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Encyclopedia > Edward Everett
Edward Everett
Edward Everett

In office
January 13, 1836 – January 18, 1840
Lieutenant(s) George Hull
Preceded by Samuel Turell Armstrong (acting)
Succeeded by Marcus Morton

In office
November 6, 1852 – March 3, 1853
Preceded by Daniel Webster
Succeeded by William L. Marcy

Member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Massachusetts's 4th district
In office
March 4, 1825 – March 3, 1835
Preceded by Timothy Fuller
Succeeded by Samuel Hoar

Senior Senator, Massachusetts
In office
March 4, 1853 – June 1, 1854
Preceded by John Davis
Succeeded by Julius Rockwell

Born April 11, 1794(1794-04-11)
Boston, Massachusetts
Died January 15, 1865 (aged 70)
Boston, Massachusetts
Political party Whig
Spouse Charlotte Gray Brooks
Profession Politician, Professor, University President
Religion Lutheran
Signature Edward Everett's signature

Edward Everett (April 11, 1794January 15, 1865) was a Whig Party politician from Massachusetts. Everett was elected to the United States House of Representatives and United States Senate, and also served as President of Harvard University, United States Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary to Britain, and Governor of Massachusetts before being appointed United States Secretary of State by President Millard Fillmore to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Daniel Webster. Mentioned in the book "The Perfect Tribute," Everett was an unsuccessful candidate for Vice President of the United States in the 1860 election on the Constitutional Union ticket. In 1863 he delivered a two-hour Gettysburg Oration that has been eclipsed in history by President Lincoln's Gettysburg Address, which he praised as superior to his own. He was the father of congressman William Everett and the great uncle of Edward Everett Hale. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts is the executive magistrate of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. ... January 13 is the 13th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1836 (MDCCCXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1840 is a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... John Hancock, first Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts The Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts is the executive magistrate of the United States Commonwealth of Massachusetts. ... George Hull was an American politician who served as Lieutenant Governor for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts from 1836 through 1843. ... Samuel Turell Armstrong (1784 - 1850) was a U.S. political figure. ... Marcus Morton, painted c. ... Seal of the United States Department of State. ... is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1852 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1853 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Daniel Webster (January 18, 1782 – October 24, 1852), was a leading American statesman during the nations antebellum era. ... William Learned Marcy ( December 12, 1786– July 4, 1857) was an American statesman. ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Massachusetts Congressional District 4 is a congessional district in southern Massachusetts. ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1825 (MDCCCXXV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... | Come and take it, slogan of the Texas Revolution 1835 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Timothy Fuller (July 11, 1778 - October 1, 1835) was a U.S. Representative from Massachusetts. ... Samuel Hoar (1778 - 1856) was a United States lawyer and politician. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1853 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... is the 152nd day of the year (153rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1854 (MDCCCLIV) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... John Davis (January 13, 1787 – April 19, 1854) was an American lawyer and politician. ... Julius Rockwell (April 26, 1805 – May 19, 1888) was a United States politician from Massachusetts, and the father of Francis Williams Rockwell. ... is the 101st day of the year (102nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1794 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Boston redirects here. ... is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1865 (MDCCCLXV) is a common year starting on Sunday. ... Boston redirects here. ... The Whig Party was a political party of the United States during the era of Jacksonian democracy. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A politician is an individual who is a formally recognized and active member of a government, or a person who influences the way a society is governed through an understanding of political power and group dynamics. ... The meaning of the word professor (Latin: [1]) varies. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... is the 101st day of the year (102nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1794 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1865 (MDCCCLXV) is a common year starting on Sunday. ... The Whig Party was a political party of the United States during the era of Jacksonian democracy. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... The President is the chief administrator of Harvard University. ... The Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts is the executive magistrate of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. ... Seal of the United States Department of State. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... Not to be confused with Mallard Fillmore. ... Daniel Webster (January 18, 1782 – October 24, 1852), was a leading American statesman during the nations antebellum era. ... The Vice President of the United States (sometimes referred to as VPOTUS[1] or Veep) is the first in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the president. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... The Constitutional Union Party was a political party in the United States created in 1860. ... Year 1863 (MDCCCLXIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The only known photo of Abraham Lincoln at Gettysburg (seated), taken about noon, just after Lincoln arrived and some three hours before he spoke. ... A Congressman or Congresswoman (generically, Congressperson) is a politician who is a member of a Congress. ... William Everett (October 10, 1839 – February 16, 1910) was born in Watertown, Massachusetts, the son of Charlotte Gray Brooks and Edward Everett who spoke at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania with President Abraham Lincoln on September 23, 1863. ... Statue of Edward Everett Hale in Boston Public Garden, by Bela Pratt. ...

Contents

Early life and education

Born in Boston, Massachusetts, to the Rev. Oliver Everett and Lucy (Hill) Everett, he attended Boston Latin School and graduated as the valedictorian from Harvard University in 1811, studied theology under the urging of the Rev. Joseph Stevens Buckminster, and was ordained pastor of the Brattle Street Unitarian Church, Boston, in 1814. He was the first American to receive a Ph.D. degree. His brother Alexander Hill Everett was a noted diplomatist and man of letters. Boston redirects here. ... Motto Sumus Primi Founded April 23, 1635 Head Master Lynne Mooney Teta Affiliation Boston Public Schools Curriculum College-Preparatory Grades 7-12 Enrollment c. ... In the United States and Canada, the title of valedictorian (an anglicized derivation from the Latin vale dicere, to say farewell) is given to the top graduate of the graduating class (the Australia/New Zealand equivalent being dux, although some Australian universities use the American term) of an educational institution. ... Harvard University (incorporated as The President and Fellows of Harvard College) is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA and a member of the Ivy League. ... For the US Federal Agent designation, see Special agent. ... Theology finds its scholars pursuing the understanding of and providing reasoned discourse of religion, spirituality and God or the gods. ... Portrait of Joseph Stevens Buckminster by Gilbert Stuart, painted circa 1810. ... Boston redirects here. ... Year 1814 (MDCCCXIV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... Alexander Hill Everett (March 19, 1792–June 28, 1847) was a noted America diplomatist, politician, and Boston man of letters. ...


Harvard University service and early political career

Everett was a professor of Greek literature at Harvard University, an overseer of the University, and its president from 1846 to 1849. He was elected to the United States House of Representatives and served from March 4, 1825-March 3, 1835. He declined to be a candidate for renomination in 1834. // Main article: Ancient Greek literature Ancient Greek literature refers to literature written in Ancient Greek from the oldest surviving written works in the Greek language until the 4th century and the rise of the Byzantine Empire. ... The President is the chief administrator of Harvard University. ... 1846 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1849 (MDCCCXLIX) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1825 (MDCCCXXV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... | Come and take it, slogan of the Texas Revolution 1835 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1834 (MDCCCXXXIV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


High political ranks

Everett served as Governor of Massachusetts from 1836-1840. He was then appointed United States Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary to Great Britain from 1841 to 1845 and declined a commission to China in 1843. He served as president of Harvard University from 1846-1849. The Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts is the executive magistrate of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. ... Year 1836 (MDCCCXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1840 is a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... The office of United States Ambassador (or Minister) to the United Kingdom (known formally as Ambassador to the Court of St. ... 1841 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1845 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... The President is the chief administrator of Harvard University. ... 1846 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1849 (MDCCCXLIX) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


In 1852 he was appointed United States Secretary of State by President Millard Fillmore to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Daniel Webster, and served until the end of the Fillmore Administration, March 3, 1853. He was elected to the United States Senate and served from March 4, 1853, until his resignation, effective June 1, 1854. On Thursday, April 6, 1854, he presented a petition from the people of Dedham against the Missouri Compromise and one from the people of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania in favor of securing religious freedom for Americans abroad.[1] 1852 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Seal of the United States Department of State. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... Not to be confused with Mallard Fillmore. ... Daniel Webster (January 18, 1782 – October 24, 1852), was a leading American statesman during the nations antebellum era. ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1853 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1853 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... is the 152nd day of the year (153rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1854 (MDCCCLIV) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Nickname: Location in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country United States State Massachusetts County Norfolk County Settled 1635 Incorporated 1636 Government  - Type Representative town meeting  - Town    Administrator Bill Keegan  - Board of    Selectmen Marie-Loise Kehoe Mike Butler James MacDonald Carmen DelloIocono Dennis Teehan Area  - Town  10. ... The United States in 1820. ... Gettysburg is a borough 38 miles (68 km) south by southwest of Harrisburg in Adams County, Pennsylvania, USA, of which it is the county seatGR6. ...


Everett was an unsuccessful candidate for Vice President of the United States in the 1860 election on the Constitutional Union ticket. The Vice President of the United States (sometimes referred to as VPOTUS[1] or Veep) is the first in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the president. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... The Constitutional Union Party was a political party in the United States created in 1860. ...


Educationist work

He went to Germany to take courses and returned to this country as the first American to receive a Ph.D. degree. Eventually, 10,000 of America’s wealthiest families would send their sons to obtain the Ph.D. in Prussian universities. Doctor of Philosophy (Ph. ...


Implementation of the Prussian education system was to become the goal of Edward Everett, America’s first Ph.D. As Governor of Massachusetts, Everett had to deal with the problem of the influx of poor Irish Catholics into his state (as a result of the Irish Potato Famine). In 1852, with the support of Horace Mann, another strong advocate of the Prussian model, Everett made the decision to adopt the Prussian system of education in Massachusetts. Unfortunately for the children and poor Irish Catholics of Massachusetts and elsewhere, the system produced a willing, cheap labor force with minimal reading and numbers skills. The Prussian education system was a system of mandatory education dating to the early 19th century. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Irish Catholics is a term used to describe Irish people or people of Irish descent who adhere to the Roman Catholic faith. ... For other uses, please see Great Famine. ... 1852 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Horace Mann (May 4, 1796 – August 2, 1859) was an American education reformer and abolitionist. ...

Edward Everett
Edward Everett

Shortly after Everett and Mann began to adopt the Prussian system, the Governor of New York set up the same method in 12 different New York schools on a trial basis. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (492x681, 43 KB)Edward Everett - Project Gutenberg eText 15393 From http://www. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (492x681, 43 KB)Edward Everett - Project Gutenberg eText 15393 From http://www. ...


Gettysburg Oration

Five Harvard University Presidents sitting in order of when they served. L-R: Josiah Quincy III, Edward Everett, Jared Sparks, James Walker and Cornelius Conway Felton.
Five Harvard University Presidents sitting in order of when they served. L-R: Josiah Quincy III, Edward Everett, Jared Sparks, James Walker and Cornelius Conway Felton.

Everett was considered the nation's greatest orator of his time. He was invited to give the main speech at the dedication of the Soldiers' National Cemetery at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania on September 23, 1863, following the Battle of Gettysburg. He told the organizing committee that he would be unable to prepare an appropriate speech in such a short period of time, and requested that the date be postponed. The committee agreed, and the dedication was postponed until November 19. Almost as an afterthought, David Wills, the president of the committee, asked President Abraham Lincoln to make a "few appropriate remarks." Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 479 pixelsFull resolution (981 × 587 pixel, file size: 59 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) http://hul. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 479 pixelsFull resolution (981 × 587 pixel, file size: 59 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) http://hul. ... The President is the chief administrator of Harvard University. ... Josiah Quincy III (February 4, 1772 – July 1, 1864) was a U.S. educator and political figure. ... Jared Sparks (10 May 1789 - 14 March 1866) was a U.S. historian, educator, Unitarian minister, and president of Harvard University. ... James Walker (August 16, 1794 – December 23, 1874) was the President of Harvard College from 1853 to 1860. ... Cornelius Conway Felton (November 6, 1807 - February 26, 1862) was an American educator. ... Soldiers National Monument at the center of Gettysburg National Cemetery, Randolph Rogers, sculptor Gettysburg National Cemetery is located on Cemetery Hill in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. ... Gettysburg is a borough 38 miles (68 km) south by southwest of Harrisburg in Adams County, Pennsylvania, USA, of which it is the county seatGR6. ... is the 266th day of the year (267th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1863 (MDCCCLXIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America Commanders George G. Meade Robert E. Lee Strength 93,921[1] 71,699[2] Casualties 23,055 (3,155 killed, 14,531 wounded, 5,369 captured/missing)[1] 23,231 (4,708 killed, 12,693 wounded, 5,830 captured/missing... is the 323rd day of the year (324th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ...


Everett spoke for two hours, but Lincoln's two-minute follow-up speech, known as the Gettysburg Address, is one of the most famous speeches in the History of the United States. Everett wrote a note to Lincoln the next day, telling him of his appreciation for the President's brief, but moving, speech: "I should be glad, if I could flatter myself that I came as near the central idea of the occasion in two hours, as you did in two minutes." The only known photo of Abraham Lincoln at Gettysburg (seated), taken about noon, just after Lincoln arrived and some three hours before he spoke. ... American history redirects here. ...


Death and legacy

He died in Boston, Massachusetts, in 1865, and was interred in Mount Auburn Cemetery, Cambridge, Massachusetts. Boston redirects here. ... 1865 (MDCCCLXV) is a common year starting on Sunday. ... Mount Auburn Cemetery Mount Auburn Cemetery Hunnewell family obelisk Civil War memorial Founded in 1831 as Americas first garden cemetery, Mount Auburn Cemetery is an Elysium where, traditionally, chaste classical monuments were set in rolling landscaped terrain. ... Location in Middlesex County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Middlesex Settled 1630 Incorporated 1636 Government  - Type Mayor-City Council  - Mayor Kenneth Reeves (D) Area  - City  7. ...


The city of Everett, Pennsylvania, and Everett, Massachusetts, are named for him, as is Edward Everett Square, the southern end of Massachusetts Avenue at Columbia Road in Boston's Dorchester section. An elementary school bearing his name is located just down the street from the square. Also, Everett Avenue in Winchester, Massachusetts is named after him because of the land that he owned in that area. Everett is a borough located in Bedford County, Pennsylvania. ... Everett is a city in Middlesex County, Massachusetts near Boston. ... 77 Massachusetts Avenue, the site of MIT, is an important landmark in Cambridge, Massachusetts. ... Flowers for sale at the Columbia Road market Columbia Road Flower Market is one of many markets in Central London; a street flower market, it is located in East London. ... 1888 German map of Boston Harbor showing Dorchester in the lower left hand corner. ... Winchester is a town located in Middlesex County, Massachusetts. ...


Everett School in Sioux City, Iowa, is named in his honor. Sioux City (IPA: ) is a city located in northwest Iowa in the United States. ...


An engraved portrait of Everett appears on U.S. currency on fifty dollar denomination silver certificates issued in 1890 and 1891. These rare notes, which are still legal tender, often sell for well over $3000 and are referred to as "Everetts" by collectors. An example can be viewed online in the American Currency Exhibit of the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco. Engraving is the practice of incising a design onto a hard, flat surface, by cutting grooves into it. ... 2004 Federal Reserve Note - Obverse 2004 Federal Reserve Note - Reverse The United States fifty-dollar bill ($50) is a denomination of United States currency. ... A picture of a Silver Certificate (top image is the obverse of the certificate, bottom image is the reverse of the certificate). ... Year 1890 (MDCCCXC) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar). ... Year 1891 (MDCCCXCI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Legal tender or forced tender is payment that cannot be refused in settlement of a debt denominated in the same currency by virtue of law. ... Federal Reserve Districts The United States Federal Reserve System consists of twelve Federal Reserve Banks, each responsible for a particular district, and some with branches. ...


Quote

On admitting the first black student to Harvard University: "If this boy passes the examinations he will be admitted and if the white students choose to withdraw, all the income of the college will be devoted to his education." (Frothingham, p. 299)[2] Harvard University (incorporated as The President and Fellows of Harvard College) is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA and a member of the Ivy League. ...


References

  1. ^ (April 7, 1854) "Thirty-Third Congress". The New York Times. 
  2. ^ Frothingham, Paul Revere. Edward Everett, Orator and Statesman. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1925.

External links

Wikisource
Wikisource has original works written by or about:
Edward Everett
Political offices
Preceded by
Timothy Fuller
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Massachusetts's 4th congressional district

March 4, 1825March 3, 1835
Succeeded by
Levi Lincoln, Jr.
Preceded by
Samuel Turell Armstrong
Governor of Massachusetts
January 13, 1836January 18, 1840
Succeeded by
Marcus Morton
Preceded by
Andrew Stevenson
U.S. Minister to Great Britain
18411845
Succeeded by
Louis McLane
Preceded by
Daniel Webster
United States Secretary of State
November 6, 1852March 3, 1853
Succeeded by
William L. Marcy
Preceded by
John Davis
United States Senator (Class 2) from Massachusetts
March 4, 1853June 1, 1854
Served alongside: Charles Sumner
Succeeded by
Julius Rockwell
Preceded by
Andrew Jackson Donelson
Whig Party vice presidential candidate
1860 (lost)
Succeeded by
(none)
Preceded by
(none)
Constitutional Union Party vice presidential candidate
1860 (lost)
Academic offices
Preceded by
Josiah Quincy III
President of Harvard University
18461849
Succeeded by
Jared Sparks

  Results from FactBites:
 
Edward Everett - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (580 words)
Everett was an unsuccessful candidate for Vice President of the United States in the 1860 election on the Constitutional Union ticket.
Born in Boston, Massachusetts to the Rev. Oliver Everett and Lucy (Hill) Everett, he graduated from Harvard University in 1811, studied theology under the urging of the Rev. Joseph Stevens Buckminster, and was ordained pastor of the Brattle Street Unitarian Church, Boston, in 1814.
Everett was a professor of Greek literature at Harvard University, an overseer of the University, and its president from 1846 to 1849.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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