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Encyclopedia > Edo Castle

Edo Castle (江戸城 -jō) was built in 1457 by Ōta Dōkan in what is now the Chiyoda ward of Tokyo, but was then known as Edo, Toshima District, Musashi Province. Tokugawa Ieyasu established the Tokugawa shogunate here, and as the residence of the shogun and location of the bakufu, it functioned as the military capital during the Edo period of Japanese history. Along with the Meiji Restoration, it became the residence of the Emperor of Japan, with the name Kokyo. Some moats, walls and ramparts survive. However, during the Edo period, the grounds were much more extensive, with Tokyo Station and the Marunouchi section of the city lying within the outermost moat. It also encompassed Kita-no-maru Park, the Nippon Budokan Hall and other landmarks of the area. Events University of Freiburg founded. ... ÅŒta Dōkan (太田道灌) (1432-1486) was born as ÅŒta Sukenaga (太田資長) into a daimyo family descending from Minamoto no Yorimasa. ... National Diet Building, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo Yasukuni Shrine, Kudan Kita 3-1-1, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo Otemon, the Great Gate of Edo Castle (Kokyo) Chiyoda (千代田区; -ku) is a special ward in central Tokyo, Japan. ... Tokyo ) , literally eastern capital, is one of the 47 prefectures of Japan and includes the highly urbanized central area formerly known as the city of Tokyo which is the heart of the Greater Tokyo Area. ... Edo (Japanese: 江戸, literally: bay-door, estuary, pronounced //), once also spelled Yedo or Yeddo, is the former name of the Japanese capital Tokyo. ... The article incorporates text from OpenHistory. ... Shogun Tokugawa Ieyasu Tokugawa Ieyasu (previously spelled Iyeyasu); 徳川 家康 (January 31, 1543 – June 1, 1616) was the founder and first shogun of the Tokugawa shogunate of Japan which ruled from the Battle of Sekigahara in 1600 until the Meiji Restoration in 1868. ... The Tokugawa shogunate or Tokugawa bakufu (徳川幕府) (also known as the Edo bakufu) was a feudal military dictatorship of Japan established in 1603 by Tokugawa Ieyasu and ruled by the shoguns of the Tokugawa family until 1868. ... In Japanese history, a shogun (将軍 shōgun) was the practical ruler of Japan for most of the time from 1192 to the Meiji Era beginning in 1868. ... The Edo period (Japanese: 江戸時代, Edo-jidai), also called Tokugawa period, is a division of Japanese history running from 1603 to 1867. ... History of Japan Paleolithic Jomon Yayoi Yamato period ---Kofun period ---Asuka period Nara period Heian period Kamakura period Muromachi period Azuchi-Momoyama period ---Nanban period Edo period Meiji period Taisho period Showa period ---Japanese expansionism ---Occupied Japan ---Post-Occupation Japan Heisei Pre-History/The Origin of History Jomon Period Main... The Meiji Restoration (Japanese: 明治維新, Meiji-ishin), also known as the Meiji Ishin, Revolution or Renewal, was a chain of events that led to a change in Japans political and social structure. ... His Imperial Majesty, Emperor Akihito of Japan Imperial Seal of Japan The Emperor (天皇 tennō, literally heavenly sovereign) is currently a constitutionally-recognized symbol of the Japanese nation and the unity of its people. ... Nijubashi Bridge at the Imperial Palace. ... The moated manor house of Baddesley Clinton in Warwickshire, England Moats (also known as a Fosse) were deep and wide water-filled trenches, excavated to provide a barrier against attack upon castle ramparts or other fortifications. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Separation barrier. ... Marunouchi side of Tokyo Station Closeup of center exit Tokyo Station (東京駅; -eki) is a train station located in the Marunouchi business district of Tokyo, near the Imperial Palace grounds and the Ginza commercial district. ... Skyline of Marunouchi district, viewed from Imperial Palace gardens Marunouchi gate of Tokyo Station Marunouchi (丸の内) is a commercial district of Tokyo located in Chiyoda Ward, between Tokyo Station and the Imperial Palace. ... The Nippon Budokan Hall (日本武道館;Nippon Budōkan) is an arena in central Tokyo. ...


Early history

Around the end of the Heian or the beginning of the Kamakura period, Edo Shigetsugu became the first the warrior to establish his base in the area. He built his residence in what is now the Honmaru and Ninomaru part of Edo Castle. The Edo clan perished in the fifteenth century as a result of uprisings in the Kanto region, and Ota Dokan, a retainer of the Ogigayatsu Uesugi family, built Edo Castle in 1457. The Heian period (Japanese: 平安時代, Heian-jidai) is the last division of classical Japanese history, running from 794 to 1185. ... The Kamakura period (Japanese: 鎌倉時代, Kamakura-jidai; 1185–1333) is a period of Japanese history that marks the governance of the Kamakura Shogunate; officially established in 1192 by the first Kamakura shogun Minamoto no Yoritomo. ... Kanto region, Japan The Kanto region (関東地方 Kantō-chihō) is a geographical area of Honshu, the largest island in Japan. ... Ota Dokan (太田 道灌, ÅŒta Dōkan), 1432-1486, was born as Ota Sukenaga (太田 資長) into a daimyo family descending from Minamoto no Yorimasa. ...


The castle came under the control of the Late Hojo clan. The Siege of Odawara of 1590 left the castle vacant, and when Toyotomi Hideyoshi offered Tokugawa Ieyasu six eastern provinces, Ieyasu accepted, making Edo Castle his base. He later defeated Toyotomi Hideyori, son of Hideyoshi, at the Battle of Sekigahara in 1600, and emerged as the political leader of Japan. The Late Hojo clan is a modern day clan, formed in the U.S., that follows the teachings of a leader, whose traditional name would be Mido. ... Odawara Castle in todays Odawara city, Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan, was sieged three times. ... Hideyoshi in old age. ... Shogun Tokugawa Ieyasu Tokugawa Ieyasu (previously spelled Iyeyasu); 徳川 家康 (January 31, 1543 – June 1, 1616) was the founder and first shogun of the Tokugawa shogunate of Japan which ruled from the Battle of Sekigahara in 1600 until the Meiji Restoration in 1868. ... Grave of Toyotomi Clan at Mount Koya Toyotomi Hideyori (豊臣 秀頼 Toyotomi Hideyori), 1593-1615, was the son and designated successor of Toyotomi Hideyoshi, the general who first united all of Japan. ... Combatants forces loyal to Toyotomi Hideyori forces of Tokugawa Ieyasu Commanders Ishida Mitsunari, others Tokugawa Ieyasu, others Strength 82,000 74,000 Casualties The Battle of Sekigahara or popularly known as the Realm Divide was a decisive battle on September 15, 1600 (on the ancient Chinese calendar, October 21 on...


Edo period

Tokugawa Ieyasu received the title of Seii Taishogun in 1603. Edo Castle was the center of Tokugawa administration. The grounds grew with the addition of Nishinomaru, Nishinomaru-shita, Fukiage, and Kitanomaru to the existing Honmaru, Ninomaru, and Sannomaru. The perimeter measured 16 km. Ieyasu mobilized the daimyo to carry out the construction, which reached completion in 1636, while his grandson Iemitsu was shogun. In Japanese history, a shogun (将軍 shōgun) was the practical ruler of Japan for most of the time from 1192 to the Meiji Era beginning in 1868. ... Daimyo Matsudaira Katamori visits the residence of a retainer. ... Shogun Tokugawa Iemitsu Tokugawa Iemitsu (previously spelled Iyemitsu); 徳川 家光 (August 12, 1604 — June 8, 1651) was the third shogun of the Tokugawa dynasty who reigned from 1623 to 1651. ...


At times, Edo Castle had a donjon in the style typical of castles of Japan. However, earthquakes and fires took their toll, and throughout most of the Edo period (and since), it had no such structure. Despite this, jidaigeki (such as Abarembo Shogun) set in Edo usually depict Edo Castle as having a donjon, and substitute Himeji Castle for that purpose. Another word for the keep of a castle. ... Matsumoto Castle in Nagano Prefecture is a fine example of a Japanese castle. ... An earthquake is a phenomenon that results from and is powered by the sudden release of stress in rocks that radiates seismic waves. ... A large bonfire. ... Jidaigeki (時代劇) is a genre of film and television in Japan. ... Lantern, Megumi (Firefighting company), Abarenbo Shogun Abarenbo Shogun (暴れん坊将軍) was a Japanese television program on the TV Asahi network. ... view from Nishi-no-maru Himeji Castle (姫路城; -jō) is a Japanese castle located in Himeji in Hyogo Prefecture. ...


On April 21, 1701, in Matsu no Ōrōka (the Great Pine Corridor) of Edo Castle, Asano Takumi-no-kami drew his short sword and attempted to kill Kira Kozuke-no-suke for terribly insulting him. This triggered the events of the Forty-seven Ronin. Monument at the location of the Corridor of the Pines at the Imperial Palace (formerly Edo Castle) in Tokyo Asano Naganori (浅野長矩 September 28, 1667 – April 21, 1701) was the daimyo of the Ako han in Japan (1675 - 1701). ... Wakizashi style sword mounting, Edo period, 19th century A wakizashi (脇差, Japanese for sidearm) is a traditional Japanese sword with a shōtō blade between 30 and 60 cm, with an average of 50 cm (between 12 and 24 inches), similar to but shorter than a katana and sometimes longer than... Incense burns at the burial graves of the 47 Ronin at Sengakuji. ...


Modern Tokyo

Many place names in Tokyo derive from Edo Castle. Otemachi ("the town in front of the great gate"), Takebashi ("the Bamboo Bridge"), Toranomon ("the Tiger Gate"), Uchibori Dōri ("Inner Moat Street"), Sotobori Dōri ("Outer Moat Street"), and Marunouchi ("Within the enclosure") are examples.


Edo castle was renamed Tokyo-jō (東京城, "Tokyo castle") in October, 1868, then Kōjō (皇城, "Imperial castle") in 1869, and Kyūjō (宮城, "Palace castle ") in 1888. Finally, it became the Kōkyo (皇居, "Imperial Palace", literally "Imperial Residence") in 1948.

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Tokyo Travel Japan Tokyo Discount Hotels Tokyo Directory (840 words)
Edo-jo (Edo Castle) had the high ground, but that wasn't enough; all around it, at strategic points, he gave large estates to allies and trusted retainers.
All this, the Edo of feudal estates, of villas and gardens and temples, lay south and west of Edo-jo.
The heart of Shitamachi, proud and stubborn in its Edo ways, is Asakusa; the dividing line is Ginza, west of which lie the boutiques and depato, the banks and engines of government, the pleasure domes and caf?s.
Edo Castle - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (574 words)
Edo Castle (江戸城 -jō) was built in 1457 by Ōta Dōkan in what is now the Chiyoda ward of Tokyo, but was then known as Edo, Toshima District, Musashi Province.
The Edo clan perished in the fifteenth century as a result of uprisings in the Kanto region, and Ota Dokan, a retainer of the Ogigayatsu Uesugi family, built Edo Castle in 1457.
Edo Castle was the center of Tokugawa administration.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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