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Encyclopedia > Edward Brooke
Edward William Brooke III


In office
January 3, 1967January 3, 1979
Preceded by Leverett Saltonstall
Succeeded by Paul Tsongas

Born October 26, 1919 (1919-10-26) (age 88)
Flag of the United States Washington, D.C.
Nationality American
Political party Republican
Spouse Anne Brooke

Edward William Brooke III (born October 26, 1919) is an American politician and was the first African American to be elected by popular vote to the United States Senate when he was elected as a Republican from Massachusetts in 1966, defeating his Democratic opponent, Endicott Peabody, 58%–42%. He was also the first African American elected since Reconstruction, and would remain the only person of African heritage sent to the Senate until Democrat Carol Moseley Braun in 1993. From US Senate website http://www. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... This article is about the U.S. state. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... Leverett A. Saltonstall (September 1, 1892 – June 17, 1979) was an American politician who served as Governor of Massachusetts (1939 - 1945) and as a United States Senator (1945 - 1967). ... Paul Efthemios Tsongas Paul Efthemios Tsongas (February 14, 1941 – January 18, 1997) was a United States Senator from Massachusetts and a member of the United States Democratic Party. ... is the 299th day of the year (300th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... GOP redirects here. ... is the 299th day of the year (300th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A politician is an individual who is a formally recognized and active member of a government, or a person who influences the way a society is governed through an understanding of political power and group dynamics. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... For his grandfather, the educator, see Endicott Peabody (educator). ... For other uses, see Reconstruction (disambiguation). ... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... Carol Elizabeth Moseley Braun (born August 16, 1947) is an American politician and lawyer who represented Illinois in the United States Senate from 1993 to 1999. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ...

Contents

Early years

Born in Washington, D.C., 1919. Upon his graduation from Howard University in 1941. He spent five years as an officer in the segregated 366th Infantry Regiment and saw combat in Italy. Following his discharge, he graduated from Boston University Law School in 1948. For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... Shield of the 366th Infantry Regiment The 366th Infantry Regiment was an all African American (segregated) unit that served in World War I and World War II. During the Second World War it was primarily commanded by Colonel Howard Donovan Queen. ... Boston University School of Law (BUSL) is the law school affiliated with Boston University. ...


The following year, he ran for a seat in the Massachusetts House of Representatives, but lost. He then made two more tries for office, including one for secretary of state, but again fell short in both races. The Massachusetts House of Representatives is the lower house of the Massachusetts General Court, the bicameral state legislature of Massachusetts. ...


He was the chairman of Finance Commission of Boston from 1961 to 1962. Brooke was elected Attorney General of Massachusetts in 1962 and re-elected in 1964. In this position, he gained a reputation as a vigorous prosecutor of organized crime, and coordinated with local police departments on the Boston strangler case.[1] Nickname: City on the Hill, Beantown, The Hub (of the Universe)1, Athens of America, The Cradle of Revolution, Puritan City, Americas Walking City Location in Massachusetts, USA Counties Suffolk County Mayor Thomas M. Menino(D) Area    - City 232. ... The Massachusetts Attorney General is an executive officer of the Massachusetts Government. ... Organized crime or criminal organizations are groups or operations run by criminals, most commonly for the purpose of generating a monetary profit. ... The Boston Strangler is a name attributed to the murderer of several women in Boston, Massachusetts, United States, in the early 1960s. ...


U.S. Senator

Edward Brooke is congratulated by President George W. Bush at the Ceremony for the 2004 Recipients of the Presidential Medal of Freedom, The East Room of the White House.

Brooke served as a U.S. senator for two terms, from January 3, 1967, to January 3, 1979. In 1967, he served on the President's Commission on Civil Disorders. He was a member of the liberal wing of the Republican Party and often had conflicts with President Richard Nixon, particularly in 1970, when Brooke helped lead the movement to stop the Senate confirmation of the President's nominee to the Supreme Court, Harrold Carswell. Brooke was re-elected in 1972, defeating Democrat John J. Droney 62%-34%. However, he lost much of his popularity during his second term after a contentious and widely-publicized divorce. He lost a bid for a third term in the Senate elections of 1978 in the general election to Paul Tsongas. He remains, as of 2008, the last Republican senator from Massachusetts. Image File history File links EBrookePresHonor. ... Image File history File links EBrookePresHonor. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... The Presidential Medal of Freedom The Presidential Medal of Freedom is one of the two highest civilian awards in the United States and is bestowed by the President of the United States (the other award which is considered its equivalent is the Congressional Gold Medal, which is bestowed by an... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... The Kerner Commission was the popular name given to the National Advisory Commission on Civil Disorders, chaired by Illinois governor Otto Kerner, Jr. ... Liberalism is an ideology, philosophical view, and political tradition which holds that liberty is the primary political value. ... Nixon redirects here. ... The Supreme Court of the United States (sometimes colloquially referred to by the acronym SCOTUS[1]) is the highest judicial body in the United States and leads the federal judiciary. ... George Harrold Harold Carswell (December 22, 1919 – July 13, 1992) was a Federal Judge and an unsuccessful nominee to the United States Supreme Court. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The U.S. Senate election, 1972 was an election for the United States Senate coinciding with the landslide re-election of Richard M. Nixon. ... Divorce or dissolution of marriage is the ending of a marriage before the death of either spouse. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The United States Senate election, 1978 was an election for the United States Senate in the middle of Democratic President Jimmy Carters term. ...


Post-Senate Life

After leaving the Senate, he was the head of the Low Income Housing Coalition.


In 1996, he became the first chairman of Alpha Phi Alpha's World Policy Council, a think tank whose purpose is to expand the fraternity's involvement in politics, and social and current policy to encompass international concerns. Brooke currently serves as the council's chairman emeritus and was honorary chairman at the Centennial Convention of Alpha Phi Alpha held in Washington, D.C in 2006. This article is about the institution. ... Emeritus (IPA pronunciation: or ) is an adjective that is used in the title of a retired professor, bishop or other professional. ... Alpha Phi Alpha (ΑΦΑ) is the first intercollegiate fraternity established by African Americans. ...


On June 20, 2000, a newly constructed Boston courthouse-- was dedicated in his honor. The Edward W. Brooke Courthouse is part of the Massachusetts Trial Court system, and houses Boston Municipal Court, Boston Juvenile Court, Family Court, and Boston Housing Court, among others. [2] is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... Nickname: City on the Hill, Beantown, The Hub (of the Universe)1, Athens of America, The Cradle of Revolution, Puritan City, Americas Walking City Location in Massachusetts, USA Counties Suffolk County Mayor Thomas M. Menino(D) Area    - City 232. ...


In September 2002, he was diagnosed with breast cancer and, since then, has assumed a national role in raising awareness of the disease among men. Breast cancer is cancer of breast tissue. ...


In 2004, Brooke was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom — designed to recognize individuals who have made "an especially meritorious contribution to the security or national interests of the United States, world peace, cultural or other significant public or private endeavors." The Presidential Medal of Freedom The Presidential Medal of Freedom is one of the two highest civilian awards in the United States and is bestowed by the President of the United States (the other award which is considered its equivalent is the Congressional Gold Medal, which is bestowed by an...


Namesakes and honors

On April 29, 2006 the Massachusetts Republican Party awarded the first annual Edward Brooke Award to former White House Chief of Staff Andrew Card at their 2006 State Nominating Convention. is the 119th day of the year (120th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Logo of the Massachusetts Republican Party The Massachusetts Republican Party, as its name implies, is the Massachusetts branch of the United States Republican Party. ... Joshua B. Bolten, the current White House Chief of Staff. ... Andrew Hill Andy Card Jr. ...


The father of two daughters and a son, Brooke currently lives in Miami with his wife, Anne. Miami redirects here. ...


See also

United States Army Portal

Image File history File links United_States_Department_of_the_Army_Seal. ... This is an incomplete list of Political appointees in the United States Government whose party was different from that of the President who made the appointment. ...

Bibliography

References

  1. ^ Boston Strangler coordination: WBUR interview
  2. ^ Browse | News Releases | Media Relations | Boston University

External links

Preceded by
Edward McCormack
Attorney General of Massachusetts
1963–1967
Succeeded by
Elliot Richardson
Preceded by
Leverett Saltonstall
United States Senator (Class 2) from Massachusetts
1967–1979
Served alongside: Ted Kennedy
Succeeded by
Paul Tsongas
The Biographical Directory of the United States Congress is a biographical dictionary of all members of both houses of the United States Congress, past and present. ... The Massachusetts Attorney General is an executive officer of the Massachusetts Government. ... Elliot Lee Richardson (July 20, 1920 – December 31, 1999) was an American lawyer and politician who was a member of the cabinet of Presidents Richard Nixon and Gerald Ford. ... Leverett A. Saltonstall (September 1, 1892 – June 17, 1979) was an American politician who served as Governor of Massachusetts (1939 - 1945) and as a United States Senator (1945 - 1967). ... Massachusetts ratified the Constitution on February 26, 1788. ... For other persons named Ted Kennedy, see Ted Kennedy (disambiguation). ... Paul Efthemios Tsongas Paul Efthemios Tsongas (February 14, 1941 – January 18, 1997) was a United States Senator from Massachusetts and a member of the United States Democratic Party. ... Massachusetts ratified the Constitution on February 26, 1788. ... Tristram Dalton (May 28, 1738-May 30, 1817) was an American politician who served as Senator from Massachusetts. ... George Cabot (December 3, 1752-April 18, 1823), a Delegate and a Senator from Massachusetts, and the Presiding Officer of the Hartford Convention, was born in Salem, Massachusetts. ... Benjamin Goodhue (September 20, 1748-July 28, 1814) was a Representative and a Senator from Massachusetts. ... Jonathan Mason (September 12, 1756–November 1, 1831) was a Federalist United States Senator and Representative from Massachusetts during the early years of the United States. ... John Quincy Adams (July 11, 1767 – February 23, 1848) was a diplomat, politician, and the sixth President of the United States (March 4, 1825 – March 4, 1829). ... James Lloyd (December, 1769–April 5, 1831) was a Federalist United States Senator from Massachusetts during the early years of the United States. ... Christopher Gore (September 21, 1758 - March 1, 1827) was a prominent Massachusetts lawyer, Federalist politician, and diplomat. ... Eli Porter Ashmun (June 24, 1770–May 10, 1819) was a Federalist United States Senator from Massachusetts from 1816 to 1818. ... MELLEN, Prentiss, a Senator from Massachusetts; born in Sterling, Worcester County, Mass. ... Elijah Hunt Mills (1776-1829) was an American politician from Massachusetts. ... Daniel Webster (January 18, 1782 – October 24, 1852), was a leading American statesman during the nations antebellum era. ... Rufus Choate Rufus Choate (October 1, 1799–July 13, 1859), American lawyer and orator, was born at Ipswich, Massachusetts, the descendant of a family which settled in Massachusetts in 1667. ... Daniel Webster (January 18, 1782 – October 24, 1852), was a leading American statesman during the nations antebellum era. ... Robert Charles Winthrop Robert Charles Winthrop (May 12, 1809–November 16, 1894) was an American statesman who served in the United States House of Representatives and the United States Senate. ... Robert Rantoul, Jr. ... For other persons named Charles Sumner, see Charles Sumner (disambiguation). ... William Barrett Washburn (January 31, 1820–October 5, 1887) was an American politician from Massachusetts, serving in the United States House of Representatives and as Governor of Massachusetts. ... Henry Laurens Dawes (October 30, 1816 - February 5, 1903) was a United States Senator notable for the Dawes Act. ... Henry Cabot Lodge (May 12, 1850 – November 9, 1924) was an American statesman, a Republican politician, and noted historian. ... This article was imported from the Biographical Directory of the United States Congress and needs to be rewritten and/or reformatted in accordance with Wikipedia styles. ... David Ignatius Walsh (November 11, 1872 - June 11, 1947) was a United States politician from Massachusetts. ... Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr. ... John Kennedy and JFK redirect here. ... Benjamin Atwood Smith II (March 16, 1916 - September 6, 1991) was a United States Senator from the U.S. State of Massachusetts. ... For other persons named Ted Kennedy, see Ted Kennedy (disambiguation). ... Caleb Strong (January 9, 1745 - November 7, 1819) was a U.S. political figure. ... Theodore Sedgwick (May 9, 1746-January 24, 1813), a Delegate, a Representative, and a Senator from Massachusetts and the fifth Speaker of the United States House of Representatives, was born in West Hartford, Connecticut. ... Samuel Dexter (May 14, 1761–May 4, 1816) was an early American statesman who served both in Congress and in the Presidential Cabinet. ... Dwight Foster (December 7, 1757–April 29, 1823) was an American lawyer and politician from Brookfield, Massachusetts. ... Portrait of U.S. Secretary of State Timothy Pickering Timothy Pickering (July 17, 1745 – January 29, 1829) was the third United States Secretary of State, serving in that office from 1795 to 1800 under Presidents George Washington and John Adams. ... Joseph Bradley Varnum Joseph Bradley Varnum (January 29, 1751–September 21, 1821) was a U.S. politician of the Democratic-Republican Party from the state of Massachusetts. ... 2nd Harrison Gray Otis House, Beacon Hill, Boston, Massachusetts. ... James Lloyd (December, 1769–April 5, 1831) was a Federalist United States Senator from Massachusetts during the early years of the United States. ... Nathanial Silsbee (1773-1850) was a American politician from Massachusetts. ... John Davis (January 13, 1787 – April 19, 1854) was an American lawyer and politician. ... Isaac Chapman Bates (1779-1845) was a American politician from Massachusetts. ... John Davis (January 13, 1787 – April 19, 1854) was an American lawyer and politician. ... 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Frederick Huntington Gillett (October 16, 1851–July 31, 1935) was a prominent U.S. politician during the early 20th century. ... Marcus Allen Coolidge (October 6, 1865 - January 23, 1947) was a Democratic Senator of Massachusetts from March 4, 1931 to January 3, 1937. ... Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr. ... Categories: U.S. Secretaries of Commerce | People stubs | United States Senators | 1893 births | 1972 deaths ... Leverett A. Saltonstall (September 1, 1892 – June 17, 1979) was an American politician who served as Governor of Massachusetts (1939 - 1945) and as a United States Senator (1945 - 1967). ... Paul Efthemios Tsongas Paul Efthemios Tsongas (February 14, 1941 – January 18, 1997) was a United States Senator from Massachusetts and a member of the United States Democratic Party. ... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts, in his fourth term of office. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Edward Marshall Brooks Memoir (724 words)
Having settled in Chicago in 1844, the Brooks family were also imbued with a sense of how members of their family had risen to the occasion to fight for their country during the Revolution, and Asa Brooks, Edward's father, further instilled them with abolitionist sympathies.
Thus for Edward Brooks, the decision to volunteer for duty in the Union army during the Civil War was almost inevitable, and on August 6, 1862, he enlisted in an independent company of light artillery, the 3rd Chicago Board of Trade Battery.
Brooks' memories of the engagement, however, were of the heroic performance of the "colored" brigade led by Col. Edward Boughton, which prevented the total annihilation of Sturgis' force.
Maureen Brooks - SCC 20313877 (2093 words)
The dangerous act was the stabbing of Edward Brooks in the chest with a knife.
The offence was aggravated by reason that Maureen Brooks caused the death of Edward Brooks by her dangerous act and that at the time of doing that act she was under the influence of alcohol.
Ms Brooks will be required to place herself under the supervision of the Director or the delegate for a period of 18 months from the date of her release from imprisonment and to obey all reasonable directions as to employment, residence, associates, reporting and assessment, counselling and treatment for substance abuse.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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