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Encyclopedia > Edward Lawrie Tatum
Tatum won the Nobel Prize for his work in genetics
Tatum won the Nobel Prize for his work in genetics

Edward Lawrie Tatum (December 14, 1909November 5, 1975) was an American geneticist. He shared half of the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1958 with George Wells Beadle for showing that genes control individual steps in metabolism. The other half of that year's award went to Joshua Lederberg. Edward Tatum From the NIH website, Courtesy of the National Library of Medicine. ... Edward Tatum From the NIH website, Courtesy of the National Library of Medicine. ... December 14 is the 348th day of the year (349th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... November 5 is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 56 days remaining. ... 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1975 calendar). ... Genetics (from the Greek genno γεννώ= give birth) is the science of genes, heredity, and the variation of organisms. ... List of Nobel Prize laureates in Physiology or Medicine from 1901 to the present day. ... 1958 was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Beadle won a Nobel Prize in 1958 George Wells Beadle (October 22, 1903 - June 9, 1989) was an American scientist in the field of genetics. ... This stylistic schematic diagram shows a gene in relation to the double helix structure of DNA and to a chromosome (right). ... Santorio Santorio (1561-1636) in his steelyard balance, from Ars de statica medecina, first published 1614 Metabolism (from μεταβολισμος (metabolismos), the Greek word for change, or overthrow (Etymonline)), is the biochemical modification of chemical compounds in living organisms and cells. ... Joshua Lederberg speaking at a conference in 1997 Dr. Joshua Lederberg (born May 23, 1925) is a American molecular biologist who is known for his work in genetics, artificial intelligence, and space exploration. ...


Beadle and Tatum's key experiments involved exposing the bread mold Neurospora crassa to x-rays, causing mutations. In a series of experiments, they showed that these mutations caused changes in specific enzymes involved in metabolic pathways. These experiments, published in 1941, led them to propose a direct link between genes and enzymatic reactions, known as the "one gene, one enzyme" hypothesis. Binomial name Neurospora crassa Neurospora crassa is a type of red bread mold of the phylum Ascomycota. ... In the NATO phonetic alphabet, X-ray represents the letter X. An X-ray picture (radiograph) taken by Röntgen An X-ray is a form of electromagnetic radiation with a wavelength approximately in the range of 5 pm to 10 nanometers (corresponding to frequencies in the range 30 PHz... In biology, mutations are permanent, sometimes transmissible (if the change is to a germ cell) changes to the genetic material (usually DNA or RNA) of a cell. ... Ribbon diagram of the catalytically perfect enzyme TIM. Factor D enzyme crystal prevents the immune system from inappropriately running out of control. ... In biochemistry, a metabolic pathway is a series of chemical reactions occurring within a cell, catalyzed by enzymes, to achieve in either the formation of a metabolic product to be used or stored by the cell, or the initiation of another metabolic pathway (then called a flux generating step). ... For the movie, see 1941 (film) 1941 (MCMXLI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ...


Tatum went on to study genetics in bacteria. Tatum and his student Lederberg showed that the bacterium Escherichia coli could share genetic information through recombinant events. Phyla/Divisions Actinobacteria Aquificae Bacteroidetes/Chlorobi Chlamydiae/Verrucomicrobia Chloroflexi Chrysiogenetes Cyanobacteria Deferribacteres Deinococcus-Thermus Dictyoglomi Fibrobacteres/Acidobacteria Firmicutes Fusobacteria Gemmatimonadetes Nitrospirae Omnibacteria Planctomycetes Proteobacteria Spirochaetes Thermodesulfobacteria Thermomicrobia Thermotogae Bacteria (singular, bacterium) are a major group of living organisms. ... Binomial name Escherichia coli T. Escherich, 1885 E. coli at 10,000x magnification Escherichia coli (usually abbreviated to E. coli) is one of the main species of bacteria that live in the lower intestines of warm-blooded animals (including birds and mammals) and are necessary for the proper digestion of... Recombinant proteins are proteins that are produced by different genetically modified organisms following insertion of the relevant DNA into their genome. ...


Tatum was born in Boulder, Colorado. He attended college at the University of Chicago and received his PhD in biochemistry from the University of Wisconsin in 1934. Starting in 1937, he worked at Stanford University, where he began his collaboration with Beadle. He then moved to Yale University in 1945 where he mentored Lederberg. He returned to Stanford in 1948 and then joined the faculty of Rockefeller University in 1957. He died in New York City. Pearl Street Mall in Downtown Boulder Boulder (40°1′ N 105°16′ W, Mountain Time Zone) is a city located in Boulder County, Colorado, United States. ... The University of Chicago is a private co-educational university located in Chicago, Illinois. ... Biochemistry is the chemistry of life, a bridge between biology and chemistry that studies how complex chemical reactions give rise to life. ... The University of Wisconsin was founded in 1848 and is the largest university in the U.S. state of Wisconsin. ... For other meanings of Stanford, see Stanford (disambiguation). ... Yale University is a private university in New Haven, Connecticut. ... Rockefeller University is a small private university focusing primarily on graduate education and research in the biomedical fields, located in the southeasternmost corner of the Upper East Side of Manhattan island in New York City, New York. ... New York City, officially named the City of New York, is the most populous city in the United States, the most densely populated major city in North America, and the largest financial center in the world. ...


External links

  • Nobel biography

  Results from FactBites:
 
NodeWorks - Encyclopedia: Edward Lawrie Tatum (219 words)
Edward Lawrie Tatum (December 14, 1909 - November 5, 1975) was an American geneticist.
Tatum went on to study genetics in bacteria.
Tatum and his student Lederberg showed that the bacterium Escherichia coli could share genetic information through recombinant events.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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