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Encyclopedia > Edgar Allan Poe
Edgar Allan Poe

This daguerreotype of Poe was taken in 1848 when he was 39, a year before his death.
Born: January 19, 1809(1809-01-19)
Boston, Massachusetts USA
Died: October 07, 1849 (aged 40)
Baltimore, Maryland USA
Occupation: Poet, short story writer, editor, literary critic
Genres: Horror fiction, Crime fiction, Detective fiction
Literary movement: Romanticism, Dark romanticism
Spouse: Virginia Eliza Clemm Poe
Parents: David Poe, Jr. and Elizabeth Arnold Poe (birth parents), John Allan and Frances Allen (foster parents)
Influences: Lord Byron, Charles Dickens, Ann Radcliffe, Nathaniel Hawthorne
Influenced: Charles Baudelaire, Oscar Wilde, Fyodor Dostoevsky, Robert Louis Stevenson, Arthur Conan Doyle, Clark Ashton Smith, Jules Verne, H. P. Lovecraft, Jorge Luis Borges, Ray Bradbury, Lemony Snicket, Stefan Grabinski, Fernando Pessoa, Harlan Ellison, Ville Valo

Edgar Allan Poe (January 19, 1809October 7, 1849) was an American poet, short story writer, playwright, editor, literary critic, essayist and one of the leaders of the American Romantic Movement. Best known for his tales of mystery and of the macabre, Poe was one of the early American practitioners of the short story and a progenitor of detective fiction and crime fiction. He is also credited with contributing to the emergent science fiction genre.[1] Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1190x1490, 419 KB) en: Daguerreotype of Edgar Allan Poe 1848, first published 1880. ... An 1837 daguerreotype by Daguerre. ... January 19 is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1809 (MDCCCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar). ... Nickname: Location in Massachusetts, USA Coordinates: , Country United States State Massachusetts County Suffolk County Settled 1630 Incorporated (city) 1822 Government  - Mayor Thomas M. Menino (D) Area  - City  89. ... October 7 is the 280th day of the year (281st in leap years). ... 1849 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Baltimore redirects here. ... For the album by the Kaiser Chiefs see Employment (album) Employment is a contract between two parties, one being the employer and the other being the employee. ... A literary genre is one of the divisions of literature into genres according to particular criteria such as literary technique, tone, or content. ... Horror fiction is, broadly, fiction in any medium intended to scare, unsettle, or horrify the reader. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with mystery_fiction. ... Basil Rathbone as Sherlock Holmes Detective fiction is a branch of crime fiction that centers upon the investigation of a crime, usually murder, by a detective, either professional or amateur. ... ... Wanderer above the sea of fog by Caspar David Friedrich Romanticism is an artistic, literary, and intellectual movement that originated in 18th century Western Europe during the Industrial Revolution. ... Dark romanticism, also referred to as anti-transcendentalism is a label applied to some gothic fiction. ... Virginia Eliza Sissy Clemm Poe (August 22, 1822 – January 30, 1847), born Virginia Eliza Clemm, was the wife of Edgar Allan Poe. ... Eliza Poe (1787-1811) was a British-born American actress and the mother of the American author Edgar Allan Poe. ... Lord Byron redirects here. ... “Dickens” redirects here. ... This article is about the 19th-century author. ... Nathaniel Hawthorne (born Nathaniel Hathorne; July 4, 1804 – May 19, 1864) was a 19th century American novelist and short story writer. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Oscar Fingal OFlahertie Wills Wilde (October 16, 1854 – November 30, 1900) was an Irish playwright, novelist, poet, and author of short stories. ... It has been suggested that Cultural depictions of Fyodor Dostoevsky be merged into this article or section. ... Robert Louis Stevenson Robert Louis (Balfour) Stevenson (November 13, 1850–December 3, 1894), was a Scottish novelist, poet, and travel writer, and a leading representative of Neo-romanticism in English literature. ... // Sir Arthur Ignatius Conan Doyle, DL (22 May 1859–7 July 1930) was a Scottish born author most noted for his stories about the detective Sherlock Holmes, which are generally considered a major innovation in the field of crime fiction, and the adventures of Professor Challenger. ... Clark Ashton Smith (January 13, 1893-August 14, 1961) was a poet, sculptor, painter and author of fantasy, horror and science fiction short stories. ... Jules Gabriel Verne (February 8, 1828–March 24, 1905) was a French author who pioneered the science-fiction genre. ... Howard Phillips Lovecraft (August 20, 1890 – March 15, 1937) was an American author from Providence, Rhode Island of fantasy, horror and science fiction. ... Jorge Luis Borges (August 24, 1899 – June 14, 1986) was an Argentine writer. ... Ray Douglas Bradbury (born August 22, 1920) is an American literary, fantasy, horror, science fiction, and mystery writer best known for The Martian Chronicles, a 1950 book which has been described both as a short story collection and a novel, and his 1953 dystopian novel Fahrenheit 451. ... Lemony Snicket is a pseudonym used by author Daniel Handler in his book series A Series of Unfortunate Events, as well as a character in that series. ... The title given to this article is incorrect due to technical limitations. ... Fernando Pessoa Fernando António Nogueira de Seabra Pessoa (pron. ... Harlan Jay Ellison (born May 27, 1934) is a prolific American writer of short stories, novellas, essays, and criticism. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... January 19 is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1809 (MDCCCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar). ... is the 280th day of the year (281st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1849 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Poets who wrote or write much of their poetry in the English language. ... This article is in need of attention. ... A writer is anyone who creates a written work, although the word more usually designates those who write creatively or professionally, or those who have written in many different forms. ... A playwright, also known as a dramatist, is a person who writes dramatic literature or drama. ... Editing may also refer to audio editing or film editing. ... Literary criticism is the study, discussion, evaluation, and interpretation of literature. ... An essayist is an author who writes compositions which can be about any particular subject. ... Wanderer above the sea of fog by Caspar David Friedrich Romanticism is an artistic, literary, and intellectual movement that originated in 18th century Western Europe during the Industrial Revolution. ... Mystery fiction is a distinct subgenre of detective fiction that entails the occurrence of an unknown event which requires the protagonist to make known (or solve). ... A death head wearing the Imperial Crown of the Holy Roman Empire, on the sarcophagus of Habsburg emperor Charles VI in the crypt of the Capuchin church in Vienna, Austria. ... This article is in need of attention. ... Basil Rathbone as Sherlock Holmes Detective fiction is a branch of crime fiction that centers upon the investigation of a crime, usually murder, by a detective, either professional or amateur. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with mystery_fiction. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ...


Born in Boston, Edgar Poe's parents died when he was still young and he was taken in by John and Frances Allan of Richmond, Virginia. Raised there and for a few years in England, the Allans raised Poe in relative wealth, though he was never formally adopted. After a short period at the University of Virginia and a brief attempt at a military career, Poe and the Allans parted ways. Poe's publishing career began humbly with an anonymous collection of poems called Tamerlane and Other Poems (1827), credited only "by a Bostonian." Poe moved to Baltimore to live with blood-relatives and switched his focus from poetry to prose. In July of 1835, he became assistant editor of the Southern Literary Messenger in Richmond, where he helped increase subscriptions and began developing his own style of literary criticism. That year he also married Virginia Clemm, his 13-year old cousin. Nickname: City on the Hill, Beantown, The Hub (of the Universe)1, Athens of America, The Cradle of Revolution, Puritan City, Americas Walking City Location in Massachusetts, USA Counties Suffolk County Mayor Thomas M. Menino(D) Area    - City 232. ... Nickname: Motto: Sic Itur Ad Astra (Thus do we reach the stars) Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia Coordinates: , Country State County Independent City Government  - Mayor L. Douglas Wilder (I) Area  - City 62. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem specific to England — the anthem of the United Kingdom is God Save the Queen. See also Proposed English National Anthems. ... The University of Virginia (also called U.Va. ... Tamerlane and Other Poems was the first published collection of poems by Edgar Allan Poe, first published in 1827. ... Flag Seal Nickname: Monument City, Charm City, Mob Town, B-more Motto: Get In On It (formerly The City That Reads and The Greatest City in America; BELIEVE is not the official motto but rather a specific campaign) Location Location of Baltimore in Maryland Coordinates , Government Country State County United... The Southern Literary Messenger was a periodical published in Richmond, Virginia from 1834 until the end of the Civil War. ... Virginia Eliza Sissy Clemm Poe (August 22, 1822 – January 30, 1847), born Virginia Eliza Clemm, was the wife of Edgar Allan Poe. ...


After an unsuccessful novel The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket, Poe produced his first collection of short stories, Tales of the Grotesque and Arabesque in 1839. That year Poe became editor of Burton's Gentlemen's Magazine and, later, Graham's Magazine in Philadelphia. It was in Philadelphia that many of his most well-known works would be published. In that city, Poe also planned on starting his own journal, The Penn (later renamed The Stylus), though it would never come to be. In February 1844, he moved to New York City and worked with the Broadway Journal, a magazine of which he would eventually become sole owner. The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket is Edgar Allan Poes only complete novel, published in 1838. ... Tales of the Grotesque and Arabesque is a collection of previously-published short stories by Edgar Allan Poe, first published in 1840. ... 1839 (MDCCCXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Sept. ... Fashion plate from an 1849 issue of Grahams Magazine. ... Nickname: Motto: Philadelphia maneto - Let brotherly love continue Location in Pennsylvania Coordinates: , Country Commonwealth County Philadelphia Founded October 27, 1682 Incorporated October 25, 1701 Government  - Mayor John F. Street (D) Area  - City 369. ... The Stylus was a would-be periodical owned and edited by Edgar Allan Poe. ... Jan. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... The Broadway Journal was a New York City-based periodical founded by Charles Frederick Briggs and John Bisco in 1844. ...


In January 1845, Poe published "The Raven" to instant success but, only two years later, his wife Virginia died of tuberculosis on January 30, 1847. Poe considered remarrying but never did. On October 7, 1849, Poe died at the age of 40 in Baltimore. The cause of his death is undetermined and has been attributed to alcohol, drugs, cholera, rabies, suicide (although likely to be mistaken with his suicide attempt in the previous year), tuberculosis, heart disease, brain congestion and other agents.[2] The Raven as illustrated by Gustave Doré. The Raven is a narrative poem by American writer and poet Edgar Allan Poe. ... Tuberculosis (abbreviated as TB for tubercle bacillus) is a common and deadly infectious disease caused by mycobacteria, mainly Mycobacterium tuberculosis. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1847 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... is the 280th day of the year (281st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1849 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Many drugs are provided in tablet form. ... Cholera (or Asiatic cholera or epidemic cholera) is a severe diarrheal disease caused by the bacterium Vibrio cholerae. ... Mayor of Leipzig, Germany, committed suicide along with his wife and daughter on April 20, 1945. ... Tuberculosis (abbreviated as TB for tubercle bacillus) is a common and deadly infectious disease caused by mycobacteria, mainly Mycobacterium tuberculosis. ... Heart disease is an umbrella term for a number of different diseases which affect the heart and is the leading cause of death in the United States as of 2007. ...


Poe's legacy includes a significant influence in literature in the United States and around the world as well as in specialized fields like cosmology and cryptography. Additionally, Poe and his works appear throughout popular culture in literature, music, films, television, video games, etc. Some of his homes are dedicated as museums today. The German Lorenz cipher machine, used in World War II for encryption of very high-level general staff messages Cryptography (or cryptology; derived from Greek κρυπτός kryptós hidden, and the verb γράφω gráfo write or λεγειν legein to speak) is the study of message secrecy. ...

Contents

Life and career

This bust of Edgar Allan Poe is found at the University of Virginia where, having lost his tuition due to a gambling problem, he dropped out in 1827.

Image File history File links Edgar_Allan_Poe_bust. ... Image File history File links Edgar_Allan_Poe_bust. ... The University of Virginia (also called U.Va. ... Compulsive gambling is an urge or addiction to gamble despite harmful negative consequences or a desire to stop. ...

Early life

Poe was born Edgar Poe to a Scots-Irish family in Boston, Massachusetts, on January 19, 1809, the son of actress Elizabeth Arnold Hopkins Poe and actor David Poe, Jr. The second of three children, his elder brother was William Henry Leonard Poe, and younger sister, Rosalie Poe.[3] His father abandoned their family in 1810.[4] His mother died a year later from "consumption" (tuberculosis). Poe was then taken into the home of John Allan, a successful Scottish merchant in Richmond, Virginia, who dealt in a variety of goods including tobacco, cloths, wheat, tombstones, and slaves.[5] The Allans served as a foster family but never formally adopted Poe, though they gave him the name "Edgar Allan Poe."[6] Scots-Irish (also called Ulster Scots) is a Scottish ethnic group that historically resided in Ireland which ultimately traces its roots back to settlers from Scotland, and to a lesser extent, England. ... Nickname: Location in Massachusetts, USA Coordinates: , Country United States State Massachusetts County Suffolk County Settled 1630 Incorporated (city) 1822 Government  - Mayor Thomas M. Menino (D) Area  - City  89. ... January 19 is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1809 (MDCCCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar). ... Eliza Poe (1787-1811) was a British-born American actress and the mother of the American author Edgar Allan Poe. ... Tuberculosis (abbreviated as TB for tubercle bacillus) is a common and deadly infectious disease caused by mycobacteria, mainly Mycobacterium tuberculosis. ... This article is about the country. ... Nickname: Motto: Sic Itur Ad Astra (Thus do we reach the stars) Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia Coordinates: , Country State County Independent City Government  - Mayor L. Douglas Wilder (I) Area  - City 62. ...


The Allan family baptised young Edgar as Episcopalian in 1812 and John Allan alternatively spoiled and aggressively disciplined his foster son.[7] The family, which included Allan's wife Frances Valentine Allan, traveled to England in 1815, and Edgar sailed with them. He attended the Grammar School in Irvine, Scotland (where John Allan was born) for a short period in 1815, before rejoining the family in London, in 1816. He studied at a boarding school in Chelsea until the summer of 1817. He was then entered at Reverend John Bransby’s Manor House School at Stoke Newington, then a suburb four miles (6 km) north of London.[8] Bransby is mentioned by name as a character in "William Wilson." The word Episcopal is derived from the Greek επισκοπος epískopos, which literally means overseer; the word however is used in religious terms to mean bishop. ... , For the river of the same name see River Irvine. ... Statue of Thomas More on Cheyne Walk. ... , Note: For an area with a similar name, see Newington, in the London Borough of Southwark. ... William Wilson is a short story by Edgar Allan Poe, first published in 1839. ...


Poe moved back with the Allans to Richmond, Virginia in 1820. In 1825, John Allan's friend and business benefactor William Galt, said to be the wealthiest man in Richmond, died and left Allan several acres of real estate. The inheritance was estimated at three quarters of a million dollars. By the summer of 1825, Allan celebrated his expansive wealth by purchasing a two-story brick home named "Moldavia".[9] Poe may have become engaged to Sarah Elmira Royster before he registered at the one-year old University of Virginia in February 1826 with the intent to study languages.[10] The University, in its infancy, was established on the ideals of its founder Thomas Jefferson. It had strict rules against gambling, horses, guns, tobacco and alcohol, however these rules were generally ignored. Jefferson had enacted a system of student self-government, allowing students to choose their own studies, make their own arrangements for boarding, and to report all wrongdoing to the faculty. The unique system was still in chaos and there was a high drop-out rate.[11] During his time there, Poe lost touch with Royster and also became estranged from his foster father over gambling debts. Poe claimed that Allan had not given him sufficient money to register for classes, purchase texts, and procure and furnish a dormitory. Allan did send additional money and clothes, but Poe's debts increased.[12] Poe gave up on the University after a year and, not feeling welcome in Richmond, especially when he learned of his sweetheart Royster having married Alexander Shelton, he traveled to Boston in April 1827, sustaining himself with odd jobs as a clerk and newspaper writer.[13] At some point, he was using the name Henri Le Rennet as a pseudonym.[14] Opening of the Stockton and Darlington Railway 1825 (MDCCCXXV) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Sarah Elmira Royster was Edgar Allan Poes early childhood sweethart. ... The University of Virginia (also called U.Va. ... Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ... Nickname: City on the Hill, Beantown, The Hub (of the Universe)1, Athens of America, The Cradle of Revolution, Puritan City, Americas Walking City Location in Massachusetts, USA Counties Suffolk County Mayor Thomas M. Menino(D) Area    - City 232. ... A pseudonym (Greek: , pseudo + -onym: false name) is an artificial, fictitious name, also known as an alias, used by an individual as an alternative to a persons legal name. ...


Military career

Reduced to destitution, Poe enlisted in the United States Army as a private, using the name "Edgar A. Perry" and claiming he was 22 years old (he was 18) on May 26, 1827. He first served at Fort Independence in Boston Harbor for five dollars a month.[15] That same year, he released his first book, a 40-page collection of poetry, Tamerlane and Other Poems attributed only as "by a Bostonian." Only 50 copies were printed, and the book received virtually no attention.[16] Poe's regiment was posted to Fort Moultrie in Charleston, South Carolina and traveled by ship on the brig Waltham on November 8, 1827. Poe was promoted to "artificer," an officer who prepared shells for artillery, and had his monthly pay doubled.[17] After serving for two years and attaining the rank of sergeant major for artillery (the highest rank a noncommissioned officer can achieve), Poe sought to end his five-year enlistment early. He revealed his real name and his circumstances to his commanding officer, Lieutenant Howard, who would only allow Poe to be discharged if he reconciled with John Allan. Howard wrote a letter to Allan, but he was unsympathetic. Several months passed and pleas to Allan were ignored; Allan may not have written to Poe even to make him aware of his foster mother's illness. Frances Allan died on February 28, 1829 and Poe visited the day after her burial. Perhaps softened by his wife's death, John Allan agreed to support Poe's attempt to be discharged in order to receive an appointment to the United States Military Academy at West Point.[18] The United States Army is the largest and oldest branch of the armed forces of the United States. ... is the 146th day of the year (147th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1827 (MDCCCXXVII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Fort Independence is a fort in Missouri, United States. ... Categories: Stub | Massachusetts geography | Boston ... The Chinese poem Quatrain on Heavenly Mountain by Emperor Gaozong (Song Dynasty) Poetry (from the Greek , poiesis, a making or creating) is a form of art in which language is used for its aesthetic and evocative qualities in addition to, or in lieu of, its ostensible meaning. ... Tamerlane and Other Poems was the first published collection of poems by Edgar Allan Poe, first published in 1827. ... Fort Moultrie is the name of a series of forts on Sullivans Island, South Carolina, built to protect the city of Charleston, South Carolina. ... Nickname: Motto: Aedes Mores Juraque Curat (She cares for her temples, customs, and rights) Location of Charleston in South Carolina. ... is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1827 (MDCCCXXVII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Artillery with Gabion fortification Cannons on display at Fort Point Continental Artillery crew from the American Revolution Firing of an 18-pound gun, Louis-Philippe Crepin, (1772 – 1851) A forge-welded Iron Cannon in Thanjavur, Tamil Nadu. ... The commanding officer (CO) is the officer in command of a military unit. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... February 28 is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Johann Wolfgang von Goethe 1829 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... “USMA” redirects here. ...


Poe finally was discharged on April 15, 1829 after securing a replacement to finish his enlisted term for him.[19] Before entering West Point, Poe moved back to Baltimore for a time, to stay with his widowed aunt, Maria Clemm, her daughter, Virginia Eliza Clemm (Poe's first cousin), and his brother Henry.[citation needed] Meanwhile, Poe published his second book, Al Aaraaf Tamerlane and Minor Poems in Baltimore in 1829. is the 105th day of the year (106th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Johann Wolfgang von Goethe 1829 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Virginia Eliza Sissy Clemm Poe (August 22, 1822 – January 30, 1847), born Virginia Eliza Clemm, was the wife of Edgar Allan Poe. ...


Poe traveled to West Point, and took his oath on July 1, 1830.[citation needed] John Allan married a second time. The marriage, and bitter quarrels with Poe over the children born to Allan out of affairs, led to the foster father finally disowning Poe.[citation needed] Poe decided to leave West Point by purposely getting court-martialed. On February 8, 1831, he was tried for gross neglect of duty and disobedience of orders for refusing to attend formations, classes, or church. Poe tactically pled not guilty to induce dismissal, knowing he would be found guilty.[20] He left for New York in February 1831, and released a third volume of poems, simply titled Poems. The book was financed with help from his fellow cadets at West Point, many of whom donated 75 cents to the cause, raising a total of $170. They may have been expecting verses similar to the satirical ones Poe had been writing about commanding officers.[21] Printed by Elam Bliss of New York, it was labeled as "Second Edition" and included a page saying, "To the U.S. Corps of Cadets this volume is respectfully dedicated." The book once again reprinted the long poems "Tamerlane" and "Al Aaraaf" but also six previously unpublished poems including early versions of "To Helen," "Israfel," and "The City in the Sea."[22] is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Liberty Leading the People by Eugène Delacroix commemorates the July Revolution 1830 (MDCCCXXX) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... A court-martial (plural courts-martial) is a military court that determines punishments for members of the military subject to military law. ... is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Leopold I 1831 (MDCCCXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: To Helen (Poe, 1831) To Helen is the first of two poems to carry that name written by Edgar Allan Poe. ... This article lists all known poems by American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe, regardless of importance. ... The City in the Sea is a poem by Edgar Allan Poe that was published in 1845, but dates back to an earlier 1831 version originally titled The Doomed City. ...


Publishing career

He returned to Baltimore, to his aunt, brother and cousin, in March 1831. Henry died from tuberculosis in August 1831. Poe turned his attention to prose, and placed a few stories with a Philadelphia publication. He also began work on his only drama, Politian. The Saturday Visitor, a Baltimore paper, awarded a prize in October 1833 to his The Manuscript Found in a Bottle. The story brought him to the attention of John P. Kennedy, a Baltimorian of considerable means. He helped Poe place some of his stories, and also introduced him to Thomas W. White, editor of the Southern Literary Messenger in Richmond. Poe became assistant editor of the periodical in July 1835. Within a few weeks, he was discharged after being found drunk repeatedly. Returning to Baltimore, he secretly married Virginia, his cousin, on September 22, 1835. She was 13 at the time, though she is listed on the marriage certificate as being 21.[23] Nickname: Motto: Philadelphia maneto - Let brotherly love continue Location in Pennsylvania Coordinates: , Country Commonwealth County Philadelphia Founded October 27, 1682 Incorporated October 25, 1701 Government  - Mayor John F. Street (D) Area  - City 369. ... John Pendleton Kennedy (October 25, 1795 – August 18, 1870) served as United States Secretary of the Navy from July 26, 1852 to March 4, 1853, during the administration of President Millard Fillmore, and as a Congressman from the fourth district of Maryland. ... The Southern Literary Messenger was a periodical published in Richmond, Virginia from 1834 until the end of the Civil War. ... Nickname: Motto: Sic Itur Ad Astra (Thus do we reach the stars) Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia Coordinates: , Country State County Independent City Government  - Mayor L. Douglas Wilder (I) Area  - City 62. ... is the 265th day of the year (266th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... | Come and take it, slogan of the Texas Revolution 1835 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ...


Reinstated by White after promising good behavior, Poe went back to Richmond with Virginia and her mother, and remained at the paper until January 1837. During this period, its circulation increased from 700 to 3500.[3] He published several poems, book reviews, criticism, and stories in the paper. On May 16, 1836, he entered into marriage in Richmond with Virginia Clemm, this time in public. May 16 is the 136th day of the year (137th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1836 (MDCCCXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...

Virginia Poe, in a painting created after her death.

The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym was published and widely reviewed in 1838. In the summer of 1839, Poe became assistant editor of Burton's Gentleman's Magazine. He published a large number of articles, stories, and reviews, enhancing the reputation as a trenchant critic that he had established at the Southern Literary Messenger. Also in 1839, the collection Tales of the Grotesque and Arabesque was published in two volumes. Though not a financial success, it was a milestone in the history of American literature, collecting such classic Poe tales as "The Fall of the House of Usher", "MS. Found in a Bottle", "Berenice", "Ligeia" and "William Wilson". Poe left Burton's after about a year and found a position as assistant at Graham's Magazine. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket is Edgar Allan Poes only complete novel, published in 1838. ... Tales of the Grotesque and Arabesque is a collection of previously-published short stories by Edgar Allan Poe, first published in 1840. ... The Fall of the House of Usher is a short story written by Edgar Allan Poe. ... MS. Found in a Bottle is a short story by Edgar Allan Poe, first published in the Baltimore Saturday Visiter in 1833. ... Berenice is a short horror story by Edgar Allan Poe, first published in the Southern Literary Messenger in 1835. ... Ligeia is a short story written by Edgar Allan Poe. ... William Wilson is a short story by Edgar Allan Poe, first published in 1839. ... Fashion plate from an 1849 issue of Grahams Magazine. ...


In June 1840, Poe published a prospectus announcing his intentions to start his own journal, The Stylus.[24] Originally, Poe intended to call the journal The Penn, as it would have been based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. In the June 6, 1840 issue of Philadelphia's Saturday Evening Post, Poe purchased advertising space for his prospectus: "PROSPECTUS OF THE PENN MAGAZINE, A MONTHLY LITERARY JOURNAL, TO BE EDITED AND PUBLISHED IN THE CITY OF PHILADELPHIA, BY EDGAR A. POE."[25] The journal would never be produced. A prospectus is a legal document that institutions and businesses use to describe what they have to offer for participants and buyers. ... The Stylus was a would-be periodical owned and edited by Edgar Allan Poe. ... Nickname: Motto: Philadelphia maneto - Let brotherly love continue Location in Pennsylvania Coordinates: , Country Commonwealth County Philadelphia Founded October 27, 1682 Incorporated October 25, 1701 Government  - Mayor John F. Street (D) Area  - City 369. ... Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Area  Ranked 33rd  - Total 46,055 sq mi (119,283 km²)  - Width 280 miles (455 km)  - Length 160 miles (255 km)  - % water 2. ... is the 157th day of the year (158th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1840 is a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... There have been many publications called the Saturday Evening Post; several were/are local British newspapers. ...


The evening of January 20, 1842, Virginia broke a blood vessel while singing and playing the piano. Blood began to rush forth from her mouth. It was the first sign of consumption, now more commonly known as tuberculosis. She only partially recovered. Poe began to drink more heavily under the stress of Virginia's illness. He left Graham's and attempted to find a new position, for a time angling for a government post. He returned to New York, where he worked briefly at the Evening Mirror before becoming editor of the Broadway Journal and, later, sole owner. There he became involved in a noisy public feud with Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. On January 29, 1845, his poem "The Raven" appeared in the Evening Mirror and became a popular sensation, making Poe a household name almost instantly.[26] January 20 is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1842 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... A short grand piano, with the top up. ... Tuberculosis (abbreviated as TB for tubercle bacillus) is a common and deadly infectious disease caused by mycobacteria, mainly Mycobacterium tuberculosis. ... The Broadway Journal was a New York City-based periodical founded by Charles Frederick Briggs and John Bisco in 1844. ... Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (February 27, 1807 – March 24, 1882) was an American poet whose works include Paul Reveres Ride, A Psalm of Life, The Song of Hiawatha and Evangeline. He also wrote the first American translation of Dante Alighieris Divine Comedy and was one of the five members... January 29 is the 29th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1845 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... The Raven as illustrated by Gustave Doré. The Raven is a narrative poem by American writer and poet Edgar Allan Poe. ...

Poe's cottage in the Bronx
Poe's cottage in the Bronx

The Broadway Journal failed in 1846. Poe moved to a cottage in the Fordham section of The Bronx, New York. He loved the Jesuits at Fordham University and frequently strolled about its campus conversing with both students and faculty. Fordham University's bell tower even inspired him to write "The Bells." The Poe Cottage is on the southeast corner of the Grand Concourse and Kingsbridge Road, and is open to the public. Virginia died there on January 30, 1847. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 759 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (2662 × 2102 pixel, file size: 3. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 759 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (2662 × 2102 pixel, file size: 3. ... Fordham University is a private, co-educational university located in the Bronx in New York City (but with campuses also in Manhattan — at Lincoln Center — and Westchester). ... The Bronx is one of the five boroughs of New York City in the United States. ... The Society of Jesus (Latin: Societas Iesu), commonly known as the Jesuits, is a Roman Catholic religious order. ... Fordham University is a private, coeducational research university[2] in the United States, with three residential campuses located in and around New York City. ... Fordham University is a private, coeducational research university[2] in the United States, with three residential campuses located in and around New York City. ... Bell Tower is an office tower in Edmonton, Canada. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: The Bells The Bells is a poem by Edgar Allan Poe. ... The Grand Concourse is likely the most famous street in The Bronx borough of New York City. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1847 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ...


Increasingly unstable after his wife's death, Poe attempted to court the poet Sarah Helen Whitman, who lived in Providence, Rhode Island. Their engagement failed, purportedly because of Poe's drinking and erratic behavior. However, there is also strong evidence that Whitman's mother intervened and did much to derail their relationship.[27] He then returned to Richmond and resumed a relationship with a childhood sweetheart, Sarah Elmira Royster. Sarah Helen Whitman was a poet. ... “Providence” redirects here. ... Sarah Elmira Royster was Edgar Allan Poes early childhood sweethart. ...


Death

Edgar Allan Poe's grave, Baltimore, MD.
Edgar Allan Poe's grave, Baltimore, MD.

On October 3, 1849, Poe was found on the streets of Baltimore delirious and "in great distress, and... in need of immediate assistance," according to the friend who found him, Dr. E. Snodgrass. He was taken to the Washington College Hospital, where he died early on the morning of October 7. Poe was never coherent long enough to explain how he came to be in his dire condition, and, oddly, was wearing clothes that were not his own. Poe is said to have repeatedly called out the name "Reynolds" on the night before his death. Some sources say Poe's final words were "Lord help my poor soul."[28] Poe suffered from bouts of depression and madness, and he may have attempted suicide in 1848.[29] Image:Poes grave Baltimore MD.jpg - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... Image:Poes grave Baltimore MD.jpg - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... Poes grave as it looks today. ... is the 276th day of the year (277th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1849 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... This article is about the mental state and medical condition. ... is the 280th day of the year (281st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Poe finally died on Sunday, October 7, 1849 at 5:00 in the morning.[30] The precise cause of Poe's death is disputed and has aroused great controversy. is the 280th day of the year (281st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1849 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ...


Griswold's "Memoir"

The day Edgar Allan Poe was buried, a long obituary appeared in the New York Tribune signed "Ludwig" which was soon published throughout the country. The piece began, "Edgar Allan Poe is dead. He died in Baltimore the day before yesterday. This announcement will startle many, but few will be grieved by it."[31] "Ludwig" was soon identified as Rufus Wilmot Griswold, a minor editor and anthologist who had borne a grudge against Poe since 1842. Griswold somehow became executor of Poe's literary estate and attempted to destroy his enemy's reputation after his death. Obituary for World War I death An obituary is a notice of the death of a person, usually published in a newspaper, written or commissioned by the newspaper, and usually including a short biography. ... The New York Tribune building - today the site of Pace Universitys building complex of One Pace Plaza in New York City The New York Tribune was established by Horace Greeley in 1841 and was long considered one of the leading newspapers in the United States. ... Rufus Wilmot Griswold (February 15, 1815 - August 12, 1857) was an American anthologist, editor and critic, famous for his enmity with Edgar Allan Poe. ...


Rufus Griswold wrote a biographical "Memoir" of Poe, which he included in an 1850 volume of the collected works. Griswold depicted Poe as a depraved, drunk, drug-addled madman and included forged letters as evidence. Griswold's book was denounced by those who knew Poe well, but it became a popularly accepted one. This was due in part because it was the only full biography available and was widely reprinted, and in part because it seemed to accord with the narrative voice Poe used in much of his fiction.


The Poe Toaster

Main article: Poe Toaster

Adding to the mystery surrounding Poe's death, an unknown visitor affectionately referred to as the "Poe Toaster" has paid homage to Poe's grave every year since 1949. Though likely to have been several individuals in the more than 50 year history of this tradition, the tribute is always the same. Every January 19 in the early hours of the morning the man makes a toast of cognac to Poe's original grave marker and leaves three roses. Members of the Edgar Allan Poe Society in Baltimore have helped in protecting this tradition for decades. On August 15, 2007, Sam Porpora, a former historian at the Westminster Church in Baltimore where Poe is buried, claimed that he had started the tradition in the 1960s. The claim that the tradition began in 1949, he said, was a hoax in order to raise money and enhance the profile of the church. His story has not been confirmed,[32] and some details he has given to the press have been pointed out as factually inaccurate.[33] The Poe Toaster is the nickname given to a mysterious figure who pays an annual tribute to American author Edgar Allan Poe. ... Cognac is a commune in the French département of Charente, of which it is a sous-préfecture. ... is the 227th day of the year (228th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ...


Literary and artistic theory

In his essay "The Poetic Principle", Poe would argue that there is no such thing as a long poem, since the ultimate purpose of art is aesthetic, that is, its purpose is the effect it has on its audience, and this effect can only be maintained for a brief period of time (the time it takes to read a lyric poem, or watch a drama performed, or view a painting, etc.). He argued that an epic, if it has any value at all, must be actually a series of smaller pieces, each geared towards a single effect or sentiment, which "elevates the soul". Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... The Poetic Principle is an essay by Edgar Allan Poe, written near the end of his life and published posthumously in 1850 (Poe died in 1849). ... The Bath, a painting by Mary Cassatt (1844–1926). ... Aesthetics (or esthetics) (from the Greek word αισθητική) is a branch of philosophy dealing with the nature of beauty. ... The epic is a broadly defined genre of narrative poetry, characterized by great length, multiple settings, large numbers of characters, or long span of time involved. ...


Poe associated the aesthetic aspect of art with pure ideality claiming that the mood or sentiment created by a work of art elevates the soul, and is thus a spiritual experience. In many of his short stories, artistically inclined characters (especially Roderick Usher from "The Fall of the House of Usher") are able to achieve this ideal aesthetic through fixation, and often exhibit obsessive personalities and reclusive tendencies. "The Oval Portrait" also examines fixation, but in this case the object of fixation is itself a work of art. The Fall of the House of Usher is a short story written by Edgar Allan Poe. ... The Oval Portrait is a short story by Edgar Allan Poe involving the disturbing tale of a portrait in a chateau. ...


He championed art for art's sake (before the term itself was coined). He was consequentially an opponent of didacticism, arguing in his literary criticisms that the role of moral or ethical instruction lies outside the realm of poetry and art, which should only focus on the production of a beautiful work of art. He criticized James Russell Lowell in a review for being excessively didactic and moralistic in his writings, and argued often that a poem should be written "for a poem's sake". Since a poem's purpose is to convey a single aesthetic experience, Poe argues in his literary theory essay "The Philosophy of Composition", the ending should be written first. Poe's inspiration for this theory was Charles Dickens, who wrote to Poe in a letter dated March 6, 1842, Art for arts sake is the usual English rendition of a French slogan, lart pour lart, which is credited to Théophile Gautier (1811–1872). ... Didactic literature is instructive literature, or literature that teaches a lesson or lessons. ... -1... Ethics is a general term for what is often described as the science (study) of morality. In philosophy, ethical behavior is that which is good or right. ... James Russell Lowell (b. ... The Philosophy of Composition is an essay written by Edgar Allan Poe that elaborates a theory about how good writers write when they write well. ... “Dickens” redirects here. ... is the 65th day of the year (66th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1842 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...

Apropos of the "construction" of "Caleb Williams," do you know that Godwin wrote it backwards, — the last volume first, — and that when he had produced the hunting down of Caleb, and the catastrophe, he waited for months, casting about for a means of accounting for what he had done?[34]

Poe refers to the letter in his essay. Dickens's literary influence on Poe can also be seen in Poe's short story "The Man of the Crowd." Its depictions of urban blight owe much to Dickens and in many places purposefully echo Dickens's language.[citation needed] The Man of the Crowd is a short story written by Edgar Allan Poe about a nameless narrator following a man through a crowded London, first published in 1840. ...


He was a proponent and supporter of magazine literature, and felt that short stories, or "tales" as they were called in the early nineteenth century, which were usually considered "vulgar" or "low art" along with the magazines that published them, were legitimate art forms on par with the novel or epic poem. His insistence on the artistic value of the short story was influential in the short story's rise to prominence in later generations. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Poe often included elements of popular pseudosciences such as phrenology[35] and physiognomy[36] in his fiction. Phrenology is regarded today as a classic example of pseudoscience. ... A 19th century phrenology chart. ... Physiognomy (Gk. ...


Poe also focused the theme of each of his short stories on one human characteristic. In "The Tell-Tale Heart", he focused on guilt, in "The Fall of the House of Usher", his focus was fear, etc. Illustration by Harry Clarke, detail from He shrieked once -once only The Tell-Tale Heart is a short story by Edgar Allan Poe, which was first published in James Russell Lowells The Pioneer in January 1843; Poe republished it in his periodical The Broadway Journal for August 23, 1845. ... “Guilty” redirects here. ... The Fall of the House of Usher is a short story written by Edgar Allan Poe. ... Fear is an emotional response to impending danger, that is tied to anxiety. ...


Much of Poe's work was allegorical, but his position on allegory was a nuanced one: "In defence of allegory, (however, or for whatever object, employed,) there is scarcely one respectable word to be said. Its best appeals are made to the fancy — that is to say, to our sense of adaptation, not of matters proper, but of matters improper for the purpose, of the real with the unreal; having never more of intelligible connection than has something with nothing, never half so much of effective affinity as has the substance for the shadow."[37] Allegory of Music by Filippino Lippi. ...


Legacy

Literary influence

Main article: Edgar Allan Poe's literary influence

Poe's work has inspired literature not only in the United States but throughout the world. France in particular ranks Poe very highly, in part due to early translations by Charles Baudelaire. Detective fiction also owes much to Poe's work, as does modern horror fiction. Edgar Allan Poes works have had a broad influence on American and world literature (sometimes even despite those who tried to resist it), and even on the art world beyond literature. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Physics and cosmology

Eureka, an essay written in 1848, included a cosmological theory that anticipated black holes[38][39] and the big bang theory by 80 years, as well as the first plausible solution to Olbers' paradox.[40] Though described as a "prose poem" by Poe, who wished it to be considered as art, this work is a remarkable scientific and mystical essay unlike any of his other works. He wrote that he considered Eureka to be his career masterpiece. Eureka is a prose poem by Edgar Allan Poe from (1848) in which he describes his illumination about the universe. ... This article is about the astronomical body. ... For other uses, see Big Bang (disambiguation). ... Olbers paradox, described by the German astronomer Heinrich Wilhelm Olbers in 1826 and earlier by Johannes Kepler in 1610 and Halley and Cheseaux in the 18th century, is the paradoxical observation that the night sky is dark, when in a static infinite universe the night sky ought to be bright. ... // Prose poetry is usually considered a form of poetry written in prose that breaks some of the normal rules associated with prose discourse, for heightened imagery or emotional effect, among other purposes. ...


Poe eschewed the scientific method in his Eureka. He argued that he wrote from pure intuition, not the Aristotelian a priori method of axioms and syllogisms, nor the empirical method of modern science set forth by Francis Bacon. For this reason, he considered it a work of art, not science, but insisted that it was still true. Though some of his assertions have later proven to be false (such as his assertion that gravity must be the strongest force—it is actually the weakest), others have been shown to be surprisingly accurate and decades ahead of their time. Intuition is an unconscious form of knowledge. ... This article needs cleanup. ... The terms a priori and a posteriori are used in philosophy to distinguish between two different types of propositional knowledge. ... For the algebra software named Axiom, see Axiom computer algebra system. ... In traditional logic, a syllogism is an inference in which one proposition (the conclusion) follows of necessity from two others (known as premises). ... A central concept in science and the scientific method is that all evidence must be empirical, or empirically based, that is, dependent on evidence or consequences that are observable by the senses. ... Sir Francis Bacon Francis Bacon, 1st Viscount St Albans, KC (22 January 1561 – 9 April 1626) was an English astrologer, philosopher, statesman, spy, freemason and essayist. ... In physics, force is anything that can cause a massive body to accelerate. ...


Cryptography

Poe had a keen interest in the field of cryptography. He had placed a notice of his abilities in the Philadelphia paper Alexander's Weekly (Express) Messenger, inviting submissions of ciphers, which he proceeded to solve.[41] In July 1841, Poe had published an essay called "Some Words on Secret Writing" in Graham's Magazine. Realizing the public interest in the topic, he wrote "The Gold-Bug" incorporating ciphers as part of the story.[42] The German Lorenz cipher machine, used in World War II for encryption of very high-level general staff messages Cryptography (or cryptology; derived from Greek κρυπτός kryptós hidden, and the verb γράφω gráfo write or λεγειν legein to speak) is the study of message secrecy. ... Nickname: City of Brotherly Love, Philly, the Quaker City Motto: Philadelphia maneto (Let brotherly love continue) Location in Pennsylvania Coordinates: Country United States State Pennsylvania County Philadelphia Founded October 27, 1682 Incorporated October 25, 1701 Mayor John F. Street (D) Area    - City 369. ... This article is about algorithms for encryption and decryption. ... Fashion plate from an 1849 issue of Grahams Magazine. ... The Gold-Bug is a short story by Edgar Allan Poe, set on Sullivans Island, South Carolina. ...


Poe's success in cryptography relied not so much on his knowledge of that field (his method was limited to the simple substitution cryptogram), as on his knowledge of the magazine and newspaper culture. His keen analytical abilities, which were so evident in his detective stories, allowed him to see that the general public was largely ignorant of the methods by which a simple substitution cryptogram can be solved, and he used this to his advantage.[43] The sensation Poe created with his cryptography stunt played a major role in popularizing cryptograms in newspapers and magazines.[44]


Poe had a long-standing influence on cryptography beyond public interest in his lifetime. William Friedman, America's foremost cryptologist, was heavily influenced by Poe.[45] Friedman's initial interest in cryptography came from reading "The Gold-Bug" as a child - interest he later put to use in deciphering Japan's PURPLE code during World War II.[46] William Frederick Friedman (September 24, 1891 - November 12, 1969) served as a US Army cryptologist, running the research division of the Armys Signals Intelligence Service (SIS) through the 1930s and its follow-on services right into the 1950s. ... Not to be confused with Violet (color). ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


Imitators

"For my soul from out that shadow
Hath been lifted evermore—
From that deep and dismal shadow,
In the streets of Baltimore!

— Lizzie Doten, "Streets of Baltimore", from Poems from the Inner Life, imitating "The Raven" by Edgar Allan Poe."[47]

Like many famous artists, Poe's works have spawned legions of imitators and plagiarists.[48] One interesting trend among imitators of Poe, however, has been claims by clairvoyants or psychics to be "channelling" poems from Poe's spirit beyond the grave. One of the most notable of these was Lizzie Doten, who in 1863 published Poems from the Inner Life, in which she claimed to have "received" new compositions by Poe's spirit. The compositions were re-workings of famous Poe poems such as "The Bells", but which reflected a new, positive outlook. Poe researcher Thomas Ollive Mabbott notes that, at least compared to many other Poe imitators, Doten was not entirely without poetic talent, whether that talent was her own or "channelled" from Poe.[citation needed] The Raven as illustrated by Gustave Doré. The Raven is a narrative poem by American writer and poet Edgar Allan Poe. ... Plagiarism (from Latin plagiare to kidnap) is the practice of claiming, or implying, original authorship or incorporating material from someone elses written or creative work, in whole or in part, into ones own without adequate acknowledgement. ... Clairvoyance, from 17th century French Clair meaning clear and voyant meaning seeing, is a term used to describe the transference of information about an object, location or physical event through means other than the 5 traditional senses (See Psi). ... Parapsychology is the study of the evidence involving phenomena where a person seems to affect or gain information about something through a means not currently explainable within the framework of mainstream, conventional science. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: The Bells The Bells is a poem by Edgar Allan Poe. ... Thomas Ollive Mabbott (1898-1968) was born and raised in New York City. ...


Poe in popular culture

Poe as a character

Poe himself appears as a character in literature. Often, the historical Poe utilizes his mystery-solving skills in such novels as The Poe Shadow by Matthew Pearl. His life is also often depicted in television and film. Edgar Allan Poe has appeared in popular culture as a character in books, films and comics. ... The Poe Shadow is the new novel by Matthew Pearl published by Random House. ... Matthew Pearl wrote The Dante Club, a bestselling novel published in more than 40 countries. ...


Audio interpretations

Vincent Leonard Price Jr. ... Basil Rathbone (13 June 1892 – 21 July 1967), Military Cross, was a British actor most famous for his portrayal of Sherlock Holmes and of suave villains in such swashbuckler films as The Mark of Zorro, Captain Blood, and The Adventures of Robin Hood. ... A compact disc or CD is an optical disc used to store digital data, originally developed for storing digital audio. ... Hal Willner (born 1957, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) is a music producer working in recording, Films, TV and live events. ... Closed On Account of Rabies (1997) is a double-CD with poems and tales of Edgar Allan Poe performed by various artists. ... Christopher Walken (born March 31, 1943) is an Academy Award-winning American film and theatre actor. ... Marianne Faithfull (born 29 December 1946) is an English singer and actress whose career spans over four decades. ... James Newell Osterberg, Jr. ... Jeff Buckley (November 17, 1966 – May 29, 1997), born Jeffrey Scott Buckley and raised as Scotty Moorhead,[1] was an American singer-songwriter and guitarist. ...

Literature

  • Author Ray Bradbury is a great admirer of Poe, and has either featured Poe as a character or alluded to Poe's stories in many of his works. Notable is Fahrenheit 451, a novel based in a world where books are banned and burned. A character in the novel memorizes Poe's short story collection Tales of Mystery and Imagination to make sure it is not lost forever.
  • Robert R. McCammon wrote Ushers Passing, a sequel to Fall of the House of Usher, published in 1984
  • The comic/graphic novel "Lenore, the Cute Little Dead Girl" features a dead little girl inspired by Poe's poem "Lenore."
  • Linda Fairstein's 2005 novel Entombed features a modern day serial killer obsessed with Poe. The story takes place amongst Poe's old haunts in New York.
  • Writer Stephen Marlowe adapted the strange details of Poe's death into his 1995 novel The Lighthouse at the End of the World.
  • Clive Cussler's 2004 novel Lost City has numerous references to Poe's works. For example, the end is similar to "The Fall of the House of Usher," during the costume party, all the guest are dressed up as characters from his works, and death and torture methods in the novel are similar to "The Pit and the Pendulum" and "The Cask of Amontillado."
  • Norwegian comic Nemi has got a special page with Nemi drawings to a poem by Poe.
  • The 1995 novel Nevermore, by William Hjortsberg concerns a serial killer whose murders are based on Poe's stories; the detectives are the odd couple Harry Houdini and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.

Ray Douglas Bradbury (born August 22, 1920) is an American literary, fantasy, horror, science fiction, and mystery writer best known for The Martian Chronicles, a 1950 book which has been described both as a short story collection and a novel, and his 1953 dystopian novel Fahrenheit 451. ... Fahrenheit 451 is a dystopian soft science fiction novella by Ray Bradbury that was published in 1953. ... Robert R. McCammon is an American novelist. ... The Fall of the House of Usher is a short story in the horror genre written by Edgar Allan Poe in 1839, and included in a collection of his stories entitled Tales of the Grotesque and of the Arabesque, published the same year. ... See comedian Stand up comedian List of Comedians List of British comedians comics comic book comic strip underground comics alternative comics web comic sprite comics manga graphic novel List of comic characters This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the... Trade paperback of Will Eisners A Contract with God (1978), often mistakenly cited as the first graphic novel. ... Lenore: Noogies Lenore, the Cute Little Dead Girl is a fictional character created by Roman Dirge, inspired by the poem Lenore, by Edgar Allan Poe. ... Lenore is a poem by the American author, Edgar Allan Poe. ... Linda Fairstein (born 1947) was head of the sex crime unit of the Manhattan District Attorneys office from 1976 until 2002 and prosecuted several highly publicized cases. ... Stephen Marlowe (born: Milton S. Lesser 7 August 1928 - ) is an American author of science and Mystery fiction novels. ... // Clive Eric Cussler (born July 15, 1931 in Aurora, Illinois)[1][2] is an American adventure novelist and successful amateur marine archaeologist. ... In the popular imagination lost cities were real, prosperous, well-populated areas of human habitation that fell into terminal decline and whose location was later lost. ... Nemi: So you dont think playing hard to get will work after this? Nemi is a Norwegian comic strip, written and drawn by Lise Myhre. ... William Hjortsberg is a novelist and screenwriter best known for writing the screenplay of the movie Legend. ... Harry Houdini (March 24, 1874 – October 31, 1926), whose real name was Ehrich Weiss (which was changed from Erich Weisz when he emigrated to America), was a Hungarian-born American magician, escapologist (widely regarded as one of the greatest ever), stunt performer, as well as an investigator of spiritualists, film... // Sir Arthur Ignatius Conan Doyle, DL (22 May 1859–7 July 1930) was a Scottish born author most noted for his stories about the detective Sherlock Holmes, which are generally considered a major innovation in the field of crime fiction, and the adventures of Professor Challenger. ...

Music

Both classical and popular music incorporate much of Poe's works. Claude Debussy, for example, considered Poe an influence on his work and wrote an unfinished opera based on "The Fall of the House of Usher." The Alan Parsons Project turned Poe's work into a full-length concept album in the 1976 called Tales of Mystery and Imagination. The influence of Edgar Allan Poe on the art of music has been considerable and long-standing, with the works, life and image of the horror fiction writer and poet inspiring composers and musicians from diverse genres for more than a century. ... Claude Debussy, photo by Félix Nadar, 1908. ... The Teatro alla Scala in Milan, Italy. ... The Fall of the House of Usher is a short story written by Edgar Allan Poe. ... Alan Parsons Project is a British pop-rock group of the late 1970s-early 1980s, founded by Alan Parsons and Eric Woolfson. ... Tales of Mystery and Imagination is a progressive rock album by The Alan Parsons Project, released in 1976 (see 1976 in music). ...


Playwrights and filmmakers

On the stage, the great dramatist George Bernard Shaw was greatly influenced by Poe's literary criticism, calling Poe "the greatest journalistic critic of his time." [49] Alfred Hitchcock declared Poe as a major inspiration, saying, "It's because I liked Edgar Allan Poe's stories so much that I began to make suspense films." [citation needed] George Bernard Shaw (26 July 1856–2 November 1950) was an Irish dramatist, literary critic, and socialist. ... This article or section includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ...


Actor John Astin, who performed as Gomez in the Addams Family television series, is an ardent admirer of Poe, whom he resembles, and in recent years has starred in a one-man play based on Poe's life and works, Edgar Allan Poe: Once Upon a Midnight.[50] The musical play Nevermore,[51] by Matt Conner and Grace Barnes, was inspired by Poe's poems and essays. Actor Vincent Price played in many films based on Poe's stories like The Pit and the Pendulum (1961), The Masque of the Red Death (1964), The Tomb of Ligeia (1965), and The Oblong Box (1969) among many more. There has also been talk about Marilyn Manson making movies out of three of Poe's stories.[citation needed] John Allen Astin (born March 30, 1930) is an Oscar nominated American actor who has appeared in numerous films and television shows, but is best known for the role of Gomez Addams on The Addams Family television series and similarly eccentric comedic characters. ... For the TV series, see The Addams Family (TV series). ... Vincent Leonard Price Jr. ... The Pit and the Pendulum is a 1961 horror film directed by Roger Corman, starring Vincent Price, Barbara Steele, John Kerr, and Luana Anders. ... The Masque of the Red Death is a classic 1964 horror film, directed by Roger Corman, based on the short story written by Edgar Allan Poe in 1842. ... The Tomb of Ligeia (1964) is a horror film, directed by Roger Corman and starring Vincent Price. ... The Oblong Box is a 1969 horror film produced in the UK starring Vincent Price, Hilary Dwyer, Alister Williamson and Christopher Lee. ...


Another Poe impersonator is Baltimore-native David Keltz, notable as the star actor in the annual Poe birthday celebration at Westminster Hall and Burying Ground every January. David Keltz is a Baltimore, Maryland-based actor, notable for his one-man performances as American author Edgar Allan Poe. ... The Westminster Hall and Burying Ground, is located on the corner of Fayette and Greene Streets on the west side of downtown Baltimore. ...


In 2005, a reading of the Broadway-bound musical "Poe" was announced, with a book by David Kogeas and music and lyrics by David Lenchus, featuring Deven May as Edgar Allan Poe. Plans for a full production have not been announced. In early 2007, NYC composer Phill Greenland and book writer/actor Ethan Angelica announced a new Poe stage musical titled "Edgar," which uses only Poe's prose and letters as text, and Poe's poems as lyrics.[52] The Lion King at the New Amsterdam Theatre, 2003 Broadway theatre[1] is the most prestigious form of professional theatre in the U.S., as well as the most well known to the general public and most lucrative for the performers, technicians and others involved in putting on the shows. ...


Television and film

Many of Poe's works have been adapted into television and film. Most recognizable, perhaps, is the series of Poe-related films directed by Roger Corman in the 1960s. Edgar Allan Poe American poet and short story writer Edgar Allan Poe has had significant influence in television and film. ... Roger Corman Roger William Corman (born April 5, 1926), sometimes nicknamed King of the Bs for his output of B-movies (though he himself rejects this appelation as inaccurate), is a prolific American producer and director of low-budget exploitation movies. ...


Video games

  • In 1995 several of Poe's stories were combined to make an interactive novel stylised as a video game called The Dark Eye. Beat legend William S. Burroughs read the poem "Annabel Lee" and the story "The Masque of the Red Death" for the game soundtrack.
  • In the Nintendo video game series The Legend Of Zelda, the ghost-like beings that are featured throughout the games are called Poes.
  • In 2002, Eternal Darkness: Sanity's Requiem (a video game for the Nintendo Gamecube) features a quote from "The Raven" upon startup, and is often said to have many elements inspired by his works (although it draws more inspiration from H.P. Lovecraft's Cthulhu Mythos).
  • In the Konami video game Lunar Knights, there's a pair of enemies collectively named The Poes, with their individual names being Viscount Edgar and Viscountess Virginia.

The Dark Eye is a computer game of the horror genre, released in 1995 for the PC by now-defunct software company inSCAPE. Upon its release, the game attracted little attention from either critics or consumers, though it has received some attention since. ... William Seward Burroughs II (February 5, 1914) - August 2, 1997), more commonly known as William S. Burroughs (pronounced ), was an American novelist, essayist, social critic, painter and spoken word performer. ... The Masque of the Red Death is a short story written by Edgar Allan Poe and first published in the May 1842 edition of Grahams Ladys and Gentlemans Magazine as The Mask of the Red Death. The story was adapted in 1964 by Roger Corman into a... Nintendo Company, Limited (任天堂 or ニンテンドー Nintendō; NASDAQ: NTDOY, TYO: 7974 usually referred to as simply Nintendo, or Big N ) is a multinational corporation founded on September 23, 1889[1] in Kyoto, Japan by Fusajiro Yamauchi to produce handmade hanafuda cards. ... “Computer and video games” redirects here. ... This article is about the first game in the series. ... The Nintendo GameCube (Japanese: ゲームキューブ; originally code-named Dolphin during development; abbreviated as GCN) is Nintendos fourth home video game console, belonging to the 128-bit era; the same generation as Segas Dreamcast, Sonys PlayStation 2, and Microsofts Xbox. ... The Raven as illustrated by Gustave Doré. The Raven is a narrative poem by American writer and poet Edgar Allan Poe. ... Howard Phillips Lovecraft (August 20, 1890 – March 15, 1937) was an American author of fantasy, horror and science fiction, noted for combining these three genres within single narratives. ... Cthulhu and Rlyeh The Cthulhu Mythos encompasses the shared elements, characters, settings, and themes in the works of H. P. Lovecraft and associated horror fiction writers. ... Konami Corporation ) (TYO: 9766 NYSE: KNM SGX: K20) is a leading developer and publisher of numerous popular and strong-selling toys, trading cards, anime, tokusatsu, slot machines and video games. ... The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ...

Visual arts

  • In the world of visual arts, Gustave Doré and Édouard Manet composed several illustrations for Poe's works.
  • Edgar Allan Poe is a semi-frequent character in the webcomic Thinkin' Lincoln.

Doré photographed by Felix Nadar. ... Articles with similar titles include Claude Monet, another painter of the same era. ... Webcomics, also known as online comics and internet comics, are comics that are available to read on the Internet. ...

Other

  • The bar in which Poe was last seen drinking before his death still stands in Fells Point in Baltimore, Maryland. Though the name has changed and it is now known as The Horse You Came In On, local lore insists that a ghost they call "Edgar" haunts the rooms above.[53]
  • The United States Navy commissioned a vessel named after Poe, the USS E.A. Poe (IX-103).
  • Poe's image adorns the bottle cap of Raven Beer.[54]
  • Edgar Allan Poe is credited with the inspiration for pro wrestler Scott Levy's stage name, Raven.
  • In 1996, the NFL franchise known as the Cleveland Browns relocated to Baltimore and assumed a new identity, including a new nickname, the Ravens, which was chosen following a telephone poll by the Baltimore Sun. The poll included three choices, the others being Americans and Marauders, but Ravens won by a wide margin, garnering nearly two-thirds of the 33,288 votes.[55] The Ravens have 3 mascots named Edgar, Allan and Poe.[56]

Fells Point is a neighborhood in Baltimore, Maryland, home to a variety of shops, restaurants, coffee bars, music stores, and over 120 pubs. ... USN redirects here. ... USS (IX-103), formerly Edgar Allan Poe, an unclassified miscellaneous vessel, was the only ship of the United States Navy to be named for Edgar Allan Poe. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Scott Levy (born September 8, 1964) is an American professional wrestler, better known by his ring name, Raven. ... NFL logo For other uses of the abbreviation NFL, see NFL (disambiguation). ... “Browns” redirects here. ... City Baltimore, Maryland Team colors Purple, Black, and Gold Head Coach Brian Billick Owner Steve Bisciotti General manager Ozzie Newsome Mascot Ravens League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1996–present) American Football Conference (1996-present) AFC Central (1996-2001) AFC North (2002-present) Team history Baltimore Ravens (1996–present) Championships...

Preserved homes and museums

The Poe National Historic Site in Philadelphia.
The Poe National Historic Site in Philadelphia.

No childhood home of Poe is still standing, including the Allan family's Moldavia estate. However, the oldest standing home in Richmond, the Old Stone House, is in use as the Edgar Allan Poe Museum, though Poe never lived there. The collection includes many items Poe used during his time with the Allan family and also features several rare first printings of Poe works. The dorm room Poe is believed to have used while studying at the University of Virginia in 1826 is preserved and available for visits. Its upkeep is now overseen by a group of students and staff known as the Raven Society.[57] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (477x735, 233 KB) Summary The Edgar Allan Poe National Historic Site, located at 532 N. Seventh Street in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (477x735, 233 KB) Summary The Edgar Allan Poe National Historic Site, located at 532 N. Seventh Street in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Raven Society is the University of Virginias oldest and most prestigious honorary society. ...


The earliest surviving home in which Poe lived is in Baltimore, preserved as the Edgar Allan Poe House and Museum. Poe is believed to have lived in the home at the age of 23 when he first lived with Maria Clemm and Virginia (as well as his grandmother and possibly his brother William Henry Leonard Poe). It is open to the public and is also the home of the Edgar Allan Poe Society. Of the several homes that Poe, his wife Virginia, and his mother-in-law Maria rented in Philadelphia, only the last house has survived. The Spring Garden home, where the author lived in 1843-44, is today preserved by the National Park Service as the Edgar Allan Poe National Historic Site. It is located on 7th and Spring Garden Streets, and is open Wednesday through Sunday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Poe's final home is also preserved as the Poe Cottage in the Bronx, New York. This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... The National Park Service (NPS) is the United States federal agency that manages all National Parks, many National Monuments, and other conservation and historical properties with various title designations. ... Edgar Allan Poe National Historic Site The Edgar Allan Poe National Historic Site, located at 532 N. Seventh Street in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, preserves the home where writer Edgar Allan Poe and his family lived from 1838 to 1844. ...


Other Poe landmarks include a building in the Upper West Side where Poe temporarily lived when he first moved to New York. A plaque suggests that Poe wrote "The Raven" here. In Boston, a plaque hangs near the building where Poe was born once stood. Believed to have been located at 62 Carver Street (now Charles Street), the plaque is possibly in an incorrect location.[58][59] The Upper West Side is a neighborhood of the borough of Manhattan in New York City that lies between Central Park and the Hudson River above West 59th Street. ...


Selected bibliography

Main article: Bibliography of Edgar Allan Poe

Tales

Poetry

The works of American author Edgar Allan Poe include many poems, short stories, and one novel. ... Berenice is a short horror story by Edgar Allan Poe, first published in the Southern Literary Messenger in 1835. ... The Black Cat is a short story by Edgar Allan Poe. ... The Cask of Amontillado (sometimes spelled The Casque of Amontillado) is a short story, written by Edgar Allan Poe and first published in the November 1846 issue of Godeys Ladys Book. ... The Fall of the House of Usher is a short story written by Edgar Allan Poe. ... The Gold-Bug is a short story by Edgar Allan Poe, set on Sullivans Island, South Carolina. ... Hop-Frog (originally Hop-Frog; Or, the Eight Chained Ourangoutangs) is a short story by American writer Edgar Allan Poe, first published in 1849. ... Ligeia is a short story written by Edgar Allan Poe. ... The Man of the Crowd is a short story written by Edgar Allan Poe about a nameless narrator following a man through a crowded London, first published in 1840. ... The Masque of the Red Death is a short story written by Edgar Allan Poe and first published in the May 1842 edition of Grahams Ladys and Gentlemans Magazine as The Mask of the Red Death. The story was adapted in 1964 by Roger Corman into a... The Murders in the Rue Morgue is a short story written by Edgar Allan Poe in 1841. ... This article is about the short story by Edgar Allan Poe. ... The Purloined Letter is one of Edgar Allan Poes detective stories. ... Illustration by Harry Clarke, detail from He shrieked once -once only The Tell-Tale Heart is a short story by Edgar Allan Poe, which was first published in James Russell Lowells The Pioneer in January 1843; Poe republished it in his periodical The Broadway Journal for August 23, 1845. ... {NPOV} Annabel Lee is the last complete poem[1] composed by American author Edgar Allan Poe. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: The Bells The Bells is a poem by Edgar Allan Poe. ... The City in the Sea is a poem by Edgar Allan Poe that was published in 1845, but dates back to an earlier 1831 version originally titled The Doomed City. ... Gaily bedight, A gallant knight, In sunshine and in shadow, Had journeyed long, Singing a song, In search of Eldorado. ... The Haunted Palace is a poem by Edgar Allan Poe. ... Lenore is a poem by the American author, Edgar Allan Poe. ... The Raven as illustrated by Gustave Doré. The Raven is a narrative poem by American writer and poet Edgar Allan Poe. ... Ulalume is a poem written by Edgar Allan Poe in 1847. ...

References

Notes

  1. ^ Stableford, Brian. "Science fiction before the genre." The Cambridge Companion to Science Fiction, edited by Edward James and Farah Mendlesohn. Cambridge: Cambridge University of Press, 2003. pp 18-19.
  2. ^ Meyers, Jeffrey. Edgar Allan Poe: His Life and Legacy. Cooper Square Press, 1992. p. 256
  3. ^ a b Allen, Hervey. Introduction to The Works of Edgar Allan Poe, P. F. Collier & Son, New York, 1927.
  4. ^ Poe Chronology. Retrieved on 2007-06-03.
  5. ^ Meyers, Jeffrey. Edgar Allan Poe: His Life and Legacy. Cooper Square Press, 1992. p. 8
  6. ^ "Poe's Middle Name". Retrieved on 2007-06-03.
  7. ^ Meyers, Jeffrey. Edgar Allan Poe: His Life and Legacy. Cooper Square Press, 1992. p. 9
  8. ^ Silverman, Kenneth. Edgar A. Poe: Mournful and Never-ending Remembrance. Harper Perennial, 1991. p. 16-8
  9. ^ Silverman, Kenneth. Edgar A. Poe: Mournful and Never-ending Remembrance. Harper Perennial, 1991. p. 27-8
  10. ^ Silverman, Kenneth. Edgar A. Poe: Mournful and Never-ending Remembrance. Harper Perennial, 1991. p. 29-30
  11. ^ Meyers, Jeffrey. Edgar Allan Poe: His Life and Legacy. Cooper Square Press, 1992. p. 21-2
  12. ^ Silverman, Kenneth. Edgar A. Poe: Mournful and Never-ending Remembrance. Harper Perennial, 1991. 32-4
  13. ^ Meyers, Jeffrey. Edgar Allan Poe: His Life and Legacy. Cooper Square Press, 1992. p. 32
  14. ^ Silverman, Kenneth. Edgar A. Poe: Mournful and Never-ending Remembrance. Harper Perennial, 1991. p. 41
  15. ^ Meyers, Jeffrey. Edgar Allan Poe: His Life and Legacy. Cooper Square Press, 1992. p. 32
  16. ^ Meyers, Jeffrey. Edgar Allan Poe: HIs Life and Legacy. Cooper Square Press, 1992. p. 33-4
  17. ^ Meyers, Jeffrey. Edgar Allan Poe: His Life and Legacy. Cooper Square Press, 1992. p. 35
  18. ^ Silverman, Kenneth. Edgar A. Poe: Mournful and Never-ending Remembrance. Harper Perennial, 1991. p. 43-7
  19. ^ Meyers, Jeffrey. Edgar Allan Poe: His Life and Legacy. Cooper Square Press, 1992. p. 38
  20. ^ Hecker, William J. Private Perry and Mister Poe: The West Point Poems. Louisiana State University Press, 2005. pp. 49-51
  21. ^ Meyers, Jeffrey. Edgar Allan Poe: His Life and Legacy. Cooper Square Press, 1992. pp. 50-1
  22. ^ Hecker, William J. Private Perry and Mister Poe: The West Point Poems. Louisiana State University Press, 2005. pp. 53-4
  23. ^ Meyers, Jeffrey. Edgar Allan Poe: His Life and Legacy. New York: Cooper Square Press, 1992. p. 85 ISBN 0815410387
  24. ^ Meyers, Jeffrey. Edgar Allan Poe: His Life and Legacy. Cooper Square Press, 1992. p. 119
  25. ^ Silverman, Kenneth. Edgar A. Poe: Mournful and Never-ending Remembrance. Harper Perennial, 1991. p. 159
  26. ^ Hoffman, Daniel. Poe Poe Poe Poe Poe Poe Poe. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1972. ISBN 0807123218 p. 80
  27. ^ Benton, Richard P. "Friends and Enemies: Women in the Life of Edgar Allan Poe" as collected in Myths and Reality: The Mysterious Mr. Poe. Baltimore: Edgar Allan Poe Society, 1987. p. 19 ISBN 0961644915
  28. ^ Meyers, Jeffrey: Edgar Allan Poe: His Life and Legacy. Cooper Square Press, 1992: p. 255.
  29. ^ Silverman, Kenneth. Edgar A. Poe: Mournful and Never-ending Remembrance. Harper Perennial, 1991. p. 374
  30. ^ Meyers, Jeffrey: Edgar Allan Poe: His Life and Legacy. Cooper Square Press, 1992: p. 255.
  31. ^ To read Griswold's full obituary, see Edgar Allan Poe obituary at Wikisource.
  32. ^ Hall, Wiley "Poe Fan Takes Credit for Grave Legend", Associate Press, August 15, 2007. http://www.breitbart.com/article.php?id=2007-08-15_D8R1O6LO0&show_article=1&cat=breaking
  33. ^ Associated Press, "Man Reveals Legend of Mystery Visitor to Edgar Allan Poe's Grave", August 15, 2007. http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,293413,00.html
  34. ^ eapoe.org/misc/letters/t4203060.htm. Retrieved on 2007-03-24.
  35. ^ Edward Hungerford. "Poe and Phrenology," American Literature 1(1930): 209-31.
  36. ^ Erik Grayson. "Weird Science, Weirder Unity: Phrenology and Physiognomy in Edgar Allan Poe" Mode 1 (2005): 56-77. Also online.
  37. ^ www.eapoe.org/WORKS/criticsm/hawthgr.html. Retrieved on 2007-03-24.
  38. ^ "Edgar Allan Poe's Eureka" URL accessed August 14, 2006
  39. ^ "Poe Foresees Modern Cosmologists' Black Holes and The Big Crunch" URL accessed August 14, 2006
  40. ^ Wrinkles in Time by George Smoot and Keay Davidson, Harper Perennial, Reprint edition (October 1, 1994) ISBN 0-380-72044-2
  41. ^ starbase.trincoll.edu/~crypto/historical/poe.html. Retrieved on 2007-03-29.
  42. ^ Rosenheim, Shawn James. The Cryptographic Imagination. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1997. p. 2, 6
  43. ^ www.usna.edu/EnglishDept/poeperplex/cryptop.htm. Retrieved on 2007-03-29.
  44. ^ Friedman, William F. "Edgar Allan Poe, Cryptographer" in On Poe: The Best from "American Literature". Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 1993. p. 40-1
  45. ^ Rosenheim, Shawn James. The Cryptographic Imagination. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1997. p. 15
  46. ^ Rosenheim, Shawn James. The Cryptographic Imagination. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1997. p. 146
  47. ^ POEMS FROM THE INNER LIFE. Retrieved on 2007-03-29.
  48. ^ www.eapoe.org/works/canon/poemsrjt.htm. Retrieved on 2007-03-29.
  49. ^ Poe Encyclopaedia page 315
  50. ^ www.astin-poe.com/. Retrieved on 2007-02-28.
  51. ^ signature-theatre.org/seasondescrip.htm#nevermore. Retrieved on 2007-02-28.
  52. ^ Edgar: A New Chamber Musical
  53. ^ Lake, Matt. Weird Maryland, Sterling Publishing, New York, 2006, p. 195. ISBN 1-4027-3906-0
  54. ^ Baltimore-Washington Beer Works
  55. ^ Key dates in Baltimore Ravens history
  56. ^ http://www.sportsecyclopedia.com/nfl/baltrav/ravens.html Key dates in Baltimore Ravens history
  57. ^ ]http://www.uvaravensociety.com/ Raven Society online]
  58. ^ Van Hoy, David C. "The Fall of the House of Edgar". The Boston Globe, Feb. 18, 2007
  59. ^ Glenn, Joshua. The house of Poe -- mystery solved! The Boston Globe April 9, 2007

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 154th day of the year (155th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 154th day of the year (155th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 83rd day of the year (84th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 83rd day of the year (84th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 226th day of the year (227th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 226th day of the year (227th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... George Fitzgerald Smoot III (born February 20, 1945) is an American astrophysicist and cosmologist awarded the 2006 Nobel Prize in Physics with John C. Mather for their discovery of the black body form and anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation. This work helped cement the big-bang theory of... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... February 28 is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... February 28 is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

General references

  • Edgar Allan Poe: Poetry and Tales (Patrick F. Quinn, ed.) (Library of America, 1984) ISBN 9780940450189
  • Edgar Allan Poe: Essays and Reviews (G.R. Thompson, ed.) (Library of America, 1984) ISBN 9780940450196
  • Collected Works of Edgar Allan Poe, Walter J. Black Inc, New York, (1927).
  • Edgar Allan Poe: A Critical Biography, Arthur Hobson Quinn, New York, Appleton-Century-Crofts, Inc, (1941). ISBN 0801857309
  • Collected Works of Edgar Allan Poe, three volumes (I and II Tales and Sketches, III Poems), edited by Thomas Ollive Mabbott, The Belknap Press Of Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts, London, England, (1978).
  • The Unknown Poe, edited by Raymond Foye. City Lights, San Francisco, CA. Prefaces, Copyright by Raymond Foye, (1980).
  • Edgar A. Poe: Mournful and Never-ending Remembrance by Kenneth Silverman. Harper Perennial, New York, NY, (1991).
  • The Poe Encyclopedia by Frederick S. Frank and Anthony Magistrale. Greenwood Press, Westport, Connecticut and London, England, (1997). ISBN 0313277680
  • The Classics of Style, by Edgar Allan Poe, et al., The American Academic Press, (2006). ISBN 0978728203

Volumes in the Library of America series The Library of America (LoA) is a nonprofit publisher of classic American literature. ... Volumes in the Library of America series The Library of America (LoA) is a nonprofit publisher of classic American literature. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... The American Academic Press is a small academic press located in Cleveland, Ohio. ...

See also

  • List of coupled cousins

// This is a list of prominent individuals who have been romantically or maritally coupled with a cousin, niece, nephew, aunt or uncle. ...

External links

Edgar Allan Poe Portal
Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:

File links The following pages link to this file: The Raven Categories: Édouard Manet ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is a sister project of Wikipedia, using the same MediaWiki software. ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ...

About Poe

Howard Phillips Lovecraft (August 20, 1890 – March 15, 1937) was an American author from Providence, Rhode Island of fantasy, horror and science fiction. ... Don Swaim is an American journalist, writer, and broadcaster. ...

Works

Wikisource
Wikisource has original works written by or about:
Edgar Allan Poe
  • Works by Edgar Allan Poe at Project Gutenberg
  • PoeStories.com - A well organized site with summaries, quotes, and full text of Poe's short stories, a Poe timeline, and image gallery.
  • Poems by Edgar Allan Poe at PoetryFoundation.org
  • The Edgar Allan Poe Virtual Library
  • Public domain recording of "The Raven"
  • Poe Short Story Audiobooks - free download
  • WorldCat Identities page for 'Poe, Edgar Allan 1809-1849'
 view  talk  edit Works of Edgar Allan Poe
Poems

Poetry (1824) • O, Tempora! O, Mores! (1825) • Song (1827) • Imitation (1827) • Spirits of the Dead (1827) • A Dream (1827) • Stanzas" (1827) (1827) • Tamerlane (1827) • The Lake (1827) • Evening Star (1827) • A Dream (1827) • To Margaret (1827) • The Happiest Day (1827) • To The River —— (1828) • Romance (1829) • Fairy-Land (1829) • To Science (1829) • To Isaac Lea (1829) • Al Aaraaf (1829) • An Acrostic (1829) • Elizabeth (1829) • To Helen (1831) • A Paean (1831) • The Sleeper (1831) • The City in the Sea (1831) • The Valley of Unrest (1831) • Israfel (1831) • The Coliseum (1833) • Enigma (1833) • Fanny (1833) • Serenade (1833) • Song of Triumph from Epimanes (1833) • Latin Hymn (1833) • To One in Paradise (1833) • Hymn (1835) • Politician (1835) • May Queen Ode (1836) • Spiritual Song (1836) • Bridal Ballad (1837) • To Zante (1837) • The Haunted Palace (1839) • Silence, a Sonnet (1839) • Lines on Joe Locke (1843) • The Conqueror Worm (1843) • Lenore (1843) • Eulalie (1843) • A Campaign Song (1844) • Dream-Land (1844) • Impromptu. To Kate Carol (1845) • To Frances (1845) • The Divine Right of Kings (1845) • Epigram for Wall Street (1845) • The Raven (1845) • A Valentine (1846) • Beloved Physician (1847) • An Enigma (1847) • Deep in Earth (1847) • Ulalume (1847) • Lines on Ale (1848) • To Marie Louise (1848) • Evangeline (1848) • A Dream Within A Dream (1849) • Eldorado (1849) • For Annie (1849) • The Bells (1849) • Annabel Lee (1849) • Alone (1875) Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... The original Wikisource logo. ... Project Gutenberg, abbreviated as PG, is a volunteer effort to digitize, archive, and distribute cultural works. ... The works of American author Edgar Allan Poe include many poems, short stories, and one novel. ... This article lists all known poems by American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe, regardless of importance. ... This article lists all known poems by American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe, regardless of importance. ... This article lists all known poems by American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe, regardless of importance. ... This article lists all known poems by American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe, regardless of importance. ... This article lists all known poems by American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe, regardless of importance. ... This article lists all known poems by American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe, regardless of importance. ... This article lists all known poems by American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe, regardless of importance. ... Tamerlane is a long poem by Edgar Allan Poe, first published in the 1827 collection Tamerlane and Other Poems. ... This article lists all known poems by American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe, regardless of importance. ... This article lists all known poems by American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe, regardless of importance. ... This article lists all known poems by American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe, regardless of importance. ... This article lists all known poems by American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe, regardless of importance. ... This article lists all known poems by American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe, regardless of importance. ... This article lists all known poems by American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe, regardless of importance. ... This article lists all known poems by American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe, regardless of importance. ... This article lists all known poems by American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe, regardless of importance. ... To Science, or Sonnet - To Science is an 1829 poem written by Edgar Allan Poe. ... This article lists all known poems by American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe, regardless of importance. ... Al Aaraaf was written by Edgar Allan Poe in 1829. ... This article lists all known poems by American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe, regardless of importance. ... This article lists all known poems by American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe, regardless of importance. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: To Helen (Poe, 1831) To Helen is the first of two poems to carry that name written by Edgar Allan Poe. ... Lenore is a poem by the American author, Edgar Allan Poe. ... This article lists all known poems by American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe, regardless of importance. ... The City in the Sea is a poem by Edgar Allan Poe that was published in 1845, but dates back to an earlier 1831 version originally titled The Doomed City. ... This article lists all known poems by American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe, regardless of importance. ... This article lists all known poems by American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe, regardless of importance. ... This article lists all known poems by American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe, regardless of importance. ... This article lists all known poems by American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe, regardless of importance. ... This article lists all known poems by American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe, regardless of importance. ... This article lists all known poems by American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe, regardless of importance. ... This article lists all known poems by American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe, regardless of importance. ... This article lists all known poems by American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe, regardless of importance. ... This article lists all known poems by American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe, regardless of importance. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: Bridal Ballad Bridal Ballad is a poem written by American author Edgar Allan Poe. ... This article lists all known poems by American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe, regardless of importance. ... The Haunted Palace is a poem by Edgar Allan Poe. ... This article lists all known poems by American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe, regardless of importance. ... This article lists all known poems by American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe, regardless of importance. ... The Conqueror Worm is a poem by Edgar Allan Poe about human mortality and the inevitability of death. ... Lenore is a poem by the American author, Edgar Allan Poe. ... Eulalie, or Eulalie - A Song, is a poem by Edgar Allan Poe, first published in the July 1845 issue of the American Review and reprinted shortly thereafter in the August 9, 1845 issue of the Broadway Journal. ... This article lists all known poems by American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe, regardless of importance. ... This article lists all known poems by American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe, regardless of importance. ... This article lists all known poems by American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe, regardless of importance. ... This page is a candidate to be moved to Wikisource. ... This article lists all known poems by American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe, regardless of importance. ... The Raven as illustrated by Gustave Doré. The Raven is a narrative poem by American writer and poet Edgar Allan Poe. ... This article lists all known poems by American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe, regardless of importance. ... The Beloved Physician is a poem, written by renowned American writer Edgar Allen Poe. ... This article lists all known poems by American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe, regardless of importance. ... This article lists all known poems by American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe, regardless of importance. ... Ulalume is a poem written by Edgar Allan Poe in 1847. ... This article lists all known poems by American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe, regardless of importance. ... This article lists all known poems by American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe, regardless of importance. ... This article lists all known poems by American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe, regardless of importance. ... A Dream Within A Dream is a poem written by Edgar Allan Poe, first published in 1849. ... Gaily bedight, A gallant knight, In sunshine and in shadow, Had journeyed long, Singing a song, In search of Eldorado. ... This article lists all known poems by American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe, regardless of importance. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: The Bells The Bells is a poem by Edgar Allan Poe. ... {NPOV} Annabel Lee is the last complete poem[1] composed by American author Edgar Allan Poe. ... Alone is a 22-line poem by Edgar Allan Poe, originally written in 1829 and left untitled. ...

Tales
Metzengerstein (1832) • The Duc De L'Omelette (1832) • A Tale of Jerusalem (1832) • Loss of Breath (1832) • Bon-Bon (1832) • MS. Found in a Bottle (1833) • The Assignation (1834) • Berenice (1835) • Morella (1835) • Lionizing (1835) • The Unparalleled Adventure of One Hans Pfaall (1835) • King Pest (1835) • Shadow - A Parable (1835) • Four Beasts in One - The Homo-Cameleopard (1836) • Mystification (1837) • Silence - A Fable (1837) • Ligeia (1838) • How to Write a Blackwood Article (1838) • A Predicament (1838) • The Devil in the Belfry (1839) • The Man That Was Used Up (1839) • The Fall of the House of Usher (1839) • William Wilson (1839) • The Conversation of Eiros and Charmion (1839) • Why the Little Frenchman Wears His Hand in a Sling (1840) • The Business Man (1840) • The Man of the Crowd (1840) • The Murders in the Rue Morgue (1841) • A Descent into the Maelström (1841) • The Island of the Fay (1841) • The Colloquy of Monos and Una (1841) • Never Bet the Devil Your Head (1841) • Eleonora (1841) • Three Sundays in a Week (1841) • The Oval Portrait (1842) • The Masque of the Red Death (1842) • The Landscape Garden (1842) • The Mystery of Marie Roget (1842) • The Pit and the Pendulum (1842) • The Tell-Tale Heart (1843) • The Gold-Bug (1843) • The Black Cat (1843) • Diddling (1843) • The Spectacles (1844) • A Tale of the Ragged Mountains (1844) • The Premature Burial (1844) • Mesmeric Revelation (1844) • The Oblong Box (1844) • The Angel of the Odd (1844) • Thou Art the Man (1844) • The Literary Life of Thingum Bob, Esq. (1844) • The Purloined Letter (1844) • The Thousand-and-Second Tale of Scheherazade (1845) • Some Words with a Mummy (1845) • The Power of Words (1845) • The Imp of the Perverse (1845) • The System of Doctor Tarr and Professor Fether (1845) • The Facts in the Case of M. Valdemar (1845) • The Sphinx (1846) • The Cask of Amontillado (1846) • The Domain of Arnheim (1847) • Mellonta Tauta (1849) • Hop-Frog (1849) • Von Kempelen and His Discovery (1849) • X-ing a Paragrab (1849) • Landor's Cottage (1849)
Other works
Essays: Maelzel's Chess Player (1836) • The Daguerreotype (1840) • The Philosophy of Furniture (1840) • A Few Words on Secret Writing (1841) • The Rationale of Verse (1843) • Morning on the Wissahiccon (1844) • Old English Poetry (1845) • The Philosophy of Composition (1846) • The Poetic Principle (1846) • Eureka (1848) Hoaxes:The Balloon-Hoax (1844) Novels: The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket (1837) • The Journal of Julius Rodman (1840) Plays: Scenes From 'Politian' (1835) Other: The Conchologist's First Book (1839) • The Light-House (1849)
Persondata
NAME Poe, Edgar Allan
ALTERNATIVE NAMES
SHORT DESCRIPTION American poet, short story writer and literary critic
DATE OF BIRTH January 19, 1809(1809-01-19)
PLACE OF BIRTH Boston, Massachusetts
DATE OF DEATH October 7, 1849
PLACE OF DEATH Baltimore, Maryland

Metzengerstein is one of the earliest short stories by American writer and poet Edgar Allan Poe. ... MS. Found in a Bottle is a short story by Edgar Allan Poe, first published in the Baltimore Saturday Visiter in 1833. ... Berenice is a short horror story by Edgar Allan Poe, first published in the Southern Literary Messenger in 1835. ... Morella is a short story by 19th century American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe. ... The Unparalleled Adventure of One Hans Pfaall (1835) is a short story by Edgar Allan Poe published in the June 1835 issue of the monthly magazine Southern Literary Messenger, and intended by Poe to be a hoax. ... Ligeia is a short story written by Edgar Allan Poe. ... A Predicament is a humorous short story by Edgar Allan Poe, usually combined with its companion piece How to Write a Blackwood Article. ... A Predicament is a humorous short story by Edgar Allan Poe, usually combined with its companion piece How to Write a Blackwood Article. ... The Devil in the Belfry is a short story by Edgar Allan Poe. ... The Man That Was Used Up, sometimes subtitled A Tale of the Late Bugaboo and Kickapoo Campaign, is a short story and satire by Edgar Allan Poe. ... The Fall of the House of Usher is a short story written by Edgar Allan Poe. ... William Wilson is a short story by Edgar Allan Poe, first published in 1839. ... The Conversation of Eiros And Charmion is a short story by Edgar Allan Poe, an apocalyptic science fiction story first published in Grahams Magazine in 1839. ... The Man of the Crowd is a short story written by Edgar Allan Poe about a nameless narrator following a man through a crowded London, first published in 1840. ... The Murders in the Rue Morgue is a short story written by Edgar Allan Poe in 1841. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: A Descent into the Maelström A Descent into the Maelström is a short story by Edgar Allan Poe. ... Eleonora is a short story by Edgar Allan Poe, first published in 1842. ... The Oval Portrait is a short story by Edgar Allan Poe involving the disturbing tale of a portrait in a chateau. ... The Masque of the Red Death is a short story written by Edgar Allan Poe and first published in the May 1842 edition of Grahams Ladys and Gentlemans Magazine as The Mask of the Red Death. The story was adapted in 1964 by Roger Corman into a... The Mystery of Marie Roget is a story by Edgar Allan Poe written in 1842. ... This article is about the short story by Edgar Allan Poe. ... Illustration by Harry Clarke, detail from He shrieked once -once only The Tell-Tale Heart is a short story by Edgar Allan Poe, which was first published in James Russell Lowells The Pioneer in January 1843; Poe republished it in his periodical The Broadway Journal for August 23, 1845. ... The Gold-Bug is a short story by Edgar Allan Poe, set on Sullivans Island, South Carolina. ... The Black Cat is a short story by Edgar Allan Poe. ... The Spectacles is a short story by Edgar Allen Poe, published in 1850. ... The Premature Burial is a short story written by Edgar Allan Poe and published in 1850. ... The Oblong Box is a short story by Edgar Allan Poe, first published in 1844, about a sea voyage and a mysterious box. ... The Angel of the Odd is a 1844 short story written by 19th century author Edgar Allan Poe. ... The Purloined Letter is one of Edgar Allan Poes detective stories. ... The Imp of the Perverse is a short story that begins as an essay written by 19th century American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe. ... The System of Doctor Tarr and Professor Fether is a comedic short story written by American author Edgar Allan Poe. ... The Facts in the Case of M. Valdemar - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... The Cask of Amontillado (sometimes spelled The Casque of Amontillado) is a short story, written by Edgar Allan Poe and first published in the November 1846 issue of Godeys Ladys Book. ... Hop-Frog (originally Hop-Frog; Or, the Eight Chained Ourangoutangs) is a short story by American writer Edgar Allan Poe, first published in 1849. ... Maelzels Chess Player (1836) is an essay by Edgar Allan Poe exposing a fraudulent automaton chess player called The Turk, which had become famous in Europe and the U.S. and toured widely. ... The Philosophy of Furniture is an essay written by American author Edgar Allan Poe published in 1840. ... Morning on the Wissahiccon (1844) is an essay by Edgar Allan Poe describing the natural beauty of Wissahickon Creek in Pennsylvania. ... The Philosophy of Composition is an essay written by Edgar Allan Poe that elaborates a theory about how good writers write when they write well. ... The Poetic Principle is an essay by Edgar Allan Poe, written near the end of his life and published posthumously in 1850 (Poe died in 1849). ... Eureka is a prose poem by Edgar Allan Poe from (1848) in which he describes his illumination about the universe. ... The Balloon-Hoax was a newspaper article written by Edgar Allan Poe. ... The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket is Edgar Allan Poes only complete novel, published in 1838. ... The Journal of Julius Rodman, Being an Account of the First Passage across the Rocky Mountains of North America Ever Achieved by Civilized Man is an unfinished serial novel by American author Edgar Allan Poe. ... Scenes From Politian (1835) is the only play known to have been written by Edgar Allan Poe, written in 1835 but not published until 1845 in the collection The Raven and Other Poems. ... The Conchologists First Book (1839) (sometimes subtitled with Or, A System of Testaceous Malacology) is an illustrated textbook issued in 1839, 1840, and 1845 under Edgar Allan Poes name though the actual author was Thomas Wyatt, an English author and lecturer. ... The Light-House is the last short story written by Edgar Allan Poe. ... January 19 is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1809 (MDCCCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar). ... Nickname: Location in Massachusetts, USA Coordinates: , Country United States State Massachusetts County Suffolk County Settled 1630 Incorporated (city) 1822 Government  - Mayor Thomas M. Menino (D) Area  - City  89. ... is the 280th day of the year (281st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1849 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Baltimore redirects here. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Edgar Allan Poe National Historic Site (1769 words)
Edgar Allan Poe lived in Philadelphia for about six years (1838-1844), spending his last year to 18 months at a house on North 7th Street.
Poe came to Philadelphia, which was at the time the literary center of the United States, boasting many publishers of books and magazines.
Poe's mental health mirrored the state of Virginia's health — flowing between optimism when she was healthy and drunken insanity was she was in decline.
Edgar Allan Poe - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (6557 words)
Edgar Allan Poe was born to a Scots-Irish family in Boston, Massachusetts, on January 19, 1809, the son of actress Elizabeth Arnold Hopkins Poe and actor David Poe, Jr.
Poe associated the aesthetic aspect of art with pure ideality claiming that the mood or sentiment created by a work of art elevates the soul, and is thus a spiritual experience.
Poe himself was critical of democracy and capitalism (in his story "Mellonta Tauta," Poe proclaims that "democracy is a very admirable form of government—for dogs" [8]), and the tragic poverty and misery of Poe's biography seemed, to Baudelaire, to be the ultimate example of how the bourgeoisie destroys genius and originality.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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