FACTOID # 9: The bookmobile capital of America is Kentucky.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Edward, the Black Prince
English Royalty
House of Plantagenet

Armorial of Plantagenet
Edward III
   Edward, Prince of Wales
   Lionel, Duke of Clarence
   John, Duke of Lancaster
   Edmund, Duke of York
   Thomas, Duke of Gloucester
   Joan of England
   Isabella, Countess of Bedford
Grandchildren
    Richard II
    Philippa, Countess of Ulster
    Philippa, Queen of Portugal
    Elizabeth, Baroness Fanhope and Milbroke
    Henry IV
    Katherine, Queen of Castile
    Edward, Duke of York
    Richard, Earl of Cambridge
    Constance of York
    Anne, Countess of Eu

Edward of Woodstock, Prince of Wales, KG (15 June 13308 June 1376), popularly known as the Black Prince, was the eldest son of King Edward III of England and Philippa of Hainault, and father to King Richard II of England. Edward, an exceptional military leader and popular during his life, died one year before his father and so never ruled as king (becoming the first English Prince of Wales to suffer that fate). The throne passed instead to his son Richard, a minor, upon the death of Edward III. This article is about the monarchy of the United Kingdom, one of sixteen that share a common monarch; for information about this constitutional relationship, see Commonwealth realm; for information on the reigning monarch, see Elizabeth II. For information about other Commonwealth realm monarchies, as well as other relevant articles, see... The House of Plantagenet (IPA: ), also called the House of Anjou, or Angevin dynasty was originally a noble family from France, which ruled the County of Anjou. ... // Categories: | ... This article is about the King of England. ... Lionel of Antwerp, Duke of Clarence, (November 29, 1338 – October 7, 1368) was the second son of Edward III of England and Philippa of Hainault. ... John of Gaunt John of Gaunt John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster (March 6, 1340 – February 3, 1399) was the third surviving son of King Edward III of England and Philippa of Hainault. ... Edmund of Langley, 1st Duke of York (June 5, 1341 – August 1, 1402) was a younger son of King Edward III of England and Philippa of Hainault, the fourth of the five sons of the Royal couple who lived to adulthood. ... Thomas of Woodstock redirects here. ... Joan of England (1335-1348) was the daughter of King Edward III of England and his queen, Philippa of Hainault. ... Isabella Plantagenet, also known as Dame Isabella de Coucy (16 June 1332- either April 1379, or 1382), was the daughter of Edward III of England and Philippa of Hainault. ... Richard II (January 6, 1367 – February 14, 1400) was King of England from 1377 until he was deposed in 1399. ... Philippa Plantagenet, (16 August 1355 – 5 January 1380/1381), Countess of Ulster sui juris, was the daughter and only child of Lionel of Antwerp, 1st Duke of Clarence and Elizabeth de Burgh, 4th Countess of Ulster. ... Philippa of Lancaster (1359 - July 19, 1415) was an English princess, daughter of John of Gaunt, 1st Duke of Lancaster by his wife and cousin Blanche of Lancaster. ... Henry IV (3 April 1367 – 20 March 1413) was the King of England and France and Lord of Ireland from 1399 to 1413. ... Katherine of Lancaster (also known as Catherine Plantagenet and as Queen Catalina of Castile and Leon) (1372/1373 – 2 June 1418) was the daughter of John of Gaunt, 1st Duke of Lancaster, and his second wife, Constance of Castile. ... Edward of Norwich, 2nd Duke of York and 1st Duke of Aumale (1373 - 25 October 1415) died by drowning in mud at the Battle of Agincourt, the major English casualty in that battle. ... Richard of Conisburgh, 3rd Earl of Cambridge (c. ... Constance of York (c. ... Anne of Gloucester (1383-October 16, 1438) was the eldest daughter of Thomas of Woodstock, Duke of Gloucester and Eleanor de Bohun. ... This article is about the title Prince of Wales. ... The insignia of a knight of the Order of the Garter. ... is the 166th day of the year (167th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events The Bulgars under Michael III are beaten by the Serbs at Velbuzhd, and large parts of Bulgaria fall to Serbia. ... is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events March – The treaty between England and France is extended until April of 1377. ... This article is about the King of England. ... Philippa of Hainault Philippa of Hainault (~1314 - August 15, 1369) was the Queen consort of Edward III of England. ... Richard II (January 6, 1367 – February 14, 1400) was King of England from 1377 until he was deposed in 1399. ... In law, the term minor (also infant or infancy) is used to refer to a person who is under the age in which one legally assumes adulthood and is legally granted rights afforded to adults in society. ...

Contents

Life

Edward George Harrison Stoke was born on June 15, 1330 at Woodstock Palace in Oxfordshire. Edward was created Earl of Chester in 1333, Duke of Cornwall in 1337 (the first creation of an English duke) and finally invested as Prince of Wales in 1343. In England Edward served as a symbolic regent for periods in 1339, 1340, and 1342 while Edward III was on campaign. He was expected to attend all council meetings, and he performed the negotiations with the papacy about the war in 1337. is the 166th day of the year (167th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events The Bulgars under Michael III are beaten by the Serbs at Velbuzhd, and large parts of Bulgaria fall to Serbia. ... Woodstock Palace was a royal residence in the Oxfordshire town of Woodstock. ... Oxfordshire (abbreviated Oxon, from the Latinised form Oxonia) is a county in the South East of England, bordering on Northamptonshire, Buckinghamshire, Berkshire, Wiltshire, Gloucestershire, and Warwickshire. ... The Earldom of Chester is one of the few palatine earldoms in England. ... The Dukedom of Cornwall was the first dukedom created in the peerage of England. ... // March 16 - Edward, the Black Prince is created Duke of Cornwall. ... This article is about the nobility title. ... This article is about the title Prince of Wales. ... The Pope is the Catholic Bishop and patriarch of Rome, and head of the Roman Catholic Church and the Eastern Catholic Churches. ...


Edward had been raised with his cousin Joan, "The Fair Maid of Kent"[1] Edward gained Innocent VI's papal permission and absolution for this marriage to a blood-relative (as had Edward III when marrying Philippa of Hainaut, being her second cousin) and married Joan in 10 October 1361 at Windsor Castle, prompting some controversy, mainly because of Joan's chequered marital history and the fact that marriage to an Englishwoman wasted an opportunity to form an alliance with a foreign power. Joan, Countess of Kent, Princess of Wales (September 29, 1328 – August 7, 1385) is known to history as The Fair Maid of Kent, and was the wife and cousin of Edward, the Black Prince. ... Innocent VI, né Étienne Aubert (1282 or 1295 – September 12, 1362), Pope at Avignon from 1352 to 1362, the successor of Pope Clement VI (1342–52), was a native of the hamlet of Les Monts, diocese of Limoges (today part of the commune of Beyssac, département of Corrèze... is the 283rd day of the year (284th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Founding of the University of Pavia, Italy. ... This article is about the castle in Windsor. ... Joan, Countess of Kent, Princess of Wales (September 29, 1328 – August 7, 1385) is known to history as The Fair Maid of Kent, and was the wife and cousin of Edward, the Black Prince. ...


When in England, Edward's chief residence was at Wallingford Castle in Berkshire (now Oxfordshire). For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Wallingford Castle 1913. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Oxfordshire (abbreviated Oxon, from the Latinised form Oxonia) is a county in the South East of England, bordering on Northamptonshire, Buckinghamshire, Berkshire, Wiltshire, Gloucestershire, and Warwickshire. ...


He served as the king's representative in Aquitaine, where he and Joan kept a court which was considered among the most brilliant of the time. It was the resort of exiled kings, like James of Majorca and Pedro of Castile. (Region flag) (Region logo) Location Administration Capital Regional President Departments Dordogne Gironde Landes Lot-et-Garonne Pyrénées-Atlantiques Arrondissements 18 Cantons 235 Communes 2,296 Statistics Land area1 41,308 km² Population (Ranked 6th)  - January 1, 2006 est. ... Pedro of Castile (1290, Valladolid – 1319), Infante of Castile and Lord of Los Cameros, was the son of Sancho IV of Castile and his wife Maria de Molina. ...


Pedro, thrust from his throne by his illegitimate brother, Henry of Trastamara, offered Edward the lordship of Biscay in 1367, in return for the Black Prince's aid in recovering his throne. Edward was successful in the battle of Navarrete in which he soundly defeated the combined French and Spanish forces led by Bertrand du Guesclin. Henry of Trastamara (January 13, 1334 Sevilla - May 29, 1379 Santo Domingo de la Calzada), was the illegitimate son of Alfonso XI of Castile and Leonora de Guzman, and half brother to Peter I of Castile the Cruel. ... For other uses, see Biscay (disambiguation). ... The Battle of Nájera from a fifteenth-century manuscript. ... Statue of Bertrand du Guesclin in Dinan Bertrand du Guesclin at the Saint-Denis Basilica, near Paris Bertrand du Guesclin (c. ...


During this period, he fathered two sons: Edward (27 January 1365 - 1372), who died at the age of 6; and Richard, born at Bordeaux in 1367 and often called Richard of Bordeaux, who would later rule as Richard II of England. is the 27th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Foundation of the University of Vienna Births John de Ros, 6th Baron de Ros (died 1394) Thomas de Mowbray, 1st Duke of Norfolk (died 1399) Deaths May 17 - Louis VI the Roman, elector of Brandenburg (born 1328) July 27 - Duke Rudolf IV of Austria (born 1339) Categories: 1365 ... In this year, the city of Aachen, Germany begins adding a Roman numeral Anno Domini date to a few of its coins. ... Richard II (January 6, 1367 – February 14, 1400) was King of England from 1377 until he was deposed in 1399. ...


The Black Prince returned to England in January 1371 and died a few years later after a long wasting illness that may have been cancer.


Emblem

A painted carving on the main gate of Oriel College, Oxford depicting the emblem of the Prince of Wales
A painted carving on the main gate of Oriel College, Oxford depicting the emblem of the Prince of Wales

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (824x848, 82 KB) Summary Photograph of a painted carving of the Prince of Wales three feathers on the main gate of Oriel College, Oxford. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (824x848, 82 KB) Summary Photograph of a painted carving of the Prince of Wales three feathers on the main gate of Oriel College, Oxford. ... College name Oriel College Named after Blessed Virgin Mary Established 1324 Sister College Clare College, Cambridge Trinity College, Dublin Provost Sir Derek Morris JCR President Frank Hardee Undergraduates 304 Graduates 158 Homepage Boatclub Oriel College (in full: The House of Blessed Mary the Virgin in Oxford commonly called Oriel College... This article is about the city of Oxford in England. ... Heraldic badges were common in the Middle Ages particularly in England. ... The badge of the Prince of Wales The Prince of Waless feathers is the heraldic badge of the Prince of Wales. ...

Edward and chivalry

Edward lived in a century of decline for the knightly ideal of chivalry. The formation of the Order of the Garter, an English royal order of which Edward was a founding member, signified a shift towards patriotism and away from the crusader mentality that characterized England in the previous two centuries. Edward's stance in this evolution is seemingly somewhat divided. Edward displayed obedience to typical chivalric obligations through his pious contributions to Canterbury Cathedral throughout his life. For other uses, see Chivalry (disambiguation). ... The insignia of a knight of the Order of the Garter. ... Canterbury Cathedral is one of the oldest and most famous Christian structures in England and forms part of a World Heritage Site. ...

Edward the Black Prince from an illuminated manuscript
Edward the Black Prince from an illuminated manuscript

On one hand, after capturing John the Good and his youngest son at Poitiers, he treated them with great respect, at one point giving John leave to return home, and reportedly praying with John at Canterbury Cathedral. Notably, he also allowed a day for preparations before the Battle of Poitiers so that the two sides could discuss the coming battle with one another, and so that the Cardinal of Perigord could plead for peace. Though not agreeing with knightly charges on the battlefield, he also was devoted to tournament jousting. Image File history File links Plantagenet,_Edward,_The_Black_Prince,_Iconic_Image. ... Image File history File links Plantagenet,_Edward,_The_Black_Prince,_Iconic_Image. ... Jean II, a portrait painted on wood panel ca 1350 (Louvre Museum), the oldest profile portrait in Europe John II the Good (French: Jean II le Bon) (April 16, 1319 – April 8, 1364), was King of France from 1350 to 1364. ... Combatants Kingdom of England Gascony France Commanders Edward, the Black Prince Captal de Buch John II of France Strength 9,000 12,000 Casualties Minimal 2,500 killed or wounded The Battle of Poitiers was fought between the Kingdom of England and France on September 19, 1356, resulting in the... Périgord is a former province of France, corresponding to the current Dordogne département, now forming the northern part of the Aquitaine région. ...


On the other hand, his chivalric tendencies were overridden by pragmatism on many occasions. The Black Prince's repeated use of the chevauchée strategy (burning and pillaging towns and farms) was not in keeping with contemporary notions of chivalry, but it was quite effective in accomplishing the goals of his campaigns and weakening the unity and economy of France. On the battlefield, pragmatism over chivalry is also demonstrated via the massed use of infantry strongholds, dismounted men at arms, longbowmen, and flank attacks (a revolutionary practice in such a chivalric age). Moreover, he was exceptionally harsh toward and contemptuous of lower classes in society, as indicated by the heavy taxes he levied as Prince of Aquitaine and by the massacres he perpetrated at Limoges and Caen. Edward's behaviour was typical of an increasing number of English knights and nobles during the late Middle Ages who paid less and less attention to the high ideal of chivalry, which would soon influence other countries. A chevauchée (French for promenade or horse charge, depending on context) was a method in medieval warfare for weakening the enemy, focusing mainly on wreaking havoc, burning and pillaging enemy territory, in order to reduce the productivity of a region; as opposed to siege warfare or wars of conquest. ... This article is about the French commune. ... , Caen (pronounced ) is a commune of northwestern France. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ...


List of major campaigns and their significance

Coin of Edward, the Black Prince.
Coin of Edward, the Black Prince.
  • The 1345 Flanders Campaign on the Northern Front, which was of little significance and ended after 3 weeks when one of Edward's allies was murdered.
  • The Crécy Campaign on the Northern Front, which crippled the French army for 10 years, allowing the siege of Calais to occur with little conventional resistance before the plague set in. Even when France's army did recover, the forces they deployed were about a quarter of that deployed at Crecy (as shown at Poitiers). Normandy came virtually under English control, but a decision was made to focus on northern France, leaving Normandy under the control of England's vassal allies instead.
  • The Siege of Calais on the Northern Front, during which the inhabitants suffered worst and were reduced to eating dogs and rats.[2] The siege gave the English personal and vassal control over northern France before the temporary peace due to the Black Death.
  • The Calais counter-offensive on the Northern Front, after which Calais remained in English hands.
  • Les Espagnols sur Mer or the Battle of Winchelsea on the English Channel Front, which was a Pyrrhic victory of little significance beyond preventing Spanish raids on Essex.
  • The Great Raid of 1355 on the Aquitaine-Languedoc Front, which crippled southern France economically, and provoked resentment of the French throne among French peasantry. The raid also 'cushioned' the area for conquest, opened up alliances with neighbours in Aquitaine of which that with Charles the Bad of Navarre is most notable, and caused many regions to move towards autonomy from France, as France was not as united as England.
  • The Aquitaine Conquests on the Aquitaine Front, which brought much firmer control in Aquitaine, much land for resources and many people to fight for Edward.
  • The Poitiers Campaign on the Aquitaine-Loire Front, which crippled the French Army for the next 13 years, causing the anarchy and chaos which would inevitably cause the Treaty of Bretigney to be signed in 1360. Following this campaign, there was no French Army leader, there were challenges towards Charles the Wise, and more aristocrats were killed at Crécy and Poitiers than those lost to the Black Death.
  • The Reims Campaign, following which peace was finally achieved with the Treaty of Bretigny. But, on the same terms, England was left with about a third of France rather than a little under half which they would have received through the Treaty of London. This is due to the failure to take Reims which led to the need for a safe passage out of France. As a result, a lesser treaty was agreed to and Edward III was obliged to drop his claims to the French throne. France was still forced to pay a huge ransom of around 4 times France's gross annual domestic product for John the Good. The ransom paid was, however, a little short of that demanded by the English, and John the Good was not returned to the French. Thus, this campaign yielded mixed results, but was mostly positive for Edward. One must also remember Edward III never actually dropped his claim to the throne, and that about half of France was controlled by the English anyway through many vassals.
  • The Najera Campaign on the Castilian Front, during which Pedro the Cruel was temporarily saved from a coup, thus confirming Castilian Spanish dedication to the Prince's cause. Later, however, Pedro was murdered. As a result of Pedro's murder, the money the prince put into the war effort became pointless, and Edward was effectively bankrupt. This forced heavy taxes to be levied in Aquitaine to relieve Edward's financial troubles, leading to a vicious cycle of resentment in Aquitaine and vicious repression of this resentment by Edward. Charles the Wise, king of France, was able to take advantage of the resentment against Edward in Aquitaine. However, the prince temporarily became the Lord of Biscay.
  • The Siege of Limoges in 1370 on the Aquitaine Front, after which the Black Prince was obliged to leave his post for his sickness and financial issues, but also because of the cruelty of the siege, which saw the massacre of some 3,000 residents according to the chronicler Froissart. Without the Prince, the English war effort against Charles the Wise and Bertrand Du Guesclin was doomed. The Prince's brother John of Gaunt was not interested with the war in France, being more interested in the war of succession in Spain.
  • King Edward III and the prince sail from Sandwich with 400 ships, carrying 4,000 men at arms and 10,000 archers for France, but after six weeks of bad weather and being blown off course they are driven back to England.

Crécy redirects here. ... Combatants Kingdom of England Kingdom of France Commanders Edward III of England Jean de Fosseux Strength 34,000 men: 5,300 knights, 6,600 infantry, 20,000 archers, 2,000 Flemish soldiers 7,000 to 8,000 citizens The Siege of Calais in northern France began in 1346, towards the... This article concerns the epidemic of the mid-14th century. ... Calais (Kales in Dutch) is a town in northern France, located at 50°57N 1°52E. It is in the département of Pas-de-Calais, of which it is a sous-préfecture. ... The naval Battle of LEspagnols sur Mer (Spanish on the Sea), or Battle of Winchelsea took place on 29 August (Old Style) 1350 and was a victory for an English fleet of 50 ships commanded by Edward III, with the Black Prince, over a Castilian fleet of 40 ships... Charles II (1332 - 1387), called Charles the Bad, was King of Navarre, Count of Evreux (Comte dEvreux), and Lord of Albret (Sire dAlbret). ... “Navarra” redirects here. ... Location within France Poitiers (population 85,000) is a small city located in west central France. ... ... Reims (alternative English spelling Rheims; pronounced in French) is a city of the Champagne-Ardenne région of northern France, standing 144 km (89 miles) east-northeast of Paris. ... Najera (Nájera in Spanish, Naiara in Basque) is a city located in La Rioja Alta, La Rioja, Spain upon river Najerilla. ... This article is about the French commune. ... Jean Froissart (~1337 - ~1405) was one of the most important of the chroniclers of medieval France. ... Statue of Bertrand du Guesclin in Dinan Bertrand du Guesclin at the Saint-Denis Basilica, near Paris Bertrand du Guesclin (c. ... John of Gaunt, 1st Duke of Lancaster (June 24, 1340 - February 3, 1399), the third surviving son of King Edward III of England, gained his name because he was born at Ghent in 1340. ...

Burial

Tomb effigy
Tomb effigy

He requested to be buried in the crypt of Canterbury Cathedral rather than next to the shrine, and a chapel was prepared there as a chantry for him and his wife Joan (this is now the French Protestant Chapel, and contains ceiling bosses of her face and of their coats of arms). However, this was overruled after his death and he was buried on the south side of the shrine of Thomas Becket behind the quire. His tomb consists of a bronze effigy beneath a tester depicting the Holy Trinity, with his heraldic achievements hung over the tester. The achievements have now been replaced by replicas, though the originals can still be seen nearby, and the tester was restored in 2006. Chantry is a term for the English establishment of a shrine or chapel on private land where monks or priests would say (or chant) prayers on a fixed schedule, usually for someone who had died. ... Saint Thomas Becket, St. ... The Ghent Altarpiece: The Adoration of the Mystic Lamb, interior view, 1432. ... This article concerns the holy Trinity of Christianity. ... Shield Field Supporter Crest Wreath Mantling Helm Compartment Charge Motto Coat of arms elements A coat of arms or armorial bearings (often just arms for short), in European tradition, is a design belonging to a particular person (or group of people) and used by him or her in a wide...


The name "Black Prince"

Although Edward is almost always now called the "Black Prince", there is no record of this name being used during his lifetime. He was instead known as Edward of Woodstock, after his place of birth. The "Black Prince" sobriquet "is first found in writing in Richard Grafton's "Chronicle of England" (1568). [3] Its origin is uncertain; according to tradition, it derived from an ornate black cuirass presented to the young prince by Edward III at the Battle of Crécy. Richard Grafton (died 1572) was a printer and chronicler, printed various ed. ... This article is devoted to the type of armour known as a cuirass. ... Crécy redirects here. ...


It is possible that the name was first coined by French chroniclers in reference to the ruinous military defeats he had inflicted on France or his cruelty in these. Also possible is the idea that Edward garnered the nickname from his explosive Angevin temper; the legendary Angevin temper was associated with his family's line since Geoffrey d'Anjou.


Cultural references

Plays

Edward is referenced in Shakespeare's Henry V in Act 2, Scene 4 Shakespeare redirects here. ... Title page of the first quarto (1600) Henry V, also known as The Cronicle History of Henry the fift, is a play by William Shakespeare based on the life of King Henry V of England. ...

KING OF FRANCE
And he is bred out of that bloody strain
That haunted us in our familiar paths:
Witness our too much memorable shame
When Cressy battle fatally was struck,
And all our princes captiv'd by the hand
Of that black name, Edward, Black Prince of Wales

and again later in Act 4, Scene 7

FLUELLEN
Your grandfather of famous memory, an't please your
majesty, and your great-uncle Edward the Black
Prince of Wales, as I have read in the chronicles,
fought a most prave pattle here in France.

The Black Prince is also prominently referred to in George Bernard Shaw's Saint Joan. From Scene 1: George Bernard Shaw (26 July 1856–2 November 1950) was a world-renowned Irish author. ... Saint Joan is the title of: a 1923 play by George Bernard Shaw a 1957 movie (based on the play) directed by Otto Preminger Saint Joan of Portugal was a Princess of Portugal, daughter of Afonso V of Portugal. ...

ROBERT
Have you heard no tales of their Black Prince who was blacker than the devil himself, or of the English King's father?
...
JOAN
I have heard tales of the Black Prince. The moment he touched the soil of our country the devil entered into him, and made him a black fiend. But at home, in the place made for him by God, he was good. It is always so.

Novels

... The White Company by Arthur Conan Doyle is a historical adventure set during the Hundred Years War. ... Sir Nigel is a historical novel by the British author Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. ... This article is about the writer. ... The Quiet American (1955) is a novel (ISBN 0-09-947839-0) written by British author Graham Greene. ... Molly Costain Haycraft was born in Toronto, Canada, and spent her childhood in Philadelphia, where her father, the well-known novelist Thomas B. Costain, was an editor for The Saturday Evening Post. ... Isabella Plantagenet, also known as Dame Isabella de Coucy (16 June 1332- either April 1379, or 1382), was the daughter of Edward III of England and Philippa of Hainault. ... Anya Seton (January 23, 1904 (although the year is often misstated to be 1906 or 1916) - November 8, 1990) was an American author of historical romances. ... Anya Setons Katherine is a historical novel based largely on facts. ... John of Gaunt, 1st Duke of Lancaster (June 24, 1340 - February 3, 1399), the third surviving son of King Edward III of England, gained his name because he was born at Ghent in 1340. ... Coat of arms designed for Katherine Swynford: three gold Catherine wheels (roet means wheel) on a red background. ... George Raymond Richard Martin, sometimes called GRRM, born September 20, 1948 in Bayonne, New Jersey is an American author and screenwriter of science fiction, horror, and fantasy. ... A Song of Ice and Fire is an award-winning series of epic fantasy novels by American novelist and screenwriter George R. R. Martin. ...

Sculpture

The statue of Edward the Black Prince in Leeds City Square
The statue of Edward the Black Prince in Leeds City Square

A large 1903 equestrian sculpture of the Prince by Thomas Brock can be seen in Leeds City Square. It was a gift from Colonel Thomas Walter Harding, Lord Mayor of Leeds between 1898 and 1899. The choice was probably also a tribute to the future Edward VII, then Prince of Wales, who opened Leeds Infirmary in 1867 and the Yorkshire College buildings (now the University of Leeds) in 1885. The statue is the centrepiece of an array of statues in the square, including more local people such as Joseph Priestley. Image File history File links 800px-Leeds_City_Square_mk2. ... Image File history File links 800px-Leeds_City_Square_mk2. ... Sir Thomas Brock (March 1, 1847 - August 22, 1922) was a British sculptor. ... For other uses, see Leeds (disambiguation) and Leeds City (disambiguation). ... Edward VII (Albert Edward; 9 November 1841 – 6 May 1910) was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, of the British Dominions beyond the Seas, and Emperor of India from 22 January 1901 until his death on 6 May 1910. ... Leeds General Infirmary, also known as the LGI, or more correctly, the General Infirmary at Leeds, is a large teaching hospital based in the centre of Leeds and is part of The Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust. ... The University of Leeds is a major teaching and research university, one of the largest in the United Kingdom with over 32,000 full-time students. ... The University of Leeds is a major teaching and research university, one of the largest in the United Kingdom with over 32,000 full-time students. ... Priestley by Ellen Sharples (1794)[1] Joseph Priestley (March 13, 1733 (old style) – February 8, 1804) was an eighteenth-century British natural philosopher, Dissenting clergyman, political theorist, theologian, and educator. ...


Films

  • Edward, Prince of Wales is the main role played by Errol Flynn in the The Dark Avenger (1955). The film was also known as The Warriors in the USA, and The Black Prince in the UK although the latter seems to have been a working title. In Greece it was aired on TV as The Black Knight.
  • Edward, The Black Prince of Wales, was portrayed by James Purefoy in the 2001 film A Knight's Tale.

Errol Leslie Thomson Flynn (June 20, 1909 – October 14, 1959) was an Australian film actor, most famous for his romantic swashbuckler roles in Hollywood films and his flamboyant lifestyle. ... James Purefoy (born June 3, 1964) is an English actor born in Taunton, Somerset. ... A Knights Tale is a 2001 action-adventure-comedy directed, produced, and written by Brian Helgeland. ...

Games

  • Edward is portrayed in the 2007 PlayStation3 and Xbox 360 video game Bladestorm: The Hundred Years' War by Koei. Within this video game, he is seen as the primary source of backing for the forces of England, aspiring to conquer the oppositionary country of France, no matter what must be sacrificed in the process
  • Edward appears under the name of Black Prince in the game Empire Earth in the English campaign in the fourth and fifth scenario.

The Sony PlayStation 3 (colloquially known as the PS3) will be the new video game console in Sonys PlayStation series. ... It has been suggested that Xbox 360 Elite be merged into this article or section. ... Bladestorm: The Hundred Years War (ブレイドストーム -百年戦争-) is a video game for the Playstation 3 and Xbox 360 platforms. ... Koeis Current Company Logo Koei Co. ... Empire Earth, also known as EE, is a real-time strategy computer game developed by Stainless Steel Studios and published by Sierra Entertainment in November 2001. ...

See also

  • HMS Black Prince, for Royal Navy ships named in his honour
  • Black Prince's Ruby which he forced Pedro the Cruel to give to him after the Spanish campaign for his ungratefulness.
  • A43 Infantry Tank "Black Prince" a British experimental AFV design, essentially a "super Churchill" of which six prototypes were built very late in WWII.
  • Black Prince Cicada, a common cicada from Australia

Five ships of the British Royal Navy have been named HMS Black Prince, after Edward, the Black Prince (1330-1376), the eldest son of King Edward III of England. ... This article is about the navy of the United Kingdom. ... The Black Princes Ruby set in the Maltese cross in the front of the Imperial State Crown of England. ... General characteristics Length 7. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Edward I was Joan's grandfather and Edward's great-grandfather.
  2. ^ H. E. Marshall, Our Island Story, ch XLVII
  3. ^ Encyclopaedia Britannica, 1985, "Edward the Black Prince"

Edward I (17 June 1239 – 7 July 1307), popularly known as Longshanks[1], also as Edward the Lawgiver or the English Justinian because of his legal reforms, and as Hammer of the Scots,[2] achieved fame as the monarch who conquered Wales and tried to do the same to Scotland. ...

Further reading

  • Richard Barber, The Life and Campaigns of the Black Prince, ISBN 0-85115-469-7
  • Tuchman, Barbara, A Distant Mirror: The Calamitous 14th Century, Alfred A. Knopf, New York City, 1978.
  • Life of the Black Prince by the Herald of Sir John Chandos.
  • Royal Berkshire History: Edward the Black Prince including images in both civilian and military dress
  • Guilhem Pepin, 'Towards a new assessment of the Black Prince's principality of Aquitaine: a study of the last years (1369-1372)', Nottingham Medieval Studies, Vol. L, 2006, pp. 59-114.
  • David Green, "Edward, The Black Prince: Power in Medieval Europe", ISBN 978-0-582-78481-9

Barbara Wertheim Tuchman (January 30, 1912 – February 6, 1989) was an American historian and author. ... Sir John Chandos (died 1369) was an English knight. ...

External links

  • Man of War: Edward, the Black Prince (myArmoury.com article)
  • Royal Berkshire History: Edward the Black Prince

Ancestry

Edward, the Black Prince
Born: 15 June 1330 Died: 8 June 1376
English royalty
Preceded by
John of Eltham, Earl of Cornwall
Heir to the English Throne
as heir apparent

15 June 1330 - 8 June 1376
Succeeded by
Richard, Prince of Wales
Peerage of England
Preceded by
Edward II of England
Prince of Wales
1330–1376
Succeeded by
Richard II of England
Preceded by
(new creation)
Duke of Cornwall
1337–1376
Preceded by
(new creation)
Prince of Aquitaine
1361–1372
Succeeded by
(merged with the crown)
Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Duke_of_Cornwall. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Edward the Black Prince (1310 words)
Edward, Prince of Wales, known as "The Black Prince", the eldest son of King Edward III and Philippa of Hainaut, was born at Woodstock on the 15th of June 1330.
In October 1361 Edward married his cousin Joan, Countess of Kent (1328-1385), the daughter and heiress of Edmund of Woodstock, Earl of Kent, the younger son of King Edward I by his second wife Margaret of France.
Edward was better able to conciliate the towns, whose franchises he favored and whose trade he fostered, hoping that they would prove a counterpoise to the aristocracy.
Edward - MSN Encarta (445 words)
Edward was born at Woodstock in Oxfordshire on June 15, 1330, the son of King Edward III of England.
During his lifetime, he was called Edward of Woodstock; the name Black Prince was given him because of the fl armor he wore.
In 1346 Edward accompanied his father on the English campaign in Normandy (Normandie), and during the Battle of Crécy, when he was only 16, the prince won high acclaim for his command of the right wing of the English army.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m