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Encyclopedia > Edmund Randolph
Edmund Jenings Randolph
Edmund Randolph

In office
1786 – 1788
Preceded by Patrick Henry
Succeeded by Beverley Randolph

In office
September 26, 1789 – January 26, 1794
President George Washington
Preceded by None
Succeeded by William Bradford

In office
January 2, 1794 – August 20, 1795
President George Washington
Preceded by Thomas Jefferson
Succeeded by Timothy Pickering

Born August 10, 1753(1753-08-10)
Williamsburg, Virginia
Died September 12, 1813 (aged 60)
Millwood, Virginia
Political party Federalist
Spouse Sara Elizabeth Nicholas
Profession Lawyer, Politician
Religion Episcopalian

Edmund Jennings Randolph (August 10, 1753September 12, 1813) was an American attorney, Governor of Virginia, Secretary of State, and the first United States Attorney General. Edmund Randolph Portrait of Edmund Randolph by Constantino Brumidi (1805-1880) The two-dimensional work of art depicted in this image is in the public domain in the United States and in those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years. ... Tim Kaine, the current Governor The Governor of Virginia serves as the chief executive of the Commonwealth of Virginia for a four-year term. ... 1786 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1788 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Patrick Henry (May 29, 1736 – June 6, 1799) was a prominent figure in the American Revolution, known and remembered primarily for his stirring oratory. ... Beverley Randolph (September 11, 1753– February 1797) was a American politician from Virginia. ... Seal of the United States Department of Justice The United States Attorney General is the head of the United States Department of Justice (see 28 U.S.C. Â§ 503) concerned with legal affairs and is the chief law enforcement officer of the United States government. ... is the 269th day of the year (270th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1789 (MDCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 26th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1794 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... William Bradford (September 14, 1755–August 23, 1795) was a lawyer and judge from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and the second United States Attorney General in 1794-1795. ... Seal of the United States Department of State. ... is the 2nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1794 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1795 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ... Portrait of U.S. Secretary of State Timothy Pickering Timothy Pickering (July 17, 1745 – January 29, 1829) was the third United States Secretary of State, serving in that office from 1795 to 1800 under Presidents George Washington and John Adams. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1753 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia. ... is the 255th day of the year (256th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1813 (MDCCCXIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Millwood is a town located in Clarke County, Virginia, USA. Categories: Clarke County, Virginia | Virginia geography stubs ... The Federalist Party (or Federal Party) was an American political party in the period 1793 to 1816, with remnants lasting into the 1820s. ... For the fish called lawyer, see Burbot. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A politician is an individual who is a formally recognized and active member of a government, or a person who influences the way a society is governed through an understanding of political power and group dynamics. ... This article is about the Episcopal Church in the United States. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1753 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... is the 255th day of the year (256th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1813 (MDCCCXIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... For the fish called lawyer, see Burbot. ... Tim Kaine, the current Governor The Governor of Virginia serves as the chief executive of the Commonwealth of Virginia for a four-year term. ... Seal of the United States Department of State. ... Seal of the United States Department of Justice The United States Attorney General is the head of the United States Department of Justice (see 28 U.S.C. Â§ 503) concerned with legal affairs and is the chief law enforcement officer of the United States government. ...

Contents

Biography

Randolph was born on August 10, 1753 to the influential Randolph family in Williamsburg, Virginia. He was educated at the College of William and Mary. After graduation he began reading law with his father John Randolph and uncle, Peyton Randolph. In 1775, with the start of the American Revolution, Randolph's father remained a Loyalist and returned to Britain; Edmund Randolph remained in America where he joined the Continental Army as aide-de-camp to General George Washington. The Randolph family was an important Virginia political family, whose members contributed to the politics of Colonial Virginia and Virginia after it gained its statehood. ... Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia. ... The College of William and Mary (also known as William & Mary, W&M or The College) is a small, selective, coeducational public university located in Williamsburg, Virginia, United States. ... John Randolph (1727–January 31, 1784) was an Amertican lawyer in colonial Williamsburg, Virginia. ... For a later governor of Virginia see Peyton Randolph (governor). ... John Trumbulls Declaration of Independence, showing the five-man committee in charge of drafting the Declaration in 1776 as it presents its work to the Second Continental Congress in Philadelphia The American Revolution refers to the period during the last half of the 18th century in which the Thirteen... Britannia gives a heros welcome to returning American Loyalists. ... Illustration depicting uniforms and weapons used during the 1779 to 1783 period of the American Revolution by showing four soldiers standing in an informal group General George Washington, was appointed Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Army on June 15, 1775. ... An aide-de-camp (French: camp assistant) is a personal assistant, secretary, or adjutant to a person of high rank, usually a senior military officer or a head of state. ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ...


Upon the death of his uncle Peyton Randolph in October of 1775 Randolph returned to Virginia to act as executor of the estate, and while there was elected as a representative to the Virginia Convention. He would go on to serve as mayor of Williamsburg, and then as the first Attorney General of the United States under the newly-formed government. For a later governor of Virginia see Peyton Randolph (governor). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ...


He was married on August 29, 1776 to Sara Elizabeth Nicholas, and had a total of six children.


Randolph died on September 12, 1813 while visiting the home of a friend, Nathaniel Burwell of Carter Hall, near Millwood, Virginia, in Clarke County and is buried at a nearby Burwell family cemetery "Old Chapel". Millwood is a town located in Clarke County, Virginia, USA. Categories: Clarke County, Virginia | Virginia geography stubs ... Location in the state of Virginia Formed 1836 Seat Berryville Area  - Total  - Water 462 km² (178 mi²) 4 km² (2 mi²) 0. ...


Political career

Randolph was selected as a delegate to the Continental Congress in 1779, and served there to 1782. During this period he also remained in private law practice, handling numerous legal issues for George Washington among others. The Continental Congress was the first national government of the United States. ...


Randolph was elected Governor of Virginia in 1786, that same year leading a delegation to the Annapolis Convention. The Annapolis Convention was an Assembly of the Counties of Maryland that functioned as the colonys revolutionary government from 1774 to 1776. ...


Constitutional Convention

The following year, as a delegate to the Constitutional Convention, Randolph introduced the Virginia Plan as an outline for a new national government. He argued against importation of slaves and in favor of a strong central government, advocating a plan for three chief executives from various parts of the country. The Virginia Plan also proposed two houses, where in both of them delegates were chosen based on state population. This article discusses the history of the United States Constitution. ... A proposal by Virginia delegates during the Philadelphia Convention of 1787, the Virginia Plan (also known as the Large State Plan) was notable for its role in setting the overall agenda for debate in the convention and, in particular, for setting forth the idea of population-weighted representation in the... Slave redirects here. ...


Randolph was also a member of the "committee on detail" which was tasked with converting the Virginia Plan's 15 resolutions into a first draft of the Constitution. Randolph refused to sign the final document, however, believing it had insufficient checks and balances, and published an account of his objections in October 1787. He nevertheless urged its ratification in 1788, seeing its adoption as having become necessary. Year 1787 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ...

Edmund Randolph
Edmund Randolph

Image File history File links EdRand. ... Image File history File links EdRand. ...

Attorney General

Randolph was appointed as the first U.S. Attorney General in September 1789, maintaining precarious neutrality in the feud between Thomas Jefferson (of whom Randolph was a distant relative) and Alexander Hamilton. When Jefferson resigned as Secretary of State in 1793, Randolph succeeded him to the position. The major diplomatic initiative of his term was the Jay Treaty with Britain in 1794, but it was Hamilton who devised the plan and wrote the instructions, leaving Randolph the nominal role of signing the papers. Randolph was hostile to the resulting treaty, and almost gained Washington's ear. Near the end of his term as Secretary of State, negotiations for Pinckney's Treaty were finalized. Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ... Alexander Hamilton (January 11, 1755 or 1757[1]—July 12, 1804) was an Army officer, lawyer, Founding Father, American politician, leading statesman, financier and political theorist. ... Pinckneys Treaty, also known as the Treaty of San Lorenzo or the Treaty of Madrid, was signed in San Lorenzo de El Escorial on October 27, 1795 and established intentions of friendship between the United States and Spain. ...


Resignation

A scandal involving an intercepted French message led to Randolph's resignation in August 1795. The British Navy had intercepted correspondence from the French minister to the U.S. and turned it over to Washington. Washington was dismayed that the letters reflected contempt for the United States and that Randolph was primarily responsible. The letters implied that Randolph had exposed the inner debates in the cabinet to the French and told them that the Administration was hostile to France. At the very least, Elkins and McKitrick conclude, there "was something here profoundly disreputable to the government's good faith and character." Washington immediately overruled Randolph's negative advice regarding the Jay Treaty. A few days later Washington, in the presence of the entire cabinet, handed the minister's letter to Randolph and demanded he explain it. Randolph was speechless and immediately resigned. Elkins and McKitrick (pages 425-6) conclude that Randolph was not bribed by the French but "was rather a pitiable figure, possessed of some talents and surprisingly little malice, but subject to self-absorbed silliness and lapses of good sense."


After leaving the cabinet he returned to Virginia to practice law; his most famous case was that of defense counsel during Aaron Burr's trial for treason in 1807. This article discusses Aaron Burr (1756-1836), the American politician. ...


External links

Preceded by
Patrick Henry
Governor of Virginia
17861787
Succeeded by
Beverley Randolph
Preceded by
(none)
Attorney General of the United States
September 26, 1789January 26, 1794
Succeeded by
William Bradford
Preceded by
Thomas Jefferson
United States Secretary of State
January 2, 1794August 20, 1795
Succeeded by
Timothy Pickering

  Results from FactBites:
 
Edmund Randolph (1576 words)
Randolph tried to pursue, as usual, a non-partisan course in foreign affairs with a leaning toward France, Washington doing the like.
It is maintained by Randolph’s biographer (M. Conway) that this conduct, and his failure to send for the other dispatches alluded to, indicate Washington’s entire disbelief of the assertions of Fauchet, whose intrigues he well knew (dispatch to Monroe, 29 July, 1795).
Randolph had attended to Washington’s law-business in Virginia, always heavy, steadily refusing payment, and could hardly have been suspected of venality.
From Revolution to Reconstruction: Biographies: Edmund Randolph (631 words)
Edmund attended the College of William and Mary and continued his education by studying the law under his father's tutelage.
During the war Edmund served as an aide-de-camp to General Washington and also attended the convention that adopted Virginia's first state constitution in 1776.
Randolph was a strong advocate of the process of amendment.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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