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Encyclopedia > Edna St. Vincent Millay
Edna St. Vincent Millay

Edna St. Vincent Millay, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1933.
Pseudonym: Nancy Boyd
Born February 22, 1892
Rockland, Maine
Died October 19, 1950
Austerlitz, New York
Occupation poet
Nationality American Flag of the United States

Edna St. Vincent Millay (February 22, 1892October 19, 1950) was an American lyrical poet and playwright and the first woman to receive the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry. She was also known for her unconventional, bohemian lifestyle and her many love affairs. She used the pseudonym Nancy Boyd for her prose work. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (708x899, 79 KB) Originally from en. ... Carl Van Vechten (June 17, 1880 – December 21, 1964) was an American writer and photographer who was a patron of the Harlem Renaissance and the literary executor of Gertrude Stein. ... Year 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A pseudonym (Greek: , pseudo + -onym: false name) is an artificial, fictitious name, also known as an alias, used by an individual as an alternative to a persons legal name. ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1892 (MDCCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Welcome to Rockland Rockland is a city in Knox County, Maine, in the United States. ... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Austerlitz is a town located in Columbia County, New York. ... This article is about work. ... The poor poet A poet is a person who writes poetry. ... In English usage, nationality is the legal relationship between a person and a country. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1892 (MDCCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... // Lyric poetry refers to either poetry that has the form and musical quality of a song, or a usually short poem that expresses personal feelings, which may or may not be set to music. ... The Pulitzer Prize in Poetry has been presented since 1922 for a distinguished volume of original verse by an American author. ... The term bohemian was first used in the nineteenth century to describe the non-traditional lifestyles of marginalized and impoverished artists, writers, musicians, and actors in major European cities. ...

Contents

Early life

Millay was born in Rockland, Maine, to Cora Lounella, a nurse, and Henry Tollman Millay, a schoolteacher who would later become superintendent of schools. Her middle name is derived from St. Vincent's Hospital in New York, where her uncle's life had been saved just prior to her birth. Welcome to Rockland Rockland is a city in Knox County, Maine, in the United States. ... Saint Vincents Hospital (zip code 10011) is a hospital in New York City, New York, serving Manhattans Lower East Side and Greenwich Village. ... This article is about the state. ...


In 1904, Cora officially divorced Millay's father for financial irresponsibility, but they had been separated for some years prior. Struggling financially, Cora and her three daughters, Edna (who would later insist on being called "Vincent"), Norma and Kathleen, moved from town to town, counting on the kindness of friends and relatives. Though poor, Cora never traveled without her trunk full of classic literature — including William Shakespeare, John Milton, and more — which she enthusiastically read to her children in her Irish brogue. Finally the family settled in Camden, Maine, moving into a small house on the property of Cora's well-heeled aunt. It was in this modest house in the middle of a field that Millay wrote the first of the poems that would catapult her to literary fame. 1904 (MCMIV) was a leap year starting on a Friday (see link for calendar). ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... For other persons named John Milton, see John Milton (disambiguation). ... Camden, Maine Camden is a town in Knox County, Maine, United States. ...


Cora taught her daughters to be independent and to speak their minds, which did not always sit well with the authority figures in Millay's life. Millay preferred to be called "Vincent" rather than Edna, which she found plain — her grade school principal, offended by her frank attitudes, refused to call her Vincent — instead, he called her by any woman's name that started with a V. [1]


At Camden High School, Millay began nurturing her budding literary talents, starting at the school's literary magazine, The Megunticook, and eventually having some of her poetry published in the popular children's magazine St. Nicholas, the Camden Herald and, significantly, the anthology Current Literature, all by the age of 15.


Millay rose to fame with her poem "Renascence" (1912), and on the strength of it was awarded a scholarship to Vassar College. After her graduation in 1917, she moved to New York City. 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday in the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Vassar College is a private, coeducational, liberal arts college situated in Poughkeepsie, New York, USA. Founded as a womens college in 1861, it was the first member of the Seven Sisters to become coeducational. ... 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar (see: 1917 Julian calendar). ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ...


Writing career

Edna St. Vincent Millay in 1914, photographed by Arnold Genthe.
Edna St. Vincent Millay in 1914, photographed by Arnold Genthe.

In New York, she lived in Greenwich Village. It was at this time that she first attained great popularity in America. She won the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry in 1923, for The Harp-Weaver, and Other Poems. She was the first woman to be so honored for poetry. Her reputation was damaged by poetry she wrote in support of the Allied war effort during World War II. Merle Rubin noted: "She seems to have caught more flak from the literary critics for supporting democracy than Ezra Pound did for championing fascism." Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Self-portrait Arnold Genthe ( 1869- 1942) was a photographer, most well known for his photos of San Franciscos Chinatown and the 1906 San Francisco Earthquake. ... The Washington Square Arch Greenwich Village (IPA pronunciation: ), also called simply the Village, is a largely residential area on the west side of downtown (southern) Manhattan in New York City named after Greenwich, London. ... Year 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the independent states that comprised the Allies. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Literary criticism is the study, discussion, evaluation, and interpretation of literature. ... Ezra Pound in 1913. ... Fascism is an authoritarian political ideology (generally tied to a mass movement) that considers individual and other societal interests subordinate to the interests of the state. ...


In 1943 she was awarded the Frost Medal for her lifetime contribution to American poetry. She was the sixth recipient of that honor, and the second woman. The Frost Medal is an award of the Poetry Society of America for lifetime achievement. ...


Personal life

Millay, who was bisexual, had relationships with several other students during her time at Vassar, then a women's college.[1] In January 1921 she went to Paris, where she met sculptor Thelma Wood, with whom she had a romantic relationship.[2] During her years in Greenwich Village and Paris she also had many relationships with men, including the literary critic Edmund Wilson, who unsuccessfully proposed marriage to her in 1920.[3] In human sexuality, bisexuality describes a man or woman having a sexual orientation to persons of either or both sexes (a man or woman who sexually likes both sexes; people who are sexually and/or romantically attracted to both males and females). ... Vassar College is a private, coeducational, liberal arts college situated in Poughkeepsie, New York, USA. Founded as a womens college in 1861, it was the first member of the Seven Sisters to become coeducational. ... In higher education, particularly in the United States, a womens college is a college (that is, a primarily undergraduate, bachelors degree-granting institution) whose students are exclusively women. ... This article is about the capital of France. ... Thelma Ellen Wood [1] was an American sculptor (July 3, 1901 – December 10, 1970). ... Edmund Wilson (May 8, 1895 – June 12, 1972) was an American writer, noted chiefly for his literary criticism. ...


In 1923, she married Eugene Jan Boissevain, then the 43-year-old widower of labor lawyer and war correspondent Inez Milholland. Boissevain greatly supported her career and took primary care of domestic responsibilities. They lived near Austerlitz, New York, at a farmhouse they named Steepletop. For the fish called lawyer, see Burbot. ... Inez Milholland Inez Milholland Boissevain (born August 6, 1886 in Brooklyn, New York - November 25, 1916 in Los Angeles) was a suffragist, labor lawyer, World War I correspondent, and public speaker who greatly impacted the womens movement in America. ... Austerlitz is a town located in Columbia County, New York. ... Steepletop, or Edna St. ...


Millay's marriage with Boissevain was an open one, with both taking other lovers. Millay's most significant other relationship during this time was with the poet George Dillon, fourteen years her junior, for whom a number of her sonnets were written. Millay also collaborated with Dillon on Flowers of Evil, a translation of Charles Baudelaire's Les Fleurs du mal. Open marriage typically refers to a marriage in which the partners agree that each may engage in extramarital sexual relationships, without this being regarded as infidelity. ... George Dillon (1906-1968) was an editor and poet. ... Francesco Petrarca, or Petrarch, one of the best-known early Italian sonnet writers. ... “Baudelaire” redirects here. ... Les Fleurs du Mal (literal trans. ...


Boissevain died in 1949 of lung cancer. Millay was found dead at the bottom of the stairs in her house on October 19, 1950, having broken her neck in a fall.[4] Lung cancer is the malignant transformation and expansion of lung tissue, and is the most lethal of all cancers worldwide, responsible for 1. ... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In 2006, the state of New York paid $1.69 million to acquire 230 acres of Steepletop. The land will be added to a nearby state forest preserve. Proceeds from the sale are being used to restore the farmhouse with plans to turn it into a museum. State nickname: Empire State Other U.S. States Capital Albany Largest city New York Governor George Pataki Official languages None Area 141,205 km² (27th)  - Land 122,409 km²  - Water 18,795 km² (13. ...


Parts of the grounds of Steepletop, including a Poet's Walk that leads to her grave, are now open to the public. Millay bought Steepletop with her husband in 1925, two years after winning the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry. The Pulitzer Prize in Poetry has been presented since 1922 for a distinguished volume of original verse by an American author. ...


Works

works
works

Her best-known poem might be "First Fig" from A Few Figs from Thistles (first published in 1920): Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (902x1168, 396 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Edna St. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (902x1168, 396 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Edna St. ... 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ...

My candle burns at both ends;
It will not last the night;
But ah, my foes, and oh, my friends--
It gives a lovely light!

Mathematicians recognize her poem "Euclid Alone Has Looked on Beauty Bare" (1922) as an expression of mathematical beauty, or an homage to the geometer Euclid. For other uses, see Euclid (disambiguation). ... Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... An example of beauty in method - a simple and elegant proof of the Pythagorean theorem. ... For other uses, see Geometry (disambiguation). ...


However, many consider "Renascence" and "The Ballad of the Harp-Weaver" to be her finest poems.


Thomas Hardy once said that America had two great attractions: the skyscraper and the poetry of Edna St. Vincent Millay. Thomas Hardy redirects here. ... For other uses, see Skyscraper (disambiguation). ...


Also, she wrote five verse dramas early in her career, including Two Slatterns and a King, The Lamp and the Bell (written for Vassar College), and The King's Henchman (originally an opera). Her most famous verse drama is the often anthologized One Act play Aria da Capo, written for the Provincetown Players. Verse drama is any drama written as verse to be spoken; another possible general term is poetic drama. ... Vassar College is a private, coeducational, liberal arts college situated in Poughkeepsie, New York, USA. Founded as a womens college in 1861, it was the first member of the Seven Sisters to become coeducational. ... For other uses, see Opera (disambiguation). ... The Provincetown Players was a theater company located in Provincetown, Massachusetts on Cape Cod, and famous for producing the plays of American playwright Eugene ONeill. ...


References

Wikisource has original text related to this article:
Author:Edna St. Vincent Millay
  1. ^ a b Epstein, Daniel Mark (2001). What Lips my Lips Have Kissed: The Loves and Love Poems of Edna St. Vincent Millay. New York: Henry Holt. ISBN 0-8050-6727-2. 
  2. ^ Herring, Phillip (1995). Djuna: The Life and Work of Djuna Barnes. New York: Penguin Books, 158. ISBN 0-14-017842-2. 
  3. ^ Milford, Nancy (2001). Savage Beauty: The Life of Edna St. Vincent Millay. New York: Random House, 191-192. ISBN 0-375-76081-4. 
  4. ^ Milford, 508; Epstein, 273.

Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... The original Wikisource logo. ...

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