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Encyclopedia > Edmonton, Alberta
City of Edmonton

River valley west of downtown. Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 1061 KB) This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ...

(Coat of Arms of Edmonton, Alberta) Image File history File links Edmonton_coa. ... The arms were granted on October 28, 1994. ...

(Flag of Edmonton) Image File history File links Edmonton-flag. ...

Location of Edmonton within census division number 11 in Alberta, Canada
Area 683.88 km²
Metro area 9,418.62 km²
Population 712,391 (2005)
Pop'n rank 5th
Metro pop'n 1,016,000 (2005 est.)
Metro rank 6th
Pop'n density 974.0
Location 53°34′N 113°31′W
Altitude 668 metres
Incorporation 1904
Province Alberta
Census Division 11
Members of Parliament Rona Ambrose, Ken Epp, Peter Goldring, Laurie Hawn, Rahim Jaffer, Michael Lake, James Rajotte, John G. Williams
Members of the Legislative Assembly Bharat Agnihotri, Dan Backs, Bill Bonko, Laurie Blakeman, David Eggen, Mo Elsalhy, Dave Hancock, Thomas Lukaszuk, Hugh MacDonald, Ray Martin, Brian Mason, Weslyn Mather, Bruce Miller, Rick Miller, Raj Pannu, Kevin Taft, Maurice Tougas, Gene Zwozdesky
Mayor Stephen Mandel

(Past mayors) Image File history File links Dot-yellow. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (395x740, 20 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Edmonton, Alberta ... Division No. ... Area is a physical quantity expressing the size of a part of a surface. ... The table below is a list of the 100 largest cities (or municipalities) in Canada. ... The below table is a list of the 100 largest Metropolitan Areas in Canada. ... Altitude is the elevation of an object from a known level or datum. ... metre or meter, see meter (disambiguation) The metre (in the U.S., chiefly meter) is a measure of length, approximately equal to 3. ... A Municipal Corporation is a legal defintion for a local governing body, including (but not necessarily limited to) cities, counties, and towns. ... Map of Canada Canada is a federation of ten provinces which, together with three territories, comprise the worlds second largest country in total area. ... Motto: Fortis et liber (Latin: Strong and free) Official languages English Flower Wild rose Capital Edmonton Largest city Calgary Lieutenant-Governor Norman Kwong Premier Ralph Klein (PC) Parliamentary representation  - House seat  - Senate seats 28 6 Area Total  - Land  - Water    (% of total)  Ranked 6th 661,848 km² 642,317 km² 19... The province of Alberta, Canada, is divided into 19 census divisions according to Statistics Canada. ... Division No. ... Members of the House of Commons in the 38th Parliament of Canada, as of November 10, 2005. ... Rona Ambrose, PC, MP, MA (born March 15, 1969 in Valleyview, Alberta) is Canadas Minister of the Environment. ... -1... Peter Goldring (born December 12, 1944 in Toronto, Ontario) is a Canadian politician. ... Laurie Hawn (born 1947) is a retired Lieutenant Colonel of the Canadian Air Force, business person, and federal politician from Edmonton, Alberta. ... Rahim Jaffer (born December 15, 1971) is the Conservative Party of Canada Member of Parliament for the Edmonton-Strathcona district of Alberta. ... Michael Mike Lake is a business person and Conservative Party politician in Alberta, Canada. ... James Rajotte, BA, MA, (born August 19, 1970 in Edmonton, Alberta) is a Canadian politician. ... Categories: People stubs | 1946 births | Members of the Canadian House of Commons ... The Legislative Assembly of Alberta meets in the provincial capital, Edmonton. ... Hon. ... David Eggen, MLA, is a Canadian politician and Member of the Legislative Assembly of Alberta for the riding of Edmonton-Calder. ... Mo Elsalhy is a politician and pharmacist from Alberta, Canada. ... Thomas Lukaszuk (born: April 5, 1979) is a politician from Alberta, Canada and a current member of the Legislative Assembly of Alberta representing the Edmonton Castle Downs district, for the Progressive Conservatives. ... Ray Martin is a Canadian politician. ... Brian Mason is a Canadian politician and current leader of the Alberta New Democrats. ... Bruce Miller, American Attorney born 1945. ... Rick Miller (born July 23, 1960 in Burns Lake, British Columbia) is a politician in Alberta, Canada He represents the riding of Edmonton Rutherford in the Legislative Assembly of Alberta. ... Raj Pannu, Ph. ... Kevin Taft (born September 9, 1955, in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan) is leader of the Alberta Liberal Party and leader of the opposition in the Alberta legislature. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger,greater) is in modern times the title of the highest ranking municipal officer, who discharges certain judicial and administrative functions, in many systems an elected politician, who serves as chief executive and/or ceremonial official of many types of municipalities. ... Stephen Mandel (born July 18, 1945) is a Canadian politician and the current mayor of Edmonton, Alberta. ... List of Edmonton mayors : Matthew McCauley (1892 - 1894) Herbert Charles Wilson (1895 - 1896) Cornelius Gallagher (1896) John Alexander McDougall (1897) William S. Edmiston (1898 - 1899) Kenneth W. MacKenzie (1900 - 1901) William Short (1902 - 1904) Kenneth W. MacKenzie (1905) (second time) Charles May (1906) William Antrobus Griesbach (1907) John Alexander McDougall...

City Manager Al Maurer
Governing Body Edmonton City Council
Time zone Mountain (UTC-7)
Postal code T5A to T6Z
Area Code 780
Official website: City of Edmonton

Edmonton is the capital of the Canadian province of Alberta, situated in the north central region of the province, an area with some of the most fertile farm land on the prairies. It is the second largest city in Alberta (after Calgary) and is the hub of the country's sixth largest Census Metropolitan Area (CMA) with a population of 1,016,000 (2005 est.). A resident of Edmonton is known as an Edmontonian. The council-manager government is one of 2 main variations of representative municipal government (for contrast, also see Mayor-Council government). ... A governing body is a corporate form of management. ... The Edmonton City Council is the governing body of the City of Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. ... A time zone is a region of the Earth that has adopted the same standard time, usually referred to as the local time. ... A Canadian postal code is a string of six characters that form part of a postal address in Canada. ... A telephone numbering plan is a system that allows subscribers to make and receive telephone calls across long distances. ... Area code 780 is a telephone area code in the Canadian province of Alberta, encompassing the northern half of the province. ... Canada consists of ten provinces and three territories. ... Motto: Fortis et liber (Latin: Strong and free) Official languages English Flower Wild rose Capital Edmonton Largest city Calgary Lieutenant-Governor Norman Kwong Premier Ralph Klein (PC) Parliamentary representation  - House seat  - Senate seats 28 6 Area Total  - Land  - Water    (% of total)  Ranked 6th 661,848 km² 642,317 km² 19... Motto: Heart of the new west Area: 712. ...


At 684 km2, Edmonton is also one of the largest cities by area in North America — larger in area than Chicago, Illinois, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and Detroit, Michigan. However, Edmonton also has the one of the lowest population densities in North America — about 67 times less than New York. Flag Seal Nickname: The Windy City Motto: Urbs In Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location Location in Chicagoland and northern Illinois Coordinates , Government Country State Counties United States Illinois Cook, DuPage Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 606. ... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Brotherly Love, Philly, the Quaker City Motto: Philadelphia maneto (Let brotherly love continue) Location Location in Pennsylvania Coordinates , Government Country  State   County United States  Pennsylvania   Philadelphia Founded Incorporated October 27, 1682 October 25, 1701 Mayor John F. Street (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 369. ... Flag Seal Nickname: Motor City, Motown Motto: Speramus Meliora; Resurget Cineribus (Latin for, We Hope For Better Things; It Shall Rise From the Ashes) Location Location in Wayne County, Michigan Coordinates , Government Country State County United States Michigan Wayne County Mayor Kwame Kilpatrick (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 370. ... Flag Seal Nickname: The Big Apple, The Capital of the World[1], Gotham [2], Metropolis Location Location in the state of New York Government Counties (Boroughs) Bronx (The Bronx) New York (Manhattan) Queens (Queens) Kings (Brooklyn) Richmond (Staten Island) Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,214. ...


Edmonton serves as the northern anchor of the "Calgary-Edmonton Corridor" (one of four such regions that, in total, comprise 50% of the Canadian population) and is a staging point for large-scale oilsands projects occurring in the north of the province as well as large-scale diamond mining operations in the Northwest Territories. The Calgary-Edmonton Corridor is a geographical region of the Canadian province of Alberta. ... Tar sands in Alberta The Athabasca Oil Sands (or Tar Sands) is a large deposit of tar sands in north-western Canada located mainly in the province of Alberta and, to a much lesser degree Saskatchewan. ... For other uses, including the shape â—Š, see Diamond (disambiguation). ... Motto: None Official languages Dene Suline, Cree, Dogrib, English, French, Gwichin, Inuktitut, Slavey Capital Yellowknife Largest city Yellowknife Commissioner Tony Whitford Premier Joe Handley (Consensus government - no party affiliations) Parliamentary representation  - House seat  - Senate seats 1 1 Area Total  â€¢ Land  â€¢ Water    (% of total)  Ranked 3rd 1,346,106 km...


Edmonton is Canada's second most populous provincial capital (after Toronto) and is known as a well-rounded cultural, government, and educational centre. It plays host to a year round slate of world-class festivals, earning it the title of Festival City[1]. Among these is included Edmonton's Capital Ex (formerly the Klondike Days Exposition), The Fringe, North America's first and largest fringe event, Edmonton International Street Performer's Festival, Edmonton Folk Music Festival, Cariwest, Canadian Finals Rodeo and many more. It has also hosted many international events, including the 2001 IAAF World Track and Field Championships, the West Edmonton Mall Grand Prix, and the 2005 World Masters Games. It is home to North America's largest mall, West Edmonton Mall, Canada's largest historical park, Fort Edmonton Park, and North America's largest collection of authentic eighteenth century ships-of-the-line. In 2004, Edmonton celebrated the centennial of its incorporation as a city in 1904. The Edmonton Fringe Festival is an annual event held every August in Edmonton, Alberta in Canada. ... Fringe Theatre refers to a series of unjuried theatre festivals often called Fringe Festivals. ... The 8th World Championships in Athletics, under the auspices of the International Association of Athletics Federations, were held at the Commonwealth Stadium, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada between August 3 and August 12 and was the first time the event had visited North America. ... West Edmonton Mall (WEM), located in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada is one of the largest shopping malls in the world, and as such is one of western Canadas major tourist attractions. ... Fort Edmonton, circa 1900 Piper and NWMP lead a parade for costumed interpreters. ...


While traditionally focused on the oil industry, earning the name "Oil Capital of Canada" in the 1940s, Edmonton's economy has worked towards becoming the second most diverse in Canada[2] and now boasts a strong technology sector with major employers such as Telus, Dell, Intuit, Matrikon, BioWare, and General Electric all contributing to a 6.2% GDP growth, the largest in Canada[3]. Edmonton is home of Canadian Western Bank, one of the few chartered bank headquarters west of Toronto. TELUS (TSX: T, NYSE: TU) is a telecom company from Canada, the countrys second-largest telecommunications carrier after Bell Canada, with C$8. ... Dell, Inc. ... Intuit Canada is headquartered in Edmonton, Alberta and has offices in Calgary, Toronto, Sherbrooke and Montreal. ... BioWare Corp. ... The Canadian Western Bank is a bank that is based in Edmonton, and which operates primarily in western Canada. ...

Contents


Geography and location

Edmonton is located near the geographical centre of the province at an elevation of 668 m (2192 ft).


The city is bisected by the North Saskatchewan River, which originates at the Columbia Icefield in Banff National Park and empties, via the Saskatchewan River, Lake Winnipeg, and the Nelson River, into Hudson Bay. It runs from the southwest to the northeast through the city and is fed by numerous creeks throughout the city, such as Mill Creek and Whitemud Creek. This creates numerous ravines, adding to the urban park. Edmonton is situated at the boundary between prairie to the south and boreal forest to the north, in a transitional area known as aspen parkland. The North Saskatchewan River is a glacier-fed river flowing east from the Canadian Rockies to Lake Winnipeg. ... Athabasca Glacier, Columbia Icefield, Canadian Rockies. ... Castle Mountain in Banff. ... The Saskatchewan River is a major river in Canada, approximately 550 km (340 mi) long, flowing roughly eastward across Saskatchewan and Manitoba to drain into Lake Winnipeg. ... Winnipeg Beach, Manitoba, on Lake Winnipeg Lake Winnipeg (52°30′N 97°47′W) is a very large (24,400 km²) lake in central North America, in the province of Manitoba, Canada, about 55 km north of the city of Winnipeg. ... The Nelson River is a river of north-central North America, in the Canadian province of Manitoba. ... Hudson Bay, Canada. ... Prairie refers to an area of land in North America of low topographic relief that principally supports grasses and herbs, with few trees, and is generally of a mesic (moderate or temperate) climate. ... Taiga (SAMPA /taIg@/, from Russian тайга́) is a biome characterized by its coniferous forests. ... The Aspen Parklands Ecoregion // Overview Subsections Central Foothills Peace River Special Features Sand dunes Sand plains Badlands Kame fields Topography Variables Level glacial lakebeds Rolling areas Hummocky Moraine Climate Central Moderate precipitation Moderate temperature Foothills Chinooks Strong winds Peace River Higher precipitation Short summer/Long winter Moderate winds Vegetation There...


Parkland and Environment

Edmonton's river valley constitutes the longest stretch of connected urban parkland in North America, and Edmonton has the highest per capita area of parkland of any Canadian city. The public river valley parks provide a unique urban escape area with park styles ranging from full fledged urban parks to campsite-like roasting pits. This main 'Ribbon of Green' is supplemented by numerous parks located throughout the city, to give a total of 111 km2 of parkland. Most of the city has excellent bike and walking trail connections [4]. World map showing North America A satellite composite image of North America. ...


Edmonton's streets and parklands are also home to one of the largest remaining concentrations of healthy American Elm trees in the world, unaffected by Dutch Elm disease, which has wiped out vast numbers of such trees in eastern North America. Jack Pine, Lodgepole Pine, White Spruce, Blue Spruce, White Birch, Aspen, Green Ash, Basswood, various Poplars and Willows, and Manitoba Maple are also abundant; Bur Oak is increasingly popular. Introduced tree species include Norway Maple, Red Oak, Sugar Maple, Common Horse-chestnut, McIntosh Apple and Evans Cherry. Binomial name Ulmus americana L. The American Elm Ulmus americana is a species of elm native to eastern North America, occurring from Nova Scotia west to southeast Saskatchewan, and south to Florida and central Texas. ... Dutch elm disease is a fungal disease of elm trees, originally native to Asia. ... Binomial name Pinus banksiana Lamb. ... Binomial name Pinus contorta Douglas Lodgepole Pine (Pinus contorta) is a common tree in western North America. ... Binomial name Picea glauca (Moench) Voss The White Spruce (Picea glauca) is a medium-sized evergreen tree growing to 15-30 m tall, rarely to 40 m tall, and with a trunk diameter of up to 1 m. ... Binomial name Picea pungens Engelm. ... Binomial name Betula pubescens Ehrh. ... Species Populus adenopoda Populus alba Populus grandidentata Populus sieboldii Populus tremula Populus tremuloides Aspens are trees of the willow family and comprise a section of the poplar genus, Populus sect. ... Binomial name Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marsh. ... Basswood is the common name of timbers of Tilia species. ... This article is about woody plants of the genus Populus. ... Species About 350, including: Salix alba - White Willow Salix amygdaloides - Peachleaf Willow Salix arbuscula - Mountain Willow Salix aurita - Eared Willow Salix babylonica - Peking Willow Salix caprea- Goat Willow Salix caroliniana - Coastal Plain Willow Salix cinerea - Grey Sallow Salix fragilis - Crack Willow Salix herbacea - Dwarf Willow Salix lanata - Woolly Willow Salix... Binomial name Acer negundo L. Manitoba Maple (Acer negundo), as the species is called in Canada, also known as Ash-leaved Maple or Boxelder in the United States, is a species of maple, which occurs throughout most of North America. ... Binomial name Quercus macrocarpa Michx. ... Binomial name Acer platanoides The Norway Maple (Acer platanoides) is a maple native to eastern and central Europe and southwest Asia, from France east to Russia, north to southern Scandinavia and southeast to northern Iran. ... Binomial name Quercus rubra L. The Northern red oak, Quercus rubra (Quercus borealis in some older references), is an oak in the red oak group (Quercus section Lobatae). ... Binomial name Acer saccharum Marshall The Sugar Maple Acer saccharum is a prominent tree in the hardwood forests of eastern North America. ... Binomial name Aesculus hippocastanum L. The Common Horse-chestnut (Aesculus hippocastanum) is a large deciduous tree, native to a small area in the mountains of the Balkans in southeast Europe, but widely cultivated throughout the temperate world. ... This article is about the apple; for other uses, see McIntosh/MacIntosh (disambiguation) The McIntosh (Mac) is an apple cultivar with red and green skin, a tart flavor and tender, white flesh. ...


Several golf courses, both public and private, are also located in the river valley. The long summer daylight hours of this northern city provide for extended play well into the evening. Golf courses and the park system become a winter recreation area during this season. Cross-country skiing and skating is popular during the long winter. Four downhill ski slopes are located in the river valley as well, two within the city and two immediately outside.


The City of Edmonton has named five parks in its River Valley Parks System in honour of each of "The Famous Five". The Valiant Five or The Famous Five were five Canadian women who, in 1927 asked the Supreme Court of Canada to answer the question, Are women persons? The case came to be known as the Persons Case. ...


Neighbourhoods

See also List of neighbourhoods in Edmonton. This is a list of neighbourhoods in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. ...

Manulife Place on the left, and Commerce Place on the right.
Manulife Place on the left, and Commerce Place on the right.

Edmonton has numerous distinct neighbourhoods. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1536x2048, 1201 KB) Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1536x2048, 1201 KB) Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ...


The downtown core, which has seen increasing redevelopment since the 1997 Capital City Downtown Plan was introduced, is home to the Central Business District (CBD) as well as over 4000 residents. Downtown proper consists of the Commercial Core, Arts District, Rice Howard Way Pedestrian Mall, MacKay Avenue, Jasper West, Warehouse District, and Government Precinct.


Radiating from the core are numerous inner city neighbourhoods such as Glenora, Westmount, Queen Mary Park, Central McDougall, McCauley, and Boyle Street on the north side of the river, while Windsor Park, Garneau, Strathcona, Bonnie Doon, and Strathern line the south side of the river. Several communities survived attempts by the municipal governments of the 1970s to rid the valley proper of all residents: these are Riverdale, Rossdale, Walterdale, and Cloverdale. Edmonton Glenora is a provincial electoral district for the Legislative Assembly of Alberta, Canada. ... Old Strathcona is a Business Revitalization Zone (BRZ) in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. ...


As with any city of its size, the inner communities give way to a collection of suburbs, generally classified as being outside the inner ring road and in extreme cases, outside of Anthony Henday Drive. The most well known of these is Mill Woods, which is home to approximately 85,000 residents. If Mill Woods were a separate municipality, it would be Alberta's third largest city after Calgary and Edmonton. Several new neighbourhoods are currently in formative stages in the South and Southwest, such as MacEwan, Terwillegar, and Rutherford. Highway 216 is the highway designation for the current construction project of a ring road around Edmonton, Alberta, also known as Anthony Henday Drive. ... Mill Woods is a district in the city of Edmonton, Alberta, south of the Whitemud Freeway and east of Calgary Trail. ... Motto: Heart of the new west Area: 712. ...


Several transit-oriented developments (TOD) have begun to appear along the LRT line at Clareview with future developments planned at Belvedere (part of the Old Town Fort Road Redevelopment Project[5]). Another TOD called Century Park [6] is already under construction at the site of what was once Heritage Mall (currently under demolition) at the southern end of the future South LRT line. Century Park will eventually house up to 5,000 residents. High density development in Cambridge, Massachusetts stimulated by Alewife subway station (right foreground) and TOD zoning. ...


An overview of neighbourhoods can be found online [7][8].


Climate

Edmonton has a northern continental climate with extreme seasonal temperatures, although they are not quite as extreme as in Regina or Winnipeg. The average temperature ranges from −16 °C (3 °F) in January to 17 °C (66 °F) in July, although over the course of a year, temperatures as high as 35 °C (95 °F) and as low as −43 °C (−45 °F) may occur. Motto: Nickname: The Queen City Motto: Floreat Regina (Let Regina Flourish) Location City Information Established: 1882 Area: 118. ... Motto: Template:Unhide = Unum Cum Virtute Multorum (One With the Strength of Many) Location City Information Established: 1738 (Fort Rouge),1873 (City of Winnipeg) Area: 465. ...


Edmonton has a continental climate with mild summers and cold winters. Edmonton's climate is dry on average. Summer typically lasts from late June until late August, while winter lasts from November through March. However, winters vary greatly in length and severity.


Edmonton has somewhat dry winters. On average, Edmonton's snowfall is 123.5 cm (48.6 in) per annum, which is much less than many other North American cities[9]. In the wettest month, July, the mean precipitation is 92 mm (3.6 in) [10]. However, extremes can occur such as the 114 mm of rainfall that fell on July 31, 1953. Edmonton receives an average of 477 mm (18.8 in) of precipitation annually, but can vary from year to year, especially during droughts. Summer thunderstorms can be frequent and sometimes severe enough to produce large hail, damaging winds, funnel clouds and even tornadoes. However, tornadoes near Edmonton are far weaker and short-lived compared to their counterparts farther south. Tornadoes nearly as powerful as the F4 tornado which struck Edmonton on July 31, 1987, are very rare. The Fujita scale (F-Scale), or Fujita-Pearson scale, rates a tornados intensity by the damage it inflicts on human-built structures and sometimes on vegetation. ...


Edmonton is the most northerly major city in North America with a metro population of over 1 million. It is at the same latitude as Hamburg, Germany and Liverpool, England. At the summer solstice, Edmonton receives 17 hours and six minutes of daylight, with twilight extending well beyond that. This article is about the city in Germany. ... This article is about the city in England. ... Illumination of Earth by the sun on the northern hemisphere summer solstice The summer solstice is an astronomical term regarding the position of the sun in relation to the celestial equator. ...


Demographics

According to the mid-2001 census, the population estimates there were 937,845 people residing within Edmonton's metropolitan area, located in the province of Alberta, of whom 49.6 per cent were male and 50.4 per cent were female. Children under five accounted for approximately 5.9 per cent of the resident population of Edmonton. This compares with 6.2 per cent in Alberta, and almost 5.6 per cent for Canada overall. 1870 US Census for New York City A census is the process of obtaining information about every member of a population (not necessarily a human population). ... More than one place has the name Edmonton. ... Motto: Fortis et liber (Latin: Strong and free) Official languages English Flower Wild rose Capital Edmonton Largest city Calgary Lieutenant-Governor Norman Kwong Premier Ralph Klein (PC) Parliamentary representation  - House seat  - Senate seats 28 6 Area Total  - Land  - Water    (% of total)  Ranked 6th 661,848 km² 642,317 km² 19...


In mid-2001, 10.5 per cent of the resident population in Edmonton were of retirement age (65 and over for males and females) compared with 13.2 per cent in Canada, therefore, the average age is 35.4 years of age comparing to 37.6 years of age for all of Canada.


In the five years between 1996 and 2001, the population of Edmonton grew by 8.7 per cent, compared with an increase of 10.3 per cent for Alberta as a whole. Population density of Edmonton averaged 99.6 people per square kilometre, compared with an average of 4.6, for Alberta altogether. Motto: Fortis et liber (Latin: Strong and free) Official languages English Flower Wild rose Capital Edmonton Largest city Calgary Lieutenant-Governor Norman Kwong Premier Ralph Klein (PC) Parliamentary representation  - House seat  - Senate seats 28 6 Area Total  - Land  - Water    (% of total)  Ranked 6th 661,848 km² 642,317 km² 19... Motto: Fortis et liber (Latin: Strong and free) Official languages English Flower Wild rose Capital Edmonton Largest city Calgary Lieutenant-Governor Norman Kwong Premier Ralph Klein (PC) Parliamentary representation  - House seat  - Senate seats 28 6 Area Total  - Land  - Water    (% of total)  Ranked 6th 661,848 km² 642,317 km² 19...


At the time of the census in May 2001, the resident population of the Edmonton city authority had 666,104 people, but had 937,845 when encompassing the whole metropolitan area, compared with a resident population in the province of Alberta of 2,974,807 people.


Racial Profile

  • White - 75.69%
  • Asian - 10.15%
  • Aboriginal - 4.62%
  • Indian - 4.24%
  • Black - 1.97%
  • Arab - 1.58%
  • Hispanic - 1.11%
  • Other - 0.64%

[1]


Religion[11]


The City of Edmonton has conducted a civic census in early 2005. The 2005 civic census has revealed that the City of Edmonton's population is currently 712,391[12]. The Greater Edmonton Area population as of 2005 was estimated at 1,016,000 (Statistics Canada estimate). Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم, Turkish: Müslüman, Persian: مسلمان) is an adherent of Islam. ... Eastern Orthodoxy (also called Greek Orthodoxy and Russian Orthodoxy) is a Christian tradition which represents the majority of Eastern Christianity. ... A replica of an ancient statue found among the ruins of a temple at Sarnath Buddhism is a philosophy based on the teachings of the Buddha, Siddhārtha Gautama, a prince of the Shakyas, whose lifetime is traditionally given as 566 to 486 BCE. It had subsequently been accepted by... A Sikh man at the Harimandir Sāhib. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Statistics Canada is the Canadian federal government bureau commissioned with producing statistics to help better understand Canada, its population, resources, economy, society, and culture. ...


History

Exploration and settlement

The first inhabitants gathered in the area which is now Edmonton around 3000 BC and perhaps as early as 10,000 BC, when an ice-free corridor was opening up as the great ice sheets covering much of Canada melted. They took advantage of the timber, water and wildlife in the region and thus made their presence in the area for thousands of years.


In 1754, Anthony Henday, an explorer working for the Hudson's Bay Company, was probably the first European to enter the Edmonton area. His expeditions across the Canadian Prairies were mainly to seek new contact with the local aboriginals for the purpose of establishing fur trade, as competition was fierce between the Hudson's Bay Company and its rivals. 1754 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Anthony Henday was sent in 1750s by the Hudsons Bay Company to present Alberta after Henry Kelsey had explored the region (also sent by HBC). ... The Hudsons Bay Company (HBC. TSX: HBC) is the oldest commercial corporation in North America and is one of the oldest in the world. ... Map of the Prairie Provinces (which include boreal forests, taiga and mountains as well as the prairies proper). ... The Hudsons Bay Company (HBC. TSX: HBC) is the oldest commercial corporation in North America and is one of the oldest in the world. ...

Alberta Legislative Building in 2005.
Alberta Legislative Building in 2005.

European traders from the Hudson's Bay Company and the North West Company set up trading posts in the area of present-day Fort Saskatchewan beginning in 1795. The trading posts later moved upstream to the present-day site of downtown Edmonton. The North West Company set up a trading post called Fort Augustus, but at the same time, the Hudson's Bay Company set up a fort of its own. The Hudson's Bay Company named its fort after the town of Edmonton in the UK (now a suburb in north London), the hometown of Sir James Winter Lake, then director of the Company. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2048x1360, 406 KB) Licensing GPL File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2048x1360, 406 KB) Licensing GPL File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The Hudsons Bay Company (HBC. TSX: HBC) is the oldest commercial corporation in North America and is one of the oldest in the world. ... Today, the North West Company is a grocery vendor in remote communities across northern Canada, Alaska and Greenland. ... Fort Saskatchewan Fort Saskatchewan is a city of 13,000 located 25km northeast of Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. ... 1795 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... The Hudsons Bay Company (HBC. TSX: HBC) is the oldest commercial corporation in North America and is one of the oldest in the world. ... The Hudsons Bay Company (HBC. TSX: HBC) is the oldest commercial corporation in North America and is one of the oldest in the world. ... Edmonton is a place in the eastern part of the London Borough of Enfield. ... For other uses, see London (disambiguation). ...


John Rowand, a fur trader for the North West Company, arrived in Edmonton in 1804 and was vital to the fort's importance, for he established it as the main distribution centre for the entire northwest. Rowand became respected and accepted as a leader by the Plains Indians, managing Edmonton's fur trade with the Cree and Blackfoot in Edmonton for about 30 years. Fort Edmonton and the surrounding area was known to the local Cree as Amiskwaciy waskahigan (the "c" in Amiskwaciy is pronounced similar to a "ch"), meaning "Beaver Hills House". As Rowand had intended, Fort Edmonton became a major economic centre for Rupert's Land, as the lands comprising the present-day Prairie Provinces, northern Ontario and northern Canada were known at the time. Fort Edmonton was the major stopping point before pioneers headed up north or farther west. The two companies merged in 1821, and the name of Fort Edmonton was retained. In 1830 the last fort was built on the present site of the Alberta Legislature. A fur trader for the North West Company who arrived in Edmonton, Alberta in 1804. ... 1804 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... The Plains Indians were the Native American tribes who lived in the Great Plains region of North America. ... The Cree are an indigenous people of North America whose people range from the Rocky Mountains to the Atlantic Ocean in both Canada and the United States. ... Crowfoot, former Head Chief of the Blackfeet Nation The Piegan Blackfeet, (Pikuni in Blackfoot) are a tribe of Blackfoot Native Americans based in Montana. ... The Cree are an indigenous people of North America whose people range from the Rocky Mountains to the Atlantic Ocean in both Canada and the United States. ... Ruperts Land Ruperts Land was a territory consisting of much of modern Canada. ... The Canadian prairies is a vast area of flat sedimentary land that stretches from Ontario and the Canadian Shield to the Canadian Rockies covering much of the provinces of Manitoba, Saskatchewan, and Alberta - the Prairie Provinces. ... Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Latin: Loyal she began, loyal she remains) Official languages English Flower White trillium Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Lieutenant-Governor James K. Bartleman Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Parliamentary representation  - House seat  - Senate seats 106 24 Area Total  - Land  - Water    (% of total)  Ranked 4th 1...


The Hudson's Bay Company relinquished its ownership and jurisdiction of Rupert's Land to the Dominion of Canada in 1871. Rupert's Land was then renamed the North West Territories by the federal government. People began settling in the vicinity of Fort Edmonton in the 1870s after the government offered the land to settlers at a good price. Ruperts Land Ruperts Land was a territory consisting of much of modern Canada. ... 1871 (MDCCCLXXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Ruperts Land Ruperts Land was a territory consisting of much of modern Canada. ... // Events and Trends Technology The invention of the telephone (1876) by Alexander Graham Bell. ...


The arrival of the railway and early growth

The Calgary and Edmonton Railway reached the area in 1891 with a terminal in Strathcona on the south side of the North Saskatchewan River. Edmonton officially became a town in 1892 with a population of 700. The city boomed during the Klondike Gold Rush of 1897 as thousands of eager prospectors heading north via the "All Canadian Route," stopping in Edmonton for supplies. The town of Strathcona grew faster than Edmonton until 1905 when the Canadian Northern Railway opened its transcontinental line through Edmonton. 1892 (MDCCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... A typical gold mining operation, on Bonanza Creek The Klondike Gold Rush was a frenzy of gold rush immigration to and gold prospecting along the Klondike River near Dawson City in the Yukon Territory, Canada, after gold was discovered in the late 19th century. ... 1897 (MDCCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... The Canadian Northern Railway (CNoR) is a historic Canadian railway. ...

High Level Bridge, built 1913
High Level Bridge, built 1913

By 1904, Edmonton had 9,000 residents and was incorporated as a city that same year. Alberta became a province in 1905, and the city was officially declared the provincial capital in 1906 after having won out over contenders including Calgary, Red Deer and even Banff due to having the highest number of government representatives. Initially the Alberta Legislature met in the Mackay Avenue School, while the Legislature Building was being erected on the north shore of the North Saskatchewan River. By 1907, the University of Alberta was established across the river in Strathcona, which also became a city that year. The city of Edmonton originally occupied only the north side of the North Saskatchewan River, as Strathcona encompassed the entire south side. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (3424x2240, 654 KB) Beschreibung Bridge in Ednonton, January, 1997 High Level Bridge, built 1913 (gebaut 1913) Brücke in Edmonton, Januar 1997 With Praktica LTL Author: Hutschi 17:05, 19 November 2005 (UTC) Licensing File links The following pages link to... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (3424x2240, 654 KB) Beschreibung Bridge in Ednonton, January, 1997 High Level Bridge, built 1913 (gebaut 1913) Brücke in Edmonton, Januar 1997 With Praktica LTL Author: Hutschi 17:05, 19 November 2005 (UTC) Licensing File links The following pages link to... Motto: Heart of the new west Area: 712. ... Template:Hide = Motto: Template:Unhide = Education, Industry, Progress Established: Town: 1901 City: 1913 Area: 70. ... Banff may refer to: Banff National Park Banff, Alberta Banff, Scotland Banff Television Festival This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... The North Saskatchewan River is a glacier-fed river flowing east from the Canadian Rockies to Lake Winnipeg. ... The University of Alberta is situated along the south bank of the North Saskatchewan River in the heart of the city of Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. ...

Whyte Avenue (82nd Ave) in Old Strathcona
Whyte Avenue (82nd Ave) in Old Strathcona

In 1912 Edmonton amalgamated with Strathcona, whose downtown core is now part of the trendy Old Strathcona historical district. As a result, Edmonton attained a population of 53,000. The amalgamation ended years of intense rivalry between these two communities. The High Level Rail Bridge (including a traffic deck) across the river was completed in 1913, linking the north and south sides of Edmonton. A real estate boom was already underway since the 1900s and spurred a massive population increase. The population quickly grew to around 75,000 but dropped back down to 50,000, as the real estate boom suddenly collapsed in 1913. The city was slow to recover economically during the 1920s, and like most cities in Canada, was hit by the Great Depression. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (3424x2248, 544 KB) Beschreibung Straße in Edmonton, Januar 1997 Street in Edmonton Whyte Avenue (82nd Ave) in Old Strathcona January 1997 with Praktica LTL Author: Hutschi 17:35, 19 November 2005 (UTC) Licensing File links The following pages link to... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (3424x2248, 544 KB) Beschreibung Straße in Edmonton, Januar 1997 Street in Edmonton Whyte Avenue (82nd Ave) in Old Strathcona January 1997 with Praktica LTL Author: Hutschi 17:35, 19 November 2005 (UTC) Licensing File links The following pages link to... Old Strathcona is a Business Revitalization Zone (BRZ) in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. ... 2001 Sourdough Raft Race, passing beneath the High Level Bridges Great Divide waterfall with the LRT bridge in the background. ... The Great Depression was a worldwide economic downturn, starting in 1929 and lasting through most of the 1930s. ...


In the 1920s, Edmonton became an aviation shipping point for food and medical supplies using the new bush planes out of Blatchford Field (now Edmonton City Centre Airport). In 1942, the construction of the Alaska Highway made the city a major ground transportation and supply centre to the far north. Edmonton became the anchor of the Northwest Staging Route, carrying war materials and supplies to Alaska in order to head off a potential attack on Alaska by the Japanese. In 1943 Blatchford Field held the record as the busiest airfield in North America. As a result of these developments, Edmonton officially became known as the Gateway to the North. Map of Alaska Highway The Alaska Highway, also the Alaskan Highway, Alaska-Canadian Highway, and the Alcan Highway, runs from Dawson Creek, British Columbia to Fairbanks, Alaska, via Whitehorse, Yukon. ... The Northwest Staging Route was a series of airstrips, airports and radio ranging stations built in British Columbia, the Yukon and Alaska during World War II. Airfields were built or upgraded every 100 miles (160 kilometres) from Edmonton, Alberta to Fairbanks, Alaska. ... Official language(s) English Capital Juneau Largest city Anchorage Area  Ranked 1st  - Total 663,267 sq mi (1,717,854 km²)  - Width 808 miles (1,300 km)  - Length 1,479 miles (2,380 km)  - % water 13. ... Official language(s) English Capital Juneau Largest city Anchorage Area  Ranked 1st  - Total 663,267 sq mi (1,717,854 km²)  - Width 808 miles (1,300 km)  - Length 1,479 miles (2,380 km)  - % water 13. ... 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1943 calendar). ...


The oil boom years

Oil rig monument at the southern entrance of Gateway Park on Hwy 2 (Queen Elizabeth II Highway).
Oil rig monument at the southern entrance of Gateway Park on Hwy 2 (Queen Elizabeth II Highway).

The first major oil discovery for Edmonton and the rest of the province was made on February 13, 1947 near the town of Leduc to the south. Although oil reserves were already known as early as 1914 to exist in the southern parts of Alberta, they produced very little oil compared to those around Edmonton. Additional oil reserves were also discovered during the late 1940s and the 1950s in the Edmonton area near the towns of Redwater and Pembina. Because most of Alberta's oil reserves were found to be concentrated in central and northern Alberta, the city became home to most of Alberta's oil production and refining. Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 856 KB) This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 856 KB) This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ...


The subsequent oil boom gave Edmonton new status as the Oil Capital of Canada. During the 1950s, the city's nearly doubled in population from 149,000 to 269,000. After a relatively calm but still prosperous period in the 1960s, the city's growth took on a renewed vigour with high world oil prices, triggered by the 1973 oil crisis and the 1979 Iranian Revolution. The oil boom of the 1970s and 1980s ended abruptly with the introduction of the National Energy Program in 1981. The population had reached 521,000 that same year. Although the National Energy Program was later scrapped by the federal government in the mid-1980s, the collapse of world oil prices in 1986 and massive government cutbacks kept the city from fully recovering economically until the late 1990s. Unsurprisingly, the city did suffer from high unemployment rates until then. At the height of the crisis in the United States, drivers of vehicles with odd numbered license plates were allowed to purchase gasoline only on odd-numbered days of the month, while drivers with even-numbers were limited to even-numbered days. ... Protestors take to the street in support of Ayatollah Khomeini. ... The National Energy Program (NEP) was an energy policy of the Government of Canada. ... The National Energy Program (NEP) was an energy policy of the Government of Canada. ...


Recent history

In 1981, the largest shopping mall in North America, West Edmonton Mall, opened. The mall is one of Alberta's most popular tourist attractions, and contains an indoor amusement park, a large indoor waterpark, and a luxury hotel in addition to its over 800 shops and services. Edmonton tornado 1987 This image is in the public domain This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Edmonton tornado 1987 This image is in the public domain This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... The 1987 tornado On the afternoon of Friday, July 31, 1987, a tornado, rated F5 on the Fujita scale, ripped through the eastern part of Edmonton, Alberta, Canada and parts of neighbouring Strathcona County. ... The King of Prussia Mall, one of the largest in the world, located in Pennsylvania, United States For the traditional meaning of the word mall, see pedestrian street or promenade. ... West Edmonton Mall (WEM), located in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada is one of the largest shopping malls in the world, and as such is one of western Canadas major tourist attractions. ... Amusement park is the more generic term for a collection of rides and other entertainment attractions assembled for the purpose of entertaining a fairly large group of people. ... A water park is an amusement park that features waterplay areas, such as water slides, splash pads, spraygrounds (water playgrounds), lazy rivers, or other recreational bathing environments. ...


On July 31, 1987, a devastating tornado, ranked as an F4 on the Fujita scale, hit the city and killed 27 people. The day became known as "Black Friday". Mayor Laurence Decore cited the community's response to the tornado as evidence that Edmonton was a "city of champions", which later became the city's slogan. July 31 is the 212th day (213th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 153 days remaining. ... 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Union City, Oklahoma tornado (1973) A tornado is a violently rotating column of air which is in contact with both a cumulonimbus (or, in rare cases, cumulus) cloud base and the surface of the earth. ... The Fujita scale (F-Scale), or Fujita-Pearson scale, rates a tornados intensity by the damage it inflicts on human-built structures and sometimes on vegetation. ... Laurence G. Decore (June 28, 1940 - November 6, 1999) was a Ukrainian-Canadian lawyer, politician, former mayor of Edmonton and leader of the Alberta Liberal Party. ...


The city entered it current period of economic recovery and prosperity by the late 1990s, helped by a strong recovery in oil prices and further economic diversification. While oil production and refining remains the basis of many jobs in Edmonton, the city's economy has managed to diversify economically, producing even more jobs. Edmonton arguably has the second most diversified economy among major Canadian cities after Montreal. The downtown core and parts of the inner city, after years of extremely high office vacancy rates and neglect, have recovered to a great degree. It is still undergoing a renaissance of its own, with further new projects underway or about to become reality, and more and more people choosing to live in or near the downtown core. City motto: Concordia Salus (Latin: Well-being through harmony) Province Quebec Mayor Gérald Tremblay Area  - % water 366. ...


Infrastructure

Transportation

Air

Edmonton is served by Edmonton International Airport, which is the fifth busiest airport in Canada. In 2005, just over 4.5 million passengers used the facilities [13]. Air passenger service from Edmonton City Centre Airport downtown was consolidated to the International Airport in 1996 and now is mostly used for charter planes and flight training, although small non-chartered planes with fewer than 19 passengers are still allowed to land at the facility. Edmonton Airports [14] controls Edmonton International, Edmonton City Centre and also Cooking Lake Airport and Villeneuve Airport, both of which primarily service general aviation and flight training services. Edmonton International Airport (IATA: YEG, ICAO: CYEG) is the 5th busiest airport in Canada by passenger traffic, and the 13th busiest by aircraft movements. ... Edmonton City Centre (Blatchford Field) Airport, (ICAO CYXD, IATA YXD), is located within the city of Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. ... Edmonton/Cooking Lake Airport, (ICAO CEZ3, IATA N/A), is located next to Cooking Lake Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. ... Edmonton/Villeneuve Airport, (ICAO CZVL, IATA ZVL), is located 1. ... General aviation (abbr. ... Flight training is a course of study used when learning to pilot an aircraft. ...


Inter-urban rail

Edmonton is also served by VIA Rail passenger trains. The station is located on the northern rail route near the City Centre Airport. Formerly the VIA trains arrived at the CN office tower downtown, but the downtown trackage has been abandoned to the LRT and new urban development. The High Level Rail Bridge, formerly CPR's route into the downtown, remains only for summer historical streetcar usage. VIA Rail Canada (also referred to as VIA Rail and VIA; pronounced vee-ah) is an independent Crown corporation offering intercity passenger rail services in Canada. ... 2001 Sourdough Raft Race, passing beneath the High Level Bridges Great Divide waterfall with the LRT bridge in the background. ...


City public transit

The main public transportation networks are run by the Edmonton Transit System (ETS). The Edmonton Transit System, also called ETS, is the public transit service which is owned and operated by the city of Edmonton, Alberta. ...

High Level Rail Bridge with Dudley B. Menzies Bridge below dedicated for LRT, cyclists, and pedestrians.
High Level Rail Bridge with Dudley B. Menzies Bridge below dedicated for LRT, cyclists, and pedestrians.

In 1908, Edmonton began operating an electric street railway system. In 1939, "trolley coaches" began to replace the trams, with the final full day of streetcar service on September 1, 1951 (the last car ran in the early morning of September 2, 1951). Edmonton is one of only two major Canadian cities still operating electric trolley buses, the other being Vancouver. Today, Edmonton Transit operates a system of 49 trolley buses on core Routes 3, 5, 7, 120, 133, and 135 in the central and western parts of the city. Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 748 KB) This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 748 KB) This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... 2001 Sourdough Raft Race, passing beneath the High Level Bridges Great Divide waterfall with the LRT bridge in the background. ... 1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ...


In addition to the bus routes, Edmonton has a light rail transit (LRT) line running from Clareview in the northeast to the Health Sciences on the south side. Upon the opening of its first segment in 1978, it was the first such system built by a city with a population less than one million people in North America. The line is surface level on previous railroad right-of-way in the northeast and goes underground through the downtown core from Churchill station (underneath Churchill Square south of the City hall) to Grandin/Government Centre station (just west of the Provincial Legislature grounds). A dedicated bridge crossing the river valley leads it toward the university station, which is also underground. This article is about light rail systems in general. ... 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (the link is to a full 1978 calendar). ... World map showing North America A satellite composite image of North America. ... Churchill Square is Brighton and Hoves only shopping centre, or mall, as it is referred to by many inhabitants of the city. ...


Further south, however, LRT expansion is being developed at surface level with a couple of underpasses, one at Belgravia Road and the other under 111 Street south of 61 Avenue. A short busway is also being constructed from the future South Campus station (to open in 2008) roughly parallel to Belgravia Road in conjunction with the South LRT expansion. The underground LRT line comes out onto the surface just north of the new Health Sciences Station at the University of Alberta, which was opened in January, 2006. From the Health Sciences station, the South LRT line will lead through the proposed South Campus and Southgate Mall, and to the former Heritage Mall site (now being developed as Century Park, a transit-oriented development) in the south end of the city. The south LRT extension is expected to be complete by 2009. 2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Overview Century Park is a planned transit-oriented development in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. ... High density development in Cambridge, Massachusetts stimulated by Alewife subway station (right foreground) and TOD zoning. ...


Future north and west High Speed Transit routes (either for LRT or BRT) are currently being considered by council. The West LRT is expected to have the LRT extending all the way to West Edmonton Mall and beyond to the extreme western outskirts of the city. West Edmonton Mall (WEM), located in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada is one of the largest shopping malls in the world, and as such is one of western Canadas major tourist attractions. ...


Highways

Edmonton is connected to British Columbia and Saskatchewan via the Yellowhead Highway (Highway 16, or Yellowhead Trail within city limits), and to Calgary and Red Deer via the Queen Elizabeth II Highway (known as Calgary Trail (southbound) or Gateway Boulevard (northbound) within city limits). Motto: Splendor Sine Occasu (Latin: Splendour without diminishment) Official languages none stated in law; English is de facto Flower Pacific dogwood Capital Victoria Largest city Vancouver Lieutenant-Governor Iona Campagnolo Premier Gordon Campbell (BC Liberal) Parliamentary representation  - House seat  - Senate seats 36 6 Area Total  - Land  - Water    (% of total)  Ranked... Motto: Multis E Gentibus Vires (Latin: From many peoples, strength) Official languages English Flower Western Red Lily Capital Regina Largest city Saskatoon Lieutenant-Governor Gordon Barnhart Premier Lorne Calvert (NDP) Parliamentary representation  - House seat  - Senate seats 14 6 Area Total  - Land  - Water    (% of total)  Ranked 7th 651,036 km² 591... The Yellowhead Highway is a major east-west highway connecting the four western Canadian provinces of British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba. ... Alberta provincial highway 16 is central and northern Albertas primary east-west highway. ... Calgary is a city in the province of Alberta, Canada. ... Template:Hide = Motto: Template:Unhide = Education, Industry, Progress Established: Town: 1901 City: 1913 Area: 70. ... Deerfoot Trail in Calgary, Alberta. ...


Arterial roads

Anthony Henday Drive (Highway 216) is a ring road transportation project which will eventually encircle the Edmonton Metropolitan area. The south west section from Highway 16 to Terwillegar Drive is open. The portion between Terwillegar Drive and Calgary Trail opens in 2006. The south east section connecting Calgary Trail to Highway 14 has recently been announced and is anticipated to open in 2007[15]. The first stage of the northwest portion is already under construction between the Yellowhead Highway and the new St. Albert west bypass, to open in 2007. As of Nov 9, 2005 the Alberta Government has committed to finishing the north portion by 2011. Anthony Henday Drive will also incorporate an already-existing stretch of Highway 216 on the east side of the city between Highway 16 and approximately 23 Avenue where the southeast leg will eventually intersect. Anthony Henday was sent in 1750s by the Hudsons Bay Company to present Alberta after Henry Kelsey had explored the region (also sent by HBC). ... Highway 216 is the highway designation for the current construction project of a ring road around Edmonton, Alberta, also known as Anthony Henday Drive. ...


Street layout

In 1914 Edmonton adopted a new numbered street and avenue system, which with a few small modifications is still in use. The centre of the city, Jasper Avenue and 101 Street, was set as the starting point. Jasper Avenue was one of the few streets that was not given a number, but the other avenues were numbered as if Jasper Avenue had been 101 Avenue.


Avenues run east and west; streets run north and south. Avenue numbers increase to the north; street numbers increase to the west. When a street lies between two numbered streets, letters are used, for example, 107A Avenue lies between 107 Avenue and 108 Avenue. Occasionally the letter B will be used and rarely even C, to denote multiple streets between 2 different street numbers. For example, 17A, 17B and 17C Avenues all lie between 17 Avenue and 18 Avenue.


Houses with odd numbers are on the east side of a street or the south side of an avenue. Dropping the last two digits of a house number tells you what two streets or avenues the house lies between, for example 8023 135A Avenue is between 80 Street and 81 Street, and 13602 100 Street is between 136 Avenue and 137 Avenue.


In the 1980s as the city grew, it began to run out of street numbers in the east and avenue numbers in the south. Therefore, in 1982 a quadrant system was adopted. Quadrant Avenue (1 Avenue; not yet built) and Meridian Street (1 Street) divide the city into four quadrants: northeast (NE), northwest (NW), southwest (SW) and, most recently, southeast (SE). The vast majority of the city falls within the northwest quadrant.


All Edmonton streets now officially have their quadrant included at the end of their names, but it is usual — even on official signage — to omit the "NW" especially when there is no possibility of confusion with a street in another quadrant. However, the city's emergency services have begun to encourage residents to get into the habit of using quadrants in all addresses.


Waste disposal

Edmonton's waste management services utilize a modern composting facility, the largest of its type in the world, to recycle 65 per cent of its residential waste. The co-composter is 38,690 square metres in size, equivalent to 8 football fields. It's designed to process 200,000 tonnes of residential solid waste per year and 22,500 dry tonnes of biosolids, turning them into 80,000 tonnes of compost annually. Waste management is the collection, transport, processing or disposal of waste materials, usually ones produced by human activity, in an effort to reduce their effect on human health or local aesthetics or amenity. ...


Electric & water distribution systems

Edmonton's first power company established itself in 1891 installing street lights along its main avenue, Jasper Avenue. The power company was bought by the Town of Edmonton in 1902 and remains under municipal ownership today as EPCOR. Also in charge of water treatment, in 2002, EPCOR installed the world's largest ultraviolet (UV) water treatment system at its E.L. Smith Water Treatment Plant.


Education

Post-secondary

University of Alberta main campus on the south side of Edmonton's river valley, as seen from the north side of the river
University of Alberta main campus on the south side of Edmonton's river valley, as seen from the north side of the river

Edmonton has become one of Canada's major educational centres with more than 60,000 full time post-secondary students spread over several institutions and campuses (total enrolment between the schools is as high as 170,000, which includes students enrolled in multiple institutions[16]). Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 837 KB) This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 837 KB) This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ...


The University of Alberta (also known colloquially as the U of A), whose main campus is situated on the south side of Edmonton's river valley, is a board-governed, public institution with annual revenue of one billion dollars. 35,000 students are served in more than 200 undergraduate programs and 170 graduate programs. Main campus consists of more than 90 buildings on 890,000 square metres of land, with buildings dating back to the university's establishment in 1908. It is also home to Canada's second largest research library which ranks first in volumes per student with over 6 million and subscriptions to 13,000 full-text electronic journals and 500 electronic databases. The University of Alberta has been recognized on several fronts internationally[17]. The University of Alberta is situated along the south bank of the North Saskatchewan River in the heart of the city of Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. ...


Other universities within the borders of Edmonton include Athabasca University, Concordia University College, the King's University College, Taylor University College and Seminary[18], and the Edmonton campus of the University of Lethbridge. Athabasca University, headquartered in Athabasca, Alberta, is a fully accredited institution specialized in the delivery of distance education courses and programs. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The Kings University College is a degree-granting institution offering Christian university education, located in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. ... The University of Lethbridge sits among the coulees on the scenic west side of the Oldman River in the city of Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada. ...


Other Edmonton post-secondary institutions include Grant MacEwan College, which enrols 57,200 students in programs leading to careers or university transfer[19], the Northern Alberta Institute of Technology (NAIT), with 48,500 students enrolled in 190 technical, vocational and apprenticeship programs[20] and NorQuest College[21], with 11,300 students, specializing in short courses in skills and academic upgrading. The Northern Alberta Institute of Technology (NAIT) is located in Edmonton, Alberta. ...


K-12

Edmonton has three publicly funded school boards (districts), who provide kindergarten and grades one through twelve. The vast majority of students attend schools in the two large English language boards: the Edmonton Public Schools board and the separate Catholic School District[22]. As well, since 1994, the francophone minority community has had their own school board, the North-Central Francophone School Authority, which, based in Edmonton, includes surrounding communities. Most recently the city has seen a small number of public charter schools open, independent of any board. All three school boards and public charter schools are funded through provincial grants and property taxes. Edmonton Public Schools (EPS) is the public school board in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Catholic education. ... Francophone means French-speaking. ... Alberta charter schools are a special type of public schools, which have a greater degree of autonomy than a normal school, to allow them to offer programs that are significantly different than regular public schools operated by district school boards. ... // Property tax is an ad valorem tax that an owner of real estate or other property pays on the value of the thing taxed. ...


Some private schools exist as well. Included are the Edmonton Society for Christian Education[23] and Edmonton Academy[24].


Both the Edmonton Public Schools and the Edmonton Catholic School District provide support and resources for those wishing to home school their children. Thomas Edison attended compulsory school for only three months, after which he was taught at home by his mother and a tutor. ...


City life

Nightlife

The skyline of Edmonton at night.
The skyline of Edmonton at night.

There are several key concentrations of nightlife in the city of Edmonton. The most popular is the Whyte Avenue (82nd Avenue) strip which today has the highest concentration of heritage buildings in Edmonton. Once the heart of the town of Strathcona (annexed by Edmonton on 1 February 1912), it fell into disrepair during the middle of the 20th century. A concentrated effort to revive the area beginning in the late 1970s through the establishment of a Business Revitalization Zone has produced an area rich with restored historical buildings and pleasant streetscapes. Its proximity to the University of Alberta has led to a high concentration of establishments ranging from restaurants and pubs to trendy clubs while hosting a wide variety of shops during the day. This area also contains two independent movie theatres: the Garneau and Princess theatres. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (4493x1317, 673 KB) Licensing GPL File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (4493x1317, 673 KB) Licensing GPL File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Old Strathcona is a Business Revitalization Zone (BRZ) in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. ...


Downtown Edmonton has undergone a continual process of renewal and unprecedented growth since the mid 1990s. Many buildings were demolished during the oil boom starting in the 1960s and continuing into the 1980s to make way for office towers. As such, there have always been numerous pub-type establishments which cater primarily to the office crowd such as The Rose and Crown, Sherlock Holmes', and Elephant & Castle as well as many hotel lounges and restaurants. However, the past decade has seen a strong resurgence in more mainstream venues. Various clubs such as the New City Suburbs and Halo are also to be found along Edmonton's main street, Jasper Avenue. The Edmonton City Centre mall also houses an Empire Theatres movie theatre featuring 10 screens and the non-profit Metro Cinema[25] shows a variety of underground or alternative films every week. Empire Theatres TSX: EPC.P is Canadas second largest movie theatre circuit, and the only major circuit operating in Atlantic Canada. ...


West Edmonton Mall holds several after hour establishments in addition to its many stores and attractions. Bourbon Street has numerous eating establishments and clubs and casinos can also be found within the complex. Silver City, at the west end of the mall, features 13 screens and an IMAX theatre. West Edmonton Mall (WEM), located in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada is one of the largest shopping malls in the world, and as such is one of western Canadas major tourist attractions. ... IMAX theatre at the Melbourne Museum complex. ...


Culture

Edmonton has always been a city proud of its cultural accomplishments. As the city has grown, so has the cultural scene. While still retaining a strong element of 'blue-collar culture,' Edmonton is a proud home to many other features which add to its cosmopolitan flair.


Many events are anchored in the downtown Arts District, centred around the newly renovated Churchill Square (named in honour of Sir Winston Churchill).

  • The Francis Winspear Centre [26] for Music was opened in 1997 after years of planning and fundraising [27]. Called one of the most acoustically perfect concert halls in Canada, it is home to the Edmonton Symphony Orchestra and hosts a wide variety of shows every year. It houses the $3 million Davis Concert Organ and seats 1916 patrons. An interesting aspect of its design is its separation into acoustically separate areas each of which are insulated from each other through acoustical barriers built into the structure. Patrons and artists can see these in the form of double-door 'sound locks.'
  • Across 102nd Street is the Citadel Theatre, so named after the Salvation Army Citadel in which Joe Shoctor first started the Citadel Theatre company in 1965. It is now one of the largest theatre complexes in Canada with five halls each specializing in different kinds of productions [28]. For instance, the Maclab Theatre features a thrust stage surrounded by a U-shaped seating arrangement, while the Shoctor Theatre is a traditional stage setup.
  • One block north of the Citadel and Winspear is the Art Gallery of Alberta. Housed in an inconspicuous production of 1970s architecture, the AGA collection has over 5000 pieces of art. Fundraising is currently underway for a new building designed by Randall Stout.
  • On the University of Alberta grounds is the 2534-seat Northern Alberta Jubilee Auditorium, which recently reopened after being out of commission for a year during heavy renovations carried out as part of the province's centennial celebrations. Both it and its southern twin in Calgary were constructed in 1955 for the province's silver jubilee and have played host to many concerts, musicals, and ballets. The Edmonton Opera uses the Jubilee as its base of operations. On the front of the building is a quote from Suetonius' Life of Augustus: "He found a city built of brick - left it built of marble."

There are also over 70 museums in Edmonton of ranging sizes. The largest is the Royal Alberta Museum (formerly the Provincial Museum of Alberta, it was renamed by Queen Elizabeth II during her 2005 visit) which houses over 10 million objects in its collection. The main galleries are the Syncrude Gallery of Aboriginal Culture, Wild Alberta, and the Natural History Gallery. The main building, located on the river valley west of downtown in Glenora, was opened in 1967 and is now in the early stages of large-scale redevelopment [29]. Located on the grounds is Government House, the former residence of the province's Lieutenant-Governor. The RAM is in the early stages of a large 180 million dollar expansion, dubbed "Project Renewal". The Citadel Theatre is the major venue for theatre arts in the city of Edmonton. ... Shield of The Salvation Army The Salvation Army is a Protestant evangelical Christian denomination founded in 1865 by Methodist ministers William Booth and Catherine Booth. ... Edmonton Art Gallery Edmonton Art Gallery winning renovation concept The Art Gallery of Alberta (formerly the Edmonton Art Gallery) is a public art gallery located in Edmonton, Alberta Canada. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... the royal alberta museum is cool and lalalallalalalallallllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllla lllllllllllllllllla dumdedumdedumdumdum lol thsi is me jesse i am bad as a cat lol duh lol hud i got it wrong but hear my bling i am jesse doing the rapping thing. ... Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor) (born 21 April 1926) is Queen of 16 independent nations known as the Commonwealth Realms. ... Syncrude Canada Ltd. ...


Festivals

Edmonton plays host to several large festivals each year, hence its local nickname as 'the Festival City.' A festival or fest is an event, usually staged by a local community, which centers on some theme, sometimes on some unique aspect of the community. ...

2001 Sourdough Raft Race, passing beneath the High Level Bridge's Great Divide waterfall during Klondike Days.
2001 Sourdough Raft Race, passing beneath the High Level Bridge's Great Divide waterfall during Klondike Days.
  • The last week of April to May 1st is the May Week Labour Arts Festival[30] a celebration of workers rights and struggles culminating in the May Day March on May 1st.
  • The Works Art & Design Festival, which takes place from late June to early August, showcases Canadian and international art & design from well-know, award-winning artists, as well as emerging and student artists.
  • The River City Shakespeare Festival - Since 1989 the Free Will Players have staged the annual River City Shakespeare Festival, which takes place every summer from late June to mid-July. The festival includes full-scale professional productions of two plays by William Shakespeare, as well as Camp Shakespeare - a summer drama camp for youth ages 8–16. All festival activities take place in the 1,000 seat Heritage Amphitheatre in Edmonton's beautiful Hawrelak Park.
  • In early July, Canada's longest-running Japanese animation festival - Animethon - is held in downtown Edmonton in Grant MacEwan College. Animethon has been a staple of Edmonton's festival scene since 1993 and welcomes over 4000 attendees during the weekend.
  • The Edmonton International Street Performer's Festival[31], taking place in mid-July, showcases street performance artists from around the world.
  • For two weeks in July, Capital Ex (formerly called Klondike Days) provides rides, music and other entertainment. Originally, Klondike Days (or K-Days) was an annual fair and exhibition which eventually adopted a gold rush theme. In early 2006 it was decided that the Klondike theme would be abandoned and the festival would be renamed 'The Capital City Exhibition' (or Capital Ex). Activities include chuckwagon races, carnival rides and fairways, music, trade shows and daily fireworks. Since 1960, the Sourdough Raft Races have also been a popular event.
  • The Heritage Days Festival is an ethnocultural food festival that takes place in Hawrelak Park on the Heritage Day long weekend (which includes the first Monday in August).
  • The Edmonton International Fringe Festival, which takes place in mid-August, is the largest Fringe Theatre Festival in North America, and second only to the Edinburgh Fringe festival in the world.
  • In August, Edmonton is also host to the Edmonton Folk Music Festival, one of the most successful and popular folk music festivals in North America.
  • The Edmonton International Film Festival, which runs from late September to early October, is now in its 19th year and is one of Canada's primary film festivals.
  • In early November, Edmonton plays host to the Canadian Finals Rodeo and Farmfair. This is the crown jewel in Canada's rodeo circuit and second only to the National Finals Rodeo in Las Vegas in prestige. Calgary's world-famous Stampede is a stop on the qualifying circuit for this million dollar event.
  • Other festivals and events include the Jazz City International Music Festival[32], and a Dragon Boat Festival.

Canada Day is celebrated with a pancake breakfast and other morning events at the Alberta Legislature grounds, the Silly Summer Parade in Old Strathcona, the Great Divide waterfall over the High Level Bridge, and evening fireworks. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1600x1323, 1702 KB) 2001 Sourdough Raft Race, passing beneath the High Level Bridges Great Divide waterfall. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1600x1323, 1702 KB) 2001 Sourdough Raft Race, passing beneath the High Level Bridges Great Divide waterfall. ... The High Level Bridge, opened in 1913, spans the North Saskatchewan River in Edmonton, Alberta. ... May Day refers to any of several holidays celebrated on May 1 or in the beginning of May. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... River City Shakespeare Festival was founded in 1989. ... A fair in Edmonton, Alberta. ... A typical gold mining operation, on Bonanza Creek The Klondike Gold Rush was a frenzy of gold rush immigration to and gold prospecting along the Klondike River near Dawson City in the Yukon Territory, Canada, after gold was discovered in the late 19th century. ... A chuckwagon was originally a wagon that carried food and cooking equipment on the prairies of North America. ... The Edmonton Heritage Festival is an annual celebration of Albertas ethnic diversity. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Holidays in Canada. ... The Edmonton Fringe Festival is an annual event held every August in Edmonton, Alberta in Canada. ... A street performer on the Royal Mile (2004). ... The Edmonton Folk Music Festival is an annual 4 day outdoor event held in Gallagher Park in just across the river from downtown Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. ... Folk Music, in the original sense of the term, is music by and of the common people. ... The Edmonton International Film Festival is an annual competition and showcase of independent films from around the world. ... A dragon boat (Chinese: 龍舟, 龍船; Simplified Chinese: 龙舟, 龙船, Mandarin Pinyin: lóng zhōu, lóng chuán) is a very long and narrow human powered boat used in the team paddling sport of dragon boat racing, which may also be known as dragonboating. ... Annually on Canada Day, festivities abound: in Ottawa, the national capital, celebrations on Parliament Hill include the Musical Ride of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police Canada Day (French: Fête du Canada) is Canadas national holiday. ... Pancakes with strawberries A pancake is a batter cake fried in a pan or on a griddle with oil or butter. ... The Legislative Assembly of Alberta meets in the provincial capital, Edmonton. ... Hopetoun Falls near Otway National Park, Victoria, Australia A waterfall is usually a geological formation resulting from water, often in the form of a stream, flowing over an erosion-resistant rock formation that forms a sudden break in elevation. ... The High Level Bridge, opened in 1913, spans the North Saskatchewan River in Edmonton, Alberta. ... The Sydney Harbour Bridge and the Sydney Opera House illuminated under New Years Eve Fireworks 2005 A fireworks event (also called a fireworks display or fireworks show) is a spectacular display of the effects produced by firework devices on various occasions. ...


Attractions

The Alberta Legislative Building is located in Edmonton, Alberta, and serves as the seat of the Legislative Assembly of Alberta. ... Commonwealth Stadium is a venue located in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, primarily used by the Edmonton Eskimos of the CFL. Built in 1978 to host the Commonwealth Games, the stadium seats 60,217. ... Formerly the Edmonton Space and Science Centre, then the Odyssium, the TELUS World of Science, Edmonton, is a museum complex situated in Edmonton, Alberta. ... Fort Edmonton, circa 1900 Piper and NWMP lead a parade for costumed interpreters. ... Muttart Conservatory The Muttart Conservatory is located in the North Saskatchewan river valley, across from downtown Edmonton. ... The Northern Alberta Institute of Technology (NAIT) is located in Edmonton, Alberta. ... This article belongs in one or more categories. ... Inside during The 2005 Tim Hortons Brier Rexall Place (formerly known as the Northlands Coliseum, Edmonton Coliseum and Skyreach Centre) is an indoor arena in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. ... the royal alberta museum is cool and lalalallalalalallallllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllla lllllllllllllllllla dumdedumdedumdumdum lol thsi is me jesse i am bad as a cat lol duh lol hud i got it wrong but hear my bling i am jesse doing the rapping thing. ... The University of Alberta is situated along the south bank of the North Saskatchewan River in the heart of the city of Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. ... West Edmonton Mall (WEM), located in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada is one of the largest shopping malls in the world, and as such is one of western Canadas major tourist attractions. ... Edmonton Art Gallery Edmonton Art Gallery winning renovation concept The Art Gallery of Alberta (formerly the Edmonton Art Gallery) is a public art gallery located in Edmonton, Alberta Canada. ... The Edmonton Corn Maze is a popular attraction in Edmonton, Alberta. ... The Valley Zoo is a zoo located in the heart of Edmonton, Albertas river valley. ...

Sports and recreation

Edmonton was home to the Edmonton Grads, North America's sports team with the best win/loss record of all time. This women's basketball team defeated most American, European and Olympic challengers and compiled a record of 502 wins vs. 20 losses over 25 years, from 1915 until they disbanded in 1940 at the outbreak of the Second World War. The Edmonton Grads were a Canadian female basketball team. ... Combatants Allies: Soviet Union, United Kingdom, France/Free France, United States, Canada, China, India, Australia, Poland, New Zealand, South Africa, and others Axis Powers: Germany, Italy, Japan, Bulgaria, Finland, Romania, Hungary, Burma Casualties Military dead: 17 million Civilian dead: 33 million Total dead: 50 million Military dead: 8 million Civilian...


Commonwealth Stadium is home to the Edmonton Eskimos of the Canadian Football League. The Eskimos hold the North American pro sports record for most consecutive playoff appearances (34 consecutive seasons, as of 2005), and have won the Grey Cup (the CFL championship trophy) 13 times since 1921. They are one of only four teams to win the Grey Cup after finishing third in their division in the regular season (the others being the B.C. Lions, the Saskatchewan Roughriders and the Montreal Alouettes). In addition to the Eskimos, Edmonton is host to two Canadian Junior Football League teams: the Edmonton Huskies and the Edmonton Wildcats. It will also play host to some of the games in the 2007 World Youth Cup. Commonwealth Stadium is a venue located in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, primarily used by the Edmonton Eskimos of the CFL. Built in 1978 to host the Commonwealth Games, the stadium seats 60,217. ... The Edmonton Eskimos are a Canadian Football League team based in Edmonton, Alberta. ... The Canadian Football League (CFL), also known by its French name, Ligue canadienne de football (LCF), is a professional league located entirely in Canada that plays Canadian football. ... Then Prime Minister Joe Clark presents the 1979 Grey Cup to victorious Edmonton Eskimos Danny Kepley and Tom Wilkinson. ... The British Columbia Lions are a Canadian Football League team based in Vancouver, British Columbia. ... The Saskatchewan Roughriders are a Canadian Football League team based in Regina, Saskatchewan. ... The Montreal Alouettes (French, Alouettes de Montréal) are a Canadian Football League team based in Montreal, Quebec. ... CJFL Logo The Canadian Junior Football League is a national amateur Canadian football league consisting of 20 teams playing in six provinces across Canada. ... The Edmonton Huskies is a Canadian Junior Football team based in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. ... The FIFA World Youth Championship is the world championship of football for male players under the age of 20 and is organized by Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA). ...


The Edmonton Oilers, originally one of the founding franchises of the World Hockey Association, joined the National Hockey League in 1979. They quickly became one of the best teams in the league, winning five Stanley Cup Championships in 1984, 1985, 1987, 1988, and 1990. Wayne Gretzky, considered by many to be the greatest hockey player ever, played with the Edmonton Oilers from 1979 to 1988. Rexall Place (formerly known as and still often referred to as the Northlands Coliseum) is the home of the Edmonton Oilers. The Edmonton Oilers fell in the Stanley Cup Finals playing the Carolina Hurricanes in 7 games in the Stanley Cup Final in 2006. Despite losing they were the first 8 seed to make it that far and they nearly came back to win from deficits of 2-0 and 3-1 in the series. The Edmonton Oilers are a professional ice hockey team based in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. ... World Hockey Association logo The World Hockey Association (French: Association Mondiale de Hockey) was a professional ice hockey league that operated in North America from 1972 to 1979. ... The modernized NHL shield logo debuted in 2005, replacing the orange and black shield, which had been used since the leagues inception. ... Stanley Cup on display at the Hockey Hall of Fame The Stanley Cup, originally called the Dominion Hockey Challenge Cup, is awarded each year by the National Hockey League to the champion of its playoff tournament. ... Wayne Gretzky playing for the Edmonton Oilers in 1984 Wayne Douglas Gretzky, OC (born January 26, 1961) is a former professional ice hockey player and is currently part-owner and head coach of the Phoenix Coyotes. ... Inside during The 2005 Tim Hortons Brier Rexall Place (formerly known as the Northlands Coliseum, Edmonton Coliseum and Skyreach Centre) is an indoor arena in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. ... The Carolina Hurricanes, a professional ice hockey club, is a National Hockey League (NHL) team based in Raleigh, the capital of North Carolina, and is the citys only major league team. ... Stanley Cup on display at the Hockey Hall of Fame The Stanley Cup, originally called the Dominion Hockey Challenge Cup, is awarded each year by the National Hockey League to the champion of its playoff tournament. ...


The city had a minor-league baseball team in the Class AAA Pacific Coast League, the Edmonton Trappers, playing at Telus Field, until the end of the 2004 season. The team moved to the Austin, Texas suburb of Round Rock, becoming the Round Rock Express. Beginning in 2005, the Edmonton Cracker-Cats have played in the independent Northern League. Minor League Baseball, formerly the National Association of Professional Baseball Leagues and also known in the past as NAPBL, National Baseball Association, and NA, is the organization which oversees the governing and organization of minor league baseball in North America. ... A view of the playing field at Busch Stadium II St. ... For the high school sports league of this name, see Pacific Coast League (California). ... The Edmonton Trappers were a minor league baseball (Triple A) team in the Pacific Coast League, ending with the 2004 season. ... Telus Field is the home of the Edmonton Cracker-Cats of the independent Northern League and former home of the defunted Edmonton Trappers, a minor-league baseball team in the Pacific Coast League that moved to Round Rock, Texas and became the Round Rock Express after the 2004 season. ... Flag Seal Nickname: Live Music Capital of the World Location Location in the state of Texas Coordinates , Government County Travis County Mayor Will Wynn Geographical characteristics Area     City 669. ... The Round Rock Round Rock is a city located in the U.S. state of Texas within the Austin–Round Rock metropolitan area and Williamson County. ... The Round Rock Express is a minor league baseball franchise based in the Austin, Texas suburb of Round Rock. ... The Edmonton Cracker-Cats are an independent minor league baseball team in the Northern League. ... The Northern League is an Independent minor league baseball league which operates in the Midwestern United States and the Canadian provinces of Manitoba and Alberta. ...


Starting in the 2006 season, the Edmonton Rush franchise have played in the National Lacrosse League. Home games are at Rexall Place. Edmonton Rush is a professional lacrosse team in the National Lacrosse League scheduled to start playing in the 2006 season. ... Old MILL logo The National Lacrosse League (NLL) is the professional league of mens indoor lacrosse in North America. ...


Edmonton hosted the 1978 Commonwealth Games, the 1983 World University Games (Universiade), the 2001 World Championships in Athletics, and the World Master Games[33]. The 1978 Commonwealth Games were held in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada // Medals by country Countries which won medals Medals by event Athletics Bowls Boxing Cycling Track Road Gymnastics Artistic Shooting Pistol Rifle Shotgun Swimming Diving Swimming Diving Weightlifting Wrestling Badminton External link 1978 Commonwealth Games - Commonwealth Games official website Categories: | | ... The Universiade is an international multi-sport event, organized for university athletes, by the International University Sports Federation (FISU). ... The 8th World Championships in Athletics, under the auspices of the International Association of Athletics Federations, were held at the Commonwealth Stadium, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada between August 3 and August 12 and was the first time the event had visited North America. ...


Edmonton also has a circuit on the Champ Car World Series, and the city is also home to World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) Superstar and former World Heavyweight Champion, Chris Benoit. Nigel Mansell racing in a Champcar in 1993 Terminology Champcar, a shortened form of Championship Car, has been the name for a class of cars used in American Championship Car Racing for many decades. ... World Wrestling Entertainment, Inc. ... The World Heavyweight Championship belt The World Heavyweight Championship is a professional wrestling title. ... Christopher Michael Benoît (born May 21, 1967 in Montréal, Québec), is a French-Canadian professional wrestler currently wrestling for World Wrestling Entertainment on its SmackDown! brand. ...


Edmonton has just been announced as the location for a new WHL expansion team, to commence playing in the 2007-2008 season. The Western Hockey League is one of the three hockey Major Junior Tier I leagues which constitute the Canadian Hockey League. ...


Current professional franchises

Logo Club League Venue Established Championships
Edmonton Oilers logo Edmonton Oilers National Hockey League Rexall Place 1972 5
Edmonton Eskimos logo Edmonton Eskimos Canadian Football League Commonwealth Stadium 1949 13
Edmonton Rush logo Edmonton Rush National Lacrosse League Rexall Place 2005 0
Edmonton Cracker Cats logo Edmonton Cracker Cats Northern League Telus Field 2005 0

Image File history File links Edmonton_Oilers. ... The Edmonton Oilers are a professional ice hockey team based in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. ... The modernized NHL shield logo debuted in 2005, replacing the orange and black shield, which had been used since the leagues inception. ... Inside during The 2005 Tim Hortons Brier Rexall Place (formerly known as the Northlands Coliseum, Edmonton Coliseum and Skyreach Centre) is an indoor arena in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. ... Image File history File links EDMONTON_ESKIMOS.jpg File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The Edmonton Eskimos are a Canadian Football League team based in Edmonton, Alberta. ... The Canadian Football League (CFL), also known by its French name, Ligue canadienne de football (LCF), is a professional league located entirely in Canada that plays Canadian football. ... Commonwealth Stadium is a venue located in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, primarily used by the Edmonton Eskimos of the CFL. Built in 1978 to host the Commonwealth Games, the stadium seats 60,217. ... Image File history File links Rush_silver2. ... Edmonton Rush is a professional lacrosse team in the National Lacrosse League scheduled to start playing in the 2006 season. ... Old MILL logo The National Lacrosse League (NLL) is the professional league of mens indoor lacrosse in North America. ... Inside during The 2005 Tim Hortons Brier Rexall Place (formerly known as the Northlands Coliseum, Edmonton Coliseum and Skyreach Centre) is an indoor arena in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. ... Edmonton Cracker Cats logo. ... The Edmonton Cracker-Cats are an independent minor league baseball team in the Northern League. ... The Northern League is an Independent minor league baseball league which operates in the Midwestern United States and the Canadian provinces of Manitoba and Alberta. ... Telus Field is the home of the Edmonton Cracker-Cats of the independent Northern League and former home of the defunted Edmonton Trappers, a minor-league baseball team in the Pacific Coast League that moved to Round Rock, Texas and became the Round Rock Express after the 2004 season. ...

Media

Television

Edmonton has six broadcast television stations:

  • Channel 8: CITV (Global)
  • Channel 9: CJAL (Access Alberta)
  • Channel 11: CBXFT (SRC)

The cable television provider in Edmonton is Shaw Cable. Network programming from the United States is received on cable via affiliates from Spokane, Washington, which is in the Pacific Time Zone despite the fact that Edmonton is in the Mountain Time Zone. CFRN (also known as CTV Edmonton) is a Canadian television station, broadcasting in Edmonton, Alberta. ... CTV is Canadas largest privately-owned English language television network. ... CBXT is the television call sign for the CBCs television station in Edmonton, Alberta. ... The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC), a Canadian crown corporation, is the countrys national radio and television broadcaster. ... CKEM is a television station owned by CHUM Limited and based in Edmonton, Alberta. ... Citytv is a system of five English language television stations in Canada, owned by the CHUM Limited group. ... This article is about CITV, the Canadian television station. ... The Global Television Network (more commonly called Global) is a major English-language television network in Canada, owned by CanWest Global Communications. ... CJAL is an educational television station in Edmonton, Alberta branded as ACCESS, Albertas provincial educational broadcasting service. ... CBXFT is the Societé Radio-Canada station serving franco-albertans in Edmonton and Alberta. ... The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, commonly known by the abbreviation CBC, is Canadas government-owned radio and television service. ... Coaxial cable is often used to transmit cable television into the house. ... Shaw is Canadas second largest cable television operator, after Rogers Communications. ... Spokane (pronounced spō-CAN ) is the county seat of Spokane County in the State of Washington, USA. It was originally incorporated as Spokan Falls (without an e at the end), drawing on the Native American tribe known as the Spokanee, which means Children of the Sun. ... PDT is UTC-7 The Pacific Time Zone observes standard time by subtracting eight hours from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC-8). ... The Mountain Time Zone of North America keeps time by subtracting seven hours from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC-7) during the short days of autumn, winter and spring), and by subtracting six hours during the Daylight Saving days of spring, summer, and early autumn (UTC-6). ...


Radio

FM radio is a broadcast technology invented by Edwin Howard Armstrong that uses frequency modulation to provide high-fidelity broadcast radio sound. ... CJSR is a Canadian campus-based community radio station, broadcasting at 88. ... The University of Alberta is situated along the south bank of the North Saskatchewan River in the heart of the city of Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. ... Campus radio (also known as college radio, university radio or student radio) is a type of radio station that is run by the students of a college, university or other educational institution. ... CFIE is a Canadian radio station, which broadasts at 106. ... Aboriginal Voices is a Canadian radio network, which airs programming produced by and for Canadian First Nations. ... CBCX-FM is a Canadian radio station, which broadcasts SRCs Espace musique network at 89. ... Espace musique is the French language musical radio service of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation / Société Radio-Canada, the national public broadcaster in Canada. ... CBX-FM is a Canadian radio station, broadcasting at 90. ... CBC Radio Two is an FM radio network in Canada, operated by the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. ... CHBN (91. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Top 40 (radio format). ... Classic hits is a popular music radio format, a variation on the classic rock theme that provides most of the playlist of classic rock with an addition of contemporaneous R&B and pop hits as well, striking a balance between the mostly 70s-focused classic rock genre and the more... CKUA is a Canadian radio station, orignally located at the University of Alberta it is now situated in the city centre of Edmonton. ... Public broadcasting, also known as public service broadcasting or PSB (though this term has a specific different meaning in the United Kingdom - see public service broadcasting in the United Kingdom) is the dominant form of broadcasting around the world, where radio, television, and potentially other electronic media outlets receive funding... CKRA is a Canadian radio station owned by Newcap Broadcasting. ... CIRK is a Canadian radio station, which broadcasts classic rock at 97. ... Classic rock was originally conceived as a radio station programming format which evolved from the album oriented rock (AOR) format in the mid-1980s. ... CHMC is a Canadian radio station, broadcasting at 99. ... Smooth jazz is generally described as a genre of music that utilizes instruments (and, at times, improvisation) traditionally associated with jazz and stylistic influences drawn from, among other sources, funk, popular and R&B. Since the late 1980s, it has become highly successful as a radio format; one can tune... CFBR is a Canadian radio station, broadcasting an album oriented rock format at 100. ... Active rock is a radio format used by many commercial radio stations in Canada and the United States. ... CHDI is the callsign of a Canadian radio station, broadcasting at 102. ... Modern rock is term commonly used to describe a rock music format found on commercial radio stations. ... CISN is an FM radio station that broadcasts on 103. ... country music, see Country music (disambiguation) In popular music, country music, also called country and western music or country-western, is an amalgam of popular musical forms developed in the Southern United States, with roots in traditional folk music, Celtic music, blues, gospel music, and old-time music that began... CFMG FM EZ Rock 104. ... CJEZ is a Canadian radio station, which broadcasts an adult contemporary format at 97. ... Adult contemporary music, frequently abbreciated to just AC, is a type of radio format that plays mainstream and pop music, without hip-hop or rap since, as per the name, it is geared more towards adults than teens. ... Christian music is music created by or adapted for the Christian church. ... Mediumwave radio transmissions (sometimes called Medium frequency or MF) are those between the frequencies of 300 kHz and 3000 kHz. ... CKUA is a Canadian radio station, orignally located at the University of Alberta it is now situated in the city centre of Edmonton. ... Public broadcasting, also known as public service broadcasting or PSB (though this term has a specific different meaning in the United Kingdom - see public service broadcasting in the United Kingdom) is the dominant form of broadcasting around the world, where radio, television, and potentially other electronic media outlets receive funding... CHED is a talk radio station in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, broadcasting at 630 on the AM dial. ... News is new information or current events. ... Talk radio is a radio format which features discussion of topical issues. ... CHFA is a Canadian radio station, which broadcasts the programming of Radio-Canadas La Première Chaîne network in Edmonton, Alberta. ... La Première Chaîne is the news and information service of la Société Radio-Canada, the French-language public broadcaster in Canada. ... CBX is a Canadian radio station, broadcasting at 740 AM in Edmonton, Alberta. ... CBC Radio One is the English language news and information radio network of the publicly-owned Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. ... CFCW is a country music radio station in Camrose, Alberta, broadcasting on 790 kHz AM. The station is owned by Newcap Broadcasting as part of the Alberta Radio Group. ... country music, see Country music (disambiguation) In popular music, country music, also called country and western music or country-western, is an amalgam of popular musical forms developed in the Southern United States, with roots in traditional folk music, Celtic music, blues, gospel music, and old-time music that began... CHQT is a radio station in Edmonton, Alberta, broadcasting its signal on 880 kHz AM with an ERP of 50,000 watts. ... Oldies is a generic term commonly used in the United States and Canada to describe a radio format that concentrates on popular Top 40 music from the 1950s, 1960s and 1970s. ... CJCA is a Canadian radio station. ... Gospel music may refer either to the religious music that first came out of African-American churches in the 1930s or, more loosely, to both black gospel music and to the religious music composed and sung by white southern Christian artists. ... The Team was a Canadian sports radio network, which broadcast from 2001 to 2002. ... XLM 572 is the callsign of a weatheradio broadcast station owned and operated by Environment Canada in Edmonton transmitting continuous weather information in English and French on the frequency of 162. ...

Print

Edmonton has 2 large-circulation daily newspapers:

The free daily Dose news magazine was formerly distributed in Edmonton, however Dose no longer exists. The Edmonton Journal is a daily newspaper in Edmonton, Alberta. ... The Edmonton Sun is a daily tabloid newspaper published in Edmonton, Alberta by Sun Media. ... Page in an issue of Dose, covering the latest for boots. ...


Edmonton also has two free weekly papers centring on the city's music scene, See Magazine[34] and Vue Weekly[35].


The weekly Edmonton Examiner[36] is also delivered free to households in Edmonton.


The University of Alberta has three regular publications: official student newspaper The Gateway, staff newspaper Folio and alumni magazine New Trail. The Gateway is the student newspaper at the University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. ...


On-line Citizen Forums

The connect2edmonton online citizen forum[37] (partnered with Edmonton Economic Development Corp. , Edmonton Airports, the City of Edmonton and the Edmonton Chamber of Commerce)


Metropolitan area

Main article: Edmonton Capital Region
Downtown Edmonton from the air
Downtown Edmonton from the air

Edmonton is at the centre of a metropolitan area that includes 35 independent municipalities either adjacent to Edmonton's city limits or within several kilometres of it. Larger communities include Sherwood Park (part of the Specialized Municipality of Strathcona County), St. Albert, Fort Saskatchewan, Leduc, Nisku (major industrial area in Leduc County), and the towns of Beaumont, Devon and Morinville. This large scale fragmentation has played a role in the development of the Edmonton region. Although several attempts have been made by the City of Edmonton to annex surrounding municipalities, no proposal has of yet been approved by the provincial government.
The Edmonton Capital Region (ECR), also known as Greater Edmonton or the Alberta Capital Region, comprises Albertas provincial capital of Edmonton and surrounding communities in Sturgeon County(north), Parkland County (west), Specialized Municipality of Strathcona County (east) and Leduc County (south). ... Download high resolution version (1000x533, 696 KB)Edmonton, Alberta Ø2005 DWindrim File links The following pages link to this file: Edmonton, Alberta Image:DWEdmonton1. ... Download high resolution version (1000x533, 696 KB)Edmonton, Alberta Ø2005 DWindrim File links The following pages link to this file: Edmonton, Alberta Image:DWEdmonton1. ... Sherwood Park is a hamlet located east of Edmonton, Alberta, Canada in the Specialized Municipality of Strathcona County, named in honor of Lord Strathcona. ... Strathcona County is a Specialized municipality in central Alberta, Canada between Edmonton and Elk Island National Park. ... St. ... Fort Saskatchewan Fort Saskatchewan is a city of 13,000 located 25km northeast of Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. ... For the disambiguation page of Leduc, see Leduc (disambiguation) The area of Leduc, Alberta (53°16′ N 113°32′ W Elevation: about 668 m or 2192 feet), began in 1889 when Robert Taylor Telford settled on a piece of land near a scenic lake. ... Beaumont is a town in central Alberta, Canada near the Irvine Creek. ... Devon is a town in the province of Alberta, Canada, situated 26 km south of Edmonton, the provincial capital, and located on the banks of the North Saskatchewan River. ... Morinville is a thriving community of about 7000 people located in Alberta, 15 minutes north of Edmonton on highway number 2. ...

Northwest: St. Albert
Morinville
North: Sturgeon County Northeast: Fort Saskatchewan
West: Parkland County
Enoch Cree Nation
Spruce Grove
Stony Plain
Edmonton East: Strathcona County
Elk Island National Park
Southwest: Devon South: Leduc County
Leduc (city)
Southeast: Beaumont

St. ... Morinville is a thriving community of about 7000 people located in Alberta, 15 minutes north of Edmonton on highway number 2. ... Sturgeon County (or M.D. #24, as it is officially known) is a Municipal district in central Alberta, Canada. ... Fort Saskatchewan Fort Saskatchewan is a city of 13,000 located 25km northeast of Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. ... Lunenburg is a county municipality in central Alberta, Canada west of Edmonton in Division No. ... The Enoch Cree Nation lies on the western edge of Edmonton, Alberta. ... Spruce Grove is a western suburb of Edmonton, Alberta. ... For the independent record label, see Stony Plain Records Stony Plain is a small town in rural Alberta, Canada, just west of Edmonton. ... Strathcona County is a Specialized municipality in central Alberta, Canada between Edmonton and Elk Island National Park. ... The Entrance to Elk Island National Park Elk Island National Park, established in 1913, is located just east of Edmonton, Alberta. ... Devon is a town in the province of Alberta, Canada, situated 26 km south of Edmonton, the provincial capital, and located on the banks of the North Saskatchewan River. ... Leduc County is a county municipality in central Alberta, Canada. ... For the disambiguation page of Leduc, see Leduc (disambiguation) The area of Leduc, Alberta began in 1889 when Robert Taylor Telford settled on a piece of land near a scenic lake. ... Beaumont is a town in central Alberta, Canada near the Irvine Creek. ...

Military

Edmonton is home to 1 Canadian Mechanized Brigade Group (1 CMBG), the regular army brigade group of Land Forces Western Area of the Canadian Army. Units in 1 CMBG include Lord Strathcona's Horse (Royal Canadians), 1 Combat Engineer Regiment, two of the three regular force battalions of Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry, and various headquarters, medical, and service and support elements. Although not part of 1 CMBG, 408 Tactical Helicopter Squadron is collocated with the brigade group. 1 CMBG Crest 1 Canadian Mechanized Brigade Group (1CMBG) is a Canadian Forces brigade group that is part of Land Forces Western Area of the Canadian Army. ... Land Force Western Area is responsible for all Canadian army operations and administration in western Canada from the northern Lakehead region of Ontario to the Pacific Ocean. ... Canadian Forces Land Force Command (LF) is responsible for army operations within the Canadian Armed Forces. ... Lord Strathconas Horse (Royal Canadians) (LdSH [RC]) is a regular armoured regiment of the Canadian Forces. ... 1 CMBG Crest 1 Canadian Mechanized Brigade Group (1CMBG) is a Canadian Forces brigade group that is part of Land Forces Western Area of the Canadian Army. ... Princess Patricias Canadian Light Infantry (PPCLI) is an infantry regiment in the Canadian Forces (CF), belonging to 1 Canadian Mechanized Brigade Group (1 CMBG). ... 408 Squadron is co-located with the Canadian Mechanized Brigade Group at Canadian Forces Base (CFB) Edmonton. ...


Edmonton also has a large army reserve element from 41 Canadian Brigade Group (41 CBG) including the The Loyal Edmonton Regiment (4th Battalion, Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry) and B Squadron of The South Alberta Light Horse, one of Alberta's oldest army reserve units. Despite being far from Canada's coasts, Edmonton is also the home of HMCS Nonsuch[38], a Naval Reserve division. The Loyal Edmonton Regiment (4th Battalion, Princess Patricias Canadian Light Infantry), or LER, is an infantry unit of the Army Reserve Canadian Forces based in Edmonton, Alberta. ... The South Alberta Light Horse, or SALH, is an armoured unit of the Canadian Forces Army Reserve based at Armouries in Medicine Hat, Alberta and Edmonton, Alberta . ...


There are numerous cadet corps[39] of the different elements (Sea, Army and Air Force) within Edmonton as well.


Sister cities

Edmonton is an official sister city of the following several cities worldwide: This article is about partnerships between towns distant from each other; see Twin cities for the different concept of physically neighbouring cities. ... This article is about partnerships between towns distant from each other; see Twin cities for the different concept of physically neighbouring cities. ...

For other meanings of Harbin, see Harbin (disambiguation). ... Heilongjiang (Simplified Chinese: 黑龙江省; Traditional Chinese: 黑龍江省; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Postal System Pinyin: Heilungkiang) is a province of the Peoples Republic of China located in the northeastern part of the country. ... Wonju is a city in Gangwon province, South Korea. ... Gangwon-do is a province of South Korea, with its capital at Chuncheon. ... Flag Seal Nickname: Live Music Capital of the World Location Location in the state of Texas Coordinates , Government County Travis County Mayor Will Wynn Geographical characteristics Area     City 669. ... Flag Seal Nickname: Music City Location Location in Davidson County and the state of Tennessee Coordinates , Government Country State Counties United States Tennessee Davidson County Founded: Incorporated: 1780 1806 Mayor Bill Purcell (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 526. ... Hull is part of the city of Gatineau, Quebec, Canada. ... Motto: Ursus super montem ivit Area: 342. ...

See also

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Wikimedia Commons logo by Reid Beels The Wikimedia Commons (also called Commons or Wikicommons) is a repository of free content images, sound and other multimedia files. ... List of Edmonton mayors : Matthew McCauley (1892 - 1894) Herbert Charles Wilson (1895 - 1896) Cornelius Gallagher (1896) John Alexander McDougall (1897) William S. Edmiston (1898 - 1899) Kenneth W. MacKenzie (1900 - 1901) William Short (1902 - 1904) Kenneth W. MacKenzie (1905) (second time) Charles May (1906) William Antrobus Griesbach (1907) John Alexander McDougall... This is a list of incorporated cities of Canada in alphabetical order by province. ... The City of Edmonton, Alberta, Canada has been the birthplace or a significant home to a few famous individuals. ... This is a list of neighbourhoods in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. ... The Edmonton Capital Region (ECR), also known as Greater Edmonton or the Alberta Capital Region, comprises Albertas provincial capital of Edmonton and surrounding communities in Sturgeon County(north), Parkland County (west), Specialized Municipality of Strathcona County (east) and Leduc County (south). ...

References

  1. ^ Edmonton - Festival city
  2. ^ Edmonton economic outlook
  3. ^ Edmonton GDP growth
  4. ^ Edmonton Trail map
  5. ^ Old Town Fort Road redevelopment project
  6. ^ Century Park
  7. ^ City of Edmonton's map website
  8. ^ Edmonton Federation of Community Leagues' website
  9. ^ Climate at WeatherOffice
  10. ^ Precipitations in Edmonton
  11. ^ Satatistics Canada - Edmonton Religion
  12. ^ Edmonton Statistics - Population
  13. ^ Edmonton Airport statistics
  14. ^ Edmonton Airports website
  15. ^ Ring road progress annonced
  16. ^ Scool statistics
  17. ^ University of Alberta
  18. ^ Taylor University College
  19. ^ Grant MacEwan College university transfers
  20. ^ North Alberta Institute of Technology
  21. ^ NorQuest College
  22. ^ Edmonton Catholic School District
  23. ^ Edmonton Society for Christian Education
  24. ^ Edmonton Academy
  25. ^ Metro Cinema
  26. ^ Francis Winspear Centre
  27. ^ Edmonton Symphony Orchestra fundraising
  28. ^ Citadel Theatre company history
  29. ^ Redevelopment of Royal Alberta Museum
  30. ^ May Week Labour Arts Festival
  31. ^ Edmonton International Street Performer's Festival
  32. ^ Jazz City International Music Festival
  33. ^ 2005 World Master Games
  34. ^ See Magazine
  35. ^ Vue Weekly
  36. ^ Edmonton Examiner
  37. ^ connect2edmonton
  38. ^ HMCS Nonsuch
  39. ^ Edmonton cadet corps

External links

  • Edmonton Municipal Government site
  • Greater Edmonton portal
  • Edmonton Economic Development Corporation portal
  • Edmonton Airports site
  • Edmonton Portal - Public Library
  • Edmonton History
  • A City at War (Edmonton in the Second World War)
  • RCSCC 27 Warrior
  • Edmonton restaurants
  • City Attractions
  • Coordinates: 53.566666° N -113.516666° E Maps and aerial photos
    • Satellite image from WikiMapia or Google Maps
    • Street map from Yahoo! Maps or GlobalGuide
    • Aerial image from TerraServer
Provincial and territorial capitals of Canada
Edmonton, ABVictoria, BCWinnipeg, MBFredericton, NBSt. John's, NLYellowknife, NTHalifax, NSIqaluit, NUToronto, ONCharlottetown, PEQuebec City, QCRegina, SKWhitehorse, YT

  Results from FactBites:
 
Edmonton, Alberta - definition of Edmonton, Alberta in Encyclopedia (1697 words)
Edmonton officially became a town in 1892 with a population of 700.
In 1912 Edmonton, which was located on the north shore of the North Saskatchewan River, amalgamated with its sister city of Strathcona on the southern shore to attain a combined population of 53,000.
Edmonton is at the heart of a metropolitan area that includes a number of towns and cities either adjacent to Edmonton's city limits, or within a few kilometres of it.
Edmonton Tourism & Travel: City of Edmonton Alberta, Canada (228 words)
Discover Edmonton® - Edmonton is the capital city of Alberta and is well known for its scenic river valley and a thriving music and art community.
Edmonton's vibrant population tends to hang out and let loose at the trendy Whyte Avenue district, which is situated next to the reputable University of Alberta.
Fort Edmonton Park is a large living history museum that recognizes Edmonton's past through a series of interactive restorations.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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