FACTOID # 10: The total number of state executions in 2005 was 60: 19 in Texas and 41 elsewhere. The racial split was 19 Black and 41 White.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Edward Clark

This article concerns the Confederate governor of Texas. For information on the 1980 Libertarian Party presidential candidate, please see Ed Clark.


Edward Clark (April 1, 1815May 4, 1880) was a Governor of Texas during the American Civil War.


Born in New Orleans, Clark moved to Texas in 1842 and set up a law practice. Clark served in the Texas Annexation Convention and two terms as a state representative in the Texas Legislature, before fighting in the Mexican-American War. When the war ended he served as secretary of state under Governor Elisha M. Pease and as lieutenant governor under Sam Houston. When Sam Houston refused to take an oath of allegiance to the Confederacy, Clark became Governor.


After losing the governor's race by 124 votes to Francis Lubbock, Clark joined the 14th Texas Infantry as a colonel and was later promoted to brigadier general after being wounded in battle. He fled briefly to Mexico at the end of the American Civil War, but returned home to Marshall, Texas, where he died. His grave in the Marshall City Cemetery is marked with a historical marker.




Preceded by:
Sam Houston
Governor of Texas
1861
Succeeded by:
Francis Lubbock



  Results from FactBites:
 
Ed Clark - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (326 words)
Clark was an honors graduate of Dartmouth College and received a law degree from Harvard Law School.
During the campaign, Clark positioned himself as a peace candidate and tailored his appeal to liberals and progressives unhappy with the resumption of Selective Service registration and the arms race with the Soviet Union.
Ed Clark's running mate in 1980 was David H. Koch of Koch Industries, who pledged part of his personal fortune to the campaign in exchange for the Vice Presidential nomination.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m