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Encyclopedia > Edward Plunkett, 18th Baron Dunsany
Lord Dunsany

Lord Dunsany, the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers
Pseudonym: Lord Dunsany
Born: July 24, 1878(1878-07-24)
London
Died: October 25, 1957 (aged 79)
Dublin
Occupation: Novelist
Nationality: Irish, British
Genres: High fantasy, Horror
Debut works: The Gods of Pegana
Influences: Herodotus, King James Bible, Keats, Brothers Grimm, Hans Christian Andersen, Algernon Swinburne
Influenced: H.P. Lovecraft, J.R.R. Tolkien, Michael Moorcock, Neil Gaiman, David Eddings
Website: http://www.dunsany.net/18th.htm

Edward John Moreton Drax Plunkett, 18th Baron Dunsany (24 July 187825 October 1957) was an Anglo-Irish writer and dramatist, notable for his work in fantasy published under the name Lord Dunsany. He was born to one of the oldest titles in the Irish peerage, lived much of his life at perhaps Ireland's longest-inhabited home, Dunsany Castle near Tara, and died in Dublin. Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... A pseudonym (Greek: , pseudo + -onym: false name) is an artificial, fictitious name, also known as an alias, used by an individual as an alternative to a persons legal name. ... is the 205th day of the year (206th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1878 (MDCCCLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ... Dublin city centre at night WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Statistics Province: Leinster County: Dáil Éireann: Dublin Central, Dublin North Central, Dublin North East, Dublin North West, Dublin South Central, Dublin South East European Parliament: Dublin Dialling Code: +353 1 Postal District(s): D1-24, D6W Area: 114. ... This article is about work. ... A novel is an extended work of written, narrative, prose fiction, usually in story form; the writer of a novel is a novelist. ... In English usage, nationality is the legal relationship between a person and a country. ... A literary genre is one of the divisions of literature into genres according to particular criteria such as literary technique, tone, or content. ... High fantasy is a subgenre of fantasy fiction that is set in invented or parallel worlds. ... “Horror story” redirects here. ... The Gods of Pegāna is the first book by Irish fantasy writer Lord Dunsany, published on a commission basis in 1905. ... Herodotus of Halicarnassus (Greek: Hērodotos Halikarnāsseus) was a Greek historian from Ionia who lived in the 5th century BC (ca. ... This page is about the version of the Bible; for the Harvey Danger album, see King James Version (album). ... The family name Keats, a surname of England is believed to be descended originally from the Anglo Saxon race from old English word cyta or cyte which has been used to describe a worker at the shed, outhouse for animals, hence herdsman. ... For information about the other uses of the name, see Brothers Grimm (disambiguation). ... Hans Christian Andersen or simply H.C. Andersen , (April 2, 1805 – August 4, 1875) was a Danish author and poet, most famous for his fairy tales. ... Algernon Swinburne, Portrait by Rossetti Algernon Charles Swinburne (April 5, 1837 – April 10, 1909) was a Victorian era English poet. ... Howard Phillips Lovecraft (August 20, 1890 – March 15, 1937) was an American author of fantasy, horror and science fiction, noted for combining these three genres within single narratives. ... J. R. R. Tolkien in 1916. ... Michael John Moorcock (born December 18, 1939, in London, England) is a prolific English writer primarily of science fiction and fantasy who has also published a number of literary novels. ... Neil Richard Gaiman () (born November 10, 1960) is an English author of science fiction and fantasy short stories and novels, graphic novels, comics, and films. ... David Eddings (born July 7, 1931) is an American author who has written several best-selling series of epic fantasy novels. ... is the 205th day of the year (206th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1878 (MDCCCLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ... Anglo-Irish was a term used historically to describe a ruling class inhabitants of Ireland who were the descendants and successors of the Protestant Ascendancy[1], mostly belonging to the Anglican Church of Ireland or to a lesser extent one of the English dissenting churches, such as the Methodist church. ... For other uses, see Fantasy (disambiguation). ... The Peerage of Ireland the term used for those peers created by British monarchs in their capacity as Lord or King of Ireland. ... Dunsany Castle (Caisleán Dhun Samhna in Irish), Dunsany, County Meath, Ireland is a modernised Norman castle, started c. ... The Hill of Tara, located near the River Boyne, is today a mound in County Meath, Leinster, Ireland, on which the grass has veiled the rich heritage of the country. ... Dublin city centre at night WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Statistics Province: Leinster County: Dáil Éireann: Dublin Central, Dublin North Central, Dublin North East, Dublin North West, Dublin South Central, Dublin South East European Parliament: Dublin Dialling Code: +353 1 Postal District(s): D1-24, D6W Area: 114. ...

Contents

Biography

Edward Plunkett ("Dunsany") was the son of John William Plunkett, 17th Baron Dunsany (1853–1899) and his wife Ernle Elizabeth Ernle-Erle Drax, née Grosvenor. The 17th Lord Dunsany was the second1 son of Edward Plunkett [29 November 1808 - 22 February 1899], the 16th Lord Baron of Dunsany and Lady Anne Constance Dutton [12 September 1816 - 27 June 1858]. He was born 31 August 1853. ...


From a historically wealthy and famous family, Dunsany was related to many other well-known Irish figures. He was a kinsman of the Catholic Saint Oliver Plunkett, the martyred Archbishop of Armagh. He was notably tall at 6' 4", taking after his mother, a cousin of Sir Richard Burton. The Countess of Fingall, wife of Dunsany's cousin, the Earl of Fingall, wrote a best-selling account of the life of the aristocracy in Ireland in the late 19th century and early 20th century, called Seventy Years Young. His brother, from whom he was estranged, was the noted admiral Reginald Aylmer Ranfurly Plunkett-Ernle-Erle-Drax. St. ... The Roman Catholic Archbishop of Armagh is a senior Irish cleric of the Roman Catholic Church. ... Richard Burton, portrait by Frederic Leighton, National Portrait Gallery, London Sir Richard Francis Burton (March 19, 1821 - October 19, 1890), British consul, explorer, translator, and Orientalist, was born at Barham House, Hertfordshire, England. ... The titles of Baron Killeen and Earl of Fingall were titles in the Peerage of Ireland. ... Admiral The Honourable Sir Reginald Aylmer Ranfurly Plunkett-Ernle-Erle-Drax (1880-1967), KCB, DSO, JP, DL, was the younger son of John William Plunkett, 17th Baron of Dunsany (1853-1899) and his wife, Ernle Elizabeth Ernle-Erle-Drax (d. ...


Edward Plunkett grew up at the family property (Dunstall Priory) in Shoreham, Kent, and at Dunsany Castle in County Meath. He went to school at Cheam, Eton and Sandhurst, which he entered in 1896. The title passed in 1899, and Dunsany returned to Dunsany Castle after war duty, in 1901. Shoreham is a village and civil parish in the valley of the River Darent six miles north of Sevenoaks in Kent: it is in the District of Sevenoaks. ... Dunsany Castle (Caisleán Dhun Samhna in Irish), Dunsany, County Meath, Ireland is a modernised Norman castle, started c. ... Statistics Province: Leinster County Town: Navan Code: MH Area: 2,342 km² Population (2006) 162,831 Website: www. ... Cheam School is a Preparatory school in Headley, Berkshire, England. ... The Kings College of Our Lady of Eton beside Windsor, commonly known as Eton College or just Eton, is a public school (privately funded and independent) for boys, founded in 1440 by King Henry VI. It is located in Eton, near Windsor in England, north of Windsor Castle, and... New College, Royal Military Academy Sandhurst New Colours are presented to RMAS, June 2005. ...


In 1903, he met Beatrice Child Villiers (1880-1970), youngest daughter of the 7th Earl of Jersey, head of the Jersey banking family, living at Osterley Park, and they were married in 1904. Their only child, Randal, was born in 1906. Beatrice was supportive of and assisted Dunsany in his writing, typing his manuscripts, selecting work for his 1950's retrospective short story collection, and overseeing his literary heritage after his death. Earl of Jersey is a title in the Peerage of England. ... Osterley House with Stable Block to right Design for the entrance facade of Osterley House by Robert Adam A design for one of the walls of the Estruscan dressing room at Osterly Park by Robert Adam. ...


Dunsany was a keen huntsman and sportsman, and was at one time the chess and pistol champion of Ireland, as well as provider of the local cricket ground near Dunsany Crossroads. He set chess puzzles for journals including The Times (of London), and also invented Dunsany's chess, an asymmetric chess variant which is notable for not involving any fairy pieces, unlike many variants which require the player to learn unconventional piece movements. For other uses, see Chess (disambiguation). ... A Browning 9 millimeter Hi-Power Ordnance pistol of the French Navy, 19th century, using a Percussion cap mechanism Derringers were small and easily hidden. ... Bowler Shaun Pollock bowls to batsman Michael Hussey. ... The Times is a national newspaper published daily in the United Kingdom since 1788. ... Dunsanys Chess, also known as Horde Chess, is an asymmetric variant of chess in which one side has standard chess pieces, and the other side has 32 pawns. ... A chess variant is a game derived from, related to or similar to chess in at least one respect. ... A fairy chess piece or unorthodox chess piece is a chess piece not used in conventional chess, but used in certain chess variants and some chess problems. ...


Dunsany served as an officer in the Coldstream Guards during the Second Boer War, in the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers in World War I and in the local defence forces of both Ireland and the United Kingdom during World War II. The Coldstream Guards is a regiment of the British Army, part of the Guards Division or Household Division. ... Combatants British Empire Orange Free State South African Republic Commanders Sir Redvers Buller Lord Kitchener Lord Roberts Paul Kruger Louis Botha Koos de la Rey Martinus Steyn Christiaan de Wet Casualties 6,000 - 7,000 (A further ~14,000 from disease) 6,000 - 8,000 (Unknown number from disease) Civilians... Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers Motto: Nec Aspera Terrent (By Difficulties Undaunted) In 1688 the inhabitants of Inniskillen, Ireland, organized a town millitia to defend the area aginst James II. The millitia fought the enemy with such succes that it was later incorporated into the army of William III as the Inniskilling... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


Dunsany's fame arose chiefly from his prolific writings, and he was involved with the Irish Literary Revival. Supporting the Revival, Dunsany gave money to the Abbey Theatre, and he moved in Irish literary circles. He was well-acquainted with Yeats (who rarely acted as editor, but gathered and published a Dunsany selection), Lady Gregory, Percy French, "AE", Oliver St. John Gogarty, Padraic Colum and others. Dunsany's own work, and contribution to the Irish literary heritage, was recognised with an honorary degree from Trinity College, Dublin. The Celtic Revival (c. ... The exterior of the Abbey Theatre in 2006. ... A photograph of Lady Gregory from her 1913 book Our Irish Theatre Isabella Augusta, Lady Gregory (15 March 1852–22 May 1932), née Isabella Augusta Persse, was an Irish dramatist and folklorist. ... William Percy French (May 1, 1854–January 24, 1920) was one of Irelands foremost songwriters and entertainers in his day. ... Oliver St John Gogarty (August 17, 1878-September 22, 1957) was an Irish physician and ear surgeon, who was also a poet and writer, one of the most prominent Dublin wits, and for some time a political figure of the Irish Free State. ... Padraic Colum, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1959 Padraic Colum (December 8, 1881 - January 11, 1972) was an Irish poet, novelist, dramatist, biographer and collector of folklore. ...


In 1940, Dunsany was appointed Byron Professor of English in Athens, Greece. This article is about the capital of Greece. ...


In 1957, Lord Dunsany took ill while eating with the Earl and Countess of Fingall, in what proved to be an attack of appendicitis, and died in hospital in Dublin. Lady Beatrice survived him, overseeing his literary heritage until 1970, and their son, Randal, succeed him to the Barony. Appendicitis (or epityphlitis) is a condition characterized by inflammation of the appendix[1]. While mild cases may resolve without treatment, most require removal of the inflamed appendix, either by laparotomy or laparoscopy. ...


Writings

Dunsany was a prolific writer, penning short stories, novels, plays, poetry, essays and autobiography, and publishing over sixty books, not including individual plays. He began his authorial career in the late 1890's, with a few published verses, such as "Rhymes from a Suburb" and "The Spirit of the Bog". But he made a lasting impression in 1905 when he burst onto the publishing scene with the well-received collection The Gods of Pegana. The Gods of Pegāna is the first book by Irish fantasy writer Lord Dunsany, published on a commission basis in 1905. ...


Dunsany's most notable fantasy short stories were published in collections from 1905 to 1919. He paid for the publication of the first such collection, The Gods of Pegāna, earning a commission on sales. This he never again had to do, the vast majority of his extensive writings selling.[1] For other uses, see Fantasy (disambiguation). ... The Gods of Pegāna is the first book by Irish fantasy writer Lord Dunsany, published (with Dunsanys subsidy) in 1905. ...


The stories in his first two books, and perhaps the beginning of his third, were set within an invented world, Pegāna, with its own gods, history and geography. Starting with this book, Dunsany's name is linked to that of Sidney Sime, his chosen artist, who illustrated much of his work, notably until 1922.[2] Sidney Sime (1867 – May 22, 1941) was born in Manchester in poverty. ...


Dunsany's style varied significantly throughout his writing career. Prominent Dunsany scholar S. T. Joshi has described these shifts as Dunsany moving on after he felt he had exhausted the potential of a style or medium. From the naïve fantasy of his earliest writings, through his early short story work in 1904-1908, he turned to the self-conscious fantasy of The Book of Wonder in 1912, in which he almost seems to be parodying his lofty early style. Sunanda Tryambak Joshi (b. ...


Each of his collections varies in mood; A Dreamer's Tales varies from the wistfulness of "Blagdaross" to the horrors of "Poor Old Bill" and "Where the Tides Ebb and Flow" to the social satire of "The Day of the Poll."


The opening paragraph of "The Hoard of the Gibbelins" from The Book of Wonder, (1912) gives a good indication of both tone and tenor of Dunsany's style at the time: The Hoard of the Gibbelins is a fantasy short story by Lord Dunsany. ...

The Gibbelins eat, as is well known, nothing less good than man. Their evil tower is joined to Terra Cognita, to the lands we know, by a bridge. Their hoard is beyond reason; avarice has no use for it; they have a separate cellar for emeralds and a separate cellar for sapphires; they have filled a hole with gold and dig it up when they need it. And the only use that is known for their ridiculous wealth is to attract to their larder a continual supply of food. In times of famine they have even been known to scatter rubies abroad, a little trail of them to some city of Man, and sure enough their larders would soon be full again.

After The Book of Wonder, Dunsany began to write plays--many of which were even more successful at the time than his early story collections--while also continuing to write short stories. He continued to write plays for into the 1930's, including the famous If and a number for radio production.


Although many of Dunsany's stage plays were successfully produced within his lifetime, he also wrote a substantial number of "chamber plays" which were only intended to be read privately (as if they were stories) rather than staged with actors[citation needed]. Some of Dunsany's chamber plays contain supernatural events -- such as a character spontaneously appearing out of thin air, or vanishing in full view of the audience -- without any explanation of how the effect is to be staged, since Dunsany did not intend these works actually to be performed.


Following a successful lecture touring in the USA in 1919-1920, and with his reputation now most related to his plays, Dunsany temporarily reduced his output of short stories, concentrating on plays, novels and poetry for a time. His poetry, now little seen, was for a time so popular that it is recited by the lead character of F. Scott Fitzgerald's This Side of Paradise.


Dunsany's first novel, Don Rodriguez: Chronicles of Shadow Valley, was published in 1922. It is set in "a Romantic Spain that never was," and follows the adventures of young noble Don Rodriguez and his servant in their search for a castle for Rodriguez. It has been argued that Dunsany's inexperience with the novel shows in the episodic nature of Don Rodriguez. In 1924, Dunsany published his second novel, The King of Elfland's Daughter, a return to his early style of writing, which is considered by many to be Dunsany's finest novel and a classic of the fantasy field.


In his next novel, The Charwoman's Shadow, Dunsany returned to the Spanish milieu and light style of Don Rodriguez, to which it is related.


Though his style and medium shifted frequently, Dunsany's thematic concerns remained essentially the same. Many of Dunsany's later novels had an explicitly Irish theme, from the semi-autobiographical The Curse of the Wise Woman to His Fellow Men.


One of Dunsany's most well known characters was Joseph Jorkens, an obese middle-aged raconteur who frequented the fictional Billiards Club in London, and who would tell fantastic stories if someone would buy him a large whiskey and soda. From his tales, it was obvious that Mr. Jorkens had traveled to all seven continents, was extremely resourceful, and was well-versed in world cultures, but always came up short on becoming rich and famous. The Jorkens books, which sold well, were among the first of a type which was to become popular in fantasy and science fiction writing: extremely improbable "club tales" told at a gentlemen's club or bar. Joseph Jorkens, usually just Jorkens, is the lead character in a long-running series of short stories by the author Lord Dunsany, who is generally noted for his fantasy short stories, fantastic plays and extensive other writings. ...


Dunsany's writing habits were considered peculiar. Beatrice said that "He always sat on a crumpled old hat while composing his tales." (The hat was eventually stolen by a visitor to Dunsany Castle.) Dunsany never rewrote anything; everything he ever published was a first draft.[3] Much of his work was penned with a quill pen; Lady Beatrice was usually the first to see the writings, and would help type them. It has been said that Lord Dunsany would often conceive stories while hunting, and would return to the Castle and draw in his family and servants to re-enact his visions before he set them on paper.


Media productions

  • Most of Dunsany's plays were performed during his lifetime, some of them many times in many locations.
  • Dunsany wrote several plays for radio production, some being collected in Plays for Earth and Air. The BBC has records of some being produced but according to articles on the author, no recordings are extant.
  • Dunsany is also recorded as having read short stories and poetry on air, and for private recording by Hazel Littlefield-Smith and friends in California.
  • The film It Happened Tomorrow credited a Dunsany short story as one of its sources.
  • The author appeared on early television a number of times.
  • An LP recording of a number of Dunsany's short stories, read by Vincent Price was published in the 1970's.
  • Two members of Steeleye Span recorded a concept album based on Dunsany's The King of Elfland's Daughter in 1977, released by Chrysalis Records on LP and later on CD.
  • Rumours have been reported about film or TV options around a number of Dunsany works, from early stories through Jorkens, including The King of Elfland's Daughter but the only such option documented publicly was one by George Pal on Dunsany's The Last Revolution.

For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Vincent Leonard Price Jr. ... Steeleye Span are a British folk-rock band, formed in 1969 and remaining active today. ... The King of Elflands Daughter is a 1924 fantasy novel written by Lord Dunsany. ... The King of Elflands Daughter is a 1924 fantasy novel written by Lord Dunsany. ...

Awards and honours

Lord Dunsany was initially an Associate Member of the Irish Academy of Letters, and later a full member. At one of their banquets, he asked Sean O'Faolain, who was presiding, "Do we not toast the King?" O'Faolain replied that there was only one toast: to the Nation; but after it was given and he'd called for coffee, Dunsany stood quietly among the bustle, raised his glass discreetly, and whispered "God bless him."[4] Sean OFaolain ( the pseudonym of John Whelan) (February 22, 1900 - April 20, 1991) was an Irish short story author and writer. ...


The Curse of the Wise Woman received a prize in Ireland.


Dunsany also received an honorary doctorate from Trinity College Dublin. The College of the Holy and Undivided Trinity of Queen Elizabeth near Dublin or more commonly Trinity College, Dublin (TCD) was founded in 1592 by Queen Elizabeth I, is the only constituent college of the University of Dublin, Irelands oldest university. ...


Influences

  • Dunsany studied Greek and Latin, particularly Greek drama and Herodotus, the "Father of History". Dunsany wrote in a letter: "When I learned Greek at Cheam and heard of other gods a great pity came on me for those beautiful marble people that had become forsaken and this mood has never quite left me."1
  • The King James Bible. In a letter to Frank Harris, Dunsany wrote: "When I went to Cheam School I was given a lot of the Bible to read. This turned my thoughts eastward. For years no style seemed to me natural but that of the Bible and I feared that I never would become a writer when I saw that other people did not use it."
  • The wide-ranging collection in the Library of Dunsany Castle, dating back centuries and comprising many classic works, from early encyclopedias through parliamentary records, Greek and Latin works and Victorian illustrated books
  • The fairy tales of the Brothers Grimm and Hans Christian Andersen
  • Irish speech patterns
  • The Darling of the Gods, a stage play written by David Belasco and John Luther Long, first performed 1902-1903. The play presents a fantastical, imaginary version of Japan that powerfully affected Dunsany and may be a key template for his own imaginary kingdoms.
  • Algernon Swinburne, who wrote the line "Time and the Gods are at strife" in his 1866 poem "Hymn to Proserpine". Dunsany later realized this was his unconscious influence for the title Time and the Gods.
  • Dunsany's 1922 novel Don Rodriguez: Chronicles of Shadow Valley seems to overtly draw on Cervantes' Don Quixote de la Mancha (1605, 1615).
  • Dunsany named his play The Seventh Symphony (collected in Plays for Earth and Air [1937]) after Beethoven's 7th Symphony, which was one of Dunsany's favourite works of music[5]. One of the last Jorkens stories returns to this theme, referring to Beethoven's Tenth Symphony.

Greek theatre or Greek Drama came into its own between 600 and 200 BC in the ancient city of Athens. ... Herodotus of Halicarnassus (Greek: HÄ“rodotos Halikarnāsseus) was a Greek historian from Ionia who lived in the 5th century BC (ca. ... The King James or Authorized Version of the Bible is an English translation of the Christian Bible first published in 1611. ... Frank Harris by Alvin Langdon Coburn. ... A fairy tale is a story, either told to children or as if told to children, concerning the adventures of mythical characters such as fairies, goblins, elves, trolls, giants, and others. ... For information about the other uses of the name, see Brothers Grimm (disambiguation). ... Hans Christian Andersen or simply H.C. Andersen , (April 2, 1805 – August 4, 1875) was a Danish author and poet, most famous for his fairy tales. ... David Belasco, between 1898 and 1916. ... John Luther Long (1861-1927) was an American lawyer and writer remembered (if he is remembered at all) for his short story Madame Butterfly based on the recollections of his sister, Mrs. ... Algernon Swinburne, Portrait by Rossetti Algernon Charles Swinburne (April 5, 1837 – April 10, 1909) was a Victorian era English poet. ... Hymn to Proserpine is a poem by Algernon Charles Swinburne, published in 1866. ... “Cervantes” redirects here. ... (IPA: , but see spelling and pronunciation below), fully titled (The Ingenious Hidalgo Don Quixote of La Mancha) is an early novel written by Spanish author Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra. ... Ludwig van Beethoven Ludwig van Beethoven (baptized December 17, 1770 – March 26, 1827) was a German composer of Classical music, the predominant musical figure in the transitional period between the Classical and Romantic eras. ...

Writers associated with Dunsany

  • Francis Ledwidge, who wrote to Dunsany in 1912 asking for help with getting his poetry published. After a delay due to a hunting trip in Africa, Dunsany invited the poet to his home, and they met and corresponded regularly thereafter, and Dunsany was so impressed that he helped with publication, and with introductions to literary society. The two became friendly and Dunsany, trying to discourage Ledwidge from joining the army when World War I broke, offered financial support. Ledwidge, however, did sign-up, and found himself for a time in the same unit as Dunsany, who helped with publication of his first collection, Songs of the Fields, received with critical success upon its release in 1915. Throughout the war years, Ledwidge kept in contact with Dunsany, sending him poems. Ledwidge was killed at the Battle of Passchendaele two years later, even as his second collection of poetry, also selected by Dunsany, circulated. Dunsany subsequently arranged for the publication of a third collection, and later a first Collected Edition.
  • Mary Lavin, who received support and encouragement from Dunsany over many years
  • William Butler Yeats, who, as for no other writer, selected and edited a collection of Dunsany's work, in 1912
  • Lady Wentworth, poet, writing in a classical style, received support from Dunsany

Francis Ledwidge (August 19, 1887 - July 31, 1917) was an Irish poet, killed in action during World War I. Ledwidge was born at Slane in Ireland, into a large and poverty-stricken family. ... Passchendaele village, before and after the Battle of Passchendaele The Battle of Passchendaele, otherwise known as the Third Battle of Ypres, was one of the major battles of World War I, fought by British, ANZAC, and Canadian soldiers against the German army near Ypres ( Ieper in Flemish) in West Flanders... Mary Josephine Lavin (June 10, 1912 - March 25, 1996) was a noted Irish short story writer and novelist. ... William Butler Yeats, 1933. ...

Writers influenced by Dunsany

  • H. P. Lovecraft was greatly impressed by Dunsany after seeing him on a speaking tour of the United States, and Lovecraft's 'Dream-Cycle' stories clearly show his influence. Lovecraft once wrote, "There are my 'Poe' pieces and my 'Dunsany' pieces — but alas — where are my Lovecraft pieces?" [6]
  • Fletcher Pratt's 1948 novel The Well of the Unicorn was written as a sequel to Dunsany's play King Argimenes and the Unknown Warrior.
  • Jorge Luis Borges included Dunsany's short story Idle Days on the Yann as the twenty-seventh title in The Library of Babel, a collection of works Borges collected and provided forewords to (not to be confused with his short story of the same name, "The Library of Babel").
  • Ursula K. Le Guin, in her essay on style in fantasy "From Elfland to Poughkeepsie," wryly referred to Lord Dunsany as the "First Terrible Fate that Awaiteth Unwary Beginners in Fantasy," alluding to the (at the time) very common practice of young writers attempting to write in Lord Dunsany's style.[7]
  • Peter S. Beagle also cites Dunsany as an influence, and wrote an introduction for one of the recent reprint editions.
  • David Eddings has named Lord Dunsany as his personal favourite writer, and recommended aspiring authors to sample him.
  • Arthur C. Clarke enjoyed Dunsany's work and corresponded with him between 1944 and 1956. Those letters are collected in the book Arthur C. Clarke & Lord Dunsany: A Correspondence. Clarke also edited and allowed the use of an early essay as an introduction to one volume of The Collected Jorkens.
  • Welleran Poltarnees, an author of numerous non-fantasy "blessing books" employing turn-of-the-century artwork, is a pen name based on two of Lord Dunsany's most famous stories.

This article is about the author. ... Edgar Allan Poe (January 19, 1809 – October 7, 1849) was an American poet, short story writer, playwright, editor, literary critic, essayist and one of the leaders of the American Romantic Movement. ... Murray Fletcher Pratt (1897–1956) was a science fiction and fantasy writer; he was also well-known as a writer on naval history and on the American Civil War. ... Jorge Luis Borges (August 24, 1899 – June 14, 1986) was an Argentine writer. ... The Library of Babel (Spanish: ) is a short story by Argentine author (and librarian) Jorge Luis Borges, conceiving of a universe in the form of a vast library containing all possible 410-page books that can be composed in a certain character set. ... Ursula Kroeber Le Guin [ˌɜɹsələ ˌkɹobɜɹ ləˈgWɪn] (born October 21, 1929) is an American author. ... Michael John Moorcock (born December 18, 1939, in London, England) is a prolific English writer primarily of science fiction and fantasy who has also published a number of literary novels. ... Peter Soyer Beagle (born in 1939) is an American fantasist and author of novels, nonfiction, and screenplays. ... David Eddings (born July 7, 1931) is an American author who has written several best-selling series of epic fantasy novels. ... Sir Arthur Charles Clarke, CBE (born 16 December 1917) is a British science-fiction author and inventor, most famous for his novel 2001: A Space Odyssey, and for collaborating with director Stanley Kubrick on the film of the same name. ... Welleran Poltarnees is the pen name of an author who is best known for their numerous blessing books that employ turn-of-the-century artwork. ... Guillermo del Toro (born October 9, 1964 in Guadalajara, Jalisco) is an Academy Award-nominated Mexican film director. ... Neil Richard Gaiman () (born November 10, 1960) is an English author of science fiction and fantasy short stories and novels, graphic novels, comics, and films. ... The King of Elflands Daughter is a 1924 fantasy novel written by Lord Dunsany. ... For the movie based on this novel, see Stardust (2007 film). ... For the book, see Stardust (novella). ...

Bibliography

The catalogue of Dunsany's work during his 50-year active writing career is quite extensive, and is fraught with pitfalls for two reasons: first, many of Dunsany's original books of collected short stories were later followed by reprint collections, some of which were unauthorized and included only previously published stories; and second, some later collections bore titles very similar to different original books.


In 1993, S. T. Joshi and Darrell Schweitzer released a bibliographic volume which, while making no claims to be the final word, gives considerable information on Dunsany's work. They noted that a "ledger" of at least some of Dunsany's work was thought to have existed at Dunsany Castle. Sunanda Tryambak Joshi (b. ... Darrell Schweitzer (born August 27, 1952) is an American writer, editor, and essayist in the field of speculative fiction. ...


The following is a partial list compiled from various sources.


Short-story collections

Original

The Gods of Pegāna is the first book by Irish fantasy writer Lord Dunsany, published (with Dunsanys subsidy) in 1905. ... Project Gutenberg, abbreviated as PG, is a volunteer effort to digitize, archive and distribute cultural works. ... Time and the Gods is the second book by Irish fantasy writer Lord Dunsany, considered a major influence on the work of J. R. R. Tolkien, H. P. Lovecraft, Ursula LeGuin and others. ... Project Gutenberg, abbreviated as PG, is a volunteer effort to digitize, archive and distribute cultural works. ... The Sword of Welleran and Other Stories is the third book by Irish fantasy writer Lord Dunsany, considered a major influence on the work of J. R. R. Tolkien, H. P. Lovecraft, Ursula LeGuin and others. ... Project Gutenberg, abbreviated as PG, is a volunteer effort to digitize, archive and distribute cultural works. ... A Dreamers Tales is the fifth book by Irish fantasy writer Lord Dunsany, considered a major influence on the work of J. R. R. Tolkien, H. P. Lovecraft, Ursula LeGuin and others. ... Project Gutenberg, abbreviated as PG, is a volunteer effort to digitize, archive and distribute cultural works. ... The Book of Wonder is the seventh book and fifth original short story collection of Irish fantasy writer Lord Dunsany, considered a major influence on the work of J. R. R. Tolkien, H. P. Lovecraft, Ursula LeGuin and others. ... Project Gutenberg, abbreviated as PG, is a volunteer effort to digitize, archive and distribute cultural works. ... Fifty-One Tales is a collection of fantasy short stories by Lord Dunsany. ... Project Gutenberg, abbreviated as PG, is a volunteer effort to digitize, archive and distribute cultural works. ... Tales of Wonder can refer to The Last Book of Wonder, a 1916 short story collection written by Lord Dunsany Tales of Wonder (album), an 2002 album of cover songs by Nnenna Freelon Category: ... The Last Book of Wonder is the tenth book and sixth original short story collection of Irish fantasy writer Lord Dunsany, considered a major influence on the work of J. R. R. Tolkien, H. P. Lovecraft, Ursula LeGuin and others. ... Project Gutenberg, abbreviated as PG, is a volunteer effort to digitize, archive and distribute cultural works. ... Tales of Three Hemispheres is a collection of fantasy short stories by Lord Dunsany. ... Project Gutenberg, abbreviated as PG, is a volunteer effort to digitize, archive and distribute cultural works. ... The Man Who Ate the Phoenix is a collection of fantasy short stories by Lord Dunsany. ... The Little Tales of Smethers and Other Stories is a collection of fantasy short stories by author Lord Dunsany. ...

Jorkens
  • The Travel Tales of Mr. Joseph Jorkens (1931)
  • Jorkens Remembers Africa (1934)
  • Jorkens Has a Large Whiskey (1940)
  • The Fourth Book of Jorkens (1947)
  • Jorkens Borrows Another Whiskey (1954)
  • The Last Book of Jorkens (2002), prepared for publication in 1957

The Travel Tales of Mr. ... Jorkens Remembers Africa is a collection of fantasy short stories by author Lord Dunsany. ... Jorkens Has a Large Whiskey is a collection of fantasy short stories by author Lord Dunsany. ... The Fourth Book of Jorkens is a collection of fantasy short stories by author Lord Dunsany. ... Jorkens Borrows Another Whiskey is a collection of fantasy short stories by author Lord Dunsany. ... The Last Book of Jorkens is a collection of fantasy short stories by author Lord Dunsany. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ...

Reprint Collections

  • A Dreamer's Tales and Other Stories (1917; collects A Dreamer's Tales and The Sword of Welleran, unauthorised)
  • Book of Wonder (1918; collects The Book of Wonder and Time and the Gods, unauthorised)
  • The Sword of Welleran and Other Tales of Enchantment (1954), selected by Lord and Lady Dunsany as a sampling of works to date

And after 1957: A 1907 engraving of Yeats. ... Project Gutenberg, abbreviated as PG, is a volunteer effort to digitize, archive and distribute cultural works. ...

  • At the Edge of the World (1970)
  • Beyond the Fields We Know (1972)
  • Gods, Men and Ghosts (1972), including short stories, essays
  • Over the Hills and Far Away (1974)
  • Bethmoora and Other Stories (1993) [citation needed]
  • The Exiles Club and Other Stories (1993) [citation needed]
  • The Lands of Wonder (1994) [citation needed]
  • The Hashish Man and Other Stories (1996)
  • The Complete Pegana (1998)
  • Time and the Gods (2000)
  • In the Land of Time, and Other Fantasy Tales (March 2004), a Penguin Classics volume
  • The Collected Jorkens, Volume One (April 2004), the first two books of Jorkens
  • The Collected Jorkens, Volume Two (2004), the second two Jorkens books, plus two uncollected stories, one not previously published
  • The Collected Jorkens, Volume Three (April 2005), the last two Jorkens books, plus three uncollected stories, at least one not previously published

At the Edge of the World is a collection of fantasy short stories by Lord Dunsany, edited by Lin Carter. ... Beyond the Fields We Know is a collection of fantasy short stories by Lord Dunsany, edited by Lin Carter. ... Over the Hills and Far Away is a collection of fantasy short stories by Lord Dunsany, edited by Lin Carter. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... In the Land of Time and Other Fantasy Tales is a posthumous collection of short stories by the author Lord Dunsany, in the Penguin Classics series. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Collected Jorkens, Volume One is an omnibus collection of fantasy short stories by author Lord Dunsany, comprising The Travel Tales of Mr. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Collected Jorkens, Volume Two is an omnibus collection of fantasy short stories by author Lord Dunsany. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Collected Jorkens, Volume Three is an omnibus collection of fantasy short stories by author Lord Dunsany. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Novels

Fantasy

  • Don Rodriguez: Chronicles of Shadow Valley aka The Chronicles of Rodriguez (1922) (Project Gutenberg Entry:[10])
  • The King of Elfland's Daughter (1924)
  • The Charwoman's Shadow (1926), second part of the Shadow Valley Chronicles
  • The Blessing of Pan (1927, see also Pan)
  • The Curse of the Wise Woman (1933)
  • My Talks with Dean Spanley (1936)
  • The Strange Journeys of Colonel Polders (1950)

Project Gutenberg, abbreviated as PG, is a volunteer effort to digitize, archive and distribute cultural works. ... The King of Elflands Daughter is a 1924 fantasy novel written by Lord Dunsany. ... The Charwomans Shadow is a 1926 fantasy novel by Lord Dunsany, and is among the pioneering works in the field, even before the genre was named fantasy. It was reprinted in Feb. ... Marble sculpture of Pan copulating with a goat, recovered from Herculaneum Pan (Greek Παν, genitive Πανος) is the Greek god who watches over shepherds and their flocks. ...

Science Fiction

  • The Last Revolution (1951)
  • The Pleasures of a Futuroscope (2003), on a topic first introduced in a Jorkens story, dating from the mid-1950's

Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Other

  • Up in the Hills (1935)
  • Rory and Bran (1936)
  • The Story of Mona Sheehy (1939)
  • Guerilla (1944)
  • His Fellow Men (1952)

Drama

  • Most of the early Dunsany plays were issued in individual editions by Samuel French, freely available but mostly for the acting and production market.

Collections

  • Five Plays (1914)
  • A Night at an Inn (full-length play) (1916)
  • Plays of Gods and Men (1917) (Project Gutenberg Entry:[11])
  • If (full-length play) (1921) (Project Gutenberg Entry:[12])
  • Plays of Near and Far (1922)
  • Alexander and Three Small Plays (1925)
  • Seven Modern Comedies (1928)
  • The Old Folk of the Centuries (full-length play) (1930)
  • Mr Faithful (full-length play) (1935)
  • Plays for Earth and Air (1937), plays written for and produced on radio
  • The Ginger Cat and Other Lost Plays (2005), plays known to have existed, and in at least once case, acted, but only unearthed in the 2000's

Five Plays is the eighth book by Irish fantasy writer Lord Dunsany, considered a major influence on the work of J. R. R. Tolkien, H. P. Lovecraft, Ursula LeGuin and others. ... Project Gutenberg, abbreviated as PG, is a volunteer effort to digitize, archive and distribute cultural works. ... Project Gutenberg, abbreviated as PG, is a volunteer effort to digitize, archive and distribute cultural works. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Poetry Collections

  • Fifty Poems (1929)
  • Mirage Water (1938)
  • War Poems (1941)
  • Wandering Songs (1943)
  • A Journey (1944)
  • The Year (1946)
  • The Odes of Horace (1947) (translation)
  • To Awaken Pegasus (1949)
  • Verses Dedicatory: 18 Previously Unpublished Poems (1985)

Fifty Poems is a collection of poetry by fantasy author Lord Dunsany. ... Horace, as imagined by Anton von Werner Quintus Horatius Flaccus, (December 8, 65 BC - November 27, 8 BC), known in the English-speaking world as Horace, was the leading Roman lyric poet during the time of Augustus. ... Pegasus and Bellerophon, Attic red-figure Pegasus and Bellerophon, from Mabie, Hamilton Wright (Ed. ...

Essays and sketches

  • Tales of War (1918) (Project Gutenberg Entry:[13]), war-related short stories, also issued in a revised "Expanded Edition" (not prepared by Dunsany but with his Estate's permission) with more stories, by Wildside Press
  • Nowadays (1918), a single long essay
  • Unhappy Far-Off Things (1919) (Project Gutenberg Entry:[14]), a second volume of war-related stories
  • If I Were Dictator (1934), a long satirical essay, one of a series by well-known figures of the period
  • My Ireland (1937), a non-fiction look at Ireland and her landscape and heritage, with photos
  • The Donnellan Lectures 1943 (1945), lectures given at Trinity College Dublin by Dunsany
  • A Glimpse from a Watchtower (1947), a long essay musing on the future in a nuclear era

Project Gutenberg, abbreviated as PG, is a volunteer effort to digitize, archive and distribute cultural works. ... Project Gutenberg, abbreviated as PG, is a volunteer effort to digitize, archive and distribute cultural works. ... The College of the Holy and Undivided Trinity of Queen Elizabeth near Dublin or more commonly Trinity College, Dublin (TCD) was founded in 1592 by Queen Elizabeth I, is the only constituent college of the University of Dublin, Irelands oldest university. ...

Omnibus

  • The Ghosts of the Heaviside Layer and Other Fantasms (1980), a posthumous gathering of uncollected stories, essays and a play

Autobiography

  • Patches of Sunlight (1938)
  • While The Sirens Slept (1944)
  • The Sirens Wake (1945)

Books in print

Millennium Fantasy Masterworks

  • Time and the Gods (contains The Gods of Pegāna, Time and the Gods, The Sword of Welleran and Other Stories, A Dreamer's Tales, The Book of Wonder and The Last Book of Wonder, without the Sime illustrations and with Pegāna out of order)
  • The King of Elfland's Daughter

Penguin Classics

  • In the Land of Time: and Other Fantasy Tales

Del Rey

  • The King of Elfland's Daughter
  • The Charwoman's Shadow

Hippocampus Press

  • The Pleasures of a Futuroscope

Wildsidepress

  • The Gods of Pegāna
  • Time and the Gods
  • The Book of Wonder
  • A Dreamer's Tales
  • Fifty-One Tales
  • Tales of War: Expanded Edition
  • Unhappy Far-Off Things
  • Don Rodriguez: Chronicles of Shadow Valley
  • Plays of Gods and Men
  • The Ginger Cat and Other Lost Plays

Night Shade Books

  • The Collected Jorkens (three-volume set, with some previously uncollected and unpublished stories at the end of Volumes 2 and 3, including the last Jorkens story written, from 1957)

Cold Spring Press

  • Tales of God and Men (contains Dunsany's first eight original short story collections, and all the related illustrations by Sidney Sime)

Forgotten Classics Sidney Sime (1867 – May 22, 1941) was born in Manchester in poverty. ...

  • The Dreams of a Prophet (hardcover, with large print edition also available via the Lulu website; contains the collections The Gods of Pegana, Time and the Gods, The Sword of Welleran, and Fifty-One Tales)

Notes

Dunsany's literary rights passed from the author to a Trust, which was first managed by Beatrice Dunsany, and is currently managed by Curtis Brown of London and partner companies worldwide (some past US deals, for example, have been listed by Locus Magazine as by SCG). All of Dunsany's work is in copyright in most of the world as of 2007, the main exception being the early work (published before 1 January 1923), which is in the public domain in the United States. 2007 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...


Dunsany's primary home, over 820 years old, can be visited at certain times of year, and tours usually include the Library, but not the tower room he often liked to work in. His other home, Dunstall Priory, was sold to a fan, Grey Gowrie, later head of the Arts Council of the UK, and on to other hands. Dunsany's original manuscripts are collected in the family archive, including some specially bound volumes of some of his works; scholarly access is possible by application. For more information on fans of football (soccer), see Football (soccer) culture. ... Alexander Patrick Greysteil Ruthven, 2nd Earl of Gowrie (born 26 November 1939) was a Conservative Party politician often known as Grey Gowrie; he works in the arts. ...

  1. ^ L. Sprague de Camp, Literary Swordsmen and Sorcerers: The Makers of Heroic Fantasy, p 53 ISBN 0-87054-076-9.
  2. ^ L. Sprague de Camp, Literary Swordsmen and Sorcerers: The Makers of Heroic Fantasy, p 54-5 ISBN 0-87054-076-9.
  3. ^ Pathways to Elfland: The Writings of Lord Dunsany (1989) by Darrell Schweitzer.
  4. ^ O'Faolain, Vive Moi!, pp. 350 n, 353
  5. ^ Lord Dunsany: Master of the Anglo-Irish Imagination (p. 152)
  6. ^ Letter to Elizabeth Toldridge, March 8, 1929, quoted in Lovecraft: A Look Behind the Cthulhu Mythos
  7. ^ Ursula K. LeGuin, "From Elfland to Poughkeepsie", p 78-9 The Language of the Night ISBN 0-425-05205-2

Lyon Sprague de Camp, (November 27, 1907 – November 6, 2000) was an American science fiction and fantasy author. ... Literary Swordsmen and Sorcerers by L. Sprague de Camp, Arkham House, 1976 Literary Swordsmen and Sorcerers: the Makers of Heroic Fantasy is a 1976 work of collective biography on the formative authors of the heroic fantasy genre by L. Sprague de Camp, published by Arkham House. ... Darrell Schweitzer (born August 27, 1952) is an American writer, editor, and essayist in the field of speculative fiction. ...

References

  • Bleiler, Everett (1948). The Checklist of Fantastic Literature. Chicago: Shasta Publishers, 104-105. 
  • Joshi, S. T. (1993). Lord Dunsany: a Bibliography / by S. T. Joshi and Darrell Schweitzer. Metuchen, N.J.: The Scarecrow Press, Inc., 1-33. 

Everett Franklin Bleiler (born 1920) is an editor and bibliographer of science fiction and Fantasy. ... Sunanda Tryambak Joshi (b. ...

External links

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Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is a sister project of Wikipedia, using the same MediaWiki software. ... Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... The original Wikisource logo. ... Project Gutenberg, abbreviated as PG, is a volunteer effort to digitize, archive and distribute cultural works. ...

See also

Peerage of Ireland
Preceded by
John William Plunkett
Baron Dunsany
1899–1957
Succeeded by
Randal Arthur Henry Plunkett
Persondata
NAME Plunkett, Edward John Moreton Drax, 18th Baron Dunsany
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Lord Dunsany
SHORT DESCRIPTION Novelist
DATE OF BIRTH July 24, 1878(1878-07-24)
PLACE OF BIRTH London
DATE OF DEATH October 25, 1957
PLACE OF DEATH Dublin

  Results from FactBites:
 
Edward Plunkett, 18th Baron Dunsany - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (912 words)
Edward John Moreton Drax Plunkett, 18th Baron Dunsany (24 July 1878 25 October 1957) was an Irish writer and dramatist notable for his work in fantasy and horror.
Edward Plunkett was the son of John William Plunkett, 17th Baron Dunsany (1853–1899) and his wife Ernle Elizabeth Ernle-Erle Drax, née Grosvenor.
Lord Dunsany was educated at Eton and Sandhurst.
Edward Plunkett, 18th Baron Dunsany - definition of Edward Plunkett, 18th Baron Dunsany in Encyclopedia (685 words)
Edward John Moreton Drax Plunkett, 18th Baron Dunsany (July 24, 1878–October 25, 1957) was an Irish writer and dramatist.
Edward Plunkett was the son of John William Plunkett, 17th Baron Dunsany (1853–1899) and his wife Ernle Grosvenor.
Lord Dunsany was educated at Eton College and Sandhurst.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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