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Encyclopedia > Edward Rutledge
Edward Rutledge

Edward Rutledge (November 23, 1749January 23, 1800), South Carolina statesman, was a signer of the Declaration of Independence and later governor of South Carolina. Image File history File links Edward_Rutledge. ... Image File history File links Edward_Rutledge. ... is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events While in debtors prison, John Cleland writes Fanny Hill (Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure). ... is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... // ON MAY 5 1853 MR.FADER HAD SEX WITH A MAN NAME MR WIEN THEN THEY HAD SON NAMEDMRS COTURE AND MR MANOOGIAN WENT INTO MRS HASKELLS OFFICE NAKED AND DANCED AROUND AND MASTERBATED ON HER CHEST AND SHE LICKED IT OFF THEN THEY HAD ORAL SEEX WITH NAPLOEAN OF... Official language(s) English Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude 78° 32′ W to 83... The United States Declaration of Independence was an act of the Second Continental Congress, adopted on July 4, 1776, which declared that the Thirteen Colonies in North America were Free and Independent States and that all political connection between them and the State of Great Britain, is and ought to...


Like his eldest brother John Rutledge, Edward was born in Charleston. He studied law at Oxford University, was admitted to the English bar (Middle Temple), and returned to Charleston to practice. He married and had three children with Henrietta Middleton, daughter of Henry Middleton. Rutledge had a successful law practice with his partner, Charles Cotesworth Pinckney. He became a leading citizen of Charleston, and owned more than 50 slaves. This article is about the Governor and Chief Justice of the United States. ... Nickname: Motto: Aedes Mores Juraque Curat (She cares for her temples, customs, and rights) Location of Charleston in South Carolina. ... The University of Oxford, located in the city of Oxford in England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Part of Middle Temple c. ... Henry Middleton (1717 – June 13, 1784) of South Carolina was the second President of the Continental Congress, and thus the leader of what was to become the United States, from October 22, 1774 until Peyton Randolph was able to resume his duties briefly beginning on May 10, 1775. ... Charles Cotesworth (C.C.) Pinckney (February 5, 1746 – August 16, 1825), was an early American statesman and a signer of the U.S. Constitution. ...


Along with his brother John, Rutledge represented South Carolina in the Continental Congress. Although a firm supporter of colonial rights, he was initially reluctant to support independence from Great Britain, hoping instead for reconciliation with the mother country. Like other Southern planters, Rutledge did not want the American Revolution to change the basic social structure of the South. He worked to have African Americans expelled from the Continental Army, and led the successful effort to have wording removed from the Declaration of Independence that condemned slavery and the slave trade. Nevertheless, he signed the Declaration for the sake of unanimity, and at age 26 was the youngest to sign. The Continental Congress was the first national government of the United States. ... John Trumbulls Declaration of Independence, showing the five-man committee in charge of drafting the Declaration in 1776 as it presents its work to the Second Continental Congress in Philadelphia The American Revolution refers to the period during the last half of the 18th century in which the Thirteen... African Americans, also known as Afro-Americans or black Americans, are an ethnic group in the United States of America whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Sub-Saharan and West Africa. ... Illustration depicting uniforms and weapons used during the 1779 to 1783 period of the American Revolution by showing four soldiers standing in an informal group General George Washington, was appointed Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Army on June 15, 1775. ...


He returned home in November 1776 to take a seat in the South Carolina Assembly. He served as a captain of artillery in the South Carolina militia, and fought at the Battle of Beaufort in 1779. The next year he was captured by the British in the fall of Charleston, and held prisoner until July 1781. For other uses, see Artillery (disambiguation). ... Combatants Kingdom of Great Britain United States Commanders Sir Henry Clinton and Mariot Arbuthnot Benjamin Lincoln Strength 14,000 troops 5,000 troops Casualties 76 killed, 182 wounded 92 killed, 148 wounded, 4,650 captured (see Trivia below) The Siege of Charleston was one of the major battles which took... 1781 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ...

Rutledge is standing on the far right in John Trumbull's famous painting The Declaration of Independence.

After his release he returned to the state assembly, where he served until 1796. He was known as an active member and an advocate for the confiscation of Loyalist property. He served in the state senate for two years, then was elected governor in 1798. He barely finished his one term before he died. Image File history File links Declaration_independence. ... Image File history File links Declaration_independence. ... This article is about the American painter. ... John Trumbulls Declaration of Independence is an iconic 12- by 18-foot painting in the U.S. Capitol Rotunda depicting the presentation of the draft of the Declaration to Congress. ... Britannia offers solace and a promise of compensation for her exiled American born Loyalists. ...


Rutledge was immortalized in the musical play 1776. He was a key character, listed fifth after Adams, Jefferson, Franklin and Dickinson. He was portrayed by Clifford David in the original Broadway production and John Cullum in the 1972 film. He sings the song "Molasses to Rum to Slaves" about the Triangle Trade, and the view of slavery in the colonies. (Redirected from 1776 (play)) 1776 is the title of a Broadway musical and the 1972 film of it. ... John Cullum is an American actor and singer. ... A triangular trade is any three-way exchange, but the term is often used to refer to one particular instance: the 18th century trade between Europe, the west coast of Africa, and the Caribbean. ...


Edward Rutledge's descendants include actresses Goldie Hawn and her daughter, Kate Hudson. Goldie Hawn's father, a musician in Washington, D.C., was in fact named Edward Rutledge Hawn in honor of their ancestor. Goldie Jeanne Hawn (born November 21, 1945) is an Academy Award-winning American actress, director and producer. ... This article is about the actress. ...


References

  • Williams, Patrick G.. "Rutledge, Edward". American National Biography Online, Feb. 2000.

External links

  • Biography by Rev. Charles A. Goodrich, 1856
  • SCIway Biography of Edward Rutledge
  • NGA Biography of Edward Rutledge
Preceded by
Charles Pinckney
Governor of South Carolina
1798 – 1800
Succeeded by
John Drayton
Charles Pinckney Charles Pinckney (October 26, 1757–October 29, 1824) was an American politician who was a signer of the United States Constitution, Governor of South Carolina, a Senator and a member of the House of Representatives. ... A list of South Carolina Governors. ... John Drayton (June 22, 1766 – November 27, 1822) was a Democratic-Republican Governor of South Carolina on two non-consecutive occasions from 1800 to 1802 and 1808 to 1810. ... The United States Declaration of Independence was an act of the Second Continental Congress, adopted on July 4, 1776, which declared that the Thirteen Colonies in North America were Free and Independent States and that all political connection between them and the State of Great Britain, is and ought to... For other persons named John Adams, see John Adams (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Samuel Adams (disambiguation). ... Josiah Bartlett (November 21, 1729–May 19, 1795), was an American physician and statesman who, as a delegate to the Continental Congress for New Hampshire, signed the Declaration of Independence. ... Painting thought to be of Carter Braxton Carter Braxton (September 16, 1736–October 10, 1797), was a signer of the United States Declaration of Independence and a representative of Virginia. ... Charles Carroll (1737-1832) Charles Carroll of Carrollton (September 19, 1737 – November 14, 1832) was a lawyer and politician from Maryland who was a delegate to the Continental Congress and later a United States Senator. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Abraham Clark (February 15, 1725—September 15, 1794) was an American politician and Revolutionary War figure. ... George Clymer (March 16, 1739–January 23, 1813) was an American politician and Founding Father. ... 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  Results from FactBites:
 
Edward Rutledge - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (307 words)
Edward Rutledge (November 23, 1749–January 23, 1800), South Carolina statesman, was a signer of the Declaration of Independence and later governor of South Carolina.
Rutledge caused commotion when the original draft of the Declaration stated and supported by Thomas Jefferson wanted to ban slavery, and lead southern states to not vote for it, until the clause had been removed, which it was.
It was ironically discovered that upon returning to South Carolina, Rutledge freed all of his slaves.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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