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Encyclopedia > Eddie Gaedel
Eddie Gaedel
Eddie Gaedel (right) in his only plate appearance.
St. Louis Browns — No. ⅛
Born: June 8, 1925
Died: June 18, 1961 (aged 36)
Batted: Right Threw: Left
MLB debut
August 19, 1951
for the St. Louis Browns
Final game
August 19, 1951
for the St. Louis Browns
Career statistics
Batting average     .000
Home runs     0
Runs batted in     0
Teams
  • St. Louis Browns (1951)
Career highlights and awards
  • Shortest player in Major League Baseball History

Edward Carl "Eddie" Gaedel (June 8, 1925 - June 18, 1961), born in Chicago, Illinois, was an American dwarf who became famous for participating in a Major League Baseball game. Image File history File links Gaedel. ... is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 169th day of the year (170th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 231st day of the year (232nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the contemporary American major league baseball team. ... is the 231st day of the year (232nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the contemporary American major league baseball team. ... Batting average is a statistic in both cricket and baseball measuring the performance of cricket batsmen and baseball hitters, respectively. ... In baseball, a home run is a base hit in which the batter is able to circle all the bases, ending at home plate and scoring a run, with no errors on the play that result in the batter achieving extra bases. ... In baseball statistics, a run batted in (RBI) is given to a batter for each run scored as the result of a batters plate appearance. ... This article is about the contemporary American major league baseball team. ... is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 169th day of the year (170th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Flag Seal Nickname: The Windy City Motto: Urbs In Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location Location in Chicagoland and northern Illinois Coordinates , Government Country State Counties United States Illinois Cook, DuPage Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 606. ... This article is about the mythical creature. ... Major Leagues redirects here. ...


Gaedel gained immortality in the second game of a doubleheader on Sunday, August 19, 1951. Weighing just 65 pounds (29.5 kg), and 3 feet 7 inches (1.09 m) tall, he became the shortest player in the history of the major leagues. He stood 3 feet 4 inches (1.02 m) shorter than Jon Rauch, whose height of 6'11" (2.11 m) made him the tallest person to play in a Major League Game. He was secretly signed by the St. Louis Browns and put in uniform (complete with number "⅛" on the back) as a publicity stunt by maverick Browns owner and showman Bill Veeck. Doubleheader is the term used to describe two baseball games played between the same two teams on the same day. ... is the 231st day of the year (232nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... See also: 1950 in sports, other events of 1951, 1952 in sports and the list of years in sports. // Auto Racing NASCAR Championship - Herb Thomas AAA Racing: Tony Bettenhausen won the series championship Lee Wallard won the Indianapolis 500 Formula One Championship - Juan Manuel Fangio of Argentina 24 hours of... Jon Erich Rauch (born September 27, 1978 in Louisville, Kentucky) is a right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball with the Washington Nationals. ... This article is about the contemporary American major league baseball team. ... William Louis Veeck Jr. ...


Gaedel popped out of a papier-mache cake between games of a doubleheader to celebrate the American League's 50th anniversary, and as a Falstaff Brewery promotion. Falstaff, and the fans, had been promised a "festival of surprises" by Veeck. Before the second game got underway, the press agreed that the "midget-in-a-cake" appearance had not been up to Veeck's usual promotional standard. Falstaff personnel, who had been promised national publicity for their participation, were particularly dissatisfied. Keeping the surprise he had in store for the second game to himself, Veeck just meekly apologized. Doubleheader is the term used to describe two baseball games played between the same two teams on the same day. ... The American League (or formally the American League of Professional Baseball Clubs) is one of two leagues that make up Major League Baseball in the United States of America and Canada. ... Falstaff Beer was the brand name for an American beer, produced first by the Lemp Brewing Company of St. ...

Contents

The plate appearance

Eddie Gaedel entered the game between the Browns and Detroit Tigers as a pinch-hitter for leadoff batter Frank Saucier. Immediately, umpire Ed Hurley called for Browns manager Zack Taylor. Veeck and Taylor had the foresight to have a copy of Gaedel's contract on hand, as well as a copy of the Browns' active roster, which had room for Gaedel's addition. Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) Central Division (1998–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 2, 5, 6, 16, 23, 42, Cobb Name Detroit Tigers (1901–present) Other nicknames The Motor City Kitties, The Bengals, The Tigs, The Bless You Boys Ballpark Comerica Park (2000–present) Tiger Stadium (1912-1999... In baseball, a pinch hitter is a common term for a substitute batter. ... Frank Saucier (May 28, 1926 in Leslie, Missouri) played one year of major league baseball for the St. ... Home plate umpire Gary Darling signals that the last pitch was a strike In baseball, the umpire is the person charged with officiating the game, including beginning and ending the game, enforcing the rules of the game and the grounds, making judgment calls on plays, and meting out discipline. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


The contract had been filed late in the day on Friday, August 17. Veeck knew the league office would summarily approve the contract upon receipt, and that it would not be scrutinized until Monday, August 20. Upon reading the contract, Hurley motioned for Gaedel to take his place in the batter's box. (As a result of Gaedel's appearance, all contracts must now be approved by the Commissioner of Baseball before a player can appear in a game.) The change to that day's St. Louis Browns scorecard, listing Gaedel, went unnoticed by everyone except Harry Mitauer, a writer for the St. Louis Globe-Democrat. Mitauer's inquiry was shunted aside by the Browns' publicity man. The Commissioner of Baseball is the chief executive of Major League Baseball. ... The St. ...


Eddie Gaedel was under strict orders not to attempt to move the bat off his shoulder. When Gaedel had hinted to Veeck that he might be tempted to swing at a pitch, the owner promised to bring a rifle to the game and shoot him if he tried. Tigers catcher Bob Swift offered his pitcher a piece of strategy: "Keep it low." Robert Virgil Swift (March 6, 1915 - October 17, 1966) was a catcher, coach and manager in American Major League Baseball. ...


With Bob Cain on the mound - laughing at the absurdity that he actually had to pitch to Gaedel - and Swift catching on his knees, Gaedel crouched with bat in hand. Cain delivered four consecutive balls, all high. Gaedel took his base (stopping twice during his trot to bow to the crowd) and was replaced by pinch-runner Jim Delsing. The fans gave Gaedel a standing ovation. The subject of this article may not satisfy the notability guideline or one of the following guidelines for inclusion on Wikipedia: Biographies, Books, Companies, Fiction, Music, Neologisms, Numbers, Web content, or several proposals for new guidelines. ... Rashad Eldridge of the Oklahoma Redhawks walks to first base after drawing a base on balls. ... James Henry (Jim) Delsing (November 13, 1925-May 4, 2006) was a Major League Baseball outfielder who is most remembered for having been the pinch runner for 3 7-tall Eddie Gaedel on August 19, 1951. ...


Baseball reaction

Veeck had dearly hoped that Delsing would go on to score in a one-run Browns victory, but he ended up stranded at third base and the Tigers went on to win the game 6-2. American League president Will Harridge, saying Veeck was making a mockery of the game, voided Gaedel's contract the next day. Veeck humorously threatened to request an official ruling on whether Yankees shortstop and reigning MVP Phil Rizzuto was a short ballplayer or a tall midget. The American League (or formally the American League of Professional Baseball Clubs) is one of two leagues that make up Major League Baseball in the United States of America and Canada. ... William Harridge (October 16, 1883 - April 9, 1971) was an American executive in Major League Baseball whose most significant role was as president of the American League from 1931 to 1958. ... Philip Francis Rizzuto (September 25, 1917 – August 13, 2007), nicknamed The Scooter, was an American shortstop in Major League Baseball who spent his entire career from 1941 to 1956 with the New York Yankees. ...


Initially, major league baseball struck Gaedel from its record book, as if he had not been in the game. He was relisted a year later. Eddie Gaedel finished his major league career with an on-base percentage of 1.000. His total earnings as a pro athlete were $100, the scale price for an AGVA appearance. However, he was able to parlay his baseball fame into more than $17,000 by appearing on several television shows. In baseball statistics, on base percentage (OBP) (sometimes referred to as on base average (OBA)) is a measure of how often a batter gets to first base for any reason other than a fielding error or a fielders choice. ... American Guild of Variety Artists (AGVA) is a U.S. entertainment union that represents live performers. ...


Later life

Gaedel's major league career lasted just the one plate appearance, but Veeck continued to employ Gaedel in non-playing promotions over the years: in 1959, Gaedel and three other dwarves dressed as spacemen were seen presenting "ray guns" to White Sox players Nellie Fox and Luis Aparicio at Comiskey Park. (Gaedel reportedly said, "I don't want to be taken to your leader. I've already met him.") In 1961, Veeck hired several dwarves and midgets, including Gaedel, as vendors, so as not to "block the fans' view" of the game. The Chicago White Sox are a Major League Baseball team based in Chicago, Illinois. ... Jacob Nelson Nellie Fox (December 25, 1927 – December 1, 1975) was a Major League Baseball second baseman for the Chicago White Sox and is a member of the Baseball Hall of Fame. ... Luis Ernesto Aparicio Montiel (born April 29, 1934 in Maracaibo, Zulia State, Venezuela) is a former shortstop in professional baseball and a member of the Baseball Hall of Fame. ... This article is about the original Comiskey Park. ...


Some claim that living down the stunt was difficult for Gaedel. Combative in his private life, he later became a heavy drinker and died of a heart attack after being mugged in Chicago in 1961. He was just 36 years old. The only baseball figure to attend the funeral was Bob Cain, the pitcher who had walked him. Said Cain: "I never even met him, but I felt obligated to go."


Due to scarcity, Gaedel's autograph now sells for more than Babe Ruth's. In his autobiography "Veeck as in Wreck," Bill Veeck commemorated Gaedel as "the best darn midget who ever played big-league ball." This article is about the baseball player. ...


Miscellany

  • Gaedel is mentioned in Terry Cashman's song homage to 1950's baseball, "Talkin' Baseball (Willie, Mickey, and the Duke)". His "1/8" jersey is in the Baseball Hall of Fame.
  • Due to his size, Gaedel worked as a riveter during World War II. He was able to crawl inside the wings of airplanes.
  • Gaedel is one of only five major-league players who drew a walk in their only plate appearance and never played in the field. The first three all played in the 1910s: Dutch Schirick (September 17, 1914 with the Browns), Bill Batsch (September 9, 1916 with Pittsburgh) and Joe Cobb (April 25, 1918 with Detroit; he was born Joseph Serafin and was unrelated to Tigers' star Ty Cobb.) Kevin Melillo of the Oakland Athletics became the fifth man to accomplish the "feat" (and the first in over half a century) when he drew a walk in his only appearance, June 24, 2007 against the New York Mets. Melillo is still active and thus would remove himself from this list if he plays future major league games.
  • The uniform that Gaedel wore during his plate appearance belonged to Bill DeWitt Jr., the current chairman of the St. Louis Cardinals, and is the same one seen in a picture with Mr. DeWitt and Babe Ruth.

Terry Cashman is a New York City born singer-songwriter best known for his 1981 hit Talkin Baseball. ... For a description of the medieval homage ceremony see commendation ceremony Homage is generally used in modern English to mean any public show of respect to someone to whom you feel indebted. ... The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, located at 62 Main Street in Cooperstown, New York, is a semi-official museum operated by private interests serving as the central point for the study of the history of baseball in the United States and beyond, the display of baseball-related... (For the 1901-02 American League team known as the Baltimore Orioles, see New York Yankees. ... This article is about the baseball team. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) Central Division (1998–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 2, 5, 6, 16, 23, 42, Cobb Name Detroit Tigers (1901–present) Other nicknames The Motor City Kitties, The Bengals, The Tigs, The Bless You Boys Ballpark Comerica Park (2000–present) Tiger Stadium (1912-1999... Tyrus Raymond Ty Cobb (December 18, 1886 – July 17, 1961), nicknamed The Georgia Peach, was a Hall of Fame baseball player and is regarded by historians and journalists[2][3] as the best player of the dead-ball era and as one of the greatest players of all time. ... Kevin Michael Melillo (born May 14, 1982, in Orlando, Florida) is a second baseman who plays for the Oakland Athletics. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 9, 27, 34, 42, 43, (As) Name Oakland Athletics (1968–present) Kansas City Athletics (1955-1967) Philadelphia Athletics (1901-1954) (Referred to as As) Other nicknames The As, The White Elephants, The... Major league affiliations National League (1962–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 14, 37, 41, 42 Name New York Mets (1962–present) Other nicknames The Amazin Mets, The Amazins, The Metropolitans, The Kings of Queens Ballpark Shea Stadium (current) (1964–present) Polo Grounds (1962–1963) Major...

External links

Image File history File links Question_book-3. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Eddie Gaedel - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (375 words)
Edward Carl "Eddie" Gaedel (June 8, 1925 - June 18, 1961), born in Chicago, Illinois, was an American dwarf who became famous for participating in a Major League Baseball game.
When Gaedel hinted that he might be tempted to swing at a pitch, Veeck promised to station a sniper in the stands.
Gaedel is mentioned in Terry Cashman's song homage to 1950's baseball, "Willie, Mickey, and the Duke".
Eddie Gaedel Obituary (306 words)
Gaedel's face after his body was discovered in the bedroom of his South Side apartment Sunday.
Gaedel made baseball history on August 19, 1951, when he popped out of a huge cake set up in Sportsman's Park in St. Louis as part of a between games show of a St. Louis doubleheader.
Gaedel, who was 3 feet 7 inches tall, was allowed to bat for the St. Louis Browns when he produced a contract signed by Bill Veeck, then president of the club.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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