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Encyclopedia > Edward Coke
Sir Edward Coke
Sir Edward Coke

Sir Edward Coke (pronounced "cook") (1 February 15523 September 1634), was an early English colonial entrepreneur and jurist whose writings on the English common law were the definitive legal texts for some 300 years. Image File history File links Edward_coke. ... Image File history File links Edward_coke. ... February 1 is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Events April - War between Henry II of France and Emperor Charles V. Henry invades Lorraine and captures Toul, Metz, and Verdun. ... September 3 is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Moses Amyrauts Traite de la predestination is published Curaçao captured by the Dutch Treaty of Polianovska First meeting of the Académie française The witchcraft affair at Loudun Jean Nicolet lands at Green Bay, Wisconsin Opening of Covent Garden Market in London English establish a settlement... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: God Save the King/Queen Capital London Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq mi  Population    - 2005 est. ... An entrepreneur (a loanword from French introduced and first defined by an Irish economist named Richard Cantillon) is a person who undertakes and operates a new enterprise or venture and assumes some accountability for the inherent risks. ... A jurist is a professional who studies, develops, applies or otherwise deals with the law. ... This article concerns the common-law legal system, as contrasted with the civil law legal system; for other meanings of the term, within the field of law, see common law (disambiguation). ...


Coke was born at Mileham, Norfolk, the son of a London barrister from a Norfolk family. He was educated at Norwich School, and then Trinity College, Cambridge. Norwich School is situated in Norwich, Norfolk, England, and is one of the oldest schools in the country, with a traceable history as far back as 1096. ... Full name The College of the Holy and Undivided Trinity Motto Virtus vera nobilitas Virtue is true Nobility Named after The Holy Trinity Previous names King’s Hall and Michaelhouse (until merged in 1546) Established 1546 Sister College(s) Christ Church Master The Lord Rees of Ludlow Location Trinity Street...


He became a Member of Parliament in 1589, Speaker of the House of Commons in 1592 and was appointed England's Attorney General in 1593, a post for which he was in competition with his rival Sir Francis Bacon. During this period, he was a zealous prosecutor of Sir Walter Raleigh and of the Gunpowder Plot conspirators. He was appointed Chief Justice of the Court of Common Pleas in 1606. In 1613, he was elevated to Chief Justice of the King's Bench, where he continued his defense of the English common law against the encroachment by the ecclesiastical hierarchy, local courts controlled by the aristocracy, and meddling by the King. A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ... Events Rebellion of the Catholic League against King Henry III of France, in revenge for his murder of Duke Henry of Guise. ... In the United Kingdom, the Speaker of the House of Commons is the presiding officer of the House of Commons, and is seen historically as the First Commoner of the Land. ... Events January 30 - The death of Pope Innocent IX during the previous year had left the Papal throne vacant. ... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: God Save the King/Queen Capital London Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq mi  Population    - 2005 est. ... In most common law jurisdictions, the Attorney General is the main legal adviser to the government, and in some jurisdictions may in addition have executive responsibility for law enforcement or responsibility for public prosecutions. ... Events May 18 - Playwright Thomas Kyds accusations of heresy lead to an arrest warrant for Christopher Marlowe. ... Francis Bacon, 1st Viscount St Alban, KC (22 January 1561 – 9 April 1626) was an English philosopher, statesman and essayist but is best known for leading the scientific revolution with his new observation and experimentation theory which is the way science has been conducted ever since. ... Portrait of Walter Raleigh, near age 32, by Nicholas Hilliard, c. ... A contemporary sketch of the conspirators. ... The Chief Justice in many countries is the name for the presiding member of a Supreme Court in Commonwealth- or other countries with an Anglosaxon type of justice, such as the Supreme Court of the United States, the Supreme Court of Canada, the Supreme Court of New Zealand, the Supreme... Events January 27 - The trial of Guy Fawkes and other conspirators begins ending in their execution on January 31 May 17 - Supporters of Vasili Shusky invade the Kremlin and kill Premier Dmitri December 26 - Shakespeares King Lear performed in court Storm buries a village of St Ismails near... Events January - Galileo observes Neptune, but mistakes it for a star and so is not credited with its discovery. ... This article concerns the common-law legal system, as contrasted with the civil law legal system; for other meanings of the term, within the field of law, see common law (disambiguation). ...


Bacon encouraged the King to remove Coke as Chief Justice in 1616, for refusing to hold a case in abeyance until the King could give his own opinion in it. In 1620 Coke became an MP again, and proved so troublesome to the crown that he was imprisoned, along with other Parliamentary leaders, for six months. In 1628, he was one of the drafters of the Petition of Right. == {| align=right cellpadding=3 id=toc style=margin-left: 15px; |- | align=center colspan=2 | Years: 1613 1614 1615 - 1616 - 1617 1618 1619 |- | align=center colspan=2 | Decades: 1580s 1590s 1600s - 1610s - 1620s 1630s 1640s |- tall> 16th century - 17th century - 18th century |} randomised 1616 was a leap year starting on Friday... Year 1620 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Saturday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... Events March 1 - writs were issued in February 1628 by Charles I of England that every county in England (not just seaport towns) pay ship tax by this date. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: Petition of Right The Petition of Right is a document produced by the English Parliament in the run-up to the English Civil War. ...


In 1606, Coke apparently helped write the charter of the Virginia Company, a private venture granted a royal charter to found settlements in North America. He became director of the London Company, one of the two branches of the Virginia Company. Events January 27 - The trial of Guy Fawkes and other conspirators begins ending in their execution on January 31 May 17 - Supporters of Vasili Shusky invade the Kremlin and kill Premier Dmitri December 26 - Shakespeares King Lear performed in court Storm buries a village of St Ismails near... The 1606 grants by James I to the London and Plymouth companies. ... World map showing North America A satellite composite image of North America. ... Virginia Company of London Seal The London Company (also called the Virginia Company of London) was an English joint stock company established by royal charter by James I on April 10, 1606 with the purpose of establishing colonial settlements in North America. ...


One of Coke's greatest contributions to the law was to interpret Magna Carta to apply not only to the protection of nobles but to all subjects of the crown equally, which effectively established the law as a guarantor of rights among all subjects, even against Parliament and the King. He famously asserted: "Magna Carta is such a fellow, that he will have no sovereign." Magna Carta Magna Carta (Latin for Great Charter, literally Great Paper), also called Magna Carta Libertatum (Great Charter of Freedoms), is an English charter originally issued in 1215. ...


Among his most famous cases, Coke wrote Dr. Bonham's Case, which has been much argued about by historians but which is seen by lawyers as the origin of judicial review of legislation. Coke's opinion in Calvin's Case established that subjects of Scotland born after King James VI became James I of England could hold land in England as well as in Scotland, because both Scots and Englishmen owed allegiance to the same king. This case would be important in supporting the idea that English colonists in North America would have the rights of Englishmen. He also wrote Semayne's Case, the origin of many of the rights to freedom from arbitrary searches; the Case of the Monopolies, important in anti-trust; Sutton's Hospital, a seminal case in corporations law; and William Aldred's Case, which may be the birth of environmental law. Published after his death, the Prohibitions del Roi detail his discussion with the King in which he (briefly) convinced a reluctant James that the law is based on "artificial reason" and must be left to lawyers to decide, rather than to the monarch. A legal case decided in 1610 by Sir Edward Coke, chief justice of Englands Court of Common Pleas, in which he asserted the supremacy of the common law in England. ... Judicial review is the power of a court to review a statute, or an official action or inaction, for constitutionality. ... James VI and I (James Stuart) (June 19, 1566 – March 27, 1625) was King of Scots, King of England, and King of Ireland and was the first to style himself King of Great Britain. ... Darcy v. ... The Charterhouse in 1770. ...


Copies of Coke's writings arrived in North America on the Mayflower in 1620, and every lawyer in the English colonies and early United States was trained from Coke's books, particularly his Reports and Institutes (see #References section below), the most famous of which was his property book, The First Institute of the Lawes of England, or a Commentary on Littleton. Both John Adams and Patrick Henry argued from Coke treatises to support their revolutionary positions against the Mother Country in the 1770s. World map showing North America A satellite composite image of North America. ... The Mayflower was the ship which transported the Pilgrim Fathers from Plymouth, England to North Virginia (in what was later to become the United States of America) in 1620, leaving Plymouth on September 6 and dropping anchor near Cape Cod on November 21. ... John Adams (October 30, 1735 – July 4, 1826) was a politician and one of the Founding Fathers of the United States of America. ... Patrick Henry (May 29, 1736 – June 6, 1799) was a prominent figure in the American Revolution, known and remembered primarily for his stirring oratory. ... Events and Trends For more events, see 18th century United States Declaration of Independence ratified by the Continental Congress (July 4, 1776). ...


Under Coke's leadership, in 1628 the House of Commons forced Charles I of England to accept Coke's Petition of Right by withholding the revenues the king wanted until he capitulated. The Petition of Right was the forerunner of the English Bill of Rights and the U.S. Bill of Rights. Events March 1 - writs were issued in February 1628 by Charles I of England that every county in England (not just seaport towns) pay ship tax by this date. ... Charles I (19 November 1600 – 30 January 1649) was King of England, Scotland and Ireland from 27 March 1625 until his execution in 1649. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: Petition of Right The Petition of Right is a document produced by the English Parliament in the run-up to the English Civil War. ... The Bill of Rights 1689 is an English Act of Parliament with the long title An Act Declaring the Rights and Liberties of the Subject and Settling the Succession of the Crown and known colloquially in the UK as the Bill of Rights. ... United States Bill of Rights The Bill of Rights is the name given to the first ten amendments to the United States Constitution. ...


The Delta Chi Fraternity considers Sir Edward Coke as its Spiritual Founder. Delta Chi (ΔΧ) (del-ta Kai) is an international fraternity formed on October 13, 1890 at Cornell University as a fraternity for law students. ...


Quotes

  • The quote believed to have led to the "castle exception" of self-defense:
    • "A man's house is his castleet domus sua cuique est tutissimum refugium i.e. Latin for "and where shall a man be safe if it be not in his own house?” Sir Edward Coke, The First Part of the Institutes of the Laws of England, or, A Commentary on Littleton (London, 1628, ed. F. Hargrave and C. Butler, 19th ed., London, 1832)
  • His famous quote about the common law:
    • "Reason is the life of the law; nay, the common law itself is nothing else but reason… The law which is perfection of reason." (First Institute)
  • "The King himself should be under no man, but under God and the Law."
  • "The Law is the surest sanctuary that a man can take, and the strongest fortress to protect the weakest of all; Lex est tutissima cassis."

This article and defense of property deal with the legal concept of excused (sometimes termed justified) acts that might otherwise be illegal. ... House - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Caernarfon Castle, Wales. ... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ... This article concerns the common-law legal system, as contrasted with the civil law legal system; for other meanings of the term, within the field of law, see common law (disambiguation). ...

References

  • The Lion and the Throne, a biography (ISBN 0-316-10393-4) of Coke by Catherine Drinker Bowen, won the National Book Award.
  • Three volumes of Coke's writings, with translations, notes, commentary, and an introduction, have been published as The Selected Writings of Sir Edward Coke, edited by Steve Sheppard (ISBN 0-86597-316-4). They are available individually as PDF files:
    vol 1 (pp. 1–520), vol 2 (pp. 521–1184), vol 3 (pp. 1185–1468).
    These also contain “The First Part of the Institutes of the Lawes of England: Or A Commentary upon Littleton, Not the name of the Author only, but of the Law it selfe”.
Legal Offices
Preceded by
Sir Thomas Fleming
Lord Chief Justice
1613–1616
Succeeded by
Henry Montagu
Political offices
Preceded by
Thomas Snagge
Speaker of the House of Commons
1592–1593
Succeeded by
Sir Christopher Yelverton

  Results from FactBites:
 
Encyclopedia4U - Edward Coke - Encyclopedia Article (490 words)
Sir Edward Coke (pronounced "cook") (1 February 1552 - 3 September 1634) was a jurist whose writings on the English common law were the definitive legal texts for some 300 years.
Coke was a director of the London Virginia Company, who discussed how slavery could be legalised in their new colony of Virginia.
Copies of Coke's writings arrived in North America on the Mayflower in 1620, and both John Adams and Patrick Henry cited Coke's treatises to support their revolutionary positions against the Mother Country in the 1770s.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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