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Encyclopedia > Edward Lowe
A portrait of Edward Lowe hanging in the National Maritime Museum in London
A portrait of Edward Lowe hanging in the National Maritime Museum in London

Edward 'Ned' Lowe (or Low, or Loe), often known as Ned Low was a notorious pirate during the Golden Age of Piracy. His pirate flag featured a black flag with a red skeleton. Image File history File linksMetadata Edwardlowepicture. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Edwardlowepicture. ... The National Maritime Museum, Greenwich The National Maritime Museum (NMM) is the leading maritime museum of the United Kingdom, and one of the most important in the world. ... A pirate is one who robs, pillages, or plunders at sea, or sometimes the shore, without a commission from a recognized sovereign nation. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... The Jolly Roger is the traditional flag of European and American pirates, envisioned today as a skull over crossed bones (see skull and cross bones), on a black field. ... In biology, the skeleton or skeletal system is the biological system providing support in living organisms. ...

Contents


Early life

Edward Lowe was born in Westminster, London, England, in the late 17th century. Westminster is a district within the City of Westminster in London. ... London is the capital city of the United Kingdom and of England. ... Royal motto (French): Dieu et mon droit (Translated: God and my right) Englands location within the British Isles Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area – Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population – Total (mid-2004) – Total (2001 Census) – Density Ranked 1st UK... (16th century - 17th century - 18th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 17th century was that century which lasted from 1601-1700. ...


As he grew older, Lowe tired of pickpocketing and thievery, and left England for Boston. In Boston, he married a lady named Eliza Marble, They had a son, who died an infant, and a daughter named Elizabeth. Eliza died in labour, leaving Lowe with his daughter. This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... // Thievery Thievery is a modification for Unreal Tournament. ... Boston is a town and small port c. ...


At first working honestly as a rigger, in May 1722 he joined a gang of men on a sloop headed for Honduras, where they planned to steal a shipment of logs for resale in Boston. In a canoe or bangca, an outrigger is a thin, long, solid, hull used to stabilise an inherently unstable main hull. ... Events Abraham De Moivre states De Moivres theorem connecting trigonometric functions and complex numbers Publication of the first book of Bachs Well-Tempered Clavier Fall of Persias Safavid dynasty during a bloody revolt of the Afghani people. ... A sloop-rigged J-24 sailboat In sailing, a sloop is a vessel with a single mast on which is hoisted a fore-and-aft rigged mainsail and a single jib, plus extras such as a spinnaker. ...


Following a failed mutiny, however, Lowe and his friends were forced to leave the boat. A day later, Lowe led the gang in taking over a small sloop, and officially turned pirate. Mutiny is the crime of conspiring to disobey orders that the mutineer is legally obliged to obey, for example by crew members of a ship. ... A pirate is one who robs, pillages, or plunders at sea, or sometimes the shore, without a commission from a recognized sovereign nation. ...


Piracy

The pirate flag used by Edward Lowe
The pirate flag used by Edward Lowe

Lowe was a success as a pirate, and after a period as lieutenant to George Lowther, he eventually captained a brigantine (named Rebecca). He captured an 80-ton schooner named The Fancy), which became his flagship. Image File history File links Edwardloweflag. ... Image File history File links Edwardloweflag. ... The Jolly Roger is the traditional flag of European and American pirates, envisioned today as a skull over crossed bones (see skull and cross bones), on a black field. ... A Lieutenant is a military, paramilitary or police officer. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Description In sailing, a brigantine is a vessel with two masts, at least one of which is square rigged. ... The word ton or tonne is derived from the Old English tunne, and ultimately from the Old French tonne, and referred originally to a large cask with a capacity of 252 wine gallons, which holds approximately 2100 pounds of water. ... Two-masted fishing schooner A schooner (IPA: ) is a type of sailing vessel characterized by the use of fore-and-aft sails on two or more masts. ... A flagship is the ship used by the commanding officer of a group of naval ships. ...


Initially, Lowe used the same flag as Edward Teach (better known as Blackbeard). Later, he used his own flag, which became notorious. He also used a flag called the Green Trumpeter, which was a green silk flag with a yellow figure of a man blowing a trumpet on it, used to signal his other ships that the captains of his fleet were to meet on his ship. It was hoisted on the mizzen peak. Blackbeard (1680? – November 22, 1718) was the nickname of Edward Teach alias Edward Thatch, a notorious English pirate who had a short reign of terror in the Caribbean Sea between 1716 and 1718. ... Blackbeards flag, showing a horned skeleton holding an hourglass and threatening a bleeding heart with a spear. ... Silk weaver Silk is a natural protein fibre that can be woven into textiles. ... The mast of a sailing ship is a tall vertical pole which supports the sails. ...


As Lowe's success increased in the Caribbean, so did his notoriety. Eventually, a bounty was placed on his head, and Lowe headed for the Azores. The Caribbean, (Spanish: Caribe; French: Caraïbe or more commonly Antilles; Dutch: Cariben or Caraïben, or more commonly Antillen) or the West Indies, is a group of islands and countries which are in or border the Caribbean Sea which lies on the Caribbean Plate. ... Bounty can refer to different things: The Bounty a 1984 film with Mel Gibson and Anthony Hopkins A bounty is an amount of money or other reward offered by an organization for the capture of a person or thing Bounty is a brand of paper towel manufactured by Procter & Gamble... Location Motto of the autonomous region: Antes morrer livres que em paz sujeitos (Portuguese: To die free rather than to be subjugated in peace) Official language Portuguese Capitals Ponta Delgada (Presidency of the autonomous government), Angra do Heroísmo (Supreme Court), Horta (Legislative Assembly) Other towns Praia da Vitória...


In the Azores, Lowe became particularly noted for his brutality and sadism, which included acts such as cutting off a victim's lips, cooking them, and forcing the victim to eat them. Many historians believe this was deliberately done to cultivate a ferocious image. One failed torture session led to one of Lowe's crew members accidentally cut him in the mouth. Botched surgery led to Lowe being scarred. Flogging demonstration at Folsom Street Fair 2004. ... The Iron Maiden of Nuremberg is an infamous and rarely used torture device. ...


Lowe teamed up with another pirate captain named Charles Harris, who owned a ship named the Ranger. As they terrorised the Azores, the increased pressure from the authorities, who by now had taken special notice of Edward Lowe, despite the hordes of pirates in operation at the time. Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ...


Lowe, Harris and their boats left the Azores for the Carolinas. Following a battle with a Man-o-war named the HMS Greyhound, Lowe fled in the Fancy and headed back to the Azores, leaving Harris and the Ranger behind. The Carolinas is a collective term used in the United States to refer to the states of North and South Carolina together. ... A man of war (also man-of-war, man-o-war or simply man) is an armed naval vessel. ... Sixteen different ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Greyhound, after the greyhound, a breed of dog notable for its speed. ...


Articles

Lowe had 17 articles, forming a code of conduct. A copy of his articles printed on 8 August 1723 were: Look up Code of Conduct in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Things called code of conduct or Code of Conduct include: code of conduct — a set of rules to guide behaviour and decisions Code of Conduct — a 2001 movie starring Kevin Bacon Code of Conduct — a book by Kirstine Smith that... August 8 is the 220th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (221st in leap years), with 145 days remaining. ... Events February 16 - Louis XV of France attains his majority Births February 24 - John Burgoyne, British general (d. ...

  1. Every sailor captured be given ample chance and encouragement to join the company and so grow their number
  2. No married man be forced to join their company
  3. Prisoners were not to be killed in cold blood
  4. No one to talk in secret with prisoners
  5. Ships of England were not to be taken (unless fate decreed otherwise, and they captured one in innocence)
  6. No boats were to be sent between ships after 8PM until morning light
  7. That if any of the Company shall advise, or speak any thing tending to the separating or breaking of the Company, or shall by any Means offer or endeavour to desert or quit the Company, that person shall be shot to Death by the Quarter Master's Order, without the sentence of a Court Martial.
  8. The captain is to have two full shares, the master is to have one share and a half, the doctor, mate, gunner and botswaine, one share and a quarter.
  9. He that shall be found guilty of taking up any unlawful weapon on board the privateer or any other prize by us taken, so as to strike or abuse one another in any regard, shall suffer what punishment the captain and majority of the company shall see fit.
  10. He that shall be found guilty of cowardice in the time of engagements, shall suffer what punishment the captain and majority of the company shall think fit.
  11. If any gold, jewels, silver etc be found on board any prize or prizes to the value of a piece of eight, and the finder does not deliver it unto the quarter master in the space of 24 hours, she shall suffer what punishment the captain and majority of the company shall think fit.
  12. He that is found guilty of gaming, or defrauding one another to the value of a royal plate, shall suffer what punishment the captain and majority of the company shall think fit.
  13. He that shall have the misfortune to loose a limb in time of engagement shall have the sum of 600 pieces of eight, and remain aboard as long as he sees fit
  14. Good quarters to be given when craved
  15. He that sees a sail first shall have the best pistol or small arm aboard her
  16. He that shall be guilty of drunkenness in time of engagement shall suffer what punishment the captain and company shall think fit
  17. No snapping of guns in the hold

Death

There are conflicting stories on the end of Edward Lowe.


One states that Edward Lowe and the Fancy were last sighted in July 1723, near the Canaries and Guinea. They were never heard of again, and it is believed his boat sank in a storm, with the loss of all hands. Events February 16 - Louis XV of France attains his majority Births February 24 - John Burgoyne, British general (d. ... Missing image image:ccaa-canary. ...


A second states that Lowe was sent adrift by his own crew, and was rescued by a French ship who tried and hanged him in 1724 after learning his identity. Hanging is a form of execution or a method for suicide. ... Events January 14 - King Philip V of Spain abdicates the throne February 20 - The premiere of Giulio Cesare, an Italian opera by George Frideric Handel, takes place in London June 23 - Treaty of Constantinople signed. ...


External links


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Lakes Edward, George and Victoria (Uganda): A study of Late Quaternary rift tectonics, sedimentation and palaeoclimate (1397 words)
A low relief accommodation zone identified in the central parts of the Edward basin (the Kasindi Fault Zone; KFZ) appears to have formed between two oppositely facing border faults, on the flexural margin of the basin.
During the Mid Holocene low stand, exposure of a >10 m fault scarp associated with the KFZ, divided the basin into a western and an eastern section and caused damming of rivers that entered the basin from the north and northeast.
Low Lake Edward in the west, which was a closed lake and where extensive beaches formed along the eastern shore, and Lake Mweya located east of the fault zone.
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MARY LOW, born October 6, 1858 in Udny, Aberdeenshire.
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(2) JESSIE JANE LOW, born November 3, 1898, Aberdeen, Aberdeenshire.
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