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Encyclopedia > Edmonton
Edmonton
View of Downtown Edmonton.

Flag

Coat of arms
Nickname: City of Champions, Festival City-Live all year, Gateway to the North, E-Town, River City, Oil Capital of Canada
Motto: Industry, Integrity, Progress
Location of Edmonton within census division number 11, Alberta, Canada.
Coordinates: 53°34′N 113°31′W / 53.567, -113.517
Country Flag of Canada Canada
Province Flag of Alberta Alberta
Region Edmonton Capital Region
Census division 11
Established 1795
Incorporated (town) 1892
Incorporated (city) 1905
Government
 - Mayor Stephen Mandel
 - Governing body Edmonton City Council
 - Manager Al Maurer
 - MPs
 - MLAs
Area [1][2]
 - City 684.37 km² (264.2 sq mi)
 - Metro 9,417.88 km² (3,636.3 sq mi)
Elevation 668 m (2,192 ft)
Population (2006)[1][2]
 - City 730,372
 - Density 1,067.2/km² (2,764/sq mi)
 - Metro 1,076,103
 - Metro Density 109.9/km² (284.6/sq mi)
 - Demonym Edmontonian
 - Metro rank 6th
Time zone MST (UTC-7)
 - Summer (DST) MDT (UTC-6)
Postal code span T5A to T6Z
Area code(s) 780
NTS Map 083H11
GNBC Code IACMP
Website: City of Edmonton

Edmonton (IPA: /ˈɛdmɪnˌtɪn/) is the capital of the Canadian province of Alberta. The city is located on the North Saskatchewan River in the central region of the province, an area with some of the most fertile farmland on the prairies. It is the second largest city in Alberta after Calgary, with a population of 730,372 (2006),[1] and is the hub of Canada's sixth largest census metropolitan area, with a metropolitan population of 1,076,103 (2006[2]), making it the northernmost North American city with a metropolitan population over one million. More than one place has the name Edmonton. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (4493x1317, 673 KB) Licensing GPL File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Edmonton-flag. ... Flag of Edmonton, Alberta The Flag of Edmonton, Alberta The flag features the Coat of Arms on a white square (Canadian pale) surmounting a light blue field. ... Image File history File links Edmonton_coa. ... The arms were granted on October 28, 1994. ... // A nickname is a name of an entity or thing that is not its proper name. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (395x740, 20 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Edmonton, Alberta ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Regions Political culture Foreign relations Other countriesAtlas  Politics Portal      Canada is a federation which consists of ten provinces that, with three territories, make up the worlds second largest country in total area. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Alberta. ... For other uses, see Alberta (disambiguation). ... // Canadian provinces and territories are normally grouped into the following regions (generally from west to east): Northern Canada (The North) Yukon Northwest Territories Nunavut Western Canada British Columbia Prairies Alberta Saskatchewan Manitoba Eastern Canada Central Canada Ontario Quebec Atlantic Canada Maritimes New Brunswick Prince Edward Island Nova Scotia Newfoundland and... The Edmonton Capital Region (ECR), also known as Greater Edmonton or the Alberta Capital Region, comprises Albertas provincial capital of Edmonton and surrounding communities in Sturgeon County(north), Parkland County (west), Specialized Municipality of Strathcona County (east) and Leduc County (south). ... NWT SK BC USA 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 Map of Alberta census subdivisions into improvement districts, counties and municipal districts Statistics Canada divides the province of Alberta into nineteen census divisions, each with a municipal... Division No. ... Stephen Mandel (born July 18, 1945) is a Canadian politician and the current mayor of Edmonton, Alberta. ... The Edmonton City Council is the governing body of the City of Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. ... Members of the House of Commons in the 38th Parliament of Canada, as of November 10, 2005. ... Ronalee Rona Ambrose, PC, BA, MA, MP (born March 15, 1969 in Valleyview, Alberta) is Canadas current Minister of the Environment. ... -1... Peter Goldring (born December 12, 1944 in Toronto, Ontario) is a Canadian politician. ... Laurie D. Hawn, CD (born May 11, 1947) is a retired Lieutenant Colonel of the Canadian Air Force (1964-1994) , business person, and federal politician from Edmonton, Alberta. ... Rahim Jaffer (Arabic: ‎) (born December 15, 1971) is the Conservative Party of Canada Member of Parliament for the Edmonton—Strathcona district of Alberta. ... James Rajotte, BA, MA, (born August 19, 1970 in Edmonton, Alberta) is a Canadian politician. ... Categories: People stubs | 1946 births | Members of the Canadian House of Commons ... The Legislative Assembly of Alberta meets in the provincial capital, Edmonton. ... Laurie Blakeman is a Canadian politician, who currently represents the electoral district of Edmonton Centre in the Legislative Assembly of Alberta. ... David Hancock (b. ... Thomas Lukaszuk (born: April 5, 1979) is a politician from Alberta, Canada and a current member of the Legislative Assembly of Alberta representing the Edmonton Castle Downs district, for the Progressive Conservatives. ... Hugn MacDonald 20th Century Canadian Poet. ... Brian Mason is a Canadian politician and current leader of the Alberta New Democrats. ... Rachel Notley Rachel Notley is a well-known labour and political activist from Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. ... Kevin Taft (born September 9, 1955, in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan) is a Liberal-Conservative politician in Alberta, Canada. ... Gene Zwozdesky (born: July 24, 1948 Nipawin, Saskatchewan) is a politician and current cabinet minister from Alberta, Canada. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Elevation histogram of the surface of the Earth – approximately 71% of the Earths surface is covered with water. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The table below lists the 100 largest metropolitan areas in Canada by population, using data from the Canada 2001 Census[1] and the Canada 2006 Census. ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... Mountain Standard Time (MST) is UTC-7, Mountain Daylight Time (MDT) is UTC-6 The Mountain Time Zone of North America keeps time by subtracting seven hours from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC-7) during the shortest days of autumn and winter, and by subtracting six hours during daylight saving time... −12 | −11 | −10 | −9:30 | −9 | −8 | −7 | −6 | −5 | −4 | −3:30 | −3 | −2:30 | −2 | −1 | −0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... Mountain Standard Time (MST) is UTC-7, Mountain Daylight Time (MDT) is UTC-6 The Mountain Time Zone of North America keeps time by subtracting seven hours from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC-7) during the shortest days of autumn and winter, and by subtracting six hours during daylight saving time... −12 | −11 | −10 | −9:30 | −9 | −8 | −7 | −6 | −5 | −4 | −3:30 | −3 | −2:30 | −2 | −1 | −0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... A telephone numbering plan is a plan for allocating telephone number ranges to countries, regions, areas and exchanges and to non-fixed telephone networks such as mobile phone networks. ... Area code 780 is a telephone area code in the Canadian province of Alberta, encompassing the northern two-thirds of the province. ... The National Topographic System or NTS is the topographic system used by Canada for providing general purpose maps of the country. ... Geographical Names Board of Canada a national committee of the Canadian Government Department of National Resources which authorizes the names used on official federal government maps of Canada since 1897. ... Canada consists of ten provinces and three territories. ... For other uses, see Alberta (disambiguation). ... The North Saskatchewan River is a glacier-fed river flowing east from the Canadian Rockies to Lake Winnipeg. ... This article is about the Canadian city. ... A census metropolitan area, or CMA is a Canadian census subdivision comprising a large urban area (known as the urban core) and adjacent areas (known as urban and rural fringes) that have a high degree of social and economic integration with the urban core. ...


At 684 square kilometres (264 sq mi), the City of Edmonton covers an area larger than Chicago, Philadelphia, Toronto or Montreal. Edmonton has one of the lowest population densities in North America, about 9.4% that of New York City. A resident of Edmonton is known as an Edmontonian. Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Philadelphia (disambiguation) and Philly. ... Nickname: Motto: Concordia Salus (well-being through harmony) Coordinates: , Country Province Region Montréal Founded 1642 Established 1832 Government  - Mayor Gérald Tremblay Area [1][2][3]  - City 365. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ...


Edmonton serves as the northern anchor of the Calgary-Edmonton Corridor (one of four regions that together comprise 50% of Canada's population) and is a staging point for large-scale oil sands projects occurring in northern Alberta and large-scale diamond mining operations in the Northwest Territories. The Calgary-Edmonton Corridor is a geographical region of the Canadian province of Alberta. ... Open pit mining Tar sands, also referred to as oil sand or bituminous sand, is a combination of clay, sand, water, and bitumen. ... This article is about the mineral. ... For the former United States territory, see Northwest Territory. ...


Edmonton is Canada's second most populous provincial capital (after Toronto) and is a cultural, government and educational centre. It plays host to a year round slate of world-class festivals, earning it the title of "The Festival City".[3] It is home to North America's largest mall, West Edmonton Mall, and Canada's largest historic park (Fort Edmonton Park). In 2004, Edmonton celebrated the centennial of its incorporation as a city. West Edmonton Mall (WEM), located in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada is the largest shopping mall in North America and the third largest in the world. ... Fort Edmonton, circa 1900. ...

Contents

History

Settlement and exploration

The first inhabitants gathered in the area which is now Edmonton around 3,000 BC and perhaps as early as 10,000 BC, when an ice-free corridor opened up as the last ice age ended and timber, water and wildlife became available in the region. Variations in CO2, temperature and dust from the Vostok ice core over the last 400 000 years For the animated movie, see Ice Age (movie). ...


In 1754, Anthony Henday, an explorer working for the Hudson's Bay Company, may have been the first European to enter the Edmonton area. His expeditions across the Canadian Prairies were mainly to seek contact with the aboriginal population for the purpose of establishing fur trade, as competition was fierce between the Hudson's Bay Company and the North West Company. By 1795, Fort Edmonton was established as a major trading post for the Hudson's Bay Company. It was named after Edmonton, London, the home town, of the HBC deputy governor Sir James Winter Lake. In the late nineteenth century, the highly fertile soils surrounding Edmonton helped attract settlers, further establishing Edmonton as a major regional commercial and agricultural centre. Edmonton was also a stopping point for people hoping to cash in on the Klondike Gold Rush in 1897, although the majority of people doing so chose to take a steamship north to the Yukon from Vancouver. 1754 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Anthony Henday was sent in 1750s by the Hudsons Bay Company to present Alberta after Henry Kelsey had explored the region (also sent by HBC). ... Hbc redirects here. ... Map of the Canadian Prairie provinces, which include boreal forests, taiga, and mountains as well as the prairies (proper). ... Hbc redirects here. ... For the grocery chain, see The North West Company The North West Company a fur trading business headquartered in the city of Montreal in British North America from 1779 to 1821. ... 1795 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Fort Edmonton, circa 1900. ... Edmonton is a place in the eastern part of the London Borough of Enfield. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... Routes to the Klondike. ... 1897 (MDCCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ...


Incorporated as a city in 1904 with a population of 8,350,[4] Edmonton became the capital of Alberta a year later on September 1, 1905. 1904 (MCMIV) was a leap year starting on a Friday (see link for calendar). ... is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1905 (disambiguation). ...


The war years

During the early 1910s, Edmonton grew very rapidly due to rising speculation in real estate prices. In 1912, Edmonton amalgamated with the city of Strathcona south of the North Saskatchewan River. As a result, the city extended south of the river. This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Strathcona is a former city in Alberta, Canada, and now a neighbourhood of Edmonton, also known as Old Strathcona. ...


Just prior to World War I, the real estate boom ended suddenly, causing the city's population to decline sharply from over 72,500 in 1914 to under 54,000 only two years later.[4] Recruitment to the Canadian military during the war also contributed to the drop in population. Afterwards, the city was slow to recover in population and economy during the 1920s and 1930s, until World War II. “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


The first licensed airfield in Canada, Blatchford Field (now Edmonton City Centre Airport), was started in 1929. Pioneering aviators such as Wop May and Max Ward used Blatchford Field as a major base for the distribution of mail, food and medicine to the Canadian North. Hence Edmonton's role as the "Gateway to the North" was strengthened. Edmonton City Centre (Blatchford Field) Airport, (IATA: YXD, ICAO: CYXD), is located within the city of Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. ... Wilfrid Reid Wop May, DFC (April 20, 1896 – June 21, 1952), was a pioneering aviator who created the rôle of bush pilot while working the Canadian west. ... Maxwell (Max) William Ward (b. ...


World War II saw Edmonton becoming a major base for the construction of the Alaska Highway and the Northwest Staging Route. Map of Alaska Highway (in red) The Alaska Highway, also the Alaskan Highway, Alaska-Canadian Highway, and the Alcan Highway, runs from Dawson Creek, British Columbia to Fairbanks, Alaska, via Whitehorse, Yukon. ... The Northwest Staging Route was a series of airstrips, airports and radio ranging stations built in British Columbia, the Yukon and Alaska during World War II. Airfields were built or upgraded every 100 miles (160 kilometres) from Edmonton, Alberta to Fairbanks, Alaska. ...


The oil boom years

The original Leduc No. 1 oil well, now a monument at the southern entrance of Gateway Park on the Queen Elizabeth II Highway.

The first major oil discovery in Alberta was made on February 13, 1947 near the town of Leduc to the south of Edmonton. As early as 1914, oil reserves were known to exist in the southern parts of Alberta (see Turner Valley, Alberta), but they produced very little oil compared to those around Edmonton. Additional oil reserves were discovered during the late 1940s and the 1950s near the town of Redwater. Because most of Alberta's oil reserves were concentrated in central and northern Alberta, Edmonton became home to most of Alberta's oil industry. is the 44th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Turner Valley is a small town southwest of Calgary. ... The 1940s decade ran from 1940 to 1949. ... The 1950s decade refers to the years of 1950 to 1959 inclusive. ... Redwater is a town in northern Alberta located north of Edmonton on Highway 38. ...


The subsequent oil boom gave Edmonton new status as the Oil Capital of Canada. During the 1950s, the city increased in population from 149,000 to 269,000.[4] After a relatively calm but still prosperous period in the 1960s, the city's growth took on renewed vigour with high world oil prices, triggered by the 1973 oil crisis and the 1979 Iranian Revolution. The oil boom of the 1970s and 1980s ended abruptly with the sharp decline in oil prices on the international market and the introduction of the National Energy Program in 1981. The population had reached 521,000 that same year.[4] Although the National Energy Program was later scrapped by the federal government in the mid-1980s, the collapse of world oil prices in 1986 and massive government cutbacks kept the city from making a full economic recovery until the late 1990s. The 1950s decade refers to the years of 1950 to 1959 inclusive. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from the beginning of 1960 to the end of 1969. ... The 1973 oil crisis began on October 17, 1973, when the members of Organization of Arab Petroleum Exporting Countries (OAPEC, consisting of the Arab members of OPEC plus Egypt and Syria) announced, as a result of the ongoing Yom Kippur War, that they would no longer ship oil to nations... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... This article is about the 1979 revolution in Iran. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ... The 1980s was the decade spanning from 1980 to 1989, also called The Eighties. The decade saw social, economic and general upheaval as wealth, production and western culture migrated to new industrializing economies. ... The National Energy Program (NEP) was an energy policy of the Government of Canada. ... AUGUST 25 1981 US Marine Sean Vance is Born on the 25th of August {ear nav|1981}} Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... For the band, see 1990s (band). ...


Recent history

In 1981, West Edmonton Mall, which was at the time the world's largest mall, opened. Still the biggest in North America, the mall is one of Alberta's most-visited tourist attractions, and contains an indoor amusement park, a large indoor waterpark, a skating rink, a New Orleans-themed bar district and a luxury hotel in addition to over eight hundred shops and services. AUGUST 25 1981 US Marine Sean Vance is Born on the 25th of August {ear nav|1981}} Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ... West Edmonton Mall (WEM), located in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada is the largest shopping mall in North America and the third largest in the world. ... North American redirects here. ... Theme park redirects here. ... Fun at a waterpark in a wave pool Aerial view of Sunway Lagoon, a popular waterpark in Malaysia. ...

On July 31, 1987, a devastating tornado, ranked as an F4 on the Fujita scale, hit the city and killed twenty-seven people. The storm blew CN rail cars off a bridge crossing the North Saskatchewan River and hit the areas of Beaumont, Mill Woods, Bannerman, Fraser, and the Evergreen Trailer Park. The day became known as "Black Friday". Then-mayor Laurence Decore cited the community's response to the tornado as evidence that Edmonton was a "city of champions", which later became the city's unofficial slogan. Image File history File links Edmonton_tornado. ... Image File history File links Edmonton_tornado. ... The Edmonton tornado was a powerful and devastating tornado that ripped through the eastern part of Edmonton, Alberta, Canada and parts of neighbouring Strathcona County on the afternoon of Friday, July 31, 1987 (also known as Black Friday to Edmontonians). ... is the 212th day of the year (213th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year 1987. ... This article is about the weather phenomenon. ... F-scale redirects here. ... The North Saskatchewan River is a glacier-fed river flowing east from the Canadian Rockies to Lake Winnipeg. ... For the provincial electoral district, see Edmonton Mill Woods. ... Evergreen Mobile Home Park[1] is a mobile home park located in the rural north east area of the City of Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. ... Laurence G. Decore (June 28, 1940 - November 6, 1999) was a Ukrainian-Canadian lawyer, politician, former mayor of Edmonton and leader of the Alberta Liberal Party. ...

ICON Tower I under construction early this year.
ICON Tower I under construction early this year.

The city entered its current period of economic recovery and prosperity by the late 1990s, helped by a strong recovery in oil prices and further economic diversification. While oil production and refining remains the basis of many jobs in Edmonton, the city's economy has managed to diversify significantly. The downtown core and parts of the inner city, after years of extremely high office vacancy rates and neglect, have recovered to a great degree. It is still undergoing a renaissance of its own, with further new projects underway or about to become reality, and more people choosing to live in or near the downtown core. Because of this renaissance, downtown is becoming very vibrant with the new Art Gallery of Alberta under construction, currently residing in Enterprise Tower during the construction, first office tower in 18 years (EPCOR Tower Station Lands) now under construction, ICON Towers (which will be the new tallest residential building when completed in 2008-Tower 1, 2009-Tower II) under construction, tons of residential towers under construction and proposed, and The Quarters proposed. Also, just recently, a new urban-format Sobey's grocer opened up downtown on 104 Street, and has since made the area more vibrant, and 104 Street quickly becoming a great shopping district. Along with increased vibrancy on 104, current shopping districts downtown are becoming greater, along with other inner city areas like Whyte Avenue, Glenora, and Westmount. Also due to demand of density, Glenora and Strathearn, two dense inner city neighbourhoods have proposed new high rises. Also in the outskirts, new neighbourhoods are being built (also due to the boom) such as Tamarack or Cameron Heights are being built as well as new power centres such as The Meadows and Windermere. There is also an explosion of warehouses and high tech industry jobs! The Downtown Core is one of the urban planning areas making up Singapores Central Area, which is highlighted red. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... 2009 (MMIX) will be a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Construction (disambiguation). ... Sobeys TSX: SBY is a Canadian supermarket chain headquartered in Stellarton, Nova Scotia. ...


This economic prosperity is bringing in large numbers of workers from around Canada. It is forecast that 83,000 new residents will move to Edmonton between 2006 and 2010, twice the rate that city planners had expected.[5] Many of the new workers moving to the city are young men.[6].


Geography and location

Edmonton is located near the geographical centre of the province at an elevation of 668 metres (2,192 ft). The terrain in and around Edmonton is generally flat to gently rolling, with ravines and deep river valleys, such as the North Saskatchewan River valley. Despite the Canadian Rockies lying as close to Edmonton as roughly 220 kilometres to the southwest (only a few hours' drive away), the city is too distant for any of its peaks to be seen from even its tallest buildings. The Canadian Rockies comprise the Canadian segment of the North American Rocky Mountains range. ...


The North Saskatchewan River bisects the city and originates at the Columbia Icefield in Jasper National Park. It empties, via the Saskatchewan River, Lake Winnipeg, and the Nelson River, into Hudson Bay. It runs from the southwest to the northeast and is fed by numerous creeks throughout the city, such as Mill Creek and Whitemud Creek. This creates numerous ravines, many of which have been incorporated into the urban parkland. Edmonton is situated at the boundary between prairie to the south and boreal forest to the north, in a transitional area known as aspen parkland. However, the aspen parkland in and around Edmonton has long since been heavily altered by farming and other human activities, such as oil and natural gas exploration. The North Saskatchewan River is a glacier-fed river flowing east from the Canadian Rockies to Lake Winnipeg. ... Athabasca Glacier, Columbia Icefield, Canadian Rockies. ... Jasper National Park is the largest national park in the Canadian Rockies, spanning 10,878 km² (4200 mi²). It is located in the province of Alberta, to the north of Banff National Park and west of the city of Edmonton. ... The Saskatchewan River (Cree: kisiskāciwani-sÄ«piy, swift flowing river)is a major river in Canada, approximately 550 km (340 mi) long, flowing roughly eastward across Saskatchewan and Manitoba to drain into Lake Winnipeg. ... Winnipeg Beach, Manitoba, on Lake Winnipeg Lake Winnipeg (52°30′N 97°47′W) is a very large (24,400 km²) lake in central North America, in the province of Manitoba, Canada, about 55 km north of the city of Winnipeg. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... New York Harbor, the outflow for Hudson River, is sometimes called Hudsons Bay. Hudson Bay, Canada. ... For other uses, see Prairie (disambiguation). ... Taiga (SAMPA /taIg@/, from Russian тайга́) is a biome characterized by its coniferous forests. ... The Aspen Parklands Ecoregion // Overview Subsections Central Foothills Peace River Special Features Sand dunes Sand plains Badlands Kame fields Topography Variables Level glacial lakebeds Rolling areas Hummocky Moraine Climate Central Moderate precipitation Moderate temperature Foothills Chinooks Strong winds Peace River Higher precipitation Short summer/Long winter Moderate winds Vegetation There...


Parkland and environment

See also: North Saskatchewan River valley parks system

Edmonton's river valley constitutes the longest stretch of connected urban parkland in North America, and Edmonton has the highest per capita area of parkland of any Canadian city. The river valley is 22 times larger than New York City's Central Park. The public river valley parks provide a unique urban escape area with park styles ranging from fully serviced urban parks to campsite-like facilities with few amenities. This main 'Ribbon of Green' is supplemented by numerous neighbourhood parks located throughout the city, to give a total of 111 square kilometres (27,400 acres) of parkland. Within the 7,400 hectare (18,000 acre), 25 kilometre (15.5 mi) long river valley park system there are eleven lakes, fourteen ravines, and twenty-two major parks. Most of the city has excellent bike and walking trail connections.[7] These trails are also part of the 235km Waskahegan walking trail. North American redirects here. ... A map of the current Waskahegan hiking trail route circa 2007. ...


Edmonton's streets and parklands are also home to one of the largest remaining concentrations of healthy American Elm trees in the world, unaffected by Dutch Elm disease, which has wiped out vast numbers of such trees in Eastern North America. Jack Pine, Lodgepole Pine, White Spruce, White Birch, Aspen, Green Ash, Basswood, various poplars and willows, and Manitoba Maple are also abundant; Bur Oak is increasingly popular. Introduced tree species include Blue Spruce, Norway Maple, Red Oak, Sugar Maple, Common Horse-chestnut, McIntosh Apple, and Evans Cherry. Three walnut species -- Butternut, Manchurian Walnut and Black Walnut -- have survived in Edmonton.[8] Binomial name Ulmus americana L. The American Elm Ulmus americana is a species of elm native to eastern North America, occurring from Nova Scotia west to southeast Saskatchewan, and south to Florida and central Texas. ... Branch death, or flagging, at multiple locations in the crown of a diseased elm. ... Binomial name Pinus banksiana Lamb. ... Binomial name Pinus contorta Douglas Lodgepole Pine (Pinus contorta) is a common tree in western North America. ... Binomial name (Moench) Voss The White Spruce (Picea glauca) is a medium-sized evergreen tree growing to 15-30 m tall, rarely to 40 m tall, and with a trunk diameter of up to 1 m. ... Binomial name Betula pubescens Ehrh. ... For other uses, see Aspen (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Marsh. ... Basswood is the common name of timbers of Tilia species. ... This article is about woody plants of the genus Populus. ... Species About 350, including: Salix alba - White Willow Salix amygdaloides - Peachleaf Willow Salix arbuscula - Mountain Willow Salix aurita - Eared Willow Salix babylonica - Peking Willow Salix caprea- Goat Willow Salix caroliniana - Coastal Plain Willow Salix cinerea - Grey Sallow Salix fragilis - Crack Willow Salix herbacea - Dwarf Willow Salix lanata - Woolly Willow Salix... Binomial name Acer negundo L. Manitoba Maple (Acer negundo), as the species is called in Canada, also known as Ash-leaved Maple or Boxelder in the United States, is a species of maple, which occurs throughout most of North America. ... Binomial name Quercus macrocarpa Michx. ... Binomial name Picea pungens Engelm. ... Binomial name Acer platanoides L. The Norway Maple (Acer platanoides) is a maple native to eastern and central Europe and southwest Asia, from France east to Russia, north to southern Scandinavia and southeast to northern Iran. ... Binomial name Quercus rubra L. The Northern red oak, Quercus rubra (Quercus borealis in some older references), is an oak in the red oak group (Quercus section Lobatae). ... Binomial name Acer saccharum Marshall The Sugar Maple Acer saccharum is a prominent tree in the hardwood forests of eastern North America. ... Binomial name Aesculus hippocastanum L. The Common Horse-chestnut (Aesculus hippocastanum) is a large deciduous tree, native to a small area in the mountains of the Balkans in southeast Europe, mainly in Albania, but also locally in northeastern Bulgaria (Preslavska Mountains), northern Greece and Macedonia. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about an immensly fat overweight man in Omaha Nebraska who teaches 7th grade Social studies at millard north middle school he is known as a bad person that does bad things with children his Name is David Evans he coaches track ( not very well) tries to act... Binomial name Juglans cinerea L. The Butternut (Juglans cinerea), also occasionally known as the White Walnut, is a species of walnut native to the eastern United States and southeast Canada, from southern Quebec west to Minnesota, south to northern Alabama and southwest to northern Arkansas. ... Binomial name Maxim. ... Binomial name L. The Black Walnut or American Walnut (Juglans nigra L.) is a native of eastern North America, where it grows, mostly alongside rivers, from southern Ontario, Canada west to southeast South Dakota, south to Georgia, northern Florida and southwest to central Texas. ...


Several golf courses, both public and private, are also located in the river valley. The long summer daylight hours of this northern city provide for extended play well into the evening. Golf courses and the park system become a winter recreation area during this season. Cross-country skiing and skating are popular during the long winter. Four downhill ski slopes are located in the river valley as well, two within the city and two immediately outside.


The City of Edmonton has named five parks in its River Valley Parks System in honour of each of "The Famous Five". The Valiant Five or The Famous Five were five Canadian women who, in 1927 asked the Supreme Court of Canada to answer the question, Are women persons? The case came to be known as the Persons Case. ...


Neighbourhoods

River valley west of downtown Edmonton.
River valley west of downtown Edmonton.
See also: List of neighbourhoods in Edmonton

Edmonton has numerous distinct neighbourhoods.[9] Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 1061 KB) This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 1061 KB) This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... This is a list of residential neighbourhoods in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. ...


The downtown core consists of the Commercial Core, Arts District, Rice Howard Way Pedestrian Mall, MacKay Avenue, Jasper-West, Warehouse District and Government Precinct (a.k.a. Grandin neighbourhood). Downtown Edmonton from the air Downtown Edmonton (Alberta) is bounded by 109 Street to the west, 105 Avenue to the north, 97 Street to the east, 97 Avenue, 100 Avenue, and Rossdale Road to the south and Jasper Avenue to the southeast (the downtown core), though many people consider part...


Radiating from the core are many inner city neighbourhoods such as Oliver, Glenora, Westmount, Queen Mary Park, Inglewood, Central McDougall, Boyle Street, McCauley, Alberta Avenue and Norwood on the north side of the river, while Windsor Park, Garneau, Strathcona, Bonnie Doon, and Strathearn line the south side of the river. Several communities survived attempts by the municipal governments of the 1970s to rid the valley proper of all residents: these are Riverdale, Rossdale, Walterdale, and Cloverdale. Glenora is a prime residential neighborhood in the city of Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, overlooking the North Saskatchewan River valley. ... Queen Mary Park is a inner city residential neighborhood in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada located just outside the downtown core. ... Boyle Street (also called the Downtown East Side or Jasper-East) is a neighbourhood located in central Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, immediately east of downtown proper. ... McCauley is an inner city neighborhood, named for the first mayor of Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, located just to the north east of the downtown core. ... Alberta Avenue (numbered as 118 Avenue following the adoption of the grid system in 1914 and also sometimes called Avenue of Champions) is a major avenue, as well as a community league and business revitalization zone (BRZ) in north-central Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. ... Norwood is a neighbourhood in North-Central Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. ... Old Strathcona is a district located on the southside of Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, near the University of Alberta. ... Bonnie Doon is a neighborhood in south-central Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. ... Riverdale is a river valley neighborhood located just east of the downtown core of the city of Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. ... Rossdale is a river valley neighborhood located immediately south of the Edmonton downtown core (Edmonton is the capital of the Canadian province of Alberta. ... Cloverdale is a river valley neighborhood in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada located on the south side of the North Saskatchewan River. ...


As with any city of its size, the inner communities give way to a collection of suburbs, generally classified as being outside the inner ring road and in extreme cases, outside of Anthony Henday Drive. One of the most well known communities within Anthony Henday Drive is Mill Woods, which is home to approximately 100,000 residents. Often, it is incorrectly referred to as "Millwoods" due to a typographical mistake on street signs, dating back to the neighbourhood's inception. If Mill Woods were a separate municipality, it would be Alberta's third largest city after Calgary and Edmonton. Highway 216 is the highway designation for the current construction project of a ring road around Edmonton, Alberta, also known as Anthony Henday Drive. ... For the provincial electoral district, see Edmonton Mill Woods. ... This article is about the Canadian city. ...


Other communities within the boundaries of the Anthony Henday on the south side of Edmonton include Riverbend, (situated between the North Saskatchewan River and Whitemud Creek), Aspen Gardens, Westbrook Estates, Royal Gardens, Sweet Grass, Blue Quill, Blue Quill Estates, Greenfield, Lansdowne and Grandview Estates, with their main transportation hub as Southgate Transit Centre. Surrounding the new Century Park development are communities such as Yellowbird and Twin Brooks. Several new neighbourhoods are currently in formative stages in the South and Southwest, such as MacEwan, Terwillegar, Southbrook, and Rutherford.[10]

Provincial Legislature of Alberta

Several transit-oriented developments (TOD) have begun to appear along the LRT line at Clareview with future developments planned at Belvedere (part of the Old Town Fort Road Redevelopment Project[11]). Another TOD called Century Park[12] is already under construction at the site of what was once Heritage Mall (currently under demolition) at the southern end of the future South LRT line. Century Park will eventually house up to 5,000 residents. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2048x1360, 406 KB) Licensing GPL File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2048x1360, 406 KB) Licensing GPL File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Aerial view of growth patterns in Arlington County, Virginia. ...


Climate

Edmonton has a northern continental climate with extreme seasonal temperatures, although the city has milder winters than either Regina or Winnipeg, which are both located at a more southerly latitude. It has mild summers and chilly winters, with the average daily temperatures ranging from -11.7°C (10.9°F) in January to 17°C (62°F) in July.[13] Annually, temperatures exceed 30°C (86°F) on an average of three days [but can occur often anytime from late May and early September] and fall below −20°C (−4°F) on an average of twenty-eight days. The highest temperature recorded in Edmonton was 34.5°C (94.1°F) on August 5, 1998.[13] Some areas, however, such as the City of St Albert and Sherwood Park recorded temperatures of 37.7°C (99.9°F) on July 22, 2006. The coldest temperature was −49.4°C (−56.9°F), recorded on January 19 and 21, 1886.[14]. 2006 was a particularly warm year for Edmonton, as temperatures reached 29°C (84.2°F) or higher more than twenty times during the year, from as early as Mid-May and again in early September. Typically, summer lasts from late June until late August, and the humidity is seldom uncomfortably high. Winter lasts from November to March and varies greatly in length and severity. Spring and autumn are both short and highly variable. Regions containing a continental climate exist in portions of Northern Hemisphere continents, and also at higher elevations in certain other parts of the world. ... Nickname: Motto: Floreat Regina (Let Regina Flourish) Location of Regina in the SE quadrant of Saskatchewan Coordinates: , Country Province District Municipality of Sherwood Established 1882 Government  - City Mayor Pat Fiacco  - Governing body Regina City Council  - MPs Dave Batters Ralph Goodale Tom Lukiwski Andrew Scheer  - MLAs Ron Harper Bill Hutchinson Warren... Motto: Template:Unhide = Unum Cum Virtute Multorum (One With the Strength of Many) Location City Information Established: 1738 (Fort Rouge), 1873 (City of Winnipeg) Area: 465. ... For other uses, see Celsius (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Fahrenheit (disambiguation). ... is the 217th day of the year (218th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ...


Edmonton has a fairly dry climate. On average, Edmonton receives 476 mm (18.78 in) of precipitation and 123.5 cm (48.6 in) of snowfall per annum.[13] Precipitation is heaviest in the late spring, summer, and early autumn. The wettest month is July, while the driest months are February, March, October, and November.[13] In July, the mean precipitation is 92 mm (3.6 in).[13] Extremes do occur such as the 114 mm of rainfall that fell on July 31, 1953. Summer thunderstorms can be frequent and occasionally severe enough to produce large hail, damaging winds, funnel clouds and even tornadoes. However, tornadoes near Edmonton are far weaker and short-lived compared to their counterparts farther south. Tornadoes as powerful as the F4 tornado which struck Edmonton on July 31, 1987, killing twenty-seven, are very rare. F-scale redirects here. ...


A massive cluster of thunderstorms occurred on July 11, 2004, with large hail and over 100 mm (4 in) of rain reported within the space of an hour in many places. This "1-in-200 year event" flooded major intersections and underpasses as well as damaging both residential and commercial properties. The storm caused extensive damage to West Edmonton Mall. The roof collapsed under the weight of the rainwater, causing water to drain onto the mall's indoor ice rink. As a result, the mall was forced to undergo an evacuation as a precautionary measure.

Weather averages for Edmonton (City Centre Airport)
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °C -7.3 -3.6 2.1 11.3 17.6 21.0 22.8 22.1 16.8 10.9 0.0 -5.4 9.0
Average low °C -16.0 -13.1 -7.3 -0.3 5.7 10.0 12.1 11.1 5.8 0.3 -8.2 -13.9 -1.2
Precipitation mm 22.5 14.6 16.6 26.0 49.0 87.1 91.7 69.0 43.7 17.9 17.9 20.9 476.9
Average high °F 18.9 25.5 35.8 52.3 63.7 69.9 73.0 71.8 62.2 51.6 32.0 22.3 48.2
Average low °F 3.2 8.4 18.9 31.5 42.3 50.0 53.8 52.0 42.4 32.5 17.2 7.0 29.8
Precipitation inches 0.89 0.57 0.65 1.02 1.93 3.43 3.61 2.72 1.72 0.70 0.70 0.82 18.78
Source: Environment Canada[13] Jan 2007

Edmonton is the most northerly major city in North America with a metro population of over one million. It is at the same latitude as Hamburg, Germany and Liverpool, England. At the summer solstice, Edmonton receives seventeen hours and six minutes of daylight, with twilight extending well beyond that. Edmonton receives 2,289 hours of sunshine per year, and is one of Canada's sunniest cities. Environment Canada is the department of the government of Canada with responsibility for coordinating environmental policies and programs as well as preserving and enhancing the natural environment and conservation of wildlife. ... This article is about the city in Germany. ... This article is about the city in England. ... For other uses, see Solstice (disambiguation). ...


Economy

See also: Economy of Alberta
Jasper Ave., a hub of major offices and the financial centre.
Jasper Ave., a hub of major offices and the financial centre.

Edmonton is the major economic centre for northern and central Alberta and a major centre for the oil and gas industry. In its Autumn 2007 Metropolitan Outlook, the Conference Board of Canada forecast that Edmonton's GDP for 2007 will be $44.1 billion (2007 dollars), a 3.6% increase over 2006.[15] The Edmonton Economic Development Corporation estimated that as of January 2005 the total value of major projects under construction in northern Alberta was $81.5 billion, with $18.2 billion occurring within Greater Edmonton. // Albertas economy is one of the strongest in Canada, supported by the burgeoning petroleum industry and to a lesser extent, agriculture and technology. ... Image File history File links JasperRoadEdmt. ... Image File history File links JasperRoadEdmt. ...


Edmonton traditionally has been a hub for Albertan petrochemical industries, earning it the nickname "Oil Capital of Canada" in the 1940s. Supply and service industries drive the energy extraction engine while research develops new technologies and supports expanded value-added processing of Alberta's massive oil, gas and oil sands reserves. These are reported to be the second largest in the world after Saudi Arabia.[16] The 1940s decade ran from 1940 to 1949. ...


Despite the apparent focus on oil and gas, Edmonton's economy is now the second most diverse in Canada.[17] Major industrial sectors include a strong technology sector anchored by major employers such as IBM, Telus, Intuit Canada, Canadian Western Bank, BioWare, Matrikon, General Electric and Stantec. The associated biotech sector, with companies such as CV Technologies, has recently seen employment growth of 37%.[18] For other uses, see IBM (disambiguation) and Big Blue. ... TELUS (TSX: T, NYSE: TU) is a Canadian telecommunications firm, the countrys second-largest telecommunications carrier after Bell Canada, with C$8. ... Intuit Canada is headquartered in Edmonton, Alberta and has offices in Calgary, Toronto, Sherbrooke and Montreal. ... The Canadian Western Bank is a bank that is based in Edmonton, and which operates primarily in western Canada. ... BioWare Corp. ... GE redirects here. ...


Much of the growth in technology sectors is due to Edmonton's reputation as one of Canada’s premiere research and education centres[neutrality disputed]. Research initiatives are anchored by educational institutions such as the University of Alberta as well as government initiatives underway at the Alberta Research Council and Edmonton Research Park. Recently the National Institute for Nanotechnology was constructed on the University of Alberta campus.


During the 1970's and 1980's, Edmonton started to become a major financial centre with both regional offices of Canada's major banks and locally based institutions opening. However, the turmoil of the late 1980s economy radically changed the situation. Locally based operations such as Principal Trust and Canadian Commercial Bank would fail and regional offices were moved to Calgary. The 1990s saw a solidification of the economy and now Edmonton is home of Canadian Western Bank, the only publicly traded Schedule I chartered bank headquarters west of Toronto. Other major financial centres include ATB Financial, Servus Credit Union (formerly Capital City Savings), TD Canada Trust, Manulife. The Canadian Commercial Bank was an Alberta-based Canadian bank bank that failed and ceased operations on September 3, 1985. ... The Canadian Western Bank is a bank that is based in Edmonton, and which operates primarily in western Canada. ... Alberta Treasury Branches, also known as ATB Financial, is a financial institution and crown corporation owned by the Government of Alberta. ... Servus Credit Union (until November 2006 known as Capital City Savings Credit Union) is a member-owned financial institution based out of Edmonton, Alberta and the largest credit union in the Province of Alberta. ... TD Canada Trust is the personal, small business and commercial banking operation of The Toronto-Dominion Bank. ... Manulife Financial (TSX: MFC) (NYSE: MFC) is a Canadian insurance company. ...


Edmonton has been the birth place of several companies which have grown to international stature such as PCL Construction, and Stantec Inc.. The local retail market has also seen the creation of many successful store concepts such as The Brick, Katz Group, AutoCanada, Boston Pizza, Pizza 73, Liquor Stores, Liquor Barn, Planet Organic, Empire Design, Running Room, Booster Juice, Earl's, Fountain Tire and XS Cargo. The Brick Group Income Fund TSX: BRK.UN opened its first store in Edmonton, Alberta in 1971, and has grown to become one of Canadas largest volume retailers of furniture, mattresses, appliances and home electronics. ... Boston Pizza is a Canadian-based pizza chain. ...


The geographical location of Edmonton has made it an ideal spot for distribution and logistics. CN Rail's North American operational facility is located in the city as well as a major intermodal facility that handles all incoming freight from the port of Prince Rupert in British Columbia. Orthographic projection centred over Prince Rupert BC Coast, showing Prince Rupert and Vancouver Prince Rupert is a city in the province of British Columbia, Canada. ...


Edmonton was judged to have the “best economic potential” of any North American city by the Financial Times publication, Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) magazine. [19] In a 2007 study, FDI placed Edmonton immediately ahead of Mississauga, Charlotte, Tijuana, and Calgary among cities with populations between 500,000 and 2 million. Edmonton's economic potential, expanding infrastructure, human resources, cost effectiveness and high standard of living place it in the No. 4 spot on FDI’s list of top-10 North American large cities. The survey also named Edmonton in the top-five large North American cities for business development and investment promotion.[20] Edmonton is known for its exceptional environmental stewardship, strong life-science sector, and burgeoning high-tech industry economy[citation needed]. The Financial Times (FT) is a British international business newspaper. ...


Demographics

Visible minorities [21] [1] Population Percent
Total visible minorities 165,465 22.9
Chinese 45,305 6.3
South Asian 38,225 5.3
Black 19,020 3.1
Filipino 18,245 2.5
Arab 11,205 1.6
Southeast Asian 10,635 1.5
Latin American 8,650 1.2
Multiple visible minorities 4,940 0.7
Korean 3,440 0.5
West Asian 2,690 0.4
Japanese 1,845 0.3
Other visible minority 1,255 0.2
Religion[22] Population Percent
Protestant 204,770 31.2%
Catholic 193,110 29.4%
No religion 160,150 24.4%
Other Christian 25,815 3.9%
Islam 18,790 2.9%
Christian Orthodox 17,275 2.6%
Buddhist 13,640 2.1%
Sikh 9,235 1.4%
Hindu 7,525 1.1%
Other 2,345 0.3%

According to the mid-2006 census, there were 730,372 residents within the city of Edmonton proper, compared to 3,290,350 for all of Alberta. The total population of the CMA (Census Metropolitan Area) was 1,034,945. Visible minorities are persons who are not of the majority race in a given population. ... Map of South Asia South Asia is a subregion of Asia comprising the modern states of Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan and Sri Lanka, . It covers about 4,480,000 km², or 10 percent of the continent, and is also known as the Indian subcontinent. ... This article is about the color. ... For other uses, see Arab (disambiguation). ... Location of Southeast Asia Southeast Asia is a subregion of Asia. ... Latin America consists of the countries of South America and some of North America (including Central America and some the islands of the Caribbean) whose inhabitants mostly speak Romance languages, although Native American languages are also spoken. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ... Eastern Orthodoxy (also called Greek Orthodoxy and Russian Orthodoxy) is a Christian tradition which represents the majority of Eastern Christianity. ... A replica of an ancient statue found among the ruins of a temple at Sarnath Buddhism is a philosophy based on the teachings of the Buddha, Siddhārtha Gautama, a prince of the Shakyas, whose lifetime is traditionally given as 566 to 486 BCE. It had subsequently been accepted by... Religions Sikhism Scriptures Guru Granth Sahib Languages English, Punjabi] A Sikh (English: or ; Punjabi: , , IPA: ) is an adherent to Sikhism. ... This article discusses the adherents of Hinduism. ... The Canada 2006 Census was a detailed enumeration of the Canadian population. ... A census metropolitan area, or CMA is a Canadian census subdivision comprising a large urban area (known as the urban core) and adjacent areas (known as urban and rural fringes) that have a high degree of social and economic integration with the urban core. ...


In the five years between 2001 and 2006, the population of the city of Edmonton proper grew by 9.6%, compared with an increase of 10.4% for Edmonton CMA, and 10.6% for Alberta as a whole. The population density of the city of Edmonton proper averaged 1,067.2 people per square kilometre (2,764/sq mi), compared with an average of 5.1 people per square kilometre (13.2/sq mi), for Alberta altogether. For other uses, see Alberta (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Alberta (disambiguation). ...


In mid-2001, 11.7% of Edmonton's population were of retirement age (65 and over for males and females) compared with 13.2% in Canada. The median age is 35.3 years of age compared to 37.6 years of age for all of Canada. Also, according to the 2001 census, 50.5% of the population within the city of Edmonton proper is female, while 49.5% is male. Children under five accounted for approximately 5.8% of the resident population of Edmonton.[23] This compares with 6.2% in Alberta, and almost 5.6% for Canada overall.


In 2006, people of European ethnicities formed the largest cluster of ethnic groups in Edmonton, mostly of English, Scottish, German, Irish, Ukrainian and French origins. [24] [2] According to the 2006 census, the city of Edmonton was 71.8% White and 5.3% Aboriginal, while Visible Minorities accounted for 22.9% of the population. [3] This article deals with the European people as an ethnic group or ethnic groups. ... This article is about the English as an ethnic group and nation. ... This article is about the Scottish people as an ethnic group. ... Whites redirects here. ... For other uses, see Native Americans (disambiguation). ... Visible minorities are persons who are not of the majority race in a given population. ...


Infrastructure

Transportation

Edmonton is a major transportation gateway to northern Alberta and northern Canada. There are two airports serving the city, Edmonton City Centre Airport and Edmonton International Airport, of which the latter is the largest. The Edmonton International Airport has passengers flying to destinations in the United States, Europe, Mexico, and the Caribbean, along with charters to Japan. The Edmonton City Centre Airport is a general aviation facility since air services consolidation in 1995 and the only airport located within the city limits. It is home to a variety of aviation companies with key markets in Northern Alberta. Interurban passenger rail service is operated by VIA Rail to Jasper National Park, Saskatchewan, and British Columbia. Edmonton serves as a major transportation hub for Canadian National Railway, whose North American operations management centre is located at their Edmonton offices. Edmonton has a transportation network fairly typical for a Canadian city of its size, involving most modes of transport including, but certainly not limited to, air, rail, road and public transit. ... Edmonton City Centre (Blatchford Field) Airport, (IATA: YXD, ICAO: CYXD), is located within the city of Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. ... Edmonton International Airport (IATA: YEG, ICAO: CYEG) is the primary air passenger and air cargo facility in Edmonton, Alberta as well as a major hub facility for Northern Alberta and Northern Canada. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... West Indies redirects here. ... A charter airline is one that operates charter flights, that is flights that take place outside normal schedules, by a hiring arrangement with a particular customer. ... VIA Rails trains travelling by Highway 401 near Brockville, Ontario. ... Jasper National Park is the largest national park in the Canadian Rockies, spanning 10,878 km² (4200 mi²). It is located in the province of Alberta, to the north of Banff National Park and west of the city of Edmonton. ... For other uses, see Saskatchewan (disambiguation). ... Motto: Splendor sine occasu (Latin: Splendour without diminishment) Capital Victoria Largest city Vancouver Official languages English (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor Steven Point Premier Gordon Campbell (BC Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 36 Senate seats 6 Confederation July 20, 1871 (6th province) Area  Ranked 5th Total 944... The Canadian National Railway (CN; AAR reporting marks CN, CNA, CNIS) is a Canadian Class I railway operated by the Canadian National Railway Company headquartered in Montreal, Quebec. ...


With direct air distances from Edmonton to places such as New Delhi in Asia and London in Europe being shorter than to other main airports in Western North America,[25] Edmonton Airports is working to establish a major container shipping hub called Port Alberta.[26] Port Alberta is a project by Edmonton International Airport in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, which will combine air, rail, and road transportation infrastructure at a single point. ...


A largely gridded street system forms most of Edmonton's street and road network. The address system is mostly numbered, with streets running south to north and avenues running east to west. In built-up areas built since the 1950s, local streets and major roadways generally do not conform to the grid system. Major roadways include Yellowhead Trail and Whitemud Drive, and the city is connected to other communities elsewhere in Alberta, B.C., and Saskatchewan via the Yellowhead Highway to the west and east, and the Queen Elizabeth II Highway to the south. The Yellowhead Highway is a major east-west highway connecting the four western Canadian provinces of British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba. ... Deerfoot Trail in Calgary, Alberta. ...


The Edmonton Transit System is the city's main public transit agency, operating a light rail transit (LRT) line as well as a large fleet of buses and trolley buses. Scheduled LRT began on April 23, 1978, with five extensions of the single line completed since. The original Edmonton line is considered to be the first "modern" light rail line in North America (i.e. built from scratch, rather than being an upgrade of an old system). It introduced the use of German-designed rolling stock that subsequently became the standard light rail vehicle of the United States. The Edmonton "proof of payment" fare collection system adopted in 1980—modelled after European ticket systems—became the North American transit industry's preferred approach for subsequent light rail projects. Currently the City of Edmonton is working on the South LRT Extension, which will see trains travelling to Century Park, located at 23 Avenue and 111 Street by the end of 2009, while making an additional stop at Southgate Centre. To facilitate this change, ETS is constructing a new transit centre on 111 Street across from Southgate. The Edmonton Transit System, also called ETS, is the public transit service owned and operated by the city of Edmonton, Alberta. ... An Edmonton LRT train at Health Sciences Station. ... is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ...


There is an extensive multi-use trail system for bicycles and pedestrians throughout the city; however, most of this is within the river valley parkland system.

Waste disposal

The Edmonton Composting Facility, the largest stainless steel building in North America. The facility is the largest of its type in the world. The Edmonton Composting Facility is the site of the City of Edmontons advanced co-composting system for processing organic waste. ...


In the next few years, the city anticipates it will divert more than 80% of the city's household waste from entering the landfills. Among the innovative uses for the city's waste includes a Christmas tree recycling program. The trees are collected each January and put through a wood chipper. This material is used to insulate the fields of developing compost. In addition, the wood chips absorb much of the odour produced by the compost, by providing a biological element onto which the odours can attach themselves.


Together, the Waste Management Centre and Wastewater Treatment plant are known as the Edmonton Waste Management Centre of Excellence. Research partners include the University of Alberta, Alberta Research Council, Northern Alberta Institute of Technology, and Olds College.[27]

Electricity and water distribution systems

Edmonton's first power company established itself in 1891 and installed street lights along the city's main avenue, Jasper Avenue. The power company was bought by the Town of Edmonton in 1902 and remains under municipal ownership today as EPCOR. Also in charge of water treatment, in 2002, EPCOR installed the world's largest ultraviolet (UV) water treatment or Ultraviolet disinfection system at its E.L. Smith Water Treatment Plant. EPCOR, formerly known as Edmonton Power is a utility company based in Edmonton, Alberta, which generates and supplies electricity in Alberta, British Columbia, Ontario and several U.S. States. ... A low pressure mercury vapor discharge tube floods the inside of a hood with shortwave UV light when not in use, sterilizing microbiological contaminants from irradiated surfaces. ... Ultraviolet disinfection is a form of waste of wastewater treatment. ...

Health care

There are four main hospitals serving Edmonton: The University of Alberta Hospital, The Royal Alexandra Hospital, The Misercordia Hospital and The Grey Nuns Hospital. Other area hospitals include the Sturgeon Community Hospital in St. Albert, the Leduc Community Hospital in Leduc, the Westview Health Centre in Stony Plain, and the Fort Saskatchewan Health Centre in Fort Saskatchewan. Dedicated psychiatric care is also provided at the Alberta Hospital. All hospitals are under the administration of the Capital Health Authority although the Misercordia and the Grey Nuns are run separately by the Caritas Health Group. A hospital today is an institution for professional health care provided by physicians and nurses. ... The University of Alberta (U of A) is a public coeducational research university located in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. ... Location of St. ... Location of Leduc in Alberta Coordinates: , Country Province Region Edmonton Capital Region Census division 11 Established Village: 15 Dec 1899 Incorporated Town: 15 Dec 1906   City: 01 Sep 1983 Government [1]  - Mayor Greg Krishke  - Governing body Leduc City Council  - MP James Rajotte  - MLA George Rogers Area  - City 36. ... For the independent record label, see Stony Plain Records Stony Plain is a small town in rural Alberta, Canada, just west of Edmonton. ... Fort Saskatchewan is a city of 14,686 (2005 census) located 25 km northeast of Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. ... Alberta Hospital Edmonton is a 410 bed psychiatric hospital located at the North Eastern quadrant of Edmonton, Alberta. ...


Education

Post-secondary

Entryway to Grant MacEwan College downtown campus
Entryway to Grant MacEwan College downtown campus

Edmonton has become one of Canada's major educational centres with more than 60,000 full time post-secondary students spread over several institutions and campuses (total enrolment between the schools is as high as 170,000, which includes students enrolled in multiple institutions[28]).


The University of Alberta (known colloquially as the "U of A"), whose main campus is situated on the south side of Edmonton's river valley, is a board-governed, public institution with annual revenue of one billion dollars. 35,000 students are served in more than 200 undergraduate programs and 170 graduate programs. Main campus consists of more than ninety buildings on 890,000 square metres (220 acres) of land, with buildings dating back to the university's establishment in 1908. It is also home to Canada's second largest research library which ranks first in volumes per student with over 10 million (in 2005)[29] and subscriptions to 13,000 full-text electronic journals and 500 electronic databases. The University of Alberta (U of A) is a public research university located in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. ... Year 1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


Other universities within the borders of Edmonton include Athabasca University, Concordia University College of Alberta, the King's University College, Taylor University College and Seminary,[30] and the Edmonton campus of the University of Lethbridge. Athabasca University, headquartered in Athabasca, Alberta, is a fully accredited institution specialized in the delivery of distance education courses and programs. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... For other uses, see Kings University College. ... The University of Lethbridge (also known as U of L) is a public university in Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada. ...


Other Edmonton post-secondary institutions include Grant MacEwan College, which enrolls[31] 40,791 students in programs offering career diplomas, university transfers and bachelor degrees[32] the Northern Alberta Institute of Technology (NAIT), with 48,500 students enrolled in 190 technical, vocational and apprenticeship programs[33] and NorQuest College,[34] with 11,300 students, specializing in short courses in skills and academic upgrading. Á á É é Í í Ó ó Ú ú À à È è Ì ì Ò ò Ù ù  â Ê ê Î î Ô ô Û û Ä ä Ë ë Ï ï Ö ö Ü ü ß Ã ã Ñ ñ Õ õ Ç ç Ģ ģ Ķ ķ Ļ ļ Ņ ņ Ŗ ŗ Ş ş Ţ ţ Ć ć Ĺ ĺ Ń ń Ŕ ŕ Ś ś Ý ý Ź ź Đ đ Ů ů Č č Ď ď Ľ ľ Ň ň Ř ř Š š Ť ť Ž ž Ǎ ǎ Ě ě Ǐ ǐ Ǒ ǒ Ǔ ǔ Ā ā Ē ē Ī ī Ō ō Ū ū ǖ ǘ ǚ ǜ Ĉ ĉ Ĝ ĝ Ĥ ĥ Ĵ ĵ Ŝ ŝ Ŵ ŵ Ŷ ŷ Ă ă Ğ ğ Ŭ ŭ Ċ ċ Ė ė Ġ ġ İ ı Ż ż Ą ą Ę ę Į į Ų ų Ł ł Ő ő Ű ű Ŀ ŀ Ħ ħ Ð ð Þ þ Œ œ Æ æ Ø ø Å å Ə ə – — … [] [[]] {{}} ~ | ° → ± − × ... The Northern Alberta Institute of Technology (NAIT) is located in Edmonton, Alberta. ...


Edmonton is also home to Antarctic Institute of Canada.


K-12

Edmonton has three publicly funded school boards (districts), who provide kindergarten and grades one through twelve. The vast majority of students attend schools in the two large English language boards: Edmonton Public Schools and the separate Catholic school Edmonton Catholic School District.[35] Also, since 1994, the francophone minority community has had their own school board based in Edmonton, the North-Central Francophone School Authority, which includes surrounding communities. Most recently the city has seen a small number of public charter schools open, independent of any board. All three school boards and public charter schools are funded through provincial grants and property taxes. Edmonton Public Schools (EPS) is the public school board in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Alberta charter schools are a special type of public schools, which have a greater degree of autonomy than a normal school, to allow them to offer programs that are significantly different than regular public schools operated by district school boards. ... Property tax, millage tax is an ad valorem tax that an owner of real estate or other property pays on the value of the property being taxed. ...


Some private schools exist as well. Included are the Edmonton Academy and Tempo School.[36] The Edmonton Society for Christian Education[37] used to be a private school, however they became part of Edmonton Public Schools. Edmonton Public Schools (EPS) is the public school board in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. ...


Both the Edmonton Public Schools and the Edmonton Catholic School District provide support and resources for those wishing to home school their children. Homeschooling[1] ( also called home education), home learning or homeschool[1] – is the education of children at home, typically by parents or guardians, rather than in a public or private school. ...


City life

See also: List of attractions and landmarks in Edmonton

The following is a list of attractions and landmarks in or near Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. ...

Nightlife

Downtown Edmonton's skyline at night.
Downtown Edmonton's skyline at night.

There are several key concentrations of nightlife in the city of Edmonton. The most popular is the Whyte Avenue (82nd Avenue) strip, concentrated between 109 Street and 99 Street. It has the highest concentration of heritage buildings in Edmonton. Once the heart of the town of Strathcona (annexed by Edmonton on February 1, 1912), it fell into disrepair during the middle of the twentieth century. Beginning in the 1970s, a concentrated effort to revive the area through the establishment of a Business Revitalization Zone has produced an area rich with restored historical buildings and pleasant streetscapes. Its proximity to the University of Alberta has led to a high concentration of establishments ranging from restaurants and pubs to trendy clubs while hosting a wide variety of shops during the day. This area also contains two independent movie theatres: the Garneau and Princess theatres, as well as several live theatre, music and comedy venues. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (4493x1317, 673 KB) Licensing GPL File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (4493x1317, 673 KB) Licensing GPL File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Old Strathcona is a district located on the southside of Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, near the University of Alberta. ... is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


Downtown Edmonton has undergone a continual process of renewal and unprecedented growth since the mid 1990s. Many buildings were demolished during the oil boom starting in the 1960s and continuing into the 1980s to make way for office towers. As such, there have always been numerous pub-type establishments such as The Rose and Crown, Sherlock Holmes' and Elephant & Castle as well as many hotel lounges and restaurants. The past decade, has seen a strong resurgence in more mainstream venues. Edmonton also has a high demand for pub crawl tours in the city. Various clubs such as the New City Suburbs, "OilCity Roadhouse", "The Bank", and Halo are also to be found along Edmonton's main street, Jasper Avenue. The Edmonton City Centre mall also houses an Empire Theatres movie theatre, featuring ten screens. The non-profit Metro Cinema [38] shows a variety of alternative or otherwise unreleased films every week. Empire Theatres TSX: EPC.P is Canadas second largest movie theatre circuit, and the only major circuit operating in Atlantic Canada. ...


West Edmonton Mall holds several after hour establishments in addition to its many stores and attractions. Bourbon Street has numerous eating establishments and clubs and casinos can also be found within the complex. Scotiabank Theatre (formerly known as SilverCity), at the west end of the mall, is a theater which features twelve screens and an IMAX. West Edmonton Mall (WEM), located in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada is the largest shopping mall in North America and the third largest in the world. ... IMAX theatre at the Melbourne Museum complex, Australia BFI London IMAX by night IMAX (short for Image Maximum) is a film format created by Canadas IMAX Corporation that has the capacity to display images of far greater size and resolution than conventional film display systems. ...


Culture

The Francis Winspear Centre for Music.
The Francis Winspear Centre for Music.

Many events are anchored in the downtown Arts District, centred around the newly renovated Churchill Square (named in honour of Sir Winston Churchill). Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (972x1296, 184 KB)[edit] Summary Picture taken by me. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (972x1296, 184 KB)[edit] Summary Picture taken by me. ... Churchill Square (Officially Sir Winston Churchill Square) is the main square downtown square in Edmonton, which play host to a large majority of festivals and events (such as the Edmonton International Street Performers Festival, The Works Art & Design Festival, Cariwest and in recent years the annual Pride Festival, which was...

  • The Francis Winspear Centre for Music[39] was opened in 1997 after years of planning and fundraising.[40] Described as one of the most acoustically perfect concert halls in Canada, it is home to the Edmonton Symphony Orchestra and hosts a wide variety of shows every year. It seats 1,932 patrons and houses the $3 million Davis Concert Organ, the largest concert organ in Canada. An interesting aspect of the hall's design is its separation into acoustically separate areas each of which are insulated from each other through acoustical barriers built into the structure. Patrons and artists can see these in the form of double-door "sound locks".
  • Across 102nd Avenue is the Citadel Theatre, so named after the Salvation Army Citadel in which Joe Shoctor first started the Citadel Theatre company in 1965. It is now one of the largest theatre complexes in Canada with five halls each specializing in different kinds of productions.[41] For instance, the Maclab Theatre features a thrust stage surrounded by a U-shaped seating arrangement, while the Shoctor Theatre is a traditional stage setup.
  • On the University of Alberta grounds is the 2534-seat Northern Alberta Jubilee Auditorium, which recently reopened after being out of commission for a year during heavy renovations carried out as part of the province's centennial celebrations. Both it and its southern twin in Calgary were constructed in 1955 for the province's silver jubilee and have played host to many concerts, musicals, and ballets. The Edmonton Opera uses the Jubilee as its base of operations. On the front of the building is a quote from Suetonius' Life of Augustus: "He found a city built of brick—left it built of marble."
  • Old Strathcona is home to the Theatre District, which holds the Transalta Arts Barns (headquarters of the Edmonton International Fringe Festival), The Walterdale Playhouse, Catalyst Theatre, and the Varscona Theatre (base of operations for several theatre companies, including Teatro la Quindicina, Shadow Theatre, Rapid Fire Theatre, Die-Nasty, and Oh Susanna!). Edmonton was named cultural capital of Canada in 2007.

The Winspear Centre, Edmonton, Alberta The Francis Winspear Centre for Music in Edmonton, Alberta was built in 1997. ... As the professional orchestra of Alberta’s creative capital city, the Edmonton Symphony Orchestra presents over 80 concerts a year of symphonic music in all genres, from classical to country. ... The Citadel Theatre is the major venue for theatre arts in the city of Edmonton. ... Shield of The Salvation Army The Salvation Army is a non-military evangelical Christian organisation. ... The Northern Alberta Jubilee Auditorium is a 4 million cubic foot (113,000 m3) performing arts, culture and community facility located in Edmonton, Alberta. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... The Twelve Caesars is a set of twelve biographies of Julius Caesar and the first 11 emperors of the Roman Empire. ... Old Strathcona is a district located on the southside of Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, near the University of Alberta. ... The Edmonton Fringe Festival is an annual event held every August in Edmonton, Alberta in Canada. ... The Varscona Theatre (10329 - 83 Avenue) is a live performance venue in the Old Strathcona neighborhood of Edmonton, Alberta. ... Teatro la Quindicina is a theatre company founded by Canadian playwright Stewart Lemoine in 1982 at the Edmonton International Fringe Festival. ... Rapid Fire Theatre (RFT) is an improvisational theatre company based in Edmonton, Alberta. ... Die-Nasty is a live improvised soap opera, running weekly in the city of Edmonton, Alberta, Canada since 1991. ... Oh Susanna! is an live improvised variety show/talkshow, presented monthly in the city of Edmonton, Alberta at the Varscona Theatre in Old Strathcona. ...

Museums and galleries

There are also over seventy museums in Edmonton of ranging sizes. The largest is the Royal Alberta Museum (formerly the Provincial Museum of Alberta until renamed by Queen Elizabeth II during her 2005 visit) which houses over 10 million objects in its collection. The museum showcases the culture and practices of the diverse aboriginal tribes of the region. The main building, located on the river valley west of downtown in Glenora, was opened in 1967 and is now in the early stages of large-scale redevelopment.[42] the royal alberta museum is cool and lalalallalalalallallllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllla lllllllllllllllllla dumdedumdedumdumdum lol thsi is me jesse i am bad as a cat lol duh lol hud i got it wrong but hear my bling i am jesse doing the rapping thing. ... Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of sixteen sovereign states, holding each crown and title equally. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ...


The Telus World of Science is located in the Woodcroft district. It opened in 1984 but has been expanded several times since then. It contains 5 permanent galleries, plus 1 for temporary exhibits, an IMAX theatre, a planetarium, an observatory and an amateur radio station. The TELUS World of Science, Edmonton, is a museum complex located in Coronation Park in north west Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. ... Woodcroft is a neighborhood located in north west Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. ... IMAX theatre at the Melbourne Museum complex, Australia BFI London IMAX by night IMAX (short for Image Maximum) is a film format created by Canadas IMAX Corporation that has the capacity to display images of far greater size and resolution than conventional film display systems. ... For the song by Ai Otsuka, see Planetarium (song) // A planetarium is a theatre built primarily for presenting educational and entertaining shows about astronomy and the night sky, or for training in celestial navigation. ... This article is about scientific observatories. ... An amateur radio station is a facility equipped with the apparatus necessary for carrying on radiocommunications in the Amateur Radio Service. ...


The Alberta Aviation Museum is at the City Centre Airport, in a hangar that was built for the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan. Its collection includes both civilian and military aircraft, of which the largest are a Boeing 737 and two CF-101 Voodoos. Every summer it holds a small airshow, featuring modern fighter aircraft that fly in from Maple Flag for the event. The Alberta Aviation Museum address is 11410 Kingsway Ave. ... RCAF Harvards were used as a trainer aircraft by thousands of Commonwealth aviators from 1940 onwards. ... The Boeing 737 is a short to medium range, single aisle, narrow body jet airliner. ... Two 409 Squadron CF-101s in the mountains of British Columbia The CF-101 Voodoo was an all-weather interceptor aircraft operated by the Royal Canadian Air Force and Canadian Forces between 1961 and 1984. ... For the navigational aid displayed to airline passengers, see In-flight Entertainment. ... An A-10 Thunderbolt II, F-86 Sabre, P-38 Lightning and P-51 Mustang fly in formation during an air show at Langley Air Force Base, Virginia. ... Exercise Maple Flag is considered to be one of the worlds largest air training exercises. ...


The Alberta Railway Museum is located in the extreme north end of the city. It contains a variety of locomotives and railroad cars from different periods, and includes a working steam locomotive. Since most of its exhibits are outdoors, it is only open between Victoria Day and Labour Day. Great Western Railway No. ... A railroad car (or, more briefly, car, not to be confused with railcar), also known as an item of rolling stock, is a vehicle on a railroad (or railway) that is not a locomotive — one that provides another purpose than purely haulage, although some types of car are powered. ... One of the last mainline steam locomotives built in the UK: British Railways Standard Class 9F 2-10-0 no. ... Queen Elizabeth II in Canada for her official birthday, Victoria Day 2005, Edmonton, Alberta Victoria Day (French: Fête de la Reine) is a Canadian statutory holiday celebrated on the last Monday before or on May 24 in honour of both Queen Victorias birthday and the current reigning Canadian... Labour Day is an annual holiday celebrated all over the world that resulted from efforts of the labour union movement, to celebrate the economic and social achievements of workers. ...


The Art Gallery of Alberta was the city's largest single gallery. Housed in an inconspicuous production of 1970s architecture, the AGA collection had over 5,000 pieces of art. The Art Gallery was demolished in July 2007, for construction of a new facility designed by Randall Stout estimated to cost over $88 million dollars. The amount that Edmonton City Council has donated towards the construction was met with some controversy. Independent galleries can be found throughout the city, especially along the 124th Street corridor. Edmonton Art Gallery Edmonton Art Gallery winning renovation concept The Art Gallery of Alberta (formerly the Edmonton Art Gallery) is a public art gallery located in Edmonton, Alberta Canada. ...


The University of Alberta operates its own internal Museums and Collections service.[43]


Festivals

2001 Sourdough Raft Race, passing beneath the High Level Bridge's Great Divide waterfall during Klondike Days.
2001 Sourdough Raft Race, passing beneath the High Level Bridge's Great Divide waterfall during Klondike Days.
Main article: Festivals in Edmonton

Edmonton plays host to several large festivals each year, hence its local nickname as "The Festival City". Downtown Edmonton and Churchill Square host numerous festivals each summer. The Works Art & Design Festival, which takes place from late June to early July, showcases Canadian and international art and design from well-know, award-winning artists, as well as emerging and student artists. The Edmonton International Street Performer's Festival[44] takes place in mid-July and showcases street performance artists from around the world. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1600x1323, 1702 KB) 2001 Sourdough Raft Race, passing beneath the High Level Bridges Great Divide waterfall. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1600x1323, 1702 KB) 2001 Sourdough Raft Race, passing beneath the High Level Bridges Great Divide waterfall. ... The High Level Bridge, opened in 1913, spans the North Saskatchewan River in Edmonton, Alberta. ... Edmonton plays host to several large festivals each year, hence its local nickname as the Festival City. ... For other uses, see Festival (disambiguation). ... The Works Art & Design Festival is a thirteen day celebration held at the end of June and the beginning of July in downtown, Edmonton, Canada. ... The Edmonton International Street Performers Festival takes place in mid-July in the city of Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. ...


Edmonton's main summer festival is Capital Ex (formerly Klondike Days). Klondike Days (or K-Days) was originally an annual fair and exhibition which eventually adopted a gold rush theme. In early 2006, it was decided that the festival would be renamed "The Capital City Exhibition" ("Capital Ex"). Activities include chuckwagon races, carnival rides and fairways, music, trade shows and daily fireworks. Since 1960, the Sourdough Raft Races have also been a popular event. Later in November, Edmonton plays host to the Canadian Finals Rodeo and Farmfair. This is a significant event in Canada's rodeo circuit and second only to the National Finals Rodeo in Las Vegas in prestige. The logo for Edmontons Capital EX 2006 Edmontons Capital EX is an annual 10-day exhibition that is located in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. ... Routes to the Klondike. ... A chuckwagon was originally a wagon that carried food and cooking equipment on the prairies of the United States and perhaps Canada. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Canadian Finals Rodeo is the national championships of Canadian rodeos. ...


The Edmonton International Fringe Festival, which takes place in mid-August, is the largest Fringe Theatre Festival in North America, and second only to the Edinburgh Fringe festival in the world. In August, Edmonton is also host to the Edmonton Folk Music Festival, one of the most successful and popular folk music festivals in North America. Another major summer festival is the Edmonton Heritage Festival which is an ethnocultural festival that takes place in Hawrelak Park on the Heritage Day long weekend. The Edmonton Fringe Festival is an annual event held every August in Edmonton, Alberta in Canada. ... A street performer on the Royal Mile, with volunteer (2004). ... The Edmonton Folk Music Festival is an annual 4 day outdoor event held in Gallagher Park in just across the river from downtown Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. ... Folk song redirects here. ... The Edmonton Heritage Festival is an annual celebration of Albertas ethnic diversity. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Holidays in Canada. ...


Many other festivals occur such as the Free Will Shakespeare Festival, the Boat Festival, Whyte Avenue Art Walk, and the Edmonton International Film Festival. The Edmonton International Film Festival is an annual competition and showcase of independent films from around the world. ...


Shopping

West Edmonton Mall Shopping!
West Edmonton Mall Shopping!

Edmonton is home to several shopping malls, including West Edmonton Mall, which was the world's largest mall, and is now North America's largest. Other malls include Bonnie Doon Shopping Centre, Edmonton City Centre (formerly Eaton Centre), Westmount Centre, Southgate Centre (currently undergoing renovations), Kingsway Garden Mall, Northgate Centre, Abbotsfield Mall and Londonderry Mall. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2592x1944, 1277 KB) By me, summer 06 I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2592x1944, 1277 KB) By me, summer 06 I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... West Edmonton Mall (WEM), located in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada is the largest shopping mall in North America and the third largest in the world. ... Bonnie Doon Shopping Centre is a shopping mall in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. ... Edmonton City Centre is a shopping mall in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. ... Interior of the Toronto Eaton Centre, looking south. ... Westmount Centre is a shopping centre located in west Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. ... Southgate Centre is a shopping centre located in south Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. ... Kingsway Garden Mall is a shopping centre located in central Edmonton, Alberta. ... Northgate Centre is a mall located in the northern part of Edmonton, Alberta. ... Londonderry Mall is a shopping centre located in the north Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. ...


Edmonton also has many big-box shopping centres and power centres. Some of the major ones include: South Edmonton Common (North America's largest open air retail development[45]), Terra Losa Shopping Centre, Southpark Centre, The Meadows and North Town Centre. As well, Windermere will be a new shopping centre to be built in 2008. A big box is a box that is big. ... A power centre is an unenclosed shopping centre with to of gross leasable area[1] that usually contains three or more big box retailers and various smaller retailers (usually located in plazas) with a common parking area shared among the retailers. ... South Edmonton Common, is Canadas largest retail power centre, located in South Edmonton, just off of Gateway Boulevard. ... Windermere or close variations is a name used in a number of places, including: // Bodies of water Windermere, lake, in the Lake District, county of Cumbria, the largest lake in England See also Lake Windermere Windermere Basin, bay, Ontario, Canada (43°1556N 79°4647W) Towns and...


Although there are many suburban outlets in Edmonton, there are many urban shopping areas. Whyte Avenue, which is on the south side of the river near the university, is one of the most popular, with many urban retailers. It is the centre of the former Strathcona town. Old Strathcona is a Business Revitalization Zone (BRZ) in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. ... Strathcona can refer to a number of things including: Donald Alexander Smith, 1st Baron Strathcona and Mount Royal The city of Strathcona, Minnesota Baron Strathcona and Mount Royal Lord Strathconas Horse (Royal Canadians) - Canadian Forces Regiment Edmonton-Strathcona - Canadian Parliament riding Strathcona County, Alberta Strathcona Composite High School in...


Another urban centre is 124 Street/High Street that is an emerging shopping district. It holds such retailers as Ginger, Dwell Modern, Light Form, Matahari, and McEtherans. In the downtown core, there are a few shopping areas such as 104 Street (4th st.), which is an urban-style shopping area/district. It holds certain urban trendy shops and restaurants like: Sobeys: Ready to Serve, 29 Armstrong, Eye Group, Blue Plate, Tzin, Ric's, as well as many galleries. Other shopping areas in downtown Edmonton are: The Arts District, Edmonton City Centre, and Jasper Avenue. Sobeys TSX: SBY is a Canadian supermarket chain headquartered in Stellarton, Nova Scotia. ... The Arts is a broad subdivision of culture, comprised of many expressive disciplines. ... Edmonton City Centre is a shopping mall in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. ...


There are also several farmers' markets in Edmonton. There is the Strathcona Farmers Market around Whyte Avenue, The Callingwood Farmer Market at the Martketplace at Callingwood, and City Market which is an urban farmer's market on 104 Street downtown.


Sports and recreation

Main article: Sport in Edmonton

Edmonton has a proud heritage of very successful sports teams including the Edmonton Grads, Edmonton Eskimos, Edmonton Trappers, Edmonton Oil Kings, and Edmonton Oilers. The primary professional sports facilities are the Commonwealth Stadium, Telus Field and Rexall Place. Edmonton was home to the Edmonton Grads, a womens basketball team with the best win/loss record of any North American team to date. ... The Edmonton Grads were a Canadian female basketball team. ... The Edmonton Eskimos are a Canadian Football League team based in Edmonton, Alberta. ... The Edmonton Trappers were a minor league baseball (Triple A) team in the Pacific Coast League, ending with the 2004 season. ... For the original Oil Kings franchises, see Edmonton Oil Kings (WCHL). ... The Edmonton Oilers are a professional ice hockey team based in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. ... Commonwealth Stadium is a venue located in the Norwood Area of Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, primarily used by the Edmonton Eskimos of the CFL. Built in 1978 to host the Commonwealth Games, the stadium seats 60,081 (for regular season football)[1] but can be expanded. ... Telus Field is the home of the Edmonton Cracker-Cats of the independent Northern League and former home of the defunted Edmonton Trappers, a minor-league baseball team in the Pacific Coast League that moved to Round Rock, Texas and became the Round Rock Express after the 2004 season. ... Rexall Place is an indoor arena in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada is situated on the north side of Northlands Park. ...


Numerous minor-league teams in the City include the Edmonton Cracker-Cats, the city's thirteenth baseball franchise since 1884. Local rugby players compete in the Rugby Canada Super League with the Edmonton Gold. Also, the city hosts the Edmonton Rush national lacrosse team, which plays out of Rexall Place The Edmonton Cracker-Cats are an independent minor league baseball team in the Northern League. ... For other uses, see Rugby (disambiguation). ... The Rugby Canada Super League (RCSL or Super League) is a national, semi-professional rugby union competition in Canada. ... Official website edmontonrugby. ... Edmonton Rush is a professional lacrosse team in the National Lacrosse League that started playing in the 2006 season. ... Rexall Place is an indoor arena in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada is situated on the north side of Northlands Park. ...


In addition to the minor-league teams, Edmonton also has very successful University-level sports teams including the U of A Golden Bears, the U of A Pandas, NAIT Ooks, and Grant MacEwan Griffins. The Alberta Golden Bears are the mens athletic teams that represent the University of Alberta in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. ... The Alberta Pandas are the womens athletic teams that represent the University of Alberta in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. ... The Northern Alberta Institute of Technology (NAIT) is located in Edmonton, Alberta. ... Á á É é Í í Ó ó Ú ú À à È è Ì ì Ò ò Ù ù  â Ê ê Î î Ô ô Û û Ä ä Ë ë Ï ï Ö ö Ü ü ß Ã ã Ñ ñ Õ õ Ç ç Ģ ģ Ķ ķ Ļ ļ Ņ ņ Ŗ ŗ Ş ş Ţ ţ Ć ć Ĺ ĺ Ń ń Ŕ ŕ Ś ś Ý ý Ź ź Đ đ Ů ů Č č Ď ď Ľ ľ Ň ň Ř ř Š š Ť ť Ž ž Ǎ ǎ Ě ě Ǐ ǐ Ǒ ǒ Ǔ ǔ Ā ā Ē ē Ī ī Ō ō Ū ū ǖ ǘ ǚ ǜ Ĉ ĉ Ĝ ĝ Ĥ ĥ Ĵ ĵ Ŝ ŝ Ŵ ŵ Ŷ ŷ Ă ă Ğ ğ Ŭ ŭ Ċ ċ Ė ė Ġ ġ İ ı Ż ż Ą ą Ę ę Į į Ų ų Ł ł Ő ő Ű ű Ŀ ŀ Ħ ħ Ð ð Þ þ Œ œ Æ æ Ø ø Å å Ə ə – — … [] [[]] {{}} ~ | ° → ± − × ...


Edmonton hosted the 1978 Commonwealth Games, the 1983 World University Games (Universiade), the 2001 World Championships in Athletics, and the 2005 World Master Games.[46] In 2006, it played host to the Women's Rugby World Cup. In the summer of 2007, Edmonton hosted the Under 20 Fifa World Cup which is the third largest sporting event in the world as well as the CN Canadian Womens Open. The 1978 Commonwealth Games were held in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada // Medals by country Countries which won medals Medals by event Athletics Bowls Boxing Cycling Track Road Gymnastics Artistic Shooting Pistol Rifle Shotgun Swimming Diving Swimming Diving Weightlifting Wrestling Badminton External link 1978 Commonwealth Games - Commonwealth Games official website Categories: | | ... For the Jimi Hendrix song, see 1983. ... The Universiade is an International multi-sport event, organized for university athletes by the International University Sports Federation (FISU). ... The 8th World Championships in Athletics, under the auspices of the International Association of Athletics Federations, were held at the Commonwealth Stadium, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada between August 3 and August 12 and was the first time the event had visited North America. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Edmonton has a circuit on the Indy Racing League known as the Edmonton Indy (formerly the Grand Prix of Edmonton). In addition, Castrol Raceway brings sprint cars and a national IHRA event to their facility next to Edmonton International Airport. The Indy Racing League, better known as IRL, is the sanctioning body of a predominantly American based open-wheel racing series. ... Castrol Raceway, formerly known as Capital City Raceway Park, Labatt Raceway, and Budweiser Motorsports Park, is a multi-track auto racing facility located in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. ... Sprint cars are small, high-powered race cars designed primarily for the purpose of running on short dirt or paved tracks. ... The International Hot Rod Association also known as IHRA is the 2nd largest drag racing sanctioning body after the NHRA. // The Carrier Era The IHRA was formed in November 1970 by businessman Larry Carrier. ... Edmonton International Airport (IATA: YEG, ICAO: CYEG) is the primary air passenger and air cargo facility in Edmonton, Alberta as well as a major hub facility for Northern Alberta and Northern Canada. ...

Current professional and amateur franchises
Club League Venue Established Championships
Edmonton Eskimos Canadian Football League Commonwealth Stadium 1949 13
Edmonton Oilers National Hockey League Rexall Place 1972 5
Edmonton Cracker Cats Golden Baseball League Telus Field 2005 0
Edmonton Rush National Lacrosse League Rexall Place 2005 0
Edmonton Oil Kings Western Hockey League Rexall Place 2007 0
Edmonton Chill International Basketball League Grant MacEwan College 2008 0
Edmonton Drillers Canadian Major Indoor Soccer League Servus Place (St. Albert) 2008 1
Edmonton Seahawks Alberta Football League Clarke Stadium 2006 0
Edmonton Stallions Alberta Football League Foote Field 2003 1

The Edmonton Eskimos are a Canadian Football League team based in Edmonton, Alberta. ... Lions Stampeders Eskimos Roughriders Blue Bombers Tiger-Cats Argonauts Alouettes The Canadian Football League (CFL) (Ligue canadienne de football (LCF) in French), is a professional sports league located in Canada that plays Canadian football. ... Commonwealth Stadium is a venue located in the Norwood Area of Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, primarily used by the Edmonton Eskimos of the CFL. Built in 1978 to host the Commonwealth Games, the stadium seats 60,081 (for regular season football)[1] but can be expanded. ... The Edmonton Oilers are a professional ice hockey team based in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. ... NHL redirects here. ... Rexall Place is an indoor arena in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada is situated on the north side of Northlands Park. ... The Edmonton Cracker-Cats are an independent minor league baseball team in the Northern League. ... The Golden Baseball League, based in Dublin, California, is a professional independent baseball league with teams in the western United States and Canada. ... Telus Field is the home of the Edmonton Cracker-Cats of the independent Northern League and former home of the defunted Edmonton Trappers, a minor-league baseball team in the Pacific Coast League that moved to Round Rock, Texas and became the Round Rock Express after the 2004 season. ... Edmonton Rush is a professional lacrosse team in the National Lacrosse League that started playing in the 2006 season. ... NLL redirects here. ... Rexall Place is an indoor arena in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada is situated on the north side of Northlands Park. ... For the original Oil Kings franchises, see Edmonton Oil Kings (WCHL). ... The Western Hockey League is one of the three hockey Major Junior Tier I leagues which constitute the Canadian Hockey League. ... Rexall Place is an indoor arena in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada is situated on the north side of Northlands Park. ... The International Basketball League is a U.S.-based professional basketball league featuring teams from the West Coast, Rocky Mountains, Western Canada, and the Midwest. ... Á á É é Í í Ó ó Ú ú À à È è Ì ì Ò ò Ù ù  â Ê ê Î î Ô ô Û û Ä ä Ë ë Ï ï Ö ö Ü ü ß Ã ã Ñ ñ Õ õ Ç ç Ģ ģ Ķ ķ Ļ ļ Ņ ņ Ŗ ŗ Ş ş Ţ ţ Ć ć Ĺ ĺ Ń ń Ŕ ŕ Ś ś Ý ý Ź ź Đ đ Ů ů Č č Ď ď Ľ ľ Ň ň Ř ř Š š Ť ť Ž ž Ǎ ǎ Ě ě Ǐ ǐ Ǒ ǒ Ǔ ǔ Ā ā Ē ē Ī ī Ō ō Ū ū ǖ ǘ ǚ ǜ Ĉ ĉ Ĝ ĝ Ĥ ĥ Ĵ ĵ Ŝ ŝ Ŵ ŵ Ŷ ŷ Ă ă Ğ ğ Ŭ ŭ Ċ ċ Ė ė Ġ ġ İ ı Ż ż Ą ą Ę ę Į į Ų ų Ł ł Ő ő Ű ű Ŀ ŀ Ħ ħ Ð ð Þ þ Œ œ Æ æ Ø ø Å å Ə ə – — … [] [[]] {{}} ~ | ° → ± − × ... On January 23rd, 2007, the formation of the Canadian Major Indoor Soccer League was announced along with that a series of exhibition games would take place in various markets to gauge interest. ... The Canadian Major Indoor Soccer League or CMISL is a professional indoor soccer league slated to begin full league play in 2009. ... The Alberta Football League (AFL) is a semi-professional Canadian football competition. ... Clarke Stadium, in its original incarnation, was a Canadian football stadium located in Edmonton, Alberta. ... The Alberta Football League (AFL) is a semi-professional Canadian football competition. ... Foote Field is a multi-purpose sports facility on the University of Alberta campus in Edmonton, Alberta, built as a legacy facility for the 2001 World Championships in Athletics. ...

Media

Edmonton has six broadcast television stations shown on basic cable TV. The cable television providers in Edmonton are Telus and Shaw Cable. Previously, network programming from the United States was received on cable via affiliates from Spokane, Washington, but local viewers now have more choice given the advances with cable television that are now being offered as digital or HD (high definition) service. Broadcasts from both eastern and western locations in the United States can be viewed. At least seventeen FM and eight AM radio stations are based in Edmonton. FM Stations include: 88.5—CJSR, 90.1—CBC (French), 90.9—CBC Radio 2, 91.7—"The Bounce", 92.5—"Joe FM", 93.9—CBC Radio 1, 94.9—CKUA, 96.3—"Capital FM", 97.3—"K Rock", 99.3—"Magic 99", 100.3—"The Bear", 101.1, 101.7—CKER, 102.9—"Sonic", 103.9—"Cisn Country", 104.9—"Easy Rock", 105.9—"ShineFM". This is a list of media outlets in the Canadian city of Edmonton, Alberta. ... Cable TV redirects here. ... TELUS (TSX: T, NYSE: TU) is a Canadian telecommunications firm, the countrys second-largest telecommunications carrier after Bell Canada, with C$8. ... Shaw is Canadas second largest cable television operator, after Rogers Communications. ... Spokane redirects here. ...


Edmonton has two large-circulation daily newspapers, The Edmonton Journal and The Edmonton Sun. There is also a number of smaller papers, which focus on different themes, such as the See Magazine[47] and Vue Weekly,[48] which focus on Edmonton's independent arts scene, and two independent free newspapers, Metro and 24 Hours. The Edmonton Journal is a daily newspaper in Edmonton, Alberta. ... The Edmonton Sun is a daily tabloid newspaper published in Edmonton, Alberta by Sun Media. ...


Metropolitan area

Downtown Edmonton from the air.
Downtown Edmonton from the air.

Edmonton is at the centre of a metropolitan area that includes twenty-five independent municipalities either adjacent to Edmonton's city limits or within several kilometres of it. Larger communities include Sherwood Park (part of the Specialized Municipality of Strathcona County), St. Albert, Spruce Grove, Stony Plain, Fort Saskatchewan, Leduc, Nisku (major industrial area in Leduc County), and the towns of Beaumont, Devon and Morinville. This large scale fragmentation has played a role in the development of the Edmonton region. Although several attempts have been made by the City of Edmonton to annex surrounding municipalities, no amalgamation has of yet been approved by the provincial government since Edmonton absorbed the town of Beverly in 1961. Download high resolution version (1000x533, 696 KB)Edmonton, Alberta Ø2005 DWindrim File links The following pages link to this file: Edmonton, Alberta Image:DWEdmonton1. ... Download high resolution version (1000x533, 696 KB)Edmonton, Alberta Ø2005 DWindrim File links The following pages link to this file: Edmonton, Alberta Image:DWEdmonton1. ... The Edmonton Capital Region (ECR), also known as Greater Edmonton or the Alberta Capital Region, comprises Albertas provincial capital of Edmonton and surrounding communities in Sturgeon County(north), Parkland County (west), Specialized Municipality of Strathcona County (east) and Leduc County (south). ... Sherwood Park is a hamlet located east of Edmonton, Alberta, Canada in the Specialized Municipality of Strathcona County. ... Strathcona County is a Specialized municipality in central Alberta, Canada between Edmonton and Elk Island National Park. ... Location of St. ... Fort Saskatchewan is a city of 14,686 (2005 census) located 25 km northeast of Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. ... Location of Leduc in Alberta Coordinates: , Country Province Region Edmonton Capital Region Census division 11 Established Village: 15 Dec 1899 Incorporated Town: 15 Dec 1906   City: 01 Sep 1983 Government [1]  - Mayor Greg Krishke  - Governing body Leduc City Council  - MP James Rajotte  - MLA George Rogers Area  - City 36. ... Nisku Business Park was established in the 1970s. ... Beaumont is a town in central Alberta, Canada near the Irvine Creek. ... Devon is a town in the province of Alberta, Canada, situated 26 km south of Edmonton, the provincial capital, and located on the banks of the North Saskatchewan River. ... Location of Morinville in Alberta Coordinates: , Country Canada Province Alberta Region Edmonton Region Census division 11 County Sturgeon Established 1892 Incorporated 1911 Government  - Mayor Lloyd Bertschi  - Governing body Morinville Town Council  - MP Brian Storseth  - MLA Ken Kowalski Area [1]  - Total 11. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... For the Provincial electoral district, see Edmonton Beverly-Clareview For other uses of Beverly, see Beverly and Beverley (disambiguation). ...


Notable people

See also: List of Edmontonians

The City of Edmonton, Alberta, Canada has been the birthplace or a significant home to a few famous individuals. ... Tommy Banks The Honourable Senator Thomas Benjamin Tommy Banks, OC , AOE (born December 17, 1936) is a Canadian pianist, conductor, arranger, composer, television personality and Senator. ... Christopher Michael Benoit (IPA: ) (May 21, 1967 – June 24, 2007) was a Canadian professional wrestler who wrestled for Extreme Championship Wrestling, World Championship Wrestling, and World Wrestling Entertainment. ... For the NES video game, see Pro Wrestling (video game). ... World Wrestling Entertainment, Inc. ... For the Australian professional wrestling promotion, see World Championship Wrestling (Australia). ... This article is about the independent promotion from 1992-2001. ... New Japan Pro Wrestling (新日本プロレス, shin nihon puroresu) is a major professional wrestling federation in Japan, founded by Antonio Inoki in 1972. ... Boston Bruins John Paul Bucyk (b. ... Terry Chen was born to Chinese and Taiwanese parents. ... Rae Dawn Chong (born February 28, 1961 in Edmonton, Alberta) is a Canadian born actress and daughter of Tommy Chong. ... Thomas Tommy B. Kin Chong (born May 24, 1938) is a Canadian-American actor and musician who is well-known for his stereotypical portrayals of hippie-era stoners. ... Bernard John Bernie Ebbers (born August 27, 1941 in Edmonton, Alberta), is a Canadian-born businessman. ... Nathan Fillion (born March 27, 1971) is a Canadian actor, known for his lead role in the television series Firefly. ... For other persons named Michael Fox, see Michael Fox (disambiguation). ... Robert Gerard Goulet (November 26, 1933 – October 30, 2007) was a Grammy- and Tony Award- winning Canadian entertainer. ... Jason Jay Bouwmeester (born September 27, 1983 in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada) is a defenceman currently playing for the Florida Panthers of the NHL. Bouwmeester was drafted third overall in the 2002 NHL Entry Draft. ... Robert Scott Niedermayer (born August 31, 1973, in Edmonton, Alberta) is a Canadian ice hockey defenceman, who is currently suspended by the Anaheim Ducks of the National Hockey League. ... Erik Christensen (Born on December 17, 1983 in Edmonton, Alberta) is a current NHL hockey player for the Pittsburgh Penguins. ... Dr. Randy John Gregg (born February 19, 1956 in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada) is a retired professional ice hockey defenceman who spent 10 seasons in the National Hockey League and is currently an orthopedic surgeon in Edmonton. ... Jillian Noel Hennessy (born November 25, 1968) is a Canadian actress, known for her television roles on Law & Order and Crossing Jordan. ... Arthur Hiller, O.C. (born November 22, 1923 in Edmonton, Alberta) is an Oscar-nominated Canadian film director. ... Kelly Hrudey (born January 13, 1961 in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada) is a former NHL ice hockey goaltender and current hockey broadcaster with the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. ... Jarome Arthur-Leigh Adekunle Tig Junior Elvis Iginla [1] (born July 1, 1977 in St. ... William Patrick Kinsella (born May 25, 1935, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada) is a noted novelist who mainly wrote about Canadas First Nations and baseball. ... “McLuhan” redirects here. ... Not to be confused with Marc Messier, an actor from Quebec. ... Leslie William Nielsen OC (born February 11, 1926) is a Canadian born American comedian and actor. ... Robert Young Pelton ©Spencer Mandell. ... Dion Phaneuf (born April 10, 1985 in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada) is a professional Canadian ice hockey defenceman. ... Doug Pruden proudly displaying two world records: 677 one-armed back-of-the-hand push ups in one hour and 1781 back-of-the-hand push ups in one hour (2005) Doug Pruden of Canada has broken over 9 world records in push ups, and has 13 National records in... Red Pollard on Seabiscuit John M. Red Pollard (October 27, 1909 - March 7, 1981) was a Canadian-born thoroughbred horse racing jockey. ... Catherine Mary Stewart, née Nursall (born April 22, 1959 in Edmonton, Alberta) is a Canadian actress. ... Ryan Stock is a Canadian based TV stunt man with a show on the Discovery Channel called Guinea Pig. Ryan and his fiancée AmberLynn Walker travel around Canada and the United States and find tests such as being bitten by de-venomed snakes, and hitting 6 times the force... Maxwell (Max) William Ward (b. ... Kenneth Welsh (born 1942, Edmonton, Alberta) is a Canadian actor. ... Dr. Greg Zeschuk is the Joint CEO and Co-Executive Producer at BioWare Corp. ... BioWare Corp. ... Dr. Ray Muzyka is the Chairman/CEO and Co-Executive Producer at BioWare Corp. ... BioWare Corp. ...

Military

Edmonton is home to 1 Canadian Mechanized Brigade Group (1 CMBG), the Regular Force army brigade group of Land Force Western Area of the Canadian Army. Units in 1 CMBG include Lord Strathcona's Horse (Royal Canadians), 1 Combat Engineer Regiment, two of the three regular force battalions of Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry, and various headquarters, service and support elements. Although not part of 1 CMBG, 408 Tactical Helicopter Squadron and 1 Field Ambulance are co-located with the brigade group. All of these units are located at Lancaster Park, immediately north of the city. From 1943 it was a major air force base [4]. In 1996, the aviation units were transferred to CFB Cold Lake. 1 CMBG badge 1 Canadian Mechanized Brigade Group (1CMBG) is a Canadian Forces brigade group that is part of Land Forces Western Area of the Canadian army. ... Land Force Western Area is responsible for all Canadian army operations and administration in western Canada from the northern Lakehead region of Ontario to the Pacific Ocean. ... Canadian Forces Land Force Command (LF) is responsible for army operations within the Canadian Armed Forces. ... Lord Strathconas Horse (Royal Canadians) (LdSH [RC]) is a regular armoured regiment of the Canadian Forces. ... Canadian Military Engineers 1 Combat Engineer Regiment is a regular force regiment of the Canadian Military Engineers. ... Princess Patricias Canadian Light Infantry (PPCLI) is an infantry regiment in the Canadian Forces (CF), belonging to 1 Canadian Mechanized Brigade Group (1 CMBG). ... 408 Squadron is co-located with the Canadian Mechanized Brigade Group at Canadian Forces Base (CFB) Edmonton. ... 1 Field Ambulance is a medical unit with the Canadian Forces situated in Edmonton, Alberta. ... CFB Cold Lake Canadian Forces Base Cold Lake, commonly referred to as CFB Cold Lake or 4 Wing Cold Lake, is a Canadian Forces Base located in Cold Lake, Alberta. ...


The Canadian Airborne Training Centre had been located in the city in the 1980s. The move of 1CMBG and component units from Calgary occurred in 1996 in what was described as a "cost-saving" measure.[49] The brigade had existed in Calgary since the 1950s, and Lord Strathcona's Horse had traditionally been a Calgary garrison unit dating back before the First World War. Ypres, 1917, in the vicinity of the Battle of Passchendaele. ...


Edmonton also has a large army reserve element from 41 Canadian Brigade Group (41 CBG) including the The Loyal Edmonton Regiment (4th Battalion, Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry), 8 Field Engineer Regiment, and HQ Squadron, 20th Field Artillery Regiment, and B Squadron of The South Alberta Light Horse, one of Alberta's oldest army reserve units. Despite being far from Canada's coasts, Edmonton is also the home of HMCS Nonsuch,[50] a Naval Reserve division. The Loyal Edmonton Regiment (4th Battalion, Princess Patricias Canadian Light Infantry), or LER, is an infantry unit of the Army Reserve Canadian Forces based in Edmonton, Alberta. ... Canadian Military Engineers // The Regiment 8 Field Engineer Regiment (8 FER) is the Reserve (Milita) unit of the Canadian Military Engineers in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. ... The South Alberta Light Horse, or SALH, is an armoured unit of the Canadian Forces Army Reserve based at Armouries in Medicine Hat, Alberta and Edmonton, Alberta . ...


There are numerous cadet corps[51] of the different elements (Sea, Army and Air Force) within Edmonton as well.


The Edmonton Garrison is currently located in the north end of Edmonton, in an area known as Lancaster Park 53°40′28″N, 113°29′29″W


Religion

Edmonton holds the following religious offices:

  • The archbishop responsible for Roman Catholic institutions in central Alberta between the Saskatchewan and British Columbia borders.[52][53]
  • The archbishop responsible for Ukrainian Catholic Church in Alberta.[54]
  • The archbishop responsible for Ukrainian Orthodox Church of Canada in all of Western Canada.[55]
  • The bishop responsible for Eastern Rite Orthodox Churches in North America.[56]
  • The bishop responsible for Anglican institutions in central Alberta between the Saskatchewan and British Columbia borders.[57]

One of Alberta's two Baha'i Centres is located in Edmonton, the other centre is situated in Sylvan Lake, Alberta. Known in India as the Lotus Temple, the Bahai House of Worship attracts an average of three and a half million visitors a year. ... Sylvan Lake is a resort town in Alberta, Canada. ...


The first mosque established in North America, the Al-Rashid Mosque founded by Abdullah Yusuf Ali, is situated in Edmonton.[58] The Masjid al-Haram in Mecca as it exists today A mosque is a place of worship for followers of the Islamic faith. ... Abdullah Yusuf Ali (14 April 1872 - 10 December 1953) was a Indian Islamic scholar who translated the Quran into English. ...


Edmonton also hosts a Maronite Catholic church, on 76th Avenue/98th Street with services in English (on Saturdays) and Arabic (on Sundays). Maronites (Marunoye ܡܪܘܢܝܐܶ; in Syriac, Mâruniyya مارونية in Arabic) are members of an Eastern Catholic Church in full communion with the Pope of Rome. ...


Another sign of the Lebanese community's visibility is the existence of a Druze Community Centre on the north side of the city. Religions Druzism Scriptures Rasail al-hikmah (Epistles of Wisdom), Quran Languages Arabic. ...


The Edmonton Alberta Temple of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints was dedicated on December 11, 1999. The Edmonton Alberta Temple is the 67th operating temple of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. ... For other uses, see The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (disambiguation). ... is the 345th day of the year (346th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ...


The Hindu Community in Edmonton is served by the Hindu Society of Alberta[59] (North Indian Temple) and Maha Gahapathy Society of Alberta (South Indian Temple)[60].


Sister cities

Edmonton is an official sister city of several cities worldwide: This article is about partnerships between towns distant from each other; see Twin cities for the different concept of physically neighbouring cities. ...

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Hull, Québec, as seen from Ottawa Hull is part of the city of Gatineau, Quebec, Canada. ... Motto: Ursus super montem ivit Area: 342. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Peoples_Republic_of_China. ... Harbin on a map of China For other meanings of Harbin, see Harbin (disambiguation). ... Heilongjiang (Simplified Chinese: 黑龙江省; Traditional Chinese: 黑龍江省; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Postal System Pinyin: Heilungkiang) is a province of the Peoples Republic of China located in the northeastern part of the country. ... This article is about the year. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Nashville redirects here. ... This article is about the year. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_South_Korea. ... Wonju is a city in Gangwon province, South Korea. ... Gangwon-do is a province of South Korea, with its capital at Chuncheon. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ...

See also

List of Edmonton mayors : Matthew McCauley (1892 - 1894) Herbert Charles Wilson (1895 - 1896) Cornelius Gallagher (1896) John Alexander McDougall (1897) William S. Edmiston (1898 - 1899) Kenneth W. MacKenzie (1900 - 1901) William Short (1902 - 1904) Kenneth W. MacKenzie (1905) (second time) Charles May (1906) William Antrobus Griesbach (1907) John Alexander McDougall... This is a list of incorporated cities of Canada in alphabetical order by province. ... The City of Edmonton, Alberta, Canada has been the birthplace or a significant home to a few famous individuals. ... This is a list of residential neighbourhoods in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. ... This is a list of the 10 tallest skyscrapers in the city of Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. ... The Edmonton Capital Region (ECR), also known as Greater Edmonton or the Alberta Capital Region, comprises Albertas provincial capital of Edmonton and surrounding communities in Sturgeon County(north), Parkland County (west), Specialized Municipality of Strathcona County (east) and Leduc County (south). ... Downtown Edmonton from the air Downtown Edmonton (Alberta) is bounded by 109 Street to the west, 105 Avenue to the north, 97 Street to the east, 97 Avenue, 100 Avenue, and Rossdale Road to the south and Jasper Avenue to the southeast (the downtown core), though many people consider part...

References

  1. ^ a b c Statistics Canada 2006 Census (Sept 11, 2007) Edmonton (City) 2006 Community Profile. Catalogue no. 92-591-XWE. Ottawa. Retrieved on Oct 27, 2007
  2. ^ a b c Statistics Canada 2006 Census (Sept 11, 2007) Edmonton (Census Metropolitan Area) 2006 Community Profile. Catalogue no. 92-591-XWE. Ottawa. Retrieved on Oct 27, 2007
  3. ^ Edmonton Tourism. Edmonton Festival City. Retrieved on 2007-10-27.
  4. ^ a b c d City of Edmonton. Population, Historical. Retrieved on 2007-02-26.
  5. ^ Canadian Press (2006-11-20). Demographics blamed for Edmonton's murder surge. CTV News. Retrieved on 2007-10-27.
  6. ^ Statistics Canada (2006-07-20). The Daily, Thursday, July 20, 2006. Government of Canada. Retrieved on 2007-10-27.
  7. ^ City of Edmonton, Transportation Department (January, 2007). Edmonton Roadway Bicycle Map (pdf). City of Edmonton. Retrieved on 2007-10-27.
  8. ^ Barkley, Shelley (2007-05-22). Juglans sp. (Butternut/Walnut). Government of Alberta. Retrieved on 2007-10-27.
  9. ^ EFCL. Edmonton Federation of Community Leagues. EFCL. Retrieved on 2007-10-28.
  10. ^ City of Edmonton. City of Edmonton's map website City of Edmonton Maps. City of Edmonton. Retrieved on 2007-10-28.
  11. ^ City of Edmonton, Planning. Fort Road Old Town Redevelopment. City of Edmonton. Retrieved on 2007-10-27.
  12. ^ Century Park Club and Residences. centuryCentral. ProCura. Retrieved on 2007-10-27.
  13. ^ a b c d e f National Climate Data and Information Archive (2004-02-25). Canadian Climate Normals 1971-2000, Edmonton City Centre Airport. Environment Canada. Retrieved on 2007-10-28.
  14. ^ Climate Data Almanac (2004-04-20). Climate Data Almanac for January 19, Edmonton, AB. Environment Canada. Retrieved on 2007-10-28.
  15. ^ Edmonton Economic Development Corporation (2007-09-25). Edmonton.com: Statistics and Reference Information—GDP. City of Edmonton. Retrieved on 2007-10-28.
  16. ^ Alberta Energy. Oil Sands Facts. Government of Alberta. Retrieved on 2007-10-28.
  17. ^ Edmonton Economic Development Corporation (June 2007). Greater Edmonton Economic Outlook 2007 (pdf). City of Edmonton. Retrieved on 2007-10-28.
  18. ^ Edmonton Economic Development Corporation. Greater Edmonton Life Sciences Value Chain (pdf). EEDC, City of Edmonton, Government of Canada. Retrieved on 2007-10-28.
  19. ^ Global Direct Investment Solutions. (April 23, 2007) [http://www.gdi-solutions.com/fdi/2007future.htm North American Cities of the Future - 2007 fDi magazine award ]. Retrieved on 2008-03-17.
  20. ^ Edmonton Economic Development Corporation (April 23, 2007) Edmonton captures three North American ‘Cities of the Future’ Awards. Retrieved on: 2007-07-14.
  21. ^ StatCan: 2006 Community Profiles
  22. ^ Statistics Canada (2007-02-01). 2001 Census- Religion by population in Edmonton. Government of Canada. Retrieved on 2007-01-20.
  23. ^ Statistics Canada (2007-09-11). 2006 Community Profiles, Edmonnton. Government of Canada. Retrieved on 2007-11-01.
  24. ^ Ethnocultural Portrait of Canada Highlight Tables, 2006 Census
  25. ^ Edmonton Airports. Strategic Location (pdf). Edmonton Airports. Retrieved on 2007-11-01.
  26. ^ Edmonton Airports (2007-11-01). Port Alberta. Edmonton Airports. Retrieved on 2007-11-01.
  27. ^ Edmonton Waste Management Centre of Excellence
  28. ^ School statistics
  29. ^ University of Alberta Libraries
  30. ^ Taylor University College
  31. ^ Grant MacEwan College Student Profile
  32. ^ Grant MacEwan College university transfers
  33. ^ North Alberta Institute of Technology
  34. ^ NorQuest College
  35. ^ Edmonton Catholic School District
  36. ^ Edmonton Academy
  37. ^ Edmonton Society for Christian Education
  38. ^ Metro Cinema
  39. ^ Francis Winspear Centre
  40. ^ Edmonton Symphony Orchestra fundraising
  41. ^ Citadel Theatre company history
  42. ^ Redevelopment of Royal Alberta Museum
  43. ^ University of Alberta—Museums
  44. ^ Edmonton International Street Performer's Festival
  45. ^ http://southedmontoncommon.com/index.htm South Edmonton Common Website
  46. ^ 2005 World Master Games
  47. ^ See Magazine
  48. ^ Vue Weekly
  49. ^ Parliament of Canada—Proceedings of the Standing Senate Committee on National Security and Defence; Issue 16—Evidence, March 7, 2005
  50. ^ HMCS Nonsuch
  51. ^ Edmonton cadet corps
  52. ^ See Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Edmonton
  53. ^ Catholic Archdiocese of Edmonton
  54. ^ See Ukrainian Catholic Eparchy of Edmonton
  55. ^ See Archbishop of Edmonton and Western Canada
  56. ^ Home - Orthodox Church Of Canada
  57. ^ Anglican Diocese of Edmonton
  58. ^ Al Rashid Mosque in Edmonton
  59. ^ Hindu Society of Alberta
  60. ^ Maha Ganapathy Temple (Hindu Temple)- Edmonton, AB, Canada
  61. ^ sent021
  62. ^ Edmonton
  63. ^ Randsco - Edmonton - Eskimos, Ermine & Energy
  64. ^ http://english.wonju.go.kr/Sub_menu.php?sub=2-5Sister.html&menu_code=108-16-12-15&level=5

Statistics Canada (French: Statistique Canada) is the Canadian federal government department commissioned with producing statistics to help better understand Canada, its population, resources, economy, society, and culture. ... The Canada 2006 Census was a detailed enumeration of the Canadian population. ... October 27 is the 300th day of the year (301st in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 65 days remaining. ... // Executive: Monarch - Queen Elizabeth II Governor General - Michaëlle Jean Lieutenant-Governor of Alberta - Norman Kwong Lieutenant-Governor of British Columbia - Iona Campagnolo Lieutenant-Governor of Manitoba - John Harvard Lieutenant-Governor of New Brunswick - Herménégilde Chiasson Lieutenant-Governor of Newfoundland and Labrador - Edward Roberts Lieutenant-Governor of Nova... Statistics Canada (French: Statistique Canada) is the Canadian federal government department commissioned with producing statistics to help better understand Canada, its population, resources, economy, society, and culture. ... The Canada 2006 Census was a detailed enumeration of the Canadian population. ... October 27 is the 300th day of the year (301st in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 65 days remaining. ... // Executive: Monarch - Queen Elizabeth II Governor General - Michaëlle Jean Lieutenant-Governor of Alberta - Norman Kwong Lieutenant-Governor of British Columbia - Iona Campagnolo Lieutenant-Governor of Manitoba - John Harvard Lieutenant-Governor of New Brunswick - Herménégilde Chiasson Lieutenant-Governor of Newfoundland and Labrador - Edward Roberts Lieutenant-Governor of Nova... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 300th day of the year (301st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Canadian Press (CP) is a Canadian news agency established in 1917 as a vehicle to permit Canadian newspapers of the day to exchange their news and information. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 324th day of the year (325th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 300th day of the year (301st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Statistics Canada (French: Statistique Canada) is the Canadian federal government department commissioned with producing statistics to help better understand Canada, its population, resources, economy, society, and culture. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 201st day of the year (202nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 300th day of the year (301st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 300th day of the year (301st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 142nd day of the year (143rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 300th day of the year (301st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 301st day of the year (302nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 301st day of the year (302nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 300th day of the year (301st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 300th day of the year (301st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 56th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 301st day of the year (302nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 110th day of the year (111th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 301st day of the year (302nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 301st day of the year (302nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 301st day of the year (302nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 301st day of the year (302nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 301st day of the year (302nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Statistics Canada (French: Statistique Canada) is the Canadian federal government department commissioned with producing statistics to help better understand Canada, its population, resources, economy, society, and culture. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Statistics Canada (French: Statistique Canada) is the Canadian federal government department commissioned with producing statistics to help better understand Canada, its population, resources, economy, society, and culture. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 254th day of the year (255th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Edmonton is a Roman Catholic archdiocese that includes the Province of Alberta and includes the suffragan dioceses of Calgary and Saint Paul in Alberta. ... The Ukrainian Catholic Eparchy of Edmonton is a Ukrainian Catholic archdiocese that includes part of the Canada. ... List of Ecumenical Patriarchate Ukrainian Orthodox Archbishops of Edmonton and Western Canada: His Eminence John (1990-present) Categories: Eastern Orthodoxy ...

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Coordinates: 53°32′38″N 113°29′24″W / 53.543997, -113.489856
Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Image File history File links Wikibooks-logo. ... Image File history File links Wikiquote-logo. ... Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Image File history File links WikiNews-Logo. ... Image File history File links Wikiversity-logo-Snorky. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


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