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Encyclopedia > Economy of Brazil

Brazil has a moderately open market and export-oriented economy. Measured nominally, its Gross Domestic Product surpasses a trillion dollars, and $2,06 trillion in purchasing power parity, making it the sixth largest economy in the world and the third largest in America.[1] Its nominal per capita GDP has repassed $6,000 in 2007, due to the strong and continued appreciation of the real for the first time this decade. Its industrial sector accounts for three fifths of the South American economy's industrial production.[2] The country’s scientific and technological development is argued to be attractive to foreign direct investment, which has averaged US$ 20 billion per year the last years, compared to only US$ 2 billion/year last decade,[2] thus showing a remarkable growth. The agricultural sector, locally called the agronegócio sector, has also been remarkably dynamic: for two decades this sector has kept Brazil amongst the most highly productive countries in areas related to the rural sector.[2] The agricultural sector and the mining sector also supported trade surpluses which allowed for massive currency gains (rebound) and external debt paydown. This article is about GDP in the context of economics. ... The purchasing power parity (PPP) theory uses the long-term equilibrium exchange rate of two currencies to equalize their purchasing power. ... World map showing the Americas CIA political map of the Americas The Americas are the lands of the Western hemisphere or New World, consisting of the continents of North America[1] and South America with their associated islands and regions. ... South America South America is a continent crossed by the equator, with most of its area in the Southern Hemisphere. ... Itaipu Brazilian science and technology has achieved in the last decades a significant position in the international arena. ... This article is about economics. ...


Brazil is a member of diverse economic organizations, such as Mercosur, SACN, G8+5, G-20 and the Cairns Group. Its trade partners number in the hundreds, with 74% of exports mostly of manufactured or semimanufactured goods.[2] Brazil's main trade partners are: the EEC (26% of trade), the United States (24%), Mercosur and Latin America (21%) and Asia (12%). Motto (Spanish) (Portuguese) (Guaraní) Our North is the South  â€¢  â€¢ Pro Tempore Secretariat Montevideo, Uruguay Largest city São Paulo, Brazil Official languages 3 Portuguese Spanish Guaraní Membership 5 Argentina Brazil Paraguay Uruguay Venezuela Leaders  -  Carlos Álvarez Establishment  -  Declaration of Foz do Iguaçu 30 December 1985   -  Treaty of Asunción... Pro Tempore Secretariat Brasília Official languages 4 Spanish Portuguese English Dutch Member states 12 Argentina Bolivia Brazil Chile Colombia Ecuador Guyana Paraguay Peru Suriname Uruguay Venezuela Leaders  -  President Rodrigo Borja  -  Tempore Secretary Jorge Taunay Filho Formation  -  Cuzco Declaration 8 December 2004  Area  -  Total 17,715,335 km² (1st2)  sq... The G8+5 group of leaders consists of the heads of government from the G8 nations (Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Russia, the United Kingdom and the United States), plus the leaders of the leading emerging economies (Brazil, China, India, Mexico and South Africa). ... The Group of 20, or G-20, developing countries focused on tearing down industrialized countries barriers to agricultural trade. ... The Cairns Group is an interest group of 18 agricultural exporting countries, composed of Argentina, Australia , Bolivia, Brazil, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Guatemala, Indonesia, Malaysia, New Zealand, Pakistan, Paraguay, the Philippines, South Africa, Thailand, and Uruguay. ... Manufacturing is the transformation of raw materials into finished goods for sale, or intermediate processes involving the production or finishing of semi-manufactures. ... Manufacturing is the transformation of raw materials into finished goods for sale, or intermediate processes involving the production or finishing of semi-manufactures. ... The European Community (EC), most important of three European Communities, was originally founded on March 25, 1957 by the signing of the Treaty of Rome under the name of European Economic Community. ... Motto (Spanish) (Portuguese) (Guaraní) Our North is the South  â€¢  â€¢ Pro Tempore Secretariat Montevideo, Uruguay Largest city São Paulo, Brazil Official languages 3 Portuguese Spanish Guaraní Membership 5 Argentina Brazil Paraguay Uruguay Venezuela Leaders  -  Carlos Álvarez Establishment  -  Declaration of Foz do Iguaçu 30 December 1985   -  Treaty of Asunción... Latin America consists of the countries of South America and some of North America (including Central America and some the islands of the Caribbean) whose inhabitants mostly speak Romance languages, although Native American languages are also spoken. ... For other uses, see Asia (disambiguation). ...


The owner of a sophisticated technological sector, Brazil develops projects that range from submarines to aircraft and is involved in space research: the country possesses a Launching Center for Light Vehicles and was the only country in the Southern Hemisphere to integrate the team responsible for the construction of the International Space Station (ISS).[3] It is also a pioneer in many fields, including ethanol production. For other uses, see Submarine (disambiguation). ... Flying machine redirects here. ... The Alcântara rocket launch site, Centro de Lançamento de Alcântara (CLA), is located at the coast of the Atlantic Ocean in the north of Brazil, in the state of Maranhão. ... southern hemisphere highlighted in yellow (Antarctica not depicted). ... ISS redirects here. ... Grain alcohol redirects here. ...


Brazil is also a pioneer in the fields of deep water oil research from where 73% of its reserves are extracted.[2] According to government statistics, Brazil was the first capitalist country to bring together the ten largest car assembly companies inside its national territory.[2]

Contents

History

When the Portuguese explorers arrived in the 15th century, the native tribes of current-day Brazil, totaling about 2.5 million people, had lived virtually unchanged since the Stone Age. From Portugal's colonisation of Brazil (1500-1822) until the late 1930s, the market elements of the Brazilian economy relied on the production of primary products for exports. Within the Portuguese Empire, Brazil was a colony subjected to an imperial mercantile policy, which had two main large-scale economic production cycles - sugar and gold. The economy of Brazil was heavily dependent on African slave labour until the late 19th century (about 3 million imported African slaves in total). Since then, Brazil experienced a period of strong economic and demographic growth accompanied by mass immigration from Europe (mainly from Portugal, Italy, Spain and Germany) until the 1930s. In the Americas, the United States, Argentina and Brazil (in descending order) were the countries that received most immigrants. In Brazil's case, statistics show that 4.5 million people emigrated to the country between 1882 and 1934. The Economic history of Brazil covers various economic events and traces the changes in the Brazilian economy of the course of the history of Brazil From Portugals discovery of Brazil in 1500 until the late 1930s, the Brazilian economy relied on the production of primary products for exports. ... See also explorations, sea explorers, astronaut, conquistador, travelogue, the History of Science and Technology and Biography. ... The indigenous people of Brazil (povos indígenas in Portuguese) comprise a large number of distict ethnic groups who inhabited the countrys present territory prior its discovery by Europeans around 1500. ... Stone Age fishing hook. ... That which is produced by the Primary sector of industry. ... An anachronous map of the Portuguese Empire (1415-1999). ... Mercantilism is the economic theory that a nations prosperity depended upon its supply of gold and silver, that the total volume of trade is unchangeable. ... This article is about sugar as food and as an important and widely traded commodity. ... GOLD refers to one of the following: GOLD (IEEE) is an IEEE program designed to garner more student members at the university level (Graduates of the Last Decade). ... The history of slavery covers many different forms of human exploitation across many cultures and throughout human history. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ...


Currently, with a population of 190 million and abundant natural resources, Brazil is one of the ten largest markets in the world, producing tons of steel, 26 million tons of cement, 3.5 million television sets, and 3 million refrigerators. In addition, about 70 million cubic meters of petroleum were being processed annually into fuels, lubricants, propane gas, and a wide range of petrochemicals. Furthermore, Brazil has at least 161,500 kilometers of paved roads and more than 63 million megawatts of installed electric power capacity. Natural resources are commodities that are considered valuable in their relatively unmodified (natural) form. ... Petro redirects here. ...


Despite these figures, the economy cannot be considered developed. Although the economic changes since 1947 greatly raised the country's per capita income, in 1995 was still only US$4,630. Growth and structural change have not altered significantly Brazil's extremely unequal distribution of wealth, income, and opportunity. Despite impressive increments in economic growth and output, the number of poor has risen sharply. Most of the poor are concentrated in the rural areas of Brazil's Northeast Region, or in the country's large cities or metropolitan areas. The economic and political troubles of the 1980s and early 1990s have only complicated the task of correcting the country's development pattern. This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


Components of the economy

The service sector is the largest component of GDP at 65%, followed by the industrial sector at 25% (2003 est.). Agriculture represents 10% of GDP (2003 est.). Brazilian labor force is estimated at 92.86 million of which 19% is occupied in agriculture, 15% in the industry sector and 66% in the service sector.


Agriculture and food production

Agriculture production
Combine harvester in the plantation
Main products Coffee, soybeans, wheat, rice, corn, sugarcane, cocoa, citrus, beef
Agriculture growth rate 5.2% (2004)
Labor force 19% of total labor force
GDP of sector 10.1% of total GDP
Main article: Agriculture in Brazil

A performance that puts agribusiness in a position of distinction in terms of Brazil’s trade balance, in spite of trade barriers and subsidizing policies adopted by the developed countries.[4] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 566 pixelsFull resolution (946 × 669 pixel, file size: 1. ... A CLAAS Caterpillar LEXION Combine. ... This article is about crop plantations. ... // Brazil is endowed with vast agricultural resources. ... This article is about the country. ... Balance of trade figures are the sum of the money gained by a given economy by selling exports, minus the cost of buying imports. ...


In the space of fifty five years (1950 to 2005), the population of Brazil grew by 51 million to approximately 180 million inhabitants,[5] an increase of over 2% per year. In order to meet this demand, it was necessary to take the development of cattle and crop raising activities a step further. Since then, an authentic green revolution has taken place, allowing the country to create and expand a complex agribusiness sector.[4] However, some of this is at the expense of the environment, including the Amazon. In agriculture, agribusiness is a generic term that refers to the various businesses involved in the food production chain, including farming, seed, agrichemicals, farm machinery, wholesaling, processing, distribution, and retail sales. ... Amazon River basin The Amazon Basin is the part of South America drained by the Amazon River and its tributaries. ...


The importance given to the rural producer takes place in the shape of the Agricultural and Cattle-raising Plan and through another specific program geared towards family agriculture (Pronaf), which guarantee financing for equipment and cultivation and encourage the use of new technology, as shown by the use of agricultural land zoning. With regards to family agriculture, over 800 thousand rural inhabitants are assisted by credit, research and extension programs. The special line of credit for women and young farmers is an innovation worth mentioning, providing an incentive towards the entrepreneurial spirit.[4] By the mid 20th century humans had achieved a mastery of technology sufficient to leave the surface of the Earth for the first time and explore space. ...


With The Land Reform Program, on the other hand, the country’s objective is to provide suitable living and working conditions for over one million families who live in areas allotted by the State, an initiative capable of generating two million jobs. Through partnerships, public policies and international partnerships, the government is working towards the guarantee of an infrastructure for the settlements, following the examples of schools and health outlets. The idea is that access to land represents just the first step towards the implementation of a quality land reform program.[4] Job (plural jobs) refers to a piece of work or a task. ...


Over 600,000 km² of land are divided into approximately five thousand areas of rural property; an agricultural area currently with three borders: the Central-western region (savanna), the Northern region (area of transition) and parts of the Northeastern region (semi-arid). At the forefront of grain crops, which produce over 110 million tonnes/year, is the soybean, yielding 50 million tonnes.[4] This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The Center-West region is composed of the states of Goiás, Mato Grosso and Mato Grosso do Sul; along with Distrito Federal (Federal District), where Brazils national capital, Brasília, is situated. ... Image:Brasil Norte vincent harley rocks maploc. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


In the bovine cattle-raising sector, the “green ox”, which is raised in pastures, on a diet of hay and mineral salts, conquered markets in Asia, Europe and the Americas, particularly after the “mad cow disease” scare period. Brazil has the largest cattle herd in the world, with 198 million heads,[6] responsible for exports surpassing the mark of US$ 1 billion/year.[4] Tribes Bovini Boselaphini Strepsicerotini The biological subfamily Bovinae includes a diverse group of about 24 medium-sized to large ungulates, including domestic cattle, bison, the Water Buffalo, the Yak, and the four-horned and spiral-horned antelopes. ... In nutrition, the diet is the sum of food consumed by a person or other organism. ... For other uses, see Mineral (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Asia (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... World map showing the Americas CIA political map of the Americas The Americas are the lands of the Western hemisphere or New World, consisting of the continents of North America[1] and South America with their associated islands and regions. ...


A pioneer and leader in the manufacture of short-fiber timber cellulose, Brazil has also achieved positive results within the packaging sector, in which it is the fifth largest world producer. In the foreign markets, it answers for 25% of global exports of raw cane and refined sugar; it is the world leader in soybean exports and is responsible for 80% of the planet’s orange juice, and since 2003, has had the highest sales figures for beef and chicken, among the countries that deal in this sector.[4] Cellulose as polymer of β-D-glucose Cellulose in 3D Cellulose (C6H10O5)n is a polysaccharide of beta-glucose. ...


Industry

Industrial production
Airplane of Embraer
Main industries Automobile industry, petrochemicals, cement and construction, aircraft, textiles, food and beverages, mining, consumer durables, tourism
Industrial growth rate 6.1% (2004)
Labor force 15% of total labor force
GDP of sector 38.6% of total GDP
Main article: Industry in Brazil

Brazil has the third most advanced industrial sector in the Americas. Accounting for one-third of GDP, Brazil's diverse industries range from automobiles, steel and petrochemicals to computers, aircraft, and consumer durables. With increased economic stability provided by the Plano Real, Brazilian and multinational businesses have invested heavily in new equipment and technology, a large proportion of which has been purchased from U.S. firms. An Embraer RJ 145 of Air France on the climbout from Bristol Airport, Bristol, England. ... Fixed-wing aircraft is a term used to refer to what are more commonly known as aeroplanes in Commonwealth English (excluding Canada) or airplanes in North American English. ... Embraer, the Empresa Brasileira de Aeronáutica S.A. is a Brazilian aircraft manufacturer. ... // During the colonial period, due to the rules of the economic theory of Mercantilism, no industrial activity could take place in Brazil. ... World map showing the Americas The Americas are the lands of the Western hemisphere historically considered to consist of the continents of North America and South America with their associated islands and regions. ... GDP is an acronym which can stand for more than one thing: (in economics) an abbreviation for Gross Domestic Product. ... Car redirects here. ... For other uses, see Steel (disambiguation). ... Petrochemicals are chemical products made from raw materials of petroleum (hydrocarbon) origin. ... This article is about the machine. ... Flying machine redirects here. ... A car (Toyota Corolla S) is a durable good in economics. ... The Plano Real (Portuguese, Real Plan) was a set of measures taken to stabilize the Brazilian economy in the early 1990s, under the direction of Fernando Henrique Cardoso as the Minister of Finance. ...


Brazil has a diverse and sophisticated services industry as well. During the early 1990s, the banking sector accounted for as much as 16% of the GDP. Although undergoing a major overhaul, Brazil's financial services industry provides local businesses with a wide range of products and is attracting numerous new entrants, including U.S. financial firms. The São Paulo and Rio de Janeiro stock exchanges are undergoing a consolidation and the reinsurance sector is about to be privatized.[citation needed] Historically, the term business referred to activities or interests. ... Landmark buildings Edifício Italia (at left) and Copan (curved façade at center), in São Paulo Downtown. ... This article is about the Brazilian city. ... Privatization (sometimes privatisation, denationalization, or — especially in India — disinvestment) is the process of transferring property, from public ownership to private ownership. ...


As of 31 December 2005, there were an estimated 3,304,000 broadband lines in Brazil.[7] Over 95% of the broadband lines were via DSL and the rest via cable modems. 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... DSL may refer to: Damn Small Linux Dark and Shattered Lands, a MUD based loosely on Forgotten Realms and Dragonlance books. ...


Proven mineral resources are extensive. Large iron and manganese reserves are important sources of industrial raw materials and export earnings. Deposits of nickel, tin, chromite, bauxite, beryllium, copper, lead, tungsten, zinc, gold, and other minerals are exploited. High-quality cooking-grade coal required in the steel industry is in short supply. Rainforest on Fatu-Hiva, Marquesas Islands Natural resources are naturally occurring substances that are considered valuable in their relatively unmodified (natural) form. ...


Energy

The Brazilian government has undertaken an ambitious program to reduce dependence on imported oil. Imports previously accounted for more than 70% of the country's oil needs but Brazil became energy independent in 2006. Brazil is one of the world's leading producers of hydroelectric power, with a current capacity of about 58,000 megawatts. Existing hydroelectric power provides 92% of the nation's electricity. Two large hydroelectric projects, the 12,600 megawatt Itaipu Dam on the Paraná River (the world's largest dam) and the Tucurui Dam in Pará in northern Brazil, are in operation. Brazil's first commercial nuclear reactor, Angra I, located near Rio de Janeiro, has been in operation for more than 10 years. Angra II has been completed in 2002. An Angra III is almost completed, planned inauguration is 2008. The three reactors would have combined capacity of 5,000 megawatts when completed. Brazil is the 10th largest energy consumer in the world and the largest in South America. ... Synthetic motor oil For other uses, see Oil (disambiguation). ... Hydroelectric dam diagram The waters of Llyn Stwlan, the upper reservoir of the Ffestiniog Pumped-Storage Scheme in north Wales, can just be glimpsed on the right. ... Hydroelectric dam diagram The waters of Llyn Stwlan, the upper reservoir of the Ffestiniog Pumped-Storage Scheme in north Wales, can just be glimpsed on the right. ... Itaipu Dam Itaipu (Portuguese: Itaipu; SAMPA [itajpu]) is a dam that includes the largest hydroelectric power plant in the world. ... The sun rising over the Paraná River, from the north-east of Rosario, Argentina. ... Capital (and largest city) Belém Demonym Paraense Government  -  Governor Ana Júlia Carepa  -  Vice Governor Odair Santos Corrêa Area  -  Total 1. ... Image:Brasil Norte vincent harley rocks maploc. ... Core of a small nuclear reactor used for research. ... Angra Nuclear Power Plant is Brazils sole nuclear power plant. ... This article is about the Brazilian city. ... Angra Nuclear Power Plant is Brazils sole nuclear power plant. ... Angra Nuclear Power Plant is Brazils sole nuclear power plant. ...


Economic status

Statistical Table
National Congress, in Brasília
Inflation (IPCA)
2001 7.67%
2002 12.53%
2003 9.30%
2004 7.60%
2005 5.69%
2006 3.14%
Source:[8]
Gross Fixed Capital Formation (% of GDP)
2001 19.47%
2002 18.32%
2003 17.78%
2004 19.58%
2005 19.93%
Source:[9]
Average Exchange Rate (BRL for 1 USD)
2001 2.349
2002 2.920
2003 3.077
2004 2.925
2005 2.434
2006 2.176
Source:[10]

Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 525 pixelsFull resolution (2000 × 1312 pixel, file size: 1. ... Brazils bicameral National Congress (Portuguese: Congresso Nacional) consists of the Federal Senate and the Chamber of Deputies. ... Nickname: Location of Brasília Coordinates: , Country Region State Brazilian Federal District Founded 21 April 1960 Government  - Governor Jose Roberto Arruda Area  - Total 5,802 km² (2,240. ... BRL may mean: Real (currency), the present monetary unit of Brazil. ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ...

Sustainable growth

After having been discovered in 1500, it was only in 1808 that Brazil obtained a permit from the Portuguese colonial government to set up its first factories and manufacturers. It was a long road to reach the position of 10th largest economy in the world. If at the beginning the export list was basically raw and primitive goods, such as sugar, rubber and gold, today 74% of exports consists of manufactured and semi-manufactured products. An anachronous map of the Portuguese Empire (1415-1999). ...


In the last decade, domestic production increased by 32.3% and agribusiness (agriculture and cattle-raising), which grew by 47% or 3.6% per year, was the most dynamic sector – even after having weathered international crises that demanded constant adjustments to the Brazilian economy.[11] A decade is a set or a group of ten, commonly a period of 10 years in contemporary English, or a period of 10 days in the French revolutionary calendar. ... In agriculture, agribusiness is a generic term that refers to the various businesses involved in the food production chain, including farming, seed, agrichemicals, farm machinery, wholesaling, processing, distribution, and retail sales. ...


Control and reform

Among measures recently adopted in order to balance the economy, Brazil carried out reforms to its Social security (state and retirement pensions) and Tax systems. These changes brought with them a noteworthy addition: a Law of Fiscal Responsibility which controls public expenditure by the Executive Branches at federal, state and municipal levels. At the same time, investments were made towards administration efficiency and policies were created to encourage exports, industry and trade, thus creating “windows of opportunity” for local and international investors and producers. In banking and accountancy, the outstanding balance is the amount of money owned, (or due), that remains in a deposit account (or a loan account) at a given date, after all past remittances, payments and withdrawal have been accounted for. ... Social security primarily refers to social welfare service concerned with social protection, or protection against socially recognized conditions, including poverty, old age, disability, unemployment and others. ... The Federal Republic of Germany and its sixteen Bundesländer (federal states) A federal republic is a federation of states with a republican form of government. ... For other uses, see State (disambiguation). ... A municipality or general-purpose district (compare with: special-purpose district) is an administrative local area generally composed of a clearly defined territory and commonly referring to a city, town, or village government. ... It has been suggested that Commerce be merged into this article or section. ...


With these alterations in place, Brazil has reduced its vulnerability: it imports 9% of the oil it consumes; it has halved its domestic debt through exchange rate-linked certificates and has seen exports grow, on average, by 15% a year. The exchange rate does not put pressure on the industrial sector or inflation – at 4% a year -, and does away with the possibility of a liquidity crisis. As a result, the country, after 12 years, has achieved a positive balance in the accounts which measure exports/imports, plus interest payments, services and overseas remmittances.[12] Synthetic motor oil For other uses, see Oil (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Debt (disambiguation). ...


Consistent policies

Support for the productive sector has been simplified at all levels; active and independent, Congress and the Judiciary Branch carry out the evaluation of rules and regulations. Among the main measures taken to stimulate the economy are the reduction of up to 30% on Manufactured Products Tax (IPI), and the investment of R$ 2 billion on road cargo transportation fleets, thus improving distribution logistics. Further resources guarantee the propagation of business and information telecenters. Brazils bicameral National Congress (Portuguese: Congresso Nacional) consists of the Federal Senate and the Chamber of Deputies. ... Manufacturing is the transformation of raw materials into finished goods for sale, or intermediate processes involving the production or finishing of semi-manufactures. ...


The Policy for Industry, Technology and Foreign Trade, at the forefront of this sector, for its part, invests R$ 14.5 billion in specific sectors, following the example of the software and semiconductor, pharmaceutical and medicine product, and capital goods sectors.[13] By the mid 20th century humans had achieved a mastery of technology sufficient to leave the surface of the Earth for the first time and explore space. ... International trade is defined as trade between two or more partners from different countries (an exporter and an importer). ...


The above table indicates that in 2005, for example, the bottom 50% of the population earned only 14,07% of the total income while the richest 10% of the population earned 45.31% of the total national income. Inequality is a historic problem for Brazil, but has improved in recent years.[14]


References

  1. ^ [The World Factbook] CIA
  2. ^ a b c d e f About Brazil Brazilian Government
  3. ^ Countries Participating in the ISS ISS EarthKam
  4. ^ a b c d e f g Agriculture Brazilian Government
  5. ^ Popclock IBGE
  6. ^ Indicators Brazilian Government
  7. ^ Broadband lines in Brazil (PDF). Retrieved on 2007-05-24.
  8. ^ Inflation Ipea
  9. ^ Gross Fixed Capital Formation Ipea
  10. ^ Average Exchange Rate Ipea
  11. ^ Sustainable growth Brazilian Government
  12. ^ Control and reform Brazilian Government
  13. ^ Consistent policies Brazilian Government
  14. ^ Find Articles. Retrieved on 2007-05-24.

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 144th day of the year (145th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 144th day of the year (145th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also

The Economic history of Brazil covers various economic events and traces the changes in the Brazilian economy of the course of the history of Brazil From Portugals discovery of Brazil in 1500 until the late 1930s, the Brazilian economy relied on the production of primary products for exports. ... The History of Brazil begins with the arrival of the first indigenous peoples, over 8. ... Politics of Brazil takes place in a framework of a federal presidential representative democratic republic, whereby the President of Brazil is both head of state and head of government, and of a pluriform multi-party system. ... The beaches of Rio de Janeiro, the second largest city of Brazil, and the most popular tourist destination in the country. ... Telephones - main lines in use: 19 million (1997) 39 million (2005) Telephones - mobile cellular: 4 million (1997) 80 million (2005) Telephone system: good working system domestic: extensive microwave radio relay system and a domestic satellite system with 64 earth stations international: 3 coaxial submarine cables; satellite earth stations - 3 Intelsat... Lula da Silva and George W. Bush Brazil is a significant political and economical power in Latin America, but deep-seated social and economic problems have kept it from realizing its goal of becoming a truly global leader. ... The economy of South America comprises about 500 million people living in 14 states and territories. ...

Lists

This is a list of major companies based in Brazil. ...

External links

Further reading

Baer, Werner. The Brazilian Economy: Growth and Development. 5th. Westport, CT: Praeger Publishers, 2001

sana Of the emerging democracies in central and eastern Europe, Czechia has one of the most developed industrialized economies. ... Tourism, petroleum transhipment, and offshore finance are the mainstays of the Netherlands Antillean economy, which is closely tied to the outside world. ... The United Kingdom has the fifth largest gross domestic product in the world in terms of market exchange rates and the sixth largest by purchasing power parity (PPP). ... A Special Administrative Region (SAR) of the Peoples Republic of China is an administrative division of the Peoples Republic of China (PRC). ... For the Chinese civilization, see China. ...

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The economy of South America comprises about 500 million people living in 14 states and territories. ... This is an alphabetical list of the sovereign states of the world, including both de jure and de facto independent states. ... Trinidad and Tobago experienced a real growth rate of 3. ... Image File history File links South_America. ... World map of dependent territories. ... Economy - overview: The economy is tied closely to that of France through subsidies and imports. ... This is a list of countries spanning more than one continent. ... World map showing the Americas CIA political map of the Americas The Americas are the lands of the Western hemisphere or New World, consisting of the continents of North America[1] and South America with their associated islands and regions. ... North American redirects here. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Brazil (874 words)
Brazil was first sighted by Europeans in 1500 and developed as a Portuguese commercial colony, based to a large extent on slavery.
Brazil received an influx of over 5 million immigrants in the late 19th, early 20th centuries, a period that also saw Brazil industrialise and further expand into its interior.
Brazil is characterised by the extensive low-lying Amazon Rainforest in the north, and a more open terrain of hills and (low) mountains to the south, home to most of Brazil's population and its agricultural base.
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The economy grew 4.4% in 2000, decreasing to 1.3% in 2001.
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