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Encyclopedia > Edward Albee
Edward Albee

Edward Albee, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1961
Born March 12, 1928 (1928-03-12) (age 79)
Washington D.C.
Occupation dramatist
Nationality American
Writing period 1958 - present

Edward Franklin Albee III (born March 12, 1928) is an American playwright known for works including Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, The Zoo Story, The Sandbox and The American Dream. His works are considered well-crafted and often unsympathetic examinations of the modern condition. His early works reflect a mastery and Americanization of the Theatre of the Absurd that found its peak in works by European playwrights such as Jean Genet, Samuel Beckett, and Eugène Ionesco. Younger American playwrights, such as Pulitzer Prize-winner Paula Vogel, credit Albee's daring mix of theatricalism and biting dialogue with helping to reinvent the post-war American theatre in the early 1960s. Albee's dedication to continuing to evolve his voice — as evidenced in later productions such as The Goat or Who is Sylvia (2000) — also routinely marks him as distinct from other American playwrights of his era. Image File history File links Edward_Albee. ... Carl Van Vechten (June 17, 1880 – December 21, 1964) was an American writer and photographer who was a patron of the Harlem Renaissance and the literary executor of Gertrude Stein. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 71st day of the year (72nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United... This article is about work. ... In English usage, nationality is the legal relationship between a person and a country. ... is the 71st day of the year (72nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the 1966 film adaptation, see Whos Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (film) Whos Afraid of Virginia Woolf? is a play by Edward Albee that opened on Broadway at the Billy Rose Theater on October 13, 1962. ... The Zoo Story is American playwright Edward Albees first play; written in 1958 and completed in just three weeks. ... The Sandbox is an one act play written by Edward Albee in 1959. ... The American Dream was one of Edward Albees early plays about what life was really like in the typical suburban American family. ... The Theatre of the Absurd, or Theater of the Absurd (French: Le Théâtre de lAbsurde) is a designation for particular plays written by a number of primarily European playwrights in the late 1940s, 1950s, and 1960s, as well as to the style of theatre which has evolved from... Jean Genet (French IPA: ) (December 19, 1910) – April 15, 1986), was a prominent, controversial French writer and later political activist. ... Samuel Barclay Beckett (13 April 1906 – 22 December 1989) was an Irish dramatist, novelist and poet. ... Eugène Ionesco Eugène Ionesco, born Eugen Ionescu, (November 26, 1909 – March 29, 1994) was a French-Romanian playwright and dramatist, one of the foremost playwrights of the Theatre of the Absurd. ... Paula Vogel (born 16 November 1951, in Washington, D.C. to a Jewish father and a Christian mother) is an American playwright. ... Book cover (Methuen) The Goat, or Who Is Sylvia?, a play written by Edward Albee, premiered on Broadway in 2002. ...

Contents

Biography

Edward Albee was born in Washington, D.C. and was adopted two weeks later and taken to Westchester County, New York. Albee's adoptive father, Reed A. Albee, himself the son of vaudeville magnate Edward Franklin Albee II, owned several theatres, where Edward first gained familiarity with the theatre as a child. His adoptive mother was Reed's third wife, Frances. Albee left home when he was in his late teens, later saying in an interview, "They weren't very good at being parents, and I wasn't very good at being a son." He attended the Rye Country Day School, then the Lawrenceville School, where he was expelled. He attended Valley Forge Military Academy in Wayne, Pennsylvania in 1943 and graduated in 1945 at the age of 17. He studied at Choate Rosemary Hall and graduated in 1946, then attended Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut for a year and a half before being expelled for skipping classes and refusing to attend compulsory chapel in 1947. Perhaps ironically, the less than diligent student later dedicated much of his time to promoting American university theatre, frequently speaking at campuses and serving as a distinguished professor at the University of Houston from 1989 to 2003. For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... Westchester County is a primarily suburban county with about 940,000 residents located in the U.S. state of New York. ... Reed A. Albee (April 1886 – August 2, 1961) was a theatre owner. ... Edward Franklin Albee II (October 8, 1857 – March 11, 1930) was a vaudeville impresario, and the adoptive grandfather of Edward Franklin Albee III, the playwright. ... Rye Country Day School Rye Country Day School, or RCDS, is a co-educational, college preparatory school in Rye, New York, in the United States. ... The Lawrenceville School is a coeducational, independent preparatory boarding school for grades 9-12 located on 700 acres in the historic community of Lawrenceville, in Lawrence Township, New Jersey, U.S. five miles southwest of Princeton. ... The Valley Forge Military Academy is an all-male Middle School, High School and College located in Wayne, Pennsylvania. ... Wayne is a community within the Main Line of Pennsylvania. ... Choate Rosemary Hall Choate Rosemary Hall (commonly referred to as Choate) is a New England preparatory school for students (who call themselves Choaties) in grades 9-12, known as the third through sixth forms at the school. ... Trinity College is a private liberal arts college in Hartford, Connecticut. ... Hartford redirects here. ... For other system schools, see University of Houston System. ...


A member of the Dramatists Guild Council, Albee has received three Pulitzer Prizes for drama — for A Delicate Balance (1967), Seascape (1975), Three Tall Women (1994); a Special Tony Award for Lifetime Achievement (2005); the Gold Medal in Drama from the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters (1980); as well as the Kennedy Center Honors and the National Medal of Arts (both in 1996). The Dramatists Guild of America is a professional organization for playwrights, composers, and lyricists working in the U.S. theatre market. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... The Pulitzer Prize for Drama was first awarded in 1918. ... A Delicate Balance is a play by Edward Albee was first produced in New York at the Martin Beck Theatre on September 12, 1966, and was revived at the Plymouth Theatre on April 21, 1996. ... Seascape is a play by the US playwright Edward Albee. ... Three Tall Women is a play by Edward Albee. ... What is popularly called the Tony Award (formally, the Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Theatre) is an annual award celebrating achievements in live American theater, including musical theater, primarily honoring productions on Broadway in New York. ... The American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters was formed in 1976 from the merger of the National Institute of Arts and Letters, which was founded in 1898, and the American Academy of Arts and Letters, which was founded in 1904. ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... The National Medal of Arts is an award and title bestowed on selected honorees by the National Endowment for the Arts. ...


Albee is the President of the Edward F. Albee Foundation, Inc., which maintains the William Flanagan Creative Persons Center, a writers and artists colony in Montauk, New York. Albee's longtime partner, Jonathan Thomas, a sculptor, died on May 2, 2005, the result of a two year-long battle with bladder cancer. Montauk is a hamlet (and census-designated place) in Suffolk County, New York on the South Shore of Long Island. ... Bladder cancer refers to any of several types of malignant growths of the urinary bladder. ...


Plays

The Zoo Story is American playwright Edward Albees first play; written in 1958 and completed in just three weeks. ... The Death of Bessie Smith is a 1959 one-act play by American playwright Edward Albee, written in 1959 and premiered in West Berlin the following year. ... The Sandbox is an one act play written by Edward Albee in 1959. ... The American Dream was one of Edward Albees early plays about what life was really like in the typical suburban American family. ... For the 1966 film adaptation, see Whos Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (film) Whos Afraid of Virginia Woolf? is a play by Edward Albee that opened on Broadway at the Billy Rose Theater on October 13, 1962. ... A Tony Award for Best Play has been awarded since 1947. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Grammy Award for Best Spoken Word Album has been awarded since 1959. ... The Ballad of the Sad Cafe is a 1991 Merchant Ivory film, produced by Ismail Merchant and directed by Simon Callow, starring Vanessa Redgrave and Keith Carradine. ... A novella is a narrative work of prose fiction somewhat longer than a short story but shorter than a novel. ... Carson McCullers, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1959 Carson McCullers (February 19, 1917 – September 29, 1967) was an American writer. ... Tiny Alice, a three act play written by Edward Albee, premiered on Broadway at the Billy Rose Theatre on December 29, 1964. ... This article is about the literary concept. ... James Purdy (July 17th, 1923-) is a noted American novelist, short story-writer, poet, and playwrite who since his debut (63: Dream Palace, 1956) has published over a dozen novels, as well as more than half-a-dozen collections of poetry and short fiction and a handful of plays. ... A Delicate Balance is a play by Edward Albee was first produced in New York at the Martin Beck Theatre on September 12, 1966, and was revived at the Plymouth Theatre on April 21, 1996. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... Studio recording Breakfast at Tiffanys is one of the most notorious flops in the history of Broadway musicals. ... A novella is a narrative work of prose fiction somewhat longer than a short story but shorter than a novel. ... Truman Capote (pronounced ) (30 September 1924 – 25 August 1984) was an American writer whose non-fiction, stories, novels and plays are recognized literary classics, including the novella Breakfast at Tiffanys (1958) and In Cold Blood (1965), which he labeled a non-fiction novel. ... Everything in the Garden is a play by Giles Cooper and Edward Albee, first produced in 1962 at the London Arts Theatre Club. ... Giles Stannus Cooper was born near Dublin, Ireland, in 1918, and brought up in London. ... The subject of this article may not satisfy the notability guideline or one of the following guidelines for inclusion on Wikipedia: Biographies, Books, Companies, Fiction, Music, Neologisms, Numbers, Web content, or several proposals for new guidelines. ... Cover of Quotations from Chairman Mao Tse-Tung with Chinese words Supreme Directives Quotations on a wall Chinese poster saying: Chairman Mao is the Red sun of our hearts. ... Seascape is a play by the US playwright Edward Albee. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... The Lady from Dubuque, a play by Edward Albee, opened on Broadway at the Morosco Theatre on January 31, 1980. ... Lolita (1955) is a novel by Vladimir Nabokov. ... This article is about the literary concept. ... Vladimir Vladimirovich Nabokov (Russian: Влади́мир Влади́мирович Набо́ков, pronounced ) (April 22 [O.S. April 10] 1899, Saint Petersburg – July 2, 1977, Montreux) was a Russian-American, Academy Award nominated author. ... This is a two-act play for three actors by Edward Albee. ... Marriage Play is a drama by Edward Albee. ... Three Tall Women is a play by Edward Albee. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... The poster for the first American production The Play About the Baby is a play by Edward Albee. ... Book cover (Methuen) The Goat, or Who Is Sylvia?, a play written by Edward Albee, premiered on Broadway in 2002. ... A Tony Award for Best Play has been awarded since 1947. ... Peter & Jerry is a play by Edward Albee which adds a first act to his 1958 play The Zoo Story. ... Me, Myself, and I is the title of a number of songs: Me, Myself, and I (1937 song) popularized by Billie Holiday. ...

Non Dramatic Writings

  • Stretching My Mind: Essays 1960-2005 (Avalon Publishing, 2005)

Quotes

  • "What could be worse than getting to the end of your life and realizing you hadn't lived it?"
  • " A usefully lived life is probably going to be, ultimately, more satisfying." [1]
  • "Writing should be useful. If it can't instruct people a little bit more about the responsibilities of consciousness there's no point in doing it."
  • "If you're willing to fail interestingly, you tend to succeed interestingly."
  • "That's what happens in plays, yes? The shit hits the fan."
  • "Creativity is magic. Don't examine it too closely." [2]

Discography

  • Mark Richman & William Daniels in The Zoo Story by Edward Albee - Directed by Arthur Luce Klein (LP, Spoken Arts SA 808)

"Creativity is like black magic. We shouldn't talk about it"


References

  1. ^ http://www.achievement.org/autodoc/page/alb1int-6
  2. ^ http://www.nytimes.com/2007/11/11/theater/11gree.html?ref=arts

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Edward Albee - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (592 words)
Edward Albee was born in Washington, DC and was adopted two weeks later and taken to Westchester County, New York.
Albee left home when he was in his late teens, later saying in an interview, "They weren't very good at being parents, and I wasn't very good at being a son." He attended the Rye Country Day School, then the Lawrenceville School, where he was expelled.
Albee is the President of the Edward F. Albee Foundation, Inc., which maintains the William Flanagan Creative Persons Center (a writers and artists colony in Montauk, NY).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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