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Encyclopedia > Edward Douglass White
Edward Douglass White
Chief Justice of the United States
Term of office December 19, 1910May 19, 1921
Preceded by Melville Fuller
Succeeded by William Howard Taft
Date of birth November 3, 1845
Place of birth Lafourche Parish, Louisiana
Date of death May 19, 1921
Place of death Washington, DC

Edward Douglass White (November 3, 1845May 19, 1921), American politician and jurist, was a United States Senator, Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States and the ninth Chief Justice of the United States. He was best known for formulating the rule of reason standard of anti-trust law. Although there has been some speculation that White was in the original Ku Klux Klan, there has never been any conclusive evidence found that supports this. Chief Justice Edward Douglass White as he appeared in Harpers December 24, 1910. ... December 19 is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... -1... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Melville Weston Fuller (February 11, 1833 – July 4, 1910) was the Chief Justice of the United States between 1888 and 1910. ... William Howard Taft (September 15, 1857 – March 8, 1930) was an American politician, the 27th President of the United States, the 10th Chief Justice of the United States, and a leader of the conservative wing of the Republican Party. ... November 3 is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 58 days remaining. ... 1845 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Lafourche Parish is a parish located in the south of the state of Louisiana. ... Official language(s) English and French Capital Largest city Baton Rouge New Orleans at last census; probably Baton Rouge since Hurricane Katrina Area  - Total   - Width   - Length    - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 31st 51,885 sq mi  134,382 km² 130 miles  210 km 379 miles  610 km 16 29°N to... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United... November 3 is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 58 days remaining. ... 1845 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Seal of the Senate The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the Congress of the United States, the other being the House of Representatives. ... Associate Justice or Puisne (pronounced puny) Justice is the title for a member of a judicial panel who is not the Chief Justice. ... The Supreme Court of the United States is the highest judicial body in the U.S. and leads the judicial branch of the U.S. federal government. ... The Chief Justice of the United States is the head of the judicial branch of the government of the United States, and presides over the Supreme Court of the United States. ... The rule of reason is a doctrine developed by the United States Supreme Court in its interpretation of the Sherman Antitrust Act. ... Antitrust is also the name for a movie, see Antitrust (movie) Antitrust or competition laws legislate against trade practices that undermine competitiveness or are considered to be unfair. ... Members of the second Ku Klux Klan at a rally during the 1920s. ...


The grandson of U.S. Marshal Tench Ringgold and the son of Edward Douglass White, a former Governor of Louisiana, White was born in a mansion in Lafourche Parish, La. on November 3, 1845. The White family owned a large plantation that produced sugar there. The plantation grew sugar cane and refined it into a finished product. The United States Marshals Service, part of the United States Department of Justice, is the United States oldest federal law enforcement agency. ... Tench Ringgold U.S. Marshal appointed by President James Monroe and served in the position through the first two years of the administration of Andrew Jackson. ... List of Governors of Louisiana First French Era Sieur Sauvole de la Villantry 1699-1701 Jean Baptiste de la Moyne, Sieur de Bienville 1701-1713 Antonine de la Mothe Cadillac 1713-1716 Jean Baptiste de la Moyne 1716-1717 De lEpinay 1717-1718 Jean Baptiste de la Moyne 1718... Mansion near Almelo, The Netherlands A mansion is a large and stately dwelling house. ... Lafourche Parish is a parish located in the south of the state of Louisiana. ... Official language(s) English and French Capital Largest city Baton Rouge New Orleans at last census; probably Baton Rouge since Hurricane Katrina Area  - Total   - Width   - Length    - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 31st 51,885 sq mi  134,382 km² 130 miles  210 km 379 miles  610 km 16 29°N to... November 3 is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 58 days remaining. ... 1845 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... A plantation is an intentional planting of a crop, on a larger scale, usually for uses other than cereal production or pasture. ... Species Ref: ITIS 42058 as of 2004-05-05 Sugarcane is one of six species of a tall tropical southeast Asian grass (Family Poaceae) having stout fibrous jointed stalks whose sap at one time was the primary source of sugar. ...


He studied at Mount St. Mary’s College, near Emmitsburg, Maryland, and the Jesuit College in New Orleans before attending Georgetown University in Washington, D.C.. For other uses: see Mount St Marys (disambiguation). ... Emmitsburg was founded in 1785 and is located in Frederick County, Maryland, just south of the Mason-Dixon line separating Maryland from Pennsylvania. ... New Orleans is the largest city in the state of Louisiana, United States of America. ... Not to be confused with the University of Georgetown in Georgetown, Guyana or Georgetown College in Georgetown, KY. Georgetown University is a private university in the United States. ... This article is the current U.S. Collaboration of the Week. ...


His studies at Georgetown were interrupted by the American Civil War. White returned home to Bayou La Fourche, where he enlisted as an infantryman in the army of the Confederate States of America under General Tyler and eventually made the rank of lieutenant. He was almost captured by General Godfrey Weitzel's army when they attacked Bayou La Fourche, but he evaded capture by hiding beneath hay in a barn. Later, he was assigned as an aide to General W. N. R. Begle and accompanied him to Port Hudson. Combatants Union (remaining U.S. states) Confederate States of America Commanders Abraham Lincoln† Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,200 Casualties KIA: 110,100 Total dead: 359,500 Wounded: 275,200 KIA: 94,000 Total dead: 258,000 Wounded: 137,000+  The... Army (from French armée) can, in some countries, refer to any armed force. ... Motto: Deo Vindice (Latin: With God As Our Vindicator) Anthem: God Save the South (unofficial) Dixie (popular) Capital Montgomery, Alabama February 4, 1861–May 29, 1861 Richmond, Virginia May 29, 1861–April 9, 1865 Danville, Virginia April 3–April 10, 1865 Largest city New Orleans February 4, 1861–May 1... A Lieutenant is a military, paramilitary or police officer. ...


Port Hudson had a garrison of 18,000 Confederate soldiers, but superior Union forces surrounded it. After a siege lasting weeks, the Confederate forces unconditionally surrendered. White was sent to a Mississippi prisoner of war camp. When he was paroled, he returned to the family plantation, but it lay in ruins, the canefields were barren, and most of the former slaves had left. Battle of Port Hudson Conflict American Civil War Date May 21-July 9, 1863 Place East Baton Rouge Parish and East Feliciana Parish, Louisiana Result Union victory The Siege of Port Hudson occurred in 1863 when 30,000 Union Army troops surrounded the Mississippi River town of Port Hudson, Louisiana. ... A siege is a prolonged military blockade and assault of a city or fortress with the intent of conquering by force or attrition. ... Official language(s) English Capital Jackson Largest city Jackson Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 32nd 125,443 km² 275 km 545 km 3 30°13N to 35°N 88°7W to 91°41W Population  - Total (2000)  - Density Ranked 31st 2,697,243 23. ... Prisoner of War camps Contents // Categories: Substubs | Prisons and detention centres ...


While living on the abandoned plantation, White began his legal studies. He was admitted to the bar and commenced practice in New Orleans in 1868. He briefly served in the Louisiana State Senate in 1874 and as an Associate Justice in the Supreme Court of Louisiana from 1879 to 1880.


He became famous in Louisiana for abolishing the Louisiana Lottery, a hotbed of corruption that was taken before the state's Supreme Court and ordered discontinued in 1894. A ticket from the February 12th, 1889 Louisiana State Lottery The Louisiana State Lottery Company was a private corporation that in the mid-19th century ran the Louisiana lottery. ...


The state's legislature appointed him to the United States Senate in 1891 to succeed J. B. Eustis. He served until his resignation on March 12, 1894, when he was nominated by President Grover Cleveland to be an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. 1891 (MDCCCXCI) was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... March 12 is the 71st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (72nd in Leap years). ... 1894 (MDCCCXCIV) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Stephen Grover Cleveland (March 18, 1837 – June 24, 1908) was the 22nd (1885–1889) and 24th (1893–1897) President of the United States, and the only President to serve two non-consecutive terms. ... Associate Justice or Puisne (pronounced puny) Justice is the title for a member of a judicial panel who is not the Chief Justice. ... The Supreme Court of the United States is the highest judicial body in the U.S. and leads the judicial branch of the U.S. federal government. ...


In 1910, he was elevated by President William Howard Taft to the position of Chief Justice of the United States upon the death of Melville Fuller. At the time, it was a controversial appointment for two reasons. First, White was a Democrat while Taft was a Republican. The media of the day widely expected Taft to name Republican Justice Hughes to the post. Second, White was the second Associate Justice to ever be appointed Chief Justice. Some historians believe that President Taft appointed White, who was 65 years old at the time and overweight, in the hope that White would not serve all that long and that Taft himself might someday be appointed--which, in fact, is just what happened eleven years later.-1... William Howard Taft (September 15, 1857 – March 8, 1930) was an American politician, the 27th President of the United States, the 10th Chief Justice of the United States, and a leader of the conservative wing of the Republican Party. ... The Chief Justice of the United States is the head of the judicial branch of the government of the United States, and presides over the Supreme Court of the United States. ... Melville Weston Fuller (February 11, 1833 – July 4, 1910) was the Chief Justice of the United States between 1888 and 1910. ... Charles Evans Hughes (April 11, 1862 – August 27, 1948) was Governor of New York, United States Secretary of State, Associate Justice and Chief Justice of the United States. ...


White was generally seen as one of the more conservative members of the court. Besides being the originator of the "rule of reason", White also wrote the decision upholding the constitutionality of the Adamson Act, which had mandated a maximum eight-hour work day for railroad employees, in 1916. The Adamson Act was a United States law passed in 1916 that established an eight-hour workday, with additional pay for overtime work, for railroad workers. ... 1916 (MCMXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ...


He married Eleanor Kent, the widow of Linden Kent, on November 6, 1894, in New York City. White died in office and was buried at the Oak Hill Cemetery in Washington, D.C. November 6 is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 55 days remaining. ... 1894 (MDCCCXCIV) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... This article is the current U.S. Collaboration of the Week. ...

Contents


Trivia

E. D. White Catholic High school in Thibodaux, LA is named after White. Thibodaux is a small city located on the banks of Bayou Lafourche in north western Lafourche Parish, Louisiana. ...


As Chief Justice he inaugurated President-elects Woodrow Wilson (twice) and Warren G. Harding.


External links

  • The E. D. White plantation home run by the Louisiana State Museum

Notes

  Paths to Distinction p157


References

  • "Chief Justice White is dead at age 75 after an operation." New York Times, May 19, 1921.
  • "White, not Hughes, for Chief Justice." New York Times, Dec 12, 1910.
Preceded by:
Samuel Blatchford
Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States
March 12, 1894December 18, 1910
Succeeded by:
Willis Van Devanter
Preceded by:
Melville Fuller
Chief Justice of the United States
December 19, 1910May 19, 1921
Succeeded by:
William Howard Taft
Chief Justices of the United States of America Seal of the United States Supreme Court
Jay, Rutledge, Ellsworth, Marshall, Taney, Chase, Waite, Fuller, White, Taft, Hughes, Stone, Vinson, Warren, Burger, Rehnquist, Roberts
The Fuller Court Seal of the U.S. Supreme Court
1894–1895: S.J. Field | J.M. Harlan | H. Gray | D.J. Brewer | H.B. Brown | Geo. Shiras, Jr. | H.E. Jackson | E.D. White
1896–1897: S.J. Field | J.M. Harlan | H. Gray | D.J. Brewer | H.B. Brown | Geo. Shiras, Jr. | E.D. White | R.W. Peckham
1898–1902: J. M. Harlan | H. Gray | D.J. Brewer | H.B. Brown | Geo. Shiras, Jr. | E.D. White | R.W. Peckham | J. McKenna
1902–1903: J. M. Harlan | D.J. Brewer | H.B. Brown | Geo. Shiras, Jr. | E.D. White | R.W. Peckham | J. McKenna | O.W. Holmes
1903–1906: J. M. Harlan | D.J. Brewer | H.B. Brown | E.D. White | R.W. Peckham | J. McKenna | O.W. Holmes | Wm. R. Day
1906–1909: J. M. Harlan | D.J. Brewer | E.D. White | R.W. Peckham | J. McKenna | O.W. Holmes | Wm. R. Day | Wm. H. Moody
January–March 1910: J. M. Harlan | D.J. Brewer | E.D. White | J. McKenna | O.W. Holmes | Wm. R. Day | Wm. H. Moody | H.H. Lurton
March–July 1910: J. M. Harlan | E.D. White | J. McKenna | O.W. Holmes | Wm. R. Day | Wm. H. Moody | H.H. Lurton
The White Court
1910: J. M. Harlan | J. McKenna | O.W. Holmes | Wm. R. Day | Wm. H. Moody | H.H. Lurton | C.E. Hughes
1911: J. M. Harlan | J. McKenna | O.W. Holmes | Wm. R. Day | H.H. Lurton | C.E. Hughes | W. Van Devanter | J.R. Lamar
1912–1914: J. McKenna | O.W. Holmes | Wm. R. Day | H.H. Lurton | C.E. Hughes | W. Van Devanter | J.R. Lamar | M. Pitney
1914–1916: J. McKenna | O.W. Holmes | Wm. R. Day | C.E. Hughes | W. Van Devanter | J.R. Lamar | M. Pitney | J.C. McReynolds
1916–1921: J. McKenna | O.W. Holmes | Wm. R. Day | W. Van Devanter | M. Pitney | J.C. McReynolds | L.D. Brandeis | J. H. Clarke

  Results from FactBites:
 
Edward Douglass White - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (771 words)
Edward Douglass White (November 3, 1845 – May 19, 1921), American politician and jurist, was a United States Senator, Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States and the ninth Chief Justice of the United States.
The grandson of U.S. Marshal Tench Ringgold and the son of Edward Douglass White, a former Governor of Louisiana, White was born in a mansion in Lafourche Parish, La.
White returned home to Bayou La Fourche, where he enlisted as an infantryman in the army of the Confederate States of America under General Tyler and eventually made the rank of lieutenant.
Edward Douglass White (187 words)
Edward Douglass White was born in the parish of Lafourche, Louisiana.
White was captured with the garrison of Port Hudson.
White's most lasting legacy as Chief Justice was the Court's adoption of "rule of reason" in judging antitrust cases.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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