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Encyclopedia > Edward Mills Purcell

Edward Mills Purcell (August 30, 1912March 7, 1997) was an American physicist who shared the 1952 Nobel Prize for Physics for his independent discovery (published 1946) of nuclear magnetic resonance in liquids and in solids. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has become widely used to study the molecular structure of pure materials and the composition of mixtures. August 30 is the 242nd day of the year (243rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday in the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... March 7 is the 66th day of the year (67th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1952 (MCMLII) was a Leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... List of Nobel Prize laureates in Physics from 1901 to the present day. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Pacific Northwest National Laboratorys high magnetic field (800 MHz, 18. ... In science, a molecule is a group of atoms in a definite arrangement held together by chemical bonds. ...


Born and raised in Taylorville, Illinois, Purcell received his BE in electrical engineering from Purdue University, followed by his M.A. and Ph.D. in physics from Harvard University. After spending the years of World War II working at the MIT Radiation Laboratory on the development of microwave radar, Purcell returned to Harvard to do research. In December of 1945, he discovered nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) with his colleagues Pound and Torrey[1]. NMR provides scientists with an elegant and precise way of determining chemical structure and properties of materials, and is widely used in physics and chemistry. It also is the basis of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), one of the most important medical advances of the 20th century. For his discovery of NMR, Purcell shared the 1952 Nobel Prize in physics with Felix Bloch of Stanford University. Taylorville is a city in Christian County, Illinois, United States. ... Bachelor of Engineering (BAI (in latin), BEng, or BE) is an undergraduate academic degree awarded to a student after three, four or five years of studying engineering at an accredited university in the United States, United Kingdom, Ireland, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Nigeria, China and India. ... Electrical Engineers design power systems… … and complex electronic circuits. ... Purdue University (Purdue) is a land-grant, public university in West Lafayette, Indiana, United States. ... Harvard University (incorporated as The President and Fellows of Harvard College) is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA and a member of the Ivy League. ... The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) is a private, coeducational research university located in Cambridge, Massachusetts. ... Year 1945and died 2007 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... Pacific Northwest National Laboratorys high magnetic field (800 MHz, 18. ... Magnetic Resonance Image showing a median sagittal cross section through a human head. ... 1952 (MCMLII) was a Leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Felix Bloch (October 23, 1905 – September 10, 1983) was a Swiss physicist, working mainly in the USA. // A stamp from Guyana commemorating Felix Bloch. ... Leland Stanford Junior University, commonly known as Stanford University (or simply Stanford), is a private university located approximately 37 miles (60 kilometers) southeast of San Francisco and approximately 20 miles northwest of San José in Stanford, California. ...


Purcell also made contributions to astronomy as the first to detect radio emissions from neutral galactic hydrogen (the famous 21 cm line due to hyperfine splitting), affording the first views of the spiral arms of the Milky Way[2]. This observation helped launch the field of radio astronomy, and measurements of the 21 cm line are still an important technique in modern astronomy. He has also made other seminal contributions to solid state physics, with studies of spin-echo relaxation, nuclear magnetic relaxation, and negative spin temperature (important in the development of the laser). With Norman F. Ramsey, he was the first to question the CP symmetry of particle physics. A giant Hubble mosaic of the Crab Nebula, a supernova remnant Astronomy is the science of celestial objects (such as stars, planets, comets, and galaxies) and phenomena that originate outside the Earths atmosphere (such as auroras and cosmic background radiation). ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... It has been suggested that Andromeda-Milky Way collision be merged into this article or section. ... The Very Large Array, a radio interferometer in New Mexico, USA Radio astronomy is a subfield of astronomy that studies celestial objects in the radio frequency portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. ... Solid-state physics, the largest branch of condensed matter physics, is the study of rigid matter, or solids. ... Norman Foster Ramsey (born August 27, 1915) is an American physicist. ... CP-symmetry is a symmetry obtained by a combination of the C-symmetry and the P-symmetry. ...


Purcell was the recipient of many awards for his scientific, educational, and civic work. He served as science advisor to Presidents Dwight D. Eisenhower, John F. Kennedy, and Lyndon B. Johnson. He was president of the American Physical Society, and a member of the American Philosophical Society, the National Academy of Sciences, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He was awarded the National Medal of Science in 1979. Dwight David Ike Eisenhower, born David Dwight Eisenhower (October 14, 1890 – March 28, 1969) was an American General and politician, who served as the thirty-fourth President of the United States (1953–1961). ... John Fitzgerald Kennedy (May 29, 1917 – November 22, 1963), also referred to as John F. Kennedy, Kennedy, John Kennedy or Jack Kennedy, was the 35th President of the United States. ... “LBJ” redirects here. ... The American Physical Society was founded in 1899 and is the worlds second largest organization of physicists. ... The American Philosophical Society is a discussion group founded as the Junto in 1743 by Benjamin Franklin. ... President Harding and the National Academy of Sciences at the White House, Washington, DC, April 1921 The National Academy of Sciences (NAS) is a corporation in the United States whose members serve pro bono as advisers to the nation on science, engineering, and medicine. ... The House of the Academy, Cambridge, Massachusetts. ... National Medal of Science The National Medal of Science, also called the Presidential Medal of Science, is an honor given by the President of the United States to individuals in science and engineering who have made important contributions to the advancement of knowledge in the fields of behavioral and social... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ...


Purcell is the author of Electricity and Magnetism (1965) — originally Volume 2 of the Berkeley Physics Course. (A 1984 second edition is meant to stand on its own.) This elegant text, which showcases Purcell's skill as a teacher, is still one of the standard introductory electricity and magnetism textooks in college physics. Purcell is also remembered by biologists for his famous lecture "Life at Low Reynolds Number" [3]


References

  1. ^ E.M. Purcell, H.C. Torrey, and R.V. Pound. "Resonance Absorption by Nuclear Magnetic Moments in a Solid." Phys. Rev. 69 37 (1946) [1]
  2. ^ H.I. Ewen and E.M. Purcell. "Observation of a Line in the Galactic Spectrum." Nature 168 356 (1951) [2]
  3. ^ E.M. Purcell. "Life at Low Reynolds Number", American Journal of Physics vol 45, p. 3-11 (1977)[3]

See also

  • Relativistic electromagnetism

Relativistic electromagnetism is the idea of explaining electromagnetism based on relativistic (Albert Einstein 1905) arguments. ...

External links

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Edward Mills Purcell

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Chemistry - Edward Mills Purcell (413 words)
Edward Mills Purcell (August 30, 1912 - March 7, 1997) was an American physicist who shared the 1952 Nobel Prize for Physics for his independent discovery (1946) of nuclear magnetic resonance in liquids and in solids.
Purcell also made contributions to astronomy as the first to detect radio emissions from neutral galactic hydrogen, affording the first views of the spiral arms of the Milky Way.
Purcell was the recipient of many awards for his scientific, educational, and civic work.
Edward Mills Purcell - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (471 words)
Edward Mills Purcell (August 30, 1912 - March 7, 1997) was an American physicist who shared the 1952 Nobel Prize for Physics for his independent discovery (1946) of nuclear magnetic resonance in liquids and in solids.
Purcell also made contributions to astronomy as the first to detect radio emissions from neutral galactic hydrogen, affording the first views of the spiral arms of the Milky Way.
Purcell was the recipient of many awards for his scientific, educational, and civic work.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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