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The term Eastern Rites may refer to the liturgical rites used by many ancient Christian Churches of Eastern Europe, the Middle East, and India that, while being part of the Catholic Church, are distinct from the Latin Rite or Western Church. Or it may apply to these particular Churches themselves, known collectively as the Eastern Catholic Churches. A rite is an established, ceremonious, usually religious act. ... Current division of Europe into five (or more) regions: one definition of Eastern Europe is marked in orange Eastern Europe as a region has several alternative definitions, whereby it can denote: the region lying between the variously and vaguely defined areas of Central Europe and Russia. ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... The Roman Catholic Church believes its founding was based on Jesus appointment of Saint Peter as the primary church leader, later Bishop of Rome. ... Latin Rite, in the singular and accompanied, in English, by the definite article (The Latin Rite), is a term by which documents of the Catholic Church designate the particular Church, distinct from the Eastern Rite Churches, that developed in western Europe and northern Africa, where Latin was the language of... A Particular Church , in Roman Catholic theology and canon law, is any of the individual constituent ecclesial communities in full communion with the Church of Rome and thus make up the Catholic Communion. ...

Contents


Eastern and Western (Latin) Catholics

Care must be taken to distinguish the two meanings of the word "rite". The one Byzantine liturgical rite is used by several distinct Eastern Churches or Rites. On the other hand, in the Western Church or Latin Rite (in the sense of particular Church), more than one Latin liturgical rite have been and are used. They include the Ambrosian and the Mozarabic rites, as well as the Roman Rite. By extension, some use the term "rite" (in its liturgical sense) to refer to one particular earlier form of the Roman rite, calling it "the Tridentine rite". ... A Particular Church , in Roman Catholic theology and canon law, is any of the individual constituent ecclesial communities in full communion with the Church of Rome and thus make up the Catholic Communion. ... Ambrosian Rite (also sometimes called the Milanese rite) named after Saint Ambrose, bishop of Milan in the fourth century, is a series of Catholic liturgical rites practised among Catholics in the greater part of the diocese of Milan (excluding notably the city of Monza), and neighbouring area, including some five... The Mozarabic rite is a form of Catholic worship within the Latin Rite of the Catholic Church. ... Latin Rite, in the singular and accompanied, in English, by the definite article, refers to the sui juris particular Church of the Roman Catholic Church that developed in the area of western Europe and northern Africa where Latin was for many centuries the language of education and culture. ... The adjective Tridentine refers to any thing or person pertaining to the city of Trent, Italy (Latin: Tridentum). ...


By the term Roman Catholic, some mean Latin-Rite Catholic, and by Roman Catholic Church the Latin Catholic Church (which, as has just been said, uses not only the Roman liturgical rite but also others, such as the Ambrosian and the Mozarabic). When Roman Catholic is used in this sense, Eastern Catholics are not "Roman Catholics", and the Eastern Catholic Churches are not part of the "Roman Catholic Church". However, the designation "Roman Catholic" is also used of the whole "Catholic Church, which is governed by the successor of Peter and by the bishops in communion with him" (Second Vatican Council, Dogmatic Constitution on the Church, 8), a usage found, for example, in the documents concerning dialogue between the Catholic Church as a whole and other Christian Churches and ecclesial communities. The First Vatican Council too referred to the whole Catholic Church as the "Holy, Catholic, Apostolic, Roman Church" (Session III, Dogmatic Constitution de fide catholica), because of the central position of the Bishop of Rome. In the Roman Catholic Church, Saint Peter, given the keys to heaven by Jesus, was the first Bishop of Rome. ...


Most Eastern Catholic Churches arose when a group within an ancient Christian Church that was in disagreement with the see of Rome chose to enter into full communion with that see. However, the Maronite Church boasts of never having been separated from Rome, and has no counterpart Orthodox Church out of communion with the Pope. It is therefore inaccurate to refer to it as a "Uniate" Church. The Syro-Malabar Church can make a somewhat similar claim. Full communion is completeness of that relationship between Christian individuals and groups which is known as communion. ... Maronites (Marunoye ܡܪܘܢܝܶܐ in Syriac, Mawarinah in Arabic) are members of one of the Eastern Rites of the Catholic church. ... For a discussion of Holy Communion see the article on the Eucharist. ... The Syro-Malabar Catholic Church is a Major Archiepiscopal Eastern Rite Church sui iuris with historical ties to the Chaldean Catholic Church in communion with the Church of Rome. ...


All Catholics are subject to the bishop of the eparchy or diocese to which they belong. They are also subject directly to the Pope, as is stated in canon 43 of the Code of Canons of the Eastern Churches and canon 331 of the Code of Canon Law. Most Eastern Catholics are also directly subject to a patriarch, major archbishop, or metropolitan who has authority for all the bishops and the other faithful of his rite or particular Church (canons 56 and 151 of the Code of Canons of the Eastern Churches). A bishop is an ordained member of the Christian clergy who, in certain Christian churches, holds a position of authority. ... In Western culture, canon law is the law of the Roman Catholic and Anglican churches. ... In Western culture, canon law is the law of the Roman Catholic and Anglican churches. ... Originally a patriarch was a man who exercised autocratic authority as a pater familias over an extended family. ... In the Roman Catholic Church, a major archbishop is an Eastern Rite hierarch who has the same jurisdiction in his sui juris particular church that an Eastern rite patriarch does, but whose episcopal see is less prestigious than a patriarchal see. ... In hierarchical Christian churches, the rank of metropolitan, pertains to the bishop of a metropolis; that is, the chief city of an old Roman province, ecclesiastical province, or regional capital. ... A Particular Church , in Roman Catholic theology and canon law, is any of the individual constituent ecclesial communities in full communion with the Church of Rome and thus make up the Catholic Communion. ...


These patriarchs and major archbishops derive their titles from the sees of Alexandria (Copts), Antioch (Syrians, Melkites, Maronites), Babylonia (Chaldaeans), Cilicia (Armenians), Kiev-Halych (Ukrainians), Ernakulam-Angamaly (Syro-Malabars), Trivandrum (Syro-Malankaras), and Făgăraş-Alba Iulia (Romanians). Antiquity and modernity stand cheek-by-jowl in Egypts chief Mediterranean seaport Located on the Mediterranean Sea coast, Alexandria Αλεξάνδρεια (in Arabic, الإسكندرية, transliterated al-ʼIskandariyyah) is the chief seaport in Egypt, and that countrys second largest city, and the capital of the Al Iskandariyah governate. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Babylonia, named for the city of Babylon, was an ancient state in Mesopotamia (in modern Iraq), combining the territories of Sumer and Akkad. ... Cilicia as Roman province, 120 AD In Antiquity, Cilicia (Ki-LIK-ya) was a region, and often a political unit, on the southeastern coast of Asia Minor (modern Turkey), north of Cyprus. ... A monument to St. ... Jackdaw on the coat-of-arms of Galicia alludes to the name of Halych Halych (Russian and Ukrainian: ) is a historic town in Western Ukraine on the Dniester River. ... For the district with the same name, see Ernakulam District. ... Angamaly (Malayalam: അങ്കമാലി) is a rapidly growing town in Ernakulam district of Kerala, south India, famous as the intersection of Main central road and National Highway 47. ... Indian Coffee House Thiruvananthapuram or Thiruvanathapuram (formerly known as Trivandrum) is the capital (population - 889,191 (2001)) of the state of Kerala, India. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Malankara catholic church. ... FăgăraÅŸ (Hungarian: Fogaras, German: Fogarasch) is a city in central Romania, county BraÅŸov. ... Alba Iulia (Hungarian: Gyulafeh r, German: Karlsburg) is a city in Alba county, Transylvania, Romania with a population of 66,369, located on the Mureş river. ...


(Within the Latin Church, there are the titles of Patriarch of Jerusalem, Lisbon, Venice, East Indies and West Indies. All except the first – the Latin Patriarch of Jerusalem – are merely honorary titles, and the last has fallen into disuse. They are irrelevant to the subject matter of this article.) Latin Rite, in the singular and accompanied, in English, by the definite article (The Latin Rite), is a term by which documents of the Catholic Church designate the particular Church, distinct from the Eastern Rite Churches, that developed in western Europe and northern Africa, where Latin was the language of... Jerusalem (31°46′N 35°14′E; Hebrew: (help· info) Yerushalayim; Arabic: (help· info) al-Quds) is an ancient Middle Eastern city on the watershed between the Mediterranean Sea and the Dead Sea at an elevation of 650-840 meter. ... District Lisbon Mayor   - Party Carmona Rodrigues PSD Area 84. ... Location within Italy Venice (Italian: Venezia, Venetian: Venexia) 45°26′N 12°19′E, the city of canals, is the capital of the region of Veneto and of the province of Venice in Italy. ... The Indies, on the display globe of the Field Museum, Chicago The Indies or East Indies (or East India) is a term used to describe lands of South and South-East Asia, occupying all of the former British India, the present Indian Union, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Myanmar, Sri Lanka, Maldives, and... The Caribbean or the West Indies is a group of islands in the Caribbean Sea. ... The Latin Patriarch of Jerusalem is one of the Roman Catholic patriarchs of the east. ...


The Eastern Catholic Churches are in full communion of faith and of acceptance of authority with the see of Rome, but retain their distinctive liturgical rites, laws and customs, and traditional devotions. Terminology may vary: for instance, "diocese" and "eparchy", "vicar general" and "protosyncellus", "confirmation" and "chrismation" are respectively Western and Eastern terms for the same realities. Clerical celibacy is not obligatory for Eastern Catholic priests, as distinct from their bishops, but is in fact practised by many of them, particularly those who live according to monastic tradition. Those who wish to marry must do so before, not after, they are ordained. The sacraments of baptism and chrismation however are generally administered, according to the ancient tradition of the Church, one immediately after the other. Full communion is completeness of that relationship between Christian individuals and groups which is known as communion. ... From the Greek word λειτουργια, which can be transliterated as leitourgia, meaning the work of the people, a liturgy comprises a prescribed religious ceremony, according to the traditions of a particular religion; it may refer to, or include, an elaborate formal ritual (such as the Catholic Mass), a daily activity such... Confirmation is a rite used in many Christian churches. ... Chrismation is the name given in Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox and Eastern_rite Catholic churches to the sacrament known as confirmation in the Latin Rite Catholic churches. ... Clerical celibacy is the practice of various religious traditions in which clergy, monastics and those in religious orders (female or male) adopt a celibate life, refraining from marriage, sexual relationships including masturbation and impure thoughts (such as sexual visualisation and fantasies). ...


The canon law that the Eastern Catholic Churches have in common has been codified in the 1990 Code of Canons of the Eastern Churches, while the Western or Latin particular Church is governed by the Code of Canon Law, a second edition of which was issued in 1983.


External link: Code of Canons of the Oriental Churches


Historical background

Communion between Christian Churches has been broken over matters of faith, when each side accused the other of heresy or departure from the true faith (orthodoxy). Communion has been broken also because of disputes that do not involve matters of faith, as when there is disagreement about questions of authority or the legitimacy of the election of a particular bishop. In these latter cases, each side accuses the other of schism, but not of heresy. Heresy, according to the Oxford English Dictionary, is a theological or religious opinion or doctrine maintained in opposition, or held to be contrary, to the catholic or orthodox doctrine of the Christian Church, or, by extension, to that of any church, creed, or religious system, considered as orthodox. ... The word orthodoxy, from the Greek ortho (right, correct) and doxa (thought, teaching), is typically used to refer to the correct theological or doctrinal observance of religion, as determined by some overseeing body. ... The word schism (IPA: or ), from the Greek σχισμα, schisma (from σχιζω, schizo, to split), means a division or a split, usually in an organization. ...


Major breaches of communion:

  1. The Churches that accepted the teaching of the 431 Council of Ephesus, which condemned the views of Nestorius, classified those who rejected the Council's teaching as heretics. Those who accepted it lived mostly in the Roman Empire and classified themselves as orthodox; they considered the others, who lived mainly under Persian rule, as Nestorian heretics. These had a period of great expansion in Asia. Monuments of their presence still exist in China. Now they are relatively few in numbers and are divided into three Churches, of which the Chaldaean Church, which is in communion with Rome, is the most numerous, while the others have recently split between the Assyrian Church of the East and the Ancient Church of the East.
  2. Those who accepted the 451 Council of Chalcedon similarly classified those who rejected it as Monophysite heretics. The Churches that refused to accept the Council considered instead that it was they who were orthodox. The six present-day Churches that continue their tradition reject the description Monophysite, preferring instead Miaphysite. They are often called, in English, Oriental Orthodox Churches, to distinguish them from the Eastern Orthodox Churches. This distinction, by which the words oriental and eastern are used as labels for two different realities, is impossible in most other languages and is not universally accepted even in English. These churches are also referred to as pre-Chalcedonian or, now more rarely, as non-Chalcedonian or anti-Chalcedonian.
  3. The East-West Schism between Rome and New Rome (Constantinople) arose over questions of authority, and was led up to by rivalry and by cultural differences (Greek was scarcely known any longer in the West and Latin in the East), not questions of doctrine, though controversy later arose over several matters such as the Western insertion of the Filioque clause in the Nicene Creed, the use of leavened or unleavened bread for the Eucharist, and discipline concerning marriage/divorce. Each side considered that the other no longer belonged to the Church that was orthodox and catholic. But with the passage of centuries, it became customary to refer to the Eastern side as the Orthodox Church and the Western as the Catholic Church, without either side thereby renouncing its claim to be the truly orthodox or the truly catholic Church. The Churches that sided with Constantinople are known collectively as the Eastern Orthodox Churches.

In each Church whose communion with the Church of Rome was broken by these three divisions, there arose, at various times, a group that considered it important to restore that communion. The see of Rome accepted them as they were: there was no question of requiring them to adopt the customs of the Latin Church. At a meeting in Balamand, Lebanon in June 1993, the Joint International Commission for the Theological Dialogue between the Roman Catholic Church and the Orthodox Church declared that what has been called "uniatism" "can no longer be accepted either as a method to be followed nor as a model of the unity our Churches are seeking."[1] The Council of Ephesus was held in Ephesus, Asia Minor in 431 under Emperor Theodosius II, grandson of Theodosius the Great. ... Nestorius - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... The term Nestorianism is eponymous, even though the person who lent his name to it always denied the associated belief. ... The Chaldean Catholic Church is an Eastern Rite sui juris (autonomous ritual church) particular church of the Catholic Church, maintaining full communion with the Pope in Rome. ... The Holy Apostolic and Catholic Assyrian Church of the East is a Christian church that traces its origins to the See of Babylon, said to be founded by Saint Thomas the Apostle. ... The Ancient Church of the East is an offshoot of the Church of the East organized in 1968 in protest against hereditary succesion of bishops and against calendar changes. ... The Council of Chalcedon was an ecumenical council that took place from October 8–November 1, 451 at Chalcedon, a city of Bithynia in Asia Minor. ... Monophysitism (from the Greek monos meaning one and physis meaning nature) is the christological position that Christ has only one nature, as opposed to the Chalcedonian position which holds that Christ has two natures, one divine and one human. ... Miaphysitism is the christology of the Oriental Orthodox Churches. ... The term Oriental Orthodoxy refers to the churches of Eastern Christian traditions that keeps the faith of only the first three ecumenical councils of the undivided Church - the councils of Nicea, Constantinople and Ephesus. ... The Vladimir Icon, one of the most venerated of Orthodox Christian icons of the Virgin Mary. ... Great Schism redirects here. ... City motto: Senatus Populusque Romanus – SPQR (The Senate and the People of Rome) Founded 21 April 753 BC mythical, 1st millennium BC Region Latium Mayor Walter Veltroni (Left-Wing Democrats) Area  - City Proper  1285 km² Population  - City (2004)  - Metropolitan  - Density (city proper) 2. ... New Rome is a term that can be applied to a city or a country. ... Map of Constantinople. ... In Christian theology the filioque clause or filioque controversy (filioque meaning and [from] the Son) is a disputed part of the Nicene Creed and is most often referred to as simply filioque or the filioque. ... Icon depicting the Holy Fathers of the First Council of Nicaea holding the Nicene Creed. ... The Eucharist or Communion or The Lords Supper, is the rite that Christians perform in fulfillment of Jesus instruction, recorded in the New Testament, to do in memory of him what he did at his Last Supper. ... The Vladimir Icon, one of the most venerated of Orthodox Christian icons of the Virgin Mary. ... 1993 (MCMXCIII in Roman) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ...


At the same time, the Commission stated that "[t]he Oriental Catholic Churches who have desired to re-establish full communion with the See of Rome and have remained faithful to it, have the rights and obligations which are connected with this communion"; and that they "have the right to exist and to act in answer to the spiritual needs of their faithful."


As remarked earlier, the identity of the Maronite Church and of the Syro-Malabar Church is due to no such division within an Eastern Church.


Eastern Catholic Churches make up 2 % of the membership of the Catholic Church, and less than 10 % of all Eastern Christians.


The term Uniat[e]

The term Uniat or Uniate is applied to Eastern Catholics primarily by Eastern Orthodox, who sometimes give it pejorative overtones, but was also historically used, though less frequently, by Catholics of both Eastern and Western liturgical traditions. Present-day Eastern Catholics generally regard the term negatively, and so its use is often avoided, especially in ecumenical contexts. According to Eastern Orthodox Professor John Erickson of St Vladimir's Theological Seminary, "The term 'uniate' itself, once used with pride in the Roman communion, had long since come to be considered as pejorative. 'Eastern Rite Catholic' also was no longer in vogue because it might suggest that the Catholics in question differed from Latins only in the externals of worship. The council affirmed rather that Eastern Catholics constituted churches, whose vocation was to provide a bridge to the separated churches of the East…"[2] Copyright © 2005 by Andrew Stephen Damick. ... Copyright © 2005 by Andrew Stephen Damick. ... Look up pejorative on Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The word ecumenism (also oecumenism, Å“cumenism) (IPA: ) is derived from the Greek oikoumene, which means the inhabited world. The term is usually used with regard to movements toward religious unity. ...


The term has been used by the Holy See (e.g., in the Ex Quo of Pope Benedict XIV)[3]. The Catholic Encyclopedia (1909) consistently used the term "Uniat" to refer to Eastern Catholics, stating: "The Uniat Church is therefore really synonymous with Eastern Churches united to Rome, and Uniats is synonymous with Eastern Christians united with Rome."[4] The term is found on the website of the Catholic television network EWTN, especially when quoting older documents, and appears occasionally in the Catholic press, though official Catholic documents no longer use the term, due to its perceived negative overtones. Benedict XVI, born Prospero Lorenzo Lambertini (Bologna, March 31, 1675 – Rome, May 3, 1758), was pope from 1740 to 1758. ... The Catholic Encyclopedia (also referred to as the Old Catholic Encyclopedia today) is an English-language encyclopedia published in 1913 by the The Encyclopedia Press, designed to give authoritative information on the entire cycle of Catholic interests, action and doctrine. // History The writing of the encyclopedia began on January 11... 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... EWTN - or The Eternal Word Television Network - is a television and radio operation that broadcasts Catholic religious programming, via satellite and shortwave radio. ...


The word can be found on the cornerstone of Ss. Peter and Paul Ukrainian Catholic Church in Simpson, Pennsylvania, adorned with a Byzantine-style cross, and which reads (in Russian) "Russian Gr. Cath. Church / of the Holy Apostles Peter and Paul", followed (in English) by "MAY 7, 1905 / RUSSIAN GR. CATH. CHURCH / SIMPSON, PA. UNIAT" (see photo at right).


When speaking of Byzantine-Rite Catholics, including those who are not Greek-speaking, the term Greek Catholic is commonly used, as well as Byzantine Catholic. The terms Oriental Catholic and Eastern Catholic are applied to these and also to Catholics belonging to Eastern Churches with no historical link to Eastern Orthodoxy). The Vladimir Icon, one of the most venerated of Orthodox Christian icons of the Virgin Mary. ...


List of Eastern Catholic Churches

The Holy See's Annuario Pontificio gives the following list of Eastern Catholic Churches and of countries (or other political areas) in which they possess an episcopal ecclesiastical jurisdiction: The Annuario Pontificio or Pontifical Yearbook is the annual directory of the Holy See of the Roman Catholic Church. ...

  • Alexandrian liturgical tradition
  • Antiochian (Antiochene or West-Syrian) liturgical tradition
    • Maronite Church (patriarchate): Lebanon, Cyprus, Jordan, Israel, Palestine, Egypt, Syria, Argentina, Brazil, USA, Australia, Canada, Mexico
    • Syrian Catholic Church (patriarchate): Lebanon, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Palestine, Egypt, Sudan, Syria, Turkey, United States and Canada, Venezuela
    • Syro-Malankara Catholic Church (major archiepiscopate): India, United States of America
  • Armenian liturgical tradition:
    • Armenian Catholic Church (patriarchate): Lebanon, Iran, Iraq, Egypt, Syria, Turkey, Palestine, Ukraine, France, Greece, Latin America, Argentina, Romania, United States and Canada, Eastern Europe
  • Chaldaean or East-Syrian liturgical tradition:
  • Byzantine (Constantinopolitan) liturgical tradition:
    • Albanian Byzantine Catholic Church (apostolic administration): Albania
    • Belarusian Byzantine Catholic Church (no established hierarchy at present): Belarus
    • Bulgarian Greek Catholic Church (apostolic exarchate): Bulgaria
    • Byzantine Church of the Eparchy of Kri evci (an eparchy and an apostolic exarchate): Croatia, Serbia and Montenegro
    • Greek Byzantine Catholic Church (two apostolic exarchates): Greece, Turkey
    • Greek-Catholic Melkite Church (patriarchate): Syria, Lebanon, Jordan, Israel, Jerusalem, Brazil, USA, Canada, Mexico, Iraq, Egypt and Sudan, Kuwait, Australia, Venezuela, Argentina
    • Hungarian Byzantine Catholic Church (an eparchy and an apostolic exarchate): Hungary
    • Italo-Albanian Catholic Church (two eparchies and a territorial abbacy): Italy
    • Macedonian Byzantine Catholic Church (apostolic exarchate): Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia
    • Romanian Church United with Rome, Greek-Catholic (major archiepiscopate): Romania, United States of America
    • Russian Byzantine Catholic Church: (two apostolic exarchates, at present with no published hierarchs): Russia, China
    • Ruthenian Catholic Church (a sui iuris metropolia, an eparchy, and an apostolic exarchate): United States of America, Ukraine, Czech Republic
    • Slovak Greek Catholic Church (two eparchies, and an apostolic exarchate): Slovak Republic, Canada
    • Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church (major archiepiscopate): Ukraine, Poland, USA, Canada, Great Britain, Australia, Germany and Scandinavia, France, Brazil, Argentina

As is obvious from the above list, an individual particular Church may have distinct jurisdictions in several countries. Antiquity and modernity stand cheek-by-jowl in Egypts chief Mediterranean seaport Located on the Mediterranean Sea coast, Alexandria Αλεξάνδρεια (in Arabic, الإسكندرية, transliterated al-ʼIskandariyyah) is the chief seaport in Egypt, and that countrys second largest city, and the capital of the Al Iskandariyah governate. ... The Coptic Catholic Church is an Alexandrian Rite church sui juris particular Church in full communion with the Pope of Rome. ... The Ethiopic Catholic Church is a particular Church within the Roman Catholic Church and uses the Ethiopic liturgical rite. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Maronites (Marunoye ܐܶܝܢܘܪܡ in Syriac, Mawarinah in Arabic) are members of one of the Eastern Rites of the Catholic church. ... The Syrian Catholic Church is a Christian church in the Levant in full communion with the pope having practices and rites in common with the Jacobites. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Malankara catholic church. ... After the Armenian Apostolic Church, along with the rest of Oriental Orthodoxy formally broke off communion from the Chalcedonian churches, numerous Armenian bishops made attempts to restore communion with the Catholic Church. ... Chaldean can refer to an ancient people of lower Mesopotamia and their culture, or a contemporary Christian people living mostly in Iraq, Turkey, Syria, Lebanon, Iran, Michigan, as well as a relativley widespread diaspora concentrated in the western world. ... The Chaldean Catholic Church is an Eastern Rite sui juris (autonomous ritual church) particular church of the Catholic Church, maintaining full communion with the Pope in Rome. ... The Syro-Malabar Catholic Church is a Major Archiepiscopal Eastern Rite Church sui iuris with historical ties to the Chaldean Catholic Church in communion with the Church of Rome. ... Byzantine Empire (Greek: Βασιλεία Ῥωμαίων) is the term conventionally used since the 19th century to describe the Greek-speaking Roman Empire during the Middle Ages, centered at its capital in Constantinople. ... Map of Constantinople. ... The Albanian Byzantine Catholic Church is an autonomous Byzantine Rite particular Church of the Roman Catholic Church, whose members lives in Albania, and is not to be confused with the Italo-Albanian Catholic Church. ... The Belarusian Byzantine Catholic Church is listed in the Annuario Pontificio as an autonomous (sui iuris) ritual Church, an Eastern Rite particular Church of the Roman Catholic Church. ... The Eparchy of Križevci is the eparchy comprising the Croatian Byzantine Catholic Church, a Catholic Church sui iuris [1] of the Byzantine Eastern Rite. ... The Greek Byzantine Catholic Church is a particular Church within the Roman Catholic Church and uses the Byzantine liturgical rite in the Greek language. ... The Sacred Coat of Arms of the Melkite Greek-Catholic Church This term comes from the Semetic words for king, (melko, or melek). ... The Italo-Albanian Catholic Church, also known as the Italo-Greek Catholic Church, is a Byzantine Rite sui juris particular Church of the Roman Catholic Church. ... The Romanian Church United with Rome, Greek-Catholic (in Romanian: Biserica Română Unită cu Roma, Greco-Catolică) is an Eastern Rite or Greek-Catholic Church ranked as a Major Archiepiscopal Church, which uses the Byzantine liturgical rite in the Romanian language. ... The Russian Catholic Church is a Byzantine Rite church sui juris of the Catholic Church. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... The Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church (UGCC), also known as the Ukrainian Catholic Church, is one of the successor Churches to the acceptance of Christianity by Grand Prince Vladimir the Great (Ukrainian Volodymyr) of Kiev (Kyiv), in 988. ...


The following Byzantine Rite Catholic Churches are not official, i.e. listed in the Annuario Pontificio, but are listed as separate churches, past or present, in other sources:

  • Byzantine Catholic Church in America: The situation of the Ruthenian Catholic Church in the United States is exceptional. While officially belonging to the Ruthenian Church, it is treated as a "sui iuris" church under the Metropolitan of Pittsburgh. A constituent metropolia, the Byzantine Catholic Metropolitan Church of Pittsburgh, which is referred to also, but not officially, as the Byzantine Catholic Church in America, is treated as if it held the rank of an autonomous ("sui iuris") metropolitan particular Church, because, when it was set up as an ecclesiastical province (in 1969), conditions in the Rusyn (Ruthenian) homeland admitted no other solution, the Byzantine Catholic Church there having been suppressed by the Government. When Communist rule ended, the eparchy of Mukacheve (founded in 1771) was able to come again into the open. It has some 320,000 adherents, greater than the number in the Pittsburgh metropolia.
  • Czech Byzantine Catholic Church: An apostolic exarchate established in 1996 for Catholics of Byzantine rite in the Czech Republic. Officially reckoned as part of the Ruthenian Catholic Church, but sometimes viewed as a separate church because of the reality that dozens of married Czech Catholic priests were reassigned to this church after the end of Communist rule.
  • Georgian Catholic Church: Obstacles imposed by the Tsarist Imperial Government of Russia impeded the long term establishment of a Byzantine-rite jurisdiction in Georgia prior to 1905. A church and two monastic orders movement existed in Constantinople since 1861. In 1917, a mission from the church in Constantinople went to Georgia and established a community of the Georgian Byzantine Rite Catholics. This community was reckoned at 8,000 in 1918. Recognized as a separate grouping under the Byzantine Rite, but was persecuted during the Soviet Communist rule of the 1920's-1980's and is presumed extinct. Listed as a separate rite up until 1994 in the Catholic Almanac, and the 3rd Edition of the Oriente Cattolico (1962). The Vatican's refinement of Eastern Catholic definitions in the 1990 Code of Canons of the Eastern Churches moved the nomenclature away from rites and towards autonomous ritual churches. As the Georgian Church was no longer viable, it was not included with the listing of particular churches. Sources include Father Christopher Zugger's book, The Forgotten: Catholics of the Soviet Union Empire from Lenin through Stalin.
  • Serbian Byzantine Catholic Church: Sometimes erroneously listed as a separate church after a jurisdiction was created out of the Croatian Eparchy in 2002. This separation serves to distinguish Byzantine Catholics in Serbia and Montenegro from the Croatian Zumbercani and Ruthenian ethnicities, who are the main adherents of the Eparchy of Križevci, in an effort to remove the Byzantine Catholics of Serbia and Montenegro from an implied connection to the "foreign" influence of mainly Catholic Croatia.

The Byzantine Catholic Metropolitan Church of Pittsburgh is a sui iuris, Eastern-Rite, Catholic Church consisting of the Archeparchy of Pittsburgh, the Eparchy of Passaic, the Eparchy of Parma and the Eparchy of Van Nuys. ... Georgian Catholic Church has called the Georgian Catholics, who followed the Eastern (Byzantine) Rite. ...

See also

This article is part of the Eastern Christianity Portal — Learn more about Eastern Christianity  

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