a regularity that would perk up the ears of any dime-store shrink: scary, dangerous and, most frequent of all, disembodied. As in Why does everything feel disembodied to me?"[12] In addition Burton cited influences from Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, Gaston Leroux's Phantom of the Opera, Victor Hugo's The Hunchback of Notre Dame, King Kong and Creature From the Black Lagoon.[3] Timothy Tim William Burton (born August 25, 1958) is an Academy Award and Golden Globe-nominated American film director, writer and designer notable for the quirky and often dark atmosphere in his high-profile films. ... ... Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley (née Godwin) (30 August 1797 – 1 February 1851) was an English romantic/gothic novelist and the author of Frankenstein, or The Modern Prometheus. ... This article is about the 1818 novel. ... Gaston Leroux. ... The title character as depicted by Lon Chaney, Sr. ... Victor-Marie Hugo (pronounced ) (February 26, 1802 — May 22, 1885) was a French poet, playwright, novelist, essayist, visual artist, statesman, human rights campaigner, and perhaps the most influential exponent of the Romantic movement in France. ... The Hunchback of Notre Dame (original French title, Notre-Dame de Paris) is an 1831 French novel written by Victor Hugo. ... For other uses, see King Kong (disambiguation). ... Creature from the Black Lagoon is a 1954 black-and-white science fiction film directed by Jack Arnold, and starring Richard Carlson, Julia Adams, Richard Denning, Antonio Moreno, and Whit Bissell. ...


After the success of Pee-wee's Big Adventure (1985), Burton pitched the idea to his agents at the William Morris Agency,[3] where they introduced him to Caroline Thompson, thinking the two would get along. Burton read a short novel of hers titled First Born, which was about an abortion that came back to life. He also cited the novella depicted a tone Burton wanted for the film. During pre-production on Beetlejuice (1988) he felt her to be perfect to write the script, paying her a few thousand dollars by himself, and as such, he commissioned Thompson to write the screenplay. In Thompson, Burton found a kindred spirit who would later write the screenplay for another of Burton's long-cherished projects, The Nightmare Before Christmas.[4] Thompson claimed she wrote the screenplay as a "love poem" to Burton, calling him "the most articulate person I know, but couldn't put a single sentence together".[12] Burton originally had plans for the film to be a musical, explaining "It seemed big and operatic to me," but later dropped the idea.[3] Pee-wee escapes from Warner Bros. ... A pitch is a concise verbal (and sometimes visual) presentation of an idea for a film, generally made by a screenwriter or director to a producer or studio executive in the hope of attracting development finance to pay for a screenplay to be written. ... Founded in 1898, the William Morris Agency was the largest diversified talent and literary agency in the world, with offices in New York, Beverly Hills, Nashville, Miami, London, and Shanghai. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... This article is about the film. ... Halloween Town redirects here. ...


It wasn't until the commercial success of Batman (1989) that Burton was then a commercially famous director. This gained him the opportunity to make any film he desired. Instead of doing another blockbuster, or the Batman sequel Warner Brothers was hoping for, Burton felt it was the perfect chance for Edward Scissorhands. Although Burton was linked with Warner Brothers with his three previous films, he found the studio unreceptive to the idea, and sought out another studio which would allow him the freedom to make the film his way. Burton quoted, "Warner just didn't get it, which was good because I knew they didn't want to do it. I try to work with people who want to do what I want to do. Even now I try to gauge if people just want to do it because of me, or if they actually like it." When submitting the script to various studios Burton joked that it was more or less of a package, in terms that Burton and Thompson wouldn't have creative difficulties over rewrites if the studio disapproved over the script. He would eventually find Twentieth-Century Fox to finance the film.[13] Batman is a 1989 Academy Award-winning superhero film based on the DC Comics character of the same name. ... Blockbuster, as applied to film or theater, denotes a very popular and/or successful production. ... For the video game based on the film, see Batman Returns (video game). ... Warner Bros. ... Related articles FOX Television Network Fox Searchlight Pictures Fox Entertainment Group List of Hollywood movie studios List of movies Variant of current 20th Century Fox logo External links 20th Century Fox Movies official site Twentieth Century Fox is also the punning title of a song by The Doors on their...


Filming

The houses were painted in faded pastel colors, to represent the generic nature of American suburbia that Edward finds himself at odds with.
The houses were painted in faded pastel colors, to represent the generic nature of American suburbia that Edward finds himself at odds with.

Cast and crew spent twelve weeks filming in Florida, where they found an occupied community to film in, Carpenter's Run subdivision in Lutz, Florida. On the shooting location, according to the words of the production designer Bo Welch: "a kind of generic, plain-wrap suburb, which we made even more characterless by painting all the houses in faded pastels, and reducing the window sizes to make it look a little more paranoid."[14] Sixty different houses were to be repainted for Tim Burton's vision of suburbia, all of them occupied, and only changed for the garish exterior paint. This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ... For other uses, see Community (disambiguation). ... Lutz is an unincorporated census-designated place in Hillsborough County, Florida, United States. ... Bo Welch (born November 30, 1951) is a former motion picture production designer turned director. ... Timothy Tim William Burton (born August 25, 1958) is an Academy Award and Golden Globe-nominated American film director, writer and designer notable for the quirky and often dark atmosphere in his high-profile films. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Suburb. ...


The director stated on the film and its setting: "A lot of it for me is the memory of growing up in suburbia. It's not a bad place. It's a weird place. It's a place where some people grow up and ask, 'Why are there resin grapes on the wall?' (and others don't). We're trying to walk the fine line of making it funny and strange without it being judgmental. It's a place where there's a lot of integrity."[3] The production then relocated to a set in Los Angeles, California for the shooting of the mansion scenes.[14] Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ...


Film score

Danny Elfman, who previously collaborated with Burton on Pee-wee's Big Adventure, Beetlejuice and Batman was hired to compose the music. Elfman describes three themes appearing in the film as the first being the "Main Titles" (what he calls "the storybook mode"). The "emotional" (or second theme) is featured with Kim as a grandmother telling her granddaughter the bedtime story. Elfman claimed it was originally "Edward's Theme" as well as a supposed theme for the "Main Titles", though Burton and Elfman decided to "toss it out".[15] He felt this piece created "the heart of the character". "The Ice Dance", or the more recognized composition, concludes the third and last theme. Elfman took scoring "The Suburban Theme" seriously, depicting it as an opportunity. In the scene where Edward is cutting the hair of the various housewives in the neighborhood, Elfman stated it wasn't intentional to "add a gypsy, or Spanish tango beat," calling it coincidental. Elfman described the climax music as "twisting the theme" or "themes that were innocently written; seemed to become worse and worse."[15] The scene where as Edward enters the Boggs' home and looks at the family photos is what Elfman considers his favorite piece of music notes for the film.[15] Daniel Robert Elfman (born May 29, 1953 in Los Angeles, California) is an American musician who led the rock band Oingo Boingo as singer / songwriter from 1976 until its breakup in 1995, and has composed film scores extensively since 1985s Pee-wees Big Adventure. ... Pee-wee escapes from Warner Bros. ... Look up tango in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Elfman claims he is relieved whenever he finishes work on a film, though on Edward Scissorhands, he felt the exact opposite, claiming he "wanted more" and wished the film were longer. To date, Elfman cites his work on the film as his most personal and favorite film he has ever worked on. In addition Elfman considers it his hardest film he has composed, jokingly stating "even harder than Batman."[15] It wasn't until after his work on Edward Scissorhands that he himself felt he earned the title of a film composer. Nonetheless Elfman jokingly theorizes that pieces and notes of the film score appear simultaneously in television commercials and various movie trailers. Elfman was romantically involved with writer Caroline Thompson during the production of this film. In addition to Elfman's music, three songs performed by Tom Jones appeared in the finished film. Elfman himself cited Burton as being creative when choosing the songs "It's Not Unusual", "Delilah" and "With These Hands". "It's Not Unusual" would appear in Mars Attacks! (1996), another film of Burton's with collaborative effort by Elfman, and with Jones himself featuring a cameo.[15] Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... For other uses, see Tom Jones (disambiguation). ... Its Not Unusual is Tom Jones signature song. ... A Tom Jones discography. ... A Tom Jones discography. ... This article is about the film. ...


Reaction

Edward Scissorhands opened in America on December 7, 1990 and grossed $6,325,249 in its opening weekend.[16] This was somewhat of a disappointment for 20th Century Fox, who thought that it could possibly beat Burton's Batman (1989) and Steven Spielberg's E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial (1982).[17] Although it performed well with little advertising (relying mostly on word-of-mouth),[18] it would eventually gross a modest $56,362,352, worldwide, beating out its $20 million budget.[16] Box office wise, the film became the 20th highest grossing film in 1990.[19] It received its first VHS cassette and laserdisc release in 1991 and received $27,500,000 in the United States through rentals alone.[20] The film was first released in a DVD format in 1997 in a bare-bones edition, followed by a special edition in 2001, celebrating the film's tenth anniversary. It has also been issued as a Blu-ray release. is the 341st day of the year (342nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... Twentieth (20th) Century Fox Film Corporation (known from 1935 to 1985 as Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation) is one of the six major American film studios. ... Batman is a 1989 Academy Award-winning superhero film based on the DC Comics character of the same name. ... Steven Allan Spielberg KBE (born December 18, 1946)[1] is an American film director, producer and screenwriter. ... For the video games based on the movie, see E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial in video games. ... Bottom view of VHS cassette with magnetic tape exposed Top view of VHS cassette with front casing removed The Video Home System, better known by its abbreviation VHS, is a recording and playing standard. ... Not to be confused with disk laser, a type of solid-state laser in a flat configuration. ... DVD (also known as Digital Versatile Disc or Digital Video Disc - see Etymology) is a popular optical disc storage media format. ... Blu-ray discs Blu-ray Disc is a next-generation optical disc format jointly developed by a group of leading consumer electronics and PC companies called the Blu_ray Disc Association (BDA), which succeeds the Blu_ray Disc Founders (BDF). ...


Based on 42 reviews collected by Rotten Tomatoes, Edward Scissorhands received an average 93 percent overall approval rating;[21] the film received an 80% with the five critics in Rotten Tomatoes' "Cream of the Crop."[22] Those who supported the film were largely enthusiastic. Peter Travers of Rolling Stone stated, "Burton's richly entertaining update of the Frankenstein story is the year's most comic, romantic and haunting film fantasy" and continued: "Edward Scissorhands isn't perfect. It's something better: pure magic."[23] Desson Howe of The Washington Post praised overall aspects of the film that included casting, design, story and the direction of Burton.[24] Chris Hicks of The Deseret News was pleased to see a modern fairy tale as he himself felt the genre had "faded out."[25] Nonetheless, the film was not without its detractors. Roger Ebert of The Chicago Sun Times gave it a negative review, citing that the film lacked development in its plot and character background: "Burton has not yet found the storytelling and character-building strength to go along with his pictorial flair."[26] The film was nominated for an Academy Award at the 64th Academy Awards in the category of Best Makeup and a Golden Globe nomination for Best Actor in a Motion Picture - Comedy/Musical for Johnny Depp, while Elfman's score was nominated for a Grammy Award. In addition, the film won a BAFTA Award for Best Production Design, and was nominated in three other categories.[27] In 2003, Entertainment Weekly ranked the film one of the most "tear-jerking";[28] and was also ranked by a Channel 4 poll of the 100 greatest family films.[29] This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Peter Travers is the film critic for Rolling Stone magazine. ... This article is about the music magazine. ... The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C.. It is also one of the citys oldest papers, having been founded in 1877. ... The Deseret Morning News is a newspaper published in Salt Lake City, Utah, and is Utahs oldest continually published daily newspaper. ... A fairy tale is a story, either told to children or as if told to children, concerning the adventures of mythical characters such as fairies, goblins, elves, trolls, giants, and others. ... Roger Joseph Ebert (born June 18, 1942) is a Pulitzer Prize-winning American film critic. ... New Chicago Sun-Times building located at 350 N. Orleans St. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... 64th Academy Awards Hosts Preshow: Show: Crew Producer: Director: Duration Network The 64th Academy Awards were presented March 30, 1992 at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, Los Angeles. ... These are the Academy Award for Makeup winners and nominees: 1980s 1982 Quest for Fire Gandhi 1983 none given 1984 Amadeus 2010: The Year We Make Contact Greystoke: The Legend of Tarzan, Lord of the Jungle 1985 Mask The Color Purple 1986 The Fly The Clan of the Cave Bear... The Golden Globe Awards are American awards for motion pictures and television programs, given out each year during a formal dinner. ... John Christopher Depp II[1] (born June 9, 1963) is an American actor, best known for his frequent portrayals of offbeat and eccentric characters such as Jack Sparrow in the Pirates of the Caribbean trilogy and the titular character of Tim Burtons Edward Scissorhands. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA), is a British organization that hosts annual awards shows for film, television, childrens film and television, and interactive media. ... Entertainment Weekly (sometimes abbreviated EW) is a magazine published by Time Inc. ... This article is about the British television station. ...


References

  1. ^ Edward Scissorhands (1990). Box Office Mojo. Retrieved on 2007-06-12.
  2. ^ Edward Scissorhands at Metacritic; accessed January 22, 2007.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m Easton, Nina J. "For Tim Burton, This One's Personal", The Los Angeles Times, 1990-08-12. Retrieved on 2007-12-10. 
  4. ^ a b c d e f Mark Salisbury; Tim Burton (2000). Burton on Burton. Faber and Faber, p.87-92. ISBN 0-57120-507-0. 
  5. ^ a b Beck, Marilyn. "Cruise Juggling Schedule for 'Scissorhand'", The Courier-Journal, 1989-11-15. Retrieved on 2007-12-10. 
  6. ^ Chris Hewitt. "Tom Cruise: The alternative universe", Empire, 2003-01-02, pp. 67. 
  7. ^ a b Johnny Depp (2005). "Foreword", Burton on Burton-Revised Edition. Faber and Faber, ix-xii. ISBN 0-571-22926-3. 
  8. ^ "Johnny Depp on his inspiration for Edward Scissorhands", Entertainment Weekly, May 2007. Retrieved on 2007-05-22. 
  9. ^ a b Benatar, Giselle. "Cutting Edge", Entertainment Weekly, 1990-12-14. Retrieved on 2007-12-10. 
  10. ^ Dutka, Elaine. "Acting as Fast as She Can", The Los Angeles Times, 1990-12-09. Retrieved on 2007-12-16. 
  11. ^ Hughes, Burton, p.84
  12. ^ a b Donna Foote, David Ansen. "The Disembodied Director", Newsweek, 1991-01-21. Retrieved on 2007-12-10. 
  13. ^ Salisbury, Burton, p.84
  14. ^ a b Smith, Laurie Halpen. "Look, Ma, No Hands, or Tim Burton's Latest Feat", The New York Times, 1990-08-26. Retrieved on 2007-12-16. 
  15. ^ a b c d e (1998). Edward Scissorhands (1990) Audio Commentary by Composer Danny Elfman (DVD). 20th Century Fox.
  16. ^ a b Edward Scissorhands (1990). Box Office Mojo. Retrieved on 2007-12-16.
  17. ^ Paul Francis. "Burton officially decides to commit for 'BATMAN SEQUEL'", The Salt Lake Tribune, 1991-03-04. Retrieved on 2007-12-16. 
  18. ^ Anne Thompson. "Fox assemble a series of low-key approaches", Sun-Sentinel, 1990-12-05. Retrieved on 2007-12-16. 
  19. ^ 1990 Domestic Grosses. Box Office Mojo. Retrieved on 2007-12-16.
  20. ^ Box Office and Business for Edward Scissorhands (1990). IMDB. Retrieved on 2007-12-16.
  21. ^ Edward Scissorhands. Rotten Tomatoes. Retrieved on 2007-11-27.
  22. ^ Edward Scissorhands: Rotten Tomatoes' Cream of the Crop. Rotten Tomatoes. Retrieved on 2007-12-16.
  23. ^ Peter Travers. "Edward Scissorhands review", Rolling Stone, 2001-02-09. Retrieved on 2007-12-16. 
  24. ^ Desson Howe. "Edward Scissorhands review", The Washington Post, 1990-12-14. Retrieved on 2007-12-16. 
  25. ^ Chris Hicks. "Edward Scissorhands review", The Deseret News, 2000-12-22. Retrieved on 2007-12-16. 
  26. ^ Roger Ebert. "Edward Scissorhands review", RogerEbert.com, 1990-12-14. Retrieved on 2007-12-16. 
  27. ^ Awards for Edward Scissorhands. Internet Movie Database. Retrieved on 2008-01-17.
  28. ^ "Edward Scissorhands", Entertainment Weekly, 2003-11-19. Retrieved on 2007-05-11. 
  29. ^ 100 Greatest Family Films. Channel 4. Retrieved on 2007-02-15.

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Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) [1] is an online database of information about actors, movies, television shows, television stars and video games. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 331st day of the year (332nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... 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External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Edward Scissorhands
  • Edward Scissorhands at the Internet Movie Database
  • Edward Scissorhands at Rotten Tomatoes
  • Edward Scissorhands at Metacritic
  • Official website for Matthew Bourne's adaptation
  • Official website for North American tour of Matthew Bourne's adaptation
Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... For the in-memory database management system, see In-memory database. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Metacritic is a website that collates reviews of music albums, games, movies, TV shows, DVDs and books. ... Timothy Tim William Burton (born August 25, 1958) is an Academy Award and Golden Globe-nominated American film director, writer and designer notable for the quirky and often dark atmosphere in his high-profile films. ... Pee-wee escapes from Warner Bros. ... This article is about the film. ... Batman is a 1989 Academy Award-winning superhero film based on the DC Comics character of the same name. ... For the video game based on the film, see Batman Returns (video game). ... Ed Wood is a biopic directed by Tim Burton, starring Johnny Depp as the cross-dressing cult movie maker Edward D. Wood, Jr. ... This article is about the film. ... For the soundtrack featuring Danny Elfmans film score, see Sleepy Hollow (soundtrack). ... This article is about the 2001 film. ... Big Fish is a 2003 fantasy drama film, directed by Tim Burton and written by John August. ... Not to be confused with the 1971 film Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory. ... Tim Burtons Corpse Bride is a 2005 Academy Award-nominated stop-motion-animation film based loosely on a 19th century Russian-Jewish folktale version of an older Jewish story and set in a fictional Victorian era England. ... Alice in Wonderland is a forthcoming live-action/animated film to be directed by Tim Burton. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... This article is under construction. ... . ... This article is under construction. ... This article is under construction. ... This article is under construction. ... . ... This article is under construction. ... . ... This article is under construction. ... This article is under construction. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
The Tim Burton Collective - Edward Scissorhands Allegory (2388 words)
Edward is constantly cutting and scarring his own face accidentally; this scarring could represent the emotional scarring of failed social attempts caused by inability to subtly manipulate social situations.
Edward also feels an odd compulsion to cut or groom things, sometimes to distraction, as in the scene where he stops to snip at a hedge while on his way to break into Jim’s father’s house.
It is important to note that the character of Edward Scissorhands is probably not intended to have Asperger’s Syndrome; merely the allegorical construct is representative of the difficulties facing an individual with Asperger’s Syndrome.
Edward Scissorhands Tickets - Cheap Edward Scissorhands Theater Shows Tickets At Onlineseats (944 words)
Edward Scissorhands by Tim Burton is an engrossing story of Edward in the form Ballad.
Edward Scissorhands is the story of an uncommonly gentle man,Edward, who finds fame, love, and then rejection in the heart of sub-urban area.
Edward can also be depicted as the representation of teenage isolation which is clearly represented through weird appearance such as clothes, the hair style and visual scarring.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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